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Edmund T. Gordon, Chair 2109 San Jacinto Blvd , Mailcode E3400, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4362

Lisa B. Thompson

Associate Professor Ph.D., 2000, Modern Thought & Literature, Stanford University

Associate Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies
Lisa B. Thompson

Contact

Biography

Lisa B. Thompson is the author of the book Beyond The Black Lady: Sexuality And The New African American Middle Class (University of Illinois Press, 2009) which received Honorable Mention in competition for the Gloria E. Anzaldúa Book Prize from the National Women's Studies Association. Her scholarship has appeared in Theatre Journal, Theatre Survey, Finding A Way Home: A Critical Assessment Of Walter Mosley’s Fiction (University Press of Mississippi, 2008), and From Bourgeois to Boojie: Black Middle-Class Performances (Wayne State University Press, 2011). She is also the author of several plays including Single Black Female (Samuel French, Inc., 2012) which has been produced throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Dr. Thompson is the recipient of fellowships and research support from Harvard University’s W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, the University of California’s Office of the President, Michele R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research, UCLA's Center for African American Studies, the Five Colleges Inc., the United University Professions and Stanford University's Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

 

 

Interests

African American Literature, Film, Cultural Studies, Black Feminist Theory, Contemporary Black Theatre and Performance

AFR 387D • Black Cultural Trauma

29875 • Spring 2015
Meets W 100pm-400pm CMA 3.134
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

This course will consider how African American cultural critics and cultural producers theorize and represent past as well as current racial trauma. The class will explore recent scholarship that will help us place the African American experience in the US within trauma studies. The course will also examine the strategies and narratives that artists, writers, playwrights and filmmakers deploy in their representations of significant historic traumas—specific tragedies, brutalities, and horrors, such as slavery, lynching, and rape—as well as repetitive, soul crushing, quotidian slights and micro-aggressions. We will also discuss the ways these cultural producers register visible as well as invisible (or less visible) psychic injuries. Situated at the intersection of theatre, literature, art history, trauma studies and African American history, this course asks participants to analyze how literary, artistic and theatrical interventions present contemporary black subjectivity in light of destabilizing experiences. We will conclude by pondering the role that theatre, literature, film and other art play in representing collective traumatic memory during an era increasingly labeled as “post-race.”

AFR 317F • Performing Blackness

30460 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WAG 201
(also listed as AMS 315, WGS 301 )
show description

Description:

 

This course will consider contemporary performance of blackness in film, art, theatre, literature, television, and music. We will discuss how performances of black life, black identity and black culture are created, consumed and sometimes contradicted by artists and non-artists alike. We will explore themes such as the criteria for black art, the Black aesthetic, racial passing, performances of black masculinity/femininity, and cultural appropriation. The class will culminate in student presentations about black performance based upon individual research.

Texts:

Evie Shockley, The New Black

George C. Wolfe, The Colored Museum

Jay-Z, Decoded

Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play and Other Works

Spike Lee, Bamboozled

Awkward Black Girl (webseries)

Kiese Laymon, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America

Mark Anthony Neal, Looking for Leroy: Illegible Black Masculinities

Nicole Fleetwood, Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality, and Blackness.

AFR 372E • Writing For Black Performance

30555 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.104
(also listed as AMS 321, E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

Description:

 

This course will require students to write critical essays as well as theatrical pieces about the performance of black identity in America. Participants will also give oral presentations and perform readings of their work using various African-American performance styles. Students will read texts that examine African-American performance, contemporary black identity, and expressive culture.

 

Texts:

 

Brandi Wilkins Catanese, Problem of the Color[blind]: Racial Transgression and the Politics of Black Performance

Nicole R. Fleetwood, Troubling Vision: Performance, Visuality, and Blackness

E. Patrick Johnson, Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Authenticity

Lynn Nottage, By the Way, Meet Vera Stark

Suzan-Lori Parks, The America Play and Other Works

Cherise Smith, Enacting Others

August Wilson, The Ground on Which I Stand

George C. Wolfe, The Colored Museum

AFR F372E • Black Film

81350 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm DFA 4.104
(also listed as AMS F325, WGS F340 )
show description

This course is primarily designed to introduce students to African American film produced both inside and outside the Hollywood mainstream.  The course traces the history of African American film culture from 1970s blaxploitation films to the emergence of a formidable number of black filmmakers such as Spike Lee, John Singleton and Charles Burnett who gained prominence during the 1980s and 1990s.  The class will also discuss the work of independent directors such as Julie Dash, Kasi Lemmons, Cheryl Dunye, and black feminist critics as we examine issues of gender and sexuality in African American film. Finally we will discuss the controversy surrounding the work of emergent black filmmakers such as Tyler Perry and Lee Daniels, as well as the hopes for a prosperous indendent black cinema inspired by AAFRM (African American Film Releasing Movement) and director/producer Ava Durvernay .

During the term we will consider how these filmmakers engage with and refute dominant cultural images of African Americans as well as create a cinematic language specifically derived from African American experiences.  Besides screening films students are expected to read articles on film theory and cultural criticism.  The course material is selective since this is a very large body of material and our time is limited.  However, the class attempts to offer as encompassing and representative a perspective as possible.  Although the class does not require any prior knowledge of or experience with film studies, I expect students to become active, skilled, critical viewers of African American cinema and astute readers of film scholarship.

Required Texts

Donald Bogle, Toms, Coons, Mulattos, Mammies & Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films, fourth edition

Manthia Diawara, Black American Cinema

Ed Guerrero, Framing Blackness: The African American Image in Film

Bell hooks, Reel to Real: Race, Sex and Class at the Movies

Mark Reid, Black Lenses, Black Voices: African American Film Now

Selected articles on Blackboard designated by *.

Course Requirements

Essays & Response Papers

Students will write weekly (1-2 page) response papers about each film screened that explores that section’s theme. Students are also required to write two essays during the course of the semester. For the first essay (4-5 pages) students will thematically or cinematically compare two films. The final essay (7-10 pages) will be a research paper that provides an in-depth critical analysis of a specific issue relevant to the study of contemporary African American film. Topics may include but are not limited to:

 

  • Representation of African Americans in a particular genre (comedy, drama, documentary, musical, horror etc.)
  • Depictions of black youth or childhood
  • The work of a particular artist (director, actor, screenwriter, etc.)
  • The role of the soundtrack in African American film
  • Financial barriers to black filmmakers
  • Renderings of African American masculinity or womanhood
  • Imaginary homeland: Africa and/or the Caribbean in black film
  • The use of historical events in African American film

Please note that written assignments must be turned in at the BEGINNING of class—late papers will be penalized.  All work must be typed, stapled, doubled-spaced, with 12-point font and one-inch margins.  Consult the MLA Style Manual or The Chicago Manual of Style for appropriate citation and formatting.  It is incumbent upon you to keep a personal copy of all work that you submit.  

Presentation

The presentation (5-minutes) is an opportunity for you to discuss the findings from your final research paper. I encourage you to be inventive! You can design a website, film a video or create a PowerPoint or a poster presentation.  I advise you to and to rehearse your presentation beforehand to check your timing and its coherence.

Class participation

Make sure to complete all reading before class and participate fully in discussions and exercises (presentations, quizzes and group projects).  Remember to bring texts to class because you may be called upon to read an excerpt or analyze a passage.  Each student is expected to speak during EVERY class.  We will screen several films during the course of the term.  You are to be an attentive, active audience.  I expect you to take notes since our discussions rely on your critical observations of the films.  Note that prompt and regular attendance is expected.  Tardiness is disrespectful to me and to your classmates.  Please be advised that if you miss more than ONE class or are consistently late (twice) your grade will suffer by at least 10%.

Grades will be calculated as follows:

Essay 1                         20%

Essay 2                         30%

Response Papers         25%

Presentation                15%

Participation               10%

AFR 372C • Black Middle Class

30637 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm JES A217A
(also listed as AMS 321, WGS 340 )
show description

The Black Middle Class

Professor Thompson

Course Description

During this term we will embark on an interdisciplinary exploration of the African

American middle class in the US from 1900 to the present, with a particular emphasis

on post-Civil Rights era developments. We will use literature, film, history, theatre,

cultural studies, music, television, and sociology to examine how the black middle class

has been imagined, defined and represented. By examining the debates within and

about the black middle class, we will complicate constructions of race in America. The

course is particularly interested in investigating the following: the concept of racial

uplift; the construction of the “race man” and “race woman;” the idea of class privilege

for a racially marginalized group; conflicts between the black middle class and the

working class; the role of the black middle class in policing black sexuality; the notion of

middle class rage; the rise of the black nerd; assertions of racial authenticity; the new

black aesthetic; and the politics of affirmative action.

Required Texts

Charles Chesnutt,

The Marrow of Tradition (1901)

ISBN: 0393934144

Ellis Cose,

Rage of a Privileged Class (1994)

ISBN: 0060925949

Nella Larsen,

Quicksand and Passing (1929)

IBSN 0813511704

Lorraine Hansberry,

A Raisin in the Sun (1959)

ISBN: 0679755314

Amiri Baraka/LeRoi Jones,

The Dutchman and The Slave (1964)

ISBN: 978-0688210847

Toni Morrison,

Song of Solomon (1977)

ISBN: 9780786508075

Andrea Lee,

Sarah Phillips (1984)

ISBN: 155553158X

Stew,

Passing Strange (2008)

ISBN: 155783752X

Course Packet

All course materials are available at the Co-op. Texts designated with an * can be found

in the course packet.

2

Course Requirements

Attendance & Participation

Students are expected to complete all reading before class and participate fully in

discussions and activities (presentations, quizzes, in-class writing and group projects).

Remember to bring texts to class because we will be reading excerpts and doing close

readings of passages. Also please be advised that prompt and regular attendance is

expected. Tardiness is disrespectful to me and to your classmates. Missing two classes

and/or excessive tardiness will result in your grade being lowered by 10%.

Essays

During the semester you will write two critical essays. The first essay will engage with a

text or texts from the syllabus. Topics will be distributed in class in advance. The final

essay will be a research project of your own choosing (in consultation with me) that

considers texts and/or topics not discussed in class. You will write a proposal that

includes a tentative bibliography that includes primary and secondary sources. Additional

guidelines for the proposal and research paper will be distributed in class in advance. I

encourage you to consult with me at any stage in your writing process. Make sure you

argue a strong thesis and carefully proofread your papers for clarity and grammatical

errors. I expect your essays to adhere to either the

MLA Style Manual or the Chicago

Manual of Style

for formatting and documentation. All work must be typed in a 12-point

academic font (Times, Palatino, Times New Roman), stapled, and doubled-spaced with

one-inch margins. Submit essays in paper (NOT electronic) format by the deadline unless

instructed by me to do otherwise. It is incumbent upon you to keep a personal copy of all

submitted work. Please note: no incompletes or extensions will be granted without my

prior written permission.

Research Presentation

Each participant will give a brief (3 minute) presentation based on her/his final research

project. Students are strongly encouraged to use PowerPoint and/or another presentation

tool. The point of this exercise is to teach your classmates about an aspect of the black

middle class NOT covered in class. Use this as an opportunity to refine your oral

presentation skills and showcase your expertise.

Documented Disability Statement

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations

should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or

1-866-329-3986 (video phone) or reference SSD’s website for more disability-related

information:

http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/for_cstudents.php

Final grades will be calculated as follows (note that plus and minus grades will be used):

Participation 15%

Research Presentation (3 min) 20%

Essay 1 (3-5 pages) 25%

Proposal (2-3 pages) 10%

Essay 2 (7-10 pages) 30%

 

AFR 372C • Rethinking Blackness

30350 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm SZB 416
(also listed as AMS 321, E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

Cultural critic Wahneema Lubiano argues that “postmodernisn offers a site for African American cultural critics and producers to utilize a discursive space  that foregrounds the possibility of rethinking history, political positionality in the cultural domain, the relationship between cultural politics and subjectivity, and the politics of narrative aesthetics”. Other scholars such as Cornel West conclude that the Black experience in American is fundamentally absurd. If postmodernism is characterized by a de-centered human subjectivity then the Black condition in the Americans is fundamentally postmodern. This course examines texts that re-imagine Black subjectivity beyond traditional narratives of suffering and oppression. Class participants will become acquainted with a variety of genres such as literary satire, rock musical, faux documentary, and speculative fiction.

 

Texts:

Paul Beatty “White Boy Shuffle” (1996)

Octavia Butler “Kindred” (1979)

Edward P. Jones “The Known World” (2003)

Andrea Lee “Sarah Phillips” (1984)

Jill Nelson “Volunteer Slavery” (1993)

Baratunde Thurston “How to Be Black” (2012)

 

Grading breakdown (percentages):

Essay One – 5 pages – 20%

Midterm – 30%

Presentation – 10%

Essay 2 – 7 pages – 30%

Participation – 10%

AFR 387D • Performing Blackness

30527 • Fall 2013
Meets W 100pm-400pm CLA 0.120
show description

Course Description

Although African American theatre and performance have not received the same sustained critical attention as other genres in literary and cultural studies, it has contributed significantly to the understanding and representation of blackness. This course examines how contemporary theatrical interventions render and challenge notions of black identity, black life and black culture in the United States. Central to that concern is an analysis of the strategies black performers and dramatists use to depict and perform blackness not only on stage, but also in everyday life. Of critical importance is the portrayal of the metanarrative of (African) American history. Finally, by considering the status of memory, the use of satire, solo performance, musicality, inventive language and experimental staging, we will assess innovations in African American theatrical performance.

 

Works to be read by:

Daphne Brooks

Brandi Wilkins Catanese

Harry J. Elam, Jr.

Katori Hall

E. Patrick Johnson

Nicole R. Fleetwood

Tarell Alvin Mc Craney

Lynn Nottage

Tavia Nyong’o

Robert O’Hara

Suzan-Lori Parks

Anna Deavere Smith

August Wilson

George C. Wolfe

Harvey Young.

 

 

AFR F372E • Black Film

81585 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm JES A230
(also listed as AMS F325, WGS F340 )
show description

This course is primarily designed to introduce students to African American film produced both inside and outside the Hollywood mainstream.  The course traces the history of African American film culture from 1970s blaxploitation films to the emergence of a formidable number of black filmmakers such as Spike Lee, John Singleton and Charles Burnett who gained prominence during the 1980s and 1990s.  The class will also discuss the work of independent directors such as Julie Dash, Kasi Lemmons, Cheryl Dunye, and black feminist critics as we examine issues of gender and sexuality in African American film. Finally we will discuss the controversy surrounding the work of emergent black filmmakers such as Tyler Perry and Lee Daniels, as well as the hopes for a prosperous indendent black cinema inspired by AAFRM (African American Film Releasing Movement) and director/producer Ava Durvernay .

During the term we will consider how these filmmakers engage with and refute dominant cultural images of African Americans as well as create a cinematic language specifically derived from African American experiences.  Besides screening films students are expected to read articles on film theory and cultural criticism.  The course material is selective since this is a very large body of material and our time is limited.  However, the class attempts to offer as encompassing and representative a perspective as possible.  Although the class does not require any prior knowledge of or experience with film studies, I expect students to become active, skilled, critical viewers of African American cinema and astute readers of film scholarship.

Required Texts

Donald Bogle, Toms, Coons, Mulattos, Mammies & Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films, fourth edition

Manthia Diawara, Black American Cinema

Ed Guerrero, Framing Blackness: The African American Image in Film

Bell hooks, Reel to Real: Race, Sex and Class at the Movies

Mark Reid, Black Lenses, Black Voices: African American Film Now

Selected articles on Blackboard designated by *.

Course Requirements

Essays & Response Papers

Students will write weekly (1-2 page) response papers about each film screened that explores that section’s theme. Students are also required to write two essays during the course of the semester. For the first essay (4-5 pages) students will thematically or cinematically compare two films. The final essay (7-10 pages) will be a research paper that provides an in-depth critical analysis of a specific issue relevant to the study of contemporary African American film. Topics may include but are not limited to:

 

  • Representation of African Americans in a particular genre (comedy, drama, documentary, musical, horror etc.)
  • Depictions of black youth or childhood
  • The work of a particular artist (director, actor, screenwriter, etc.)
  • The role of the soundtrack in African American film
  • Financial barriers to black filmmakers
  • Renderings of African American masculinity or womanhood
  • Imaginary homeland: Africa and/or the Caribbean in black film
  • The use of historical events in African American film

Please note that written assignments must be turned in at the BEGINNING of class—late papers will be penalized.  All work must be typed, stapled, doubled-spaced, with 12-point font and one-inch margins.  Consult the MLA Style Manual or The Chicago Manual of Style for appropriate citation and formatting.  It is incumbent upon you to keep a personal copy of all work that you submit.  

Presentation

The presentation (5-minutes) is an opportunity for you to discuss the findings from your final research paper. I encourage you to be inventive! You can design a website, film a video or create a PowerPoint or a poster presentation.  I advise you to and to rehearse your presentation beforehand to check your timing and its coherence.

Class participation

Make sure to complete all reading before class and participate fully in discussions and exercises (presentations, quizzes and group projects).  Remember to bring texts to class because you may be called upon to read an excerpt or analyze a passage.  Each student is expected to speak during EVERY class.  We will screen several films during the course of the term.  You are to be an attentive, active audience.  I expect you to take notes since our discussions rely on your critical observations of the films.  Note that prompt and regular attendance is expected.  Tardiness is disrespectful to me and to your classmates.  Please be advised that if you miss more than ONE class or are consistently late (twice) your grade will suffer by at least 10%.

Grades will be calculated as follows:

Essay 1                         20%

Essay 2                         30%

Response Papers         25%

Presentation                15%

Participation               10%

AFR 317F • Toni Morrison & August Wilson

30240 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SZB 524
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison and Tony award-winning playwright August Wilson are two of the most honored and prolific African American writers in recent history. They both make race (and particularly blackness) central to their work. Morrison, considered a "leading voice in current debates about constructions of race and gender in U.S. literature and culture...refuses to allow race to be relegated to the margins of literary discourse." Similarly, Wilson cautioned against a premature, post-racial vision of the world, especially considering the cultural politics of American theatre. During the term we will study how notions of race and power erupt in Morrison's "fantastic earthy realism" and Wilson's "dramatic vision." We will also trace African American cultural influences such as folktales, blues and jazz in their writing. Finally, we will measure their reach and authority as public intellectuals by discussing their essays, interviews, and speeches.

 

Texts:

By Toni Morrison

Beloved

Jazz

Sula

What Moves in the Margin: Selected Non-Fiction

By August Wilson:

Fences

Joe Turner's Come & Gone

Piano Lesson

Radio Golf

AFR 372C • Black Middle Class

30275 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 203
(also listed as E 376M, WGS 340 )
show description

The Black Middle Class

 

Professor Thompson

Course Description

During this term we will embark on an interdisciplinary exploration of the African

American middle class in the US from 1900 to the present, with a particular emphasis

on post-Civil Rights era developments. We will use literature, film, history, theatre,

cultural studies, music, television, and sociology to examine how the black middle class

has been imagined, defined and represented. By examining the debates within and

about the black middle class, we will complicate constructions of race in America. The

course is particularly interested in investigating the following: the concept of racial

uplift; the construction of the “race man” and “race woman;” the idea of class privilege

for a racially marginalized group; conflicts between the black middle class and the

working class; the role of the black middle class in policing black sexuality; the notion of

middle class rage; the rise of the black nerd; assertions of racial authenticity; the new

black aesthetic; and the politics of affirmative action.

Required Texts

Charles Chesnutt,

The Marrow of Tradition (1901)

ISBN: 0393934144

Ellis Cose,

Rage of a Privileged Class (1994)

ISBN: 0060925949

Nella Larsen,

Quicksand and Passing (1929)

IBSN 0813511704

Lorraine Hansberry,

A Raisin in the Sun (1959)

ISBN: 0679755314

Amiri Baraka/LeRoi Jones,

The Dutchman and The Slave (1964)

ISBN: 978-0688210847

Toni Morrison,

Song of Solomon (1977)

ISBN: 9780786508075

Andrea Lee,

Sarah Phillips (1984)

ISBN: 155553158X

Stew,

Passing Strange (2008)

ISBN: 155783752X

Course Packet

All course materials are available at the Co-op. Texts designated with an * can be found

in the course packet.

2

Course Requirements

Attendance & Participation

Students are expected to complete all reading before class and participate fully in

discussions and activities (presentations, quizzes, in-class writing and group projects).

Remember to bring texts to class because we will be reading excerpts and doing close

readings of passages. Also please be advised that prompt and regular attendance is

expected. Tardiness is disrespectful to me and to your classmates. Missing two classes

and/or excessive tardiness will result in your grade being lowered by 10%.

Essays

During the semester you will write two critical essays. The first essay will engage with a

text or texts from the syllabus. Topics will be distributed in class in advance. The final

essay will be a research project of your own choosing (in consultation with me) that

considers texts and/or topics not discussed in class. You will write a proposal that

includes a tentative bibliography that includes primary and secondary sources. Additional

guidelines for the proposal and research paper will be distributed in class in advance. I

encourage you to consult with me at any stage in your writing process. Make sure you

argue a strong thesis and carefully proofread your papers for clarity and grammatical

errors. I expect your essays to adhere to either the

MLA Style Manual or the Chicago

Manual of Style

for formatting and documentation. All work must be typed in a 12-point

academic font (Times, Palatino, Times New Roman), stapled, and doubled-spaced with

one-inch margins. Submit essays in paper (NOT electronic) format by the deadline unless

instructed by me to do otherwise. It is incumbent upon you to keep a personal copy of all

submitted work. Please note: no incompletes or extensions will be granted without my

prior written permission.

Research Presentation

Each participant will give a brief (3 minute) presentation based on her/his final research

project. Students are strongly encouraged to use PowerPoint and/or another presentation

tool. The point of this exercise is to teach your classmates about an aspect of the black

middle class NOT covered in class. Use this as an opportunity to refine your oral

presentation skills and showcase your expertise.

Documented Disability Statement

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations

should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or

1-866-329-3986 (video phone) or reference SSD’s website for more disability-related

information:

http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/for_cstudents.php

Final grades will be calculated as follows (note that plus and minus grades will be used):

Participation 15%

Research Presentation (3 min) 20%

Essay 1 (3-5 pages) 25%

Proposal (2-3 pages) 10%

Essay 2 (7-10 pages) 30%

 

 

 

 

Theatrical Productions

"Single Black Female." Selected productions.

Directed by Marcus McQuirter. Performing Blackness Series, produced by UT Austin’s John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies.  George Washington Carver Cultural Center’s Boyd Vance Theatre, Austin, Texas. November 8-10, 2013.

Directed by Letitia Brooks. Nu Spyce Productions. St-Ambroise Montreal FRINGE Festival 2013, Venue 6 - MainLine Theatre, Montreal, Canada. June 14-24, 2013.

Directed by Martin Wilkins. Produced by Kingston 6 Entertainment. George Weston Recital Hall, Toronto Centre for the Arts, Toronto, Canada. March 13, 2010-March 21, 2010. International premiere.

Directed by Colman Domingo. Produced by the New Professional Theatre. The Duke on 42nd Street, New York City. June 10-June 29, 2008.Off-Broadway premiere. 

Directed by Colman Domingo. Produced by the New Professional Theatre. Peter Jay Sharpe Theatre, New York City. June 15-June 25, 2006.

New York Times review: http://theater.nytimes.com/2006/06/20/theater/reviews/20fema.html?_r=0

 

"I Don’t Want to Be." 

Directed by Ayana Cahrr. Black Women: State of the Union—Taking Flight. Company of Angels Theater, Los Angeles, California. February 15- 24, 2013.

Directed by Ayana Cahrr. Black Women: State of the Union—Taking Flight. Skylight Theatre, Los Angeles, California. October 27- November 18, 2012. 

Backstage review:

http://www.backstage.com/review/la-theater/black-women-state-of-the-union-taking-flight-katselas-theatre-company/

 

"Mother’s Day."

A short featured in the ensemble production "Black Women: State of the Union." The Black Box at the Alexandria Hotel. Company of Angels Theatre, Los Angeles, California. February 20, 2009-March 10, 2009.

 

Selected Publications

Books

Single Black Female. New York: Samuel French, Inc., 2012.

Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class. Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2009.

Received an honorable mention for the National Women's Studies Association's Gloria E. Anzaldua Book Prize, 2010.

http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/56ttm9xr9780252034268.html

 

Articles

“Black Ladies and Black Magic Women.” From Bourgeois to Boojie: Black Middle Class Performances. Vershawn Young with Bridget Tsemo, eds. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2011, 287-307.

“Easy Women: Black Beauty in Walter Mosley’s Easy Rawlins Mystery Series.” Finding a Way Home: A Critical Assessment of Walter Mosley’s Fiction. Owen Brady and Derek Maus, Eds. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2008, 58-69.

 

Poetry

“What Do I Want? From Men & Love.” Catch the Fire: A Cross-Generational Anthology of Contemporary African American Poetry. Ed. Derrick I. M. Gilbert. New York: Riverhead Books/Putnam Berkeley Group, 1998. 136-138.

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