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Steven Hoelscher, Chair Burdine 437, Mailcode B7100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-7277

Anne M. Martínez

Affiliate Faculty Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Assistant Professor
Anne M. Martínez

Contact

Biography

Research interests

Professor Martínez is interested in the role of religion in interactions between the United States and Mexico during and immediately after the Mexican Revolution, as well as Mexican migration to the Midwest during that time period. Her work examines the relationships among race, religion and nationalism for Mexicans in both the United States and Mexico.

Professor Martínez's forthcoming book, Catholic Borderlands: Mapping Catholicism into U.S. Empire, 1905-1935 (University of Nebraska Press, 2014), considers how Mexico's religious crisis during and after the Mexican Revolution shaped American Catholicism. This cultural, diplomatic, and intellectual history sets the stage for her second book project, The Outsourcing of Souls, a social history of Black and Mexican Catholics in Chicago from 1910 to the beginning of World War II.

Her second book project, The Outsourcing of Souls compares Black and Mexican Catholics in Chicago from 1910 to the beginning of World War II.

Courses taught

Mexican American cultural, intellectual and social histories; emphasis on race, gender and citizenship through a transnational lens; U.S Catholic history

Awards/Honors

Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, University of Chicago (2004-05)

College Research Fellow, College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas (2012-13)

Interests

Mexican Americans, religion, migration, nation

AMS 321 • Us Catholic History

31135 • Spring 2014
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as HIS 365G, MAS 374, R S 346 )
show description

This course examines the experiences of Catholic in the United States, with an emphasis on the twentieth century. We will examine how Catholicism and national identity work for U.S. Catholics, with an emphasis on Catholic women and Latina/os.

Texts:

Books TBA

Course packet

Grading:

75% of grade will be based on writing

25% of grade will be based on attendance and participation

AMS 370 • Race & Citizenship In Us Hist

30850 • Fall 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as HIS 350R, MAS 374 )
show description

Race has been key in defining citizenship since the founding of the United States of America. From the earliest treaties with Indians to the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the Jones Act, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, race has outweighed citizenship in determining the rights of individuals in this country. In this course we will use primary and secondary sources to analyze how race and citizenship have functioned for populations of color in the United States. We will examine events in U.S. history and consider how citizenship impacts the histories of various groups as well as the writing of their histories

Texts:

The Possessive Investment in Whiteness, George Lipsitz

A packet of required readings will be available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keaton.

A few required readings will be available on Blackboard.

The bulk of the reading for this course will be from materials you collect for your research project.

Additional readings to be determined.

Grading:

This has been designated and designed as a writing-intensive course. As such, writing will be a significant part of the workload for this course, and the bulk of your grade will be determined by your writing.

The final paper will count for 50% of the final grade. Class participation will count for 20% of your final grade. The remaining thirty percent will be based on shorter writing assignments.

AMS 321 • Us Catholic History

30815 • Spring 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as HIS 365G, MAS 374, R S 346 )
show description

This course will examine the history of Catholics and Catholicism in the United States with an emphasis on the twentieth century. We will examine relationships between immigration, race, labor, politics, devotionalism and religion, with some focus on Mexican Americans and how they have shaped the U.S. Catholic Church in the late twentieth century.

 

Required Readings

Lara Medina, Las Hermanas

Kathleen Sprow Cummings, New Women of the Old Faith

A required packet of readings will be available locally.

Other readings to be determined.

 

Class Format

Approximate use of class time: 40% lecture, 40% discussion and working groups, 20% writing. There will be four major writing assignments. Attendance is required. There is no final exam in this class.

AMS 370 • Race & Citizenship In Us Hist

30629 • Fall 2011
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 0.128
(also listed as HIS 350R, MAS 374 )
show description

Race has been key in defining citizenship since the founding of the United States of America. From the earliest treaties with Indians to the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the Jones Act, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, race has outweighed citizenship in determining the rights of individuals in this country. In this course we will use primary and secondary sources to analyze how race and citizenship have functioned for populations of color in the United States. We will examine events in U.S. history and consider how citizenship impacts the histories of various groups as well as the writing of their histories.

 

Readings

Unequal Freedom, Evelyn Nakano Glenn 

The Possessive Investment in Whiteness, George Lipsitz

A packet of required readings will be available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. 

A few required readings will be available on Blackboard.

The bulk of the reading for this course will be from materials you collect for your research project.

 

Grading

This has been designated and designed as a writing-intensive course. As such, writing will be a significant part of the workload for this course, and the bulk of your grade will be determined by your writing. 

The final paper will count for 50% of the final grade. Class participation will count for 20% of your final grade. The remaining 30%  percent will be based on shorter writing assignments.

 

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

AMS 370 • Race & Citizenship In Us Hist

30889 • Spring 2011
Meets T 500pm-800pm PAR 103
(also listed as HIS 350R )
show description

Race has been key in defining citizenship since the founding of the United States of America. From the earliest treaties with Indians to the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the Jones Act, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, race has outweighed citizenship in determining the rights of individuals in this country. In this course we will use primary and secondary sources to analyze how race and citizenship have functioned for populations of color in the United States. We will examine events in U.S. history and consider how citizenship impacts the histories of various groups as well as the writing of their histories.

Likely Readings

 Unequal Freedom, Evelyn Nakano Glenn 

The Possessive Investment in Whiteness, George Lipsitz

A packet of required readings will be available at Jenn’s on Guadalupe at Dean Keaton. 

A few required readings will be available on Blackboard.

The bulk of the reading for this course will be from materials you collect for your research project.

Grading

This has been designated and designed as a writing-intensive course. As such, writing will be a significant part of the workload for this course, and the bulk of your grade will be determined by your writing. 

The final paper will count for 50% of the final grade. Class participation will count for 20% of your final grade. The remaining thirty percent will be based on shorter writing assignments.

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