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Steven Hoelscher, Chair Burdine 437, Mailcode B7100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-7277

Jennifer Kelly

Doctoral Student

Biography

M.A. Interdisciplinary Humanities and Social Thought. New York University
B.A. Feminist Studies and Literature, University of California, Santa Cruz

Interests

Israel/Palestine, transnational American studies, U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, comparative colonial histories, critical race studies, feminist studies, queer criticism and theory, tourism studies, carceral studies, militarism

AMS 311S • American Empire

30660 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BUR 228
show description

This course introduces students to American studies by centralizing the history of slavery, colonialism, and imperial state practice in the formation and expansion of the United States. It traces not only the history and legacies of these practices, but also the myriad ways in which disparate Americans have negotiated and resisted state-sponsored racism and imperialism. The course is chronological in that it travels from Puritan New England to the "War on Terror," but it is conceptually nonlinear in that we will ask questions about rupture and continuity throughout each of these historical and contemporary moments.

           

Requirements

Precis (5): 15%

Participation: 15%

Comparative book review (1 course text and 2 outside texts): 25%

Final Paper Proposal and Bibliography: 10%

Final Paper: 35%

 

Possible Texts

Selections from:

Lepore, The Name of War: King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity

Stephanson, Manifest Destiny: American Expansion and the Empire of Right

Stauffer, The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race

Du Bois, Black Reconstruction

English, Unnatural Selections: Eugenics in American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance

Lowe, Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics

Singh, Black is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy

Camacho, Migrant Imaginaries: Latino Cultural Politics in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Gregory, The Colonial Present: Afghanistan, Palestine, Iraq

 

 Flag(s): Writing

 

AMS 311S • American Empire

30665 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BUR 228
show description

This course introduces students to American studies by centralizing the history of slavery, colonialism, and imperial state practice in the formation and expansion of the United States. It traces not only the history and legacies of these practices, but also the myriad ways in which disparate Americans have negotiated and resisted state-sponsored racism and imperialism. The course is chronological in that it travels from Puritan New England to the "War on Terror," but it is conceptually nonlinear in that we will ask questions about rupture and continuity throughout each of these historical and contemporary moments.

           

Requirements

Precis (5): 15%

Participation: 15%

Comparative book review (1 course text and 2 outside texts): 25%

Final Paper Proposal and Bibliography: 10%

Final Paper: 35%

 

Possible Texts

Selections from:

Lepore, The Name of War: King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity

Stephanson, Manifest Destiny: American Expansion and the Empire of Right

Stauffer, The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race

Du Bois, Black Reconstruction

English, Unnatural Selections: Eugenics in American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance

Lowe, Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics

Singh, Black is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy

Camacho, Migrant Imaginaries: Latino Cultural Politics in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Gregory, The Colonial Present: Afghanistan, Palestine, Iraq

 

 Flag(s): Writing

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