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Steven Hoelscher, Chair Burdine 437, Mailcode B7100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-7277

Sean Cashbaugh

PhD

Doctoral Student

Contact

Biography

Sean Cashbaugh received his BA in English from the College of William and Mary in 2008, and his MA in American Studies from the the University of Texas at Austin 2010. He is currently is a doctoral candidate completing a dissertation entitled "A Cultural History Beneath the Left: Politics, Art, and the Emergence of the Underground During the Cold War." His dissertation explores the emergence and consolidation of the idea of a cultural underground in the postwar era in relation to discourses of the American Left, the culture of the Cold War, and the institutionalization of the avant-garde.

While at UT, he has taught classes about rhetoric and writing, science fiction, and the history of Marxism in America. He has also worked as a writing consultant at UT's Undergraduate Writing Center. he has served as an editor for multiple publications, including FlowTV, Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, and most recently, The End of Austin.

 

Publications

Review of Crises of Imagination, Crises of Power: Capitalism, Creativity, and the Commons by Max Haiven. Working USA: The Journal of Labor and Society 17, no. 4 (December 2014): 611-615.

“Mapping and Understanding the Emergence of the Underground,” Fresh Pickin’s, Archives and Special Collections, Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut, 19 May 2014, http://blogs.lib.uconn.edu/archives/2014/05/19/ mapping-and-understanding-the-emergence-of-the-underground/.

“Guarantee Me You’ll Bring This Corporation Down: Narrative Closure and Resident Evil’s Anti-Corporate Politics.” In Media Res, 22 May 2013, http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/2013/05/22/guarantee-me-you-ll-bring-corporation-down-narrative-closure-and-resident-evil-s-anti-cor

“Hashtagged Why Austin.” The End of Austin, Vol. 3, Spring 2013, http://endofaustin.com/ 2013/05/18/hashtagged-why-austin/.

“A Conversation with Thor,” Interview with musician and artist Thor Harris, The End of Austin, Vol. 2, Winter 2012, http://endofaustin.com/2013/ 01/08/a-conversation-with-thor/.

Review of Atomic Comics: Cartoonists Confront the Nuclear World by Ferenc Morton Szasz. H-War, H-Net Reviews. September, 2012. http://www.h-net.org/reviews/ showrev.php?id=36275

Review of Race in American Science Fiction by Isiah Lavender III, Ethnic and Third World Literature Review of Books 12 (Spring 2012).

Interests

Cultures of American Radicalism, Political Aesthetics, Cold War Culture, Cinema Studies, Cultural Studies, the Avant-Garde and Underground Culture

AMS 311S • Marxism And American Culture

30855 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 0.120
show description

Throughout the twentieth century, Marxism has been cast as subversively un-American and as a threat to individuals living in America. Yet this ignores Marxism's long history in American political, social, and cultural life. Many Americans have embraced Marxism in diverse ways since the late 1800s, seeing it as a mode of political analysis and engagement, as well as a theoretical approach to history and art. In this course, students will explore these processes and examine how Americans have understood and transformed Marxism in light of their distinct experiences and political goals. In the first of three units, we will examine key writings by Karl Marx, paying close attention to key concepts later revised. In unit two, through analysis of philosophical tracts, speeches, literature, other primary documents, and secondary readings, we will investigate the ways individuals and groups have understood these ideas and sought to make them their own, processes entwined with ideologies of class, race, gender, and nation. Having thought about Marxism in this sense, in unit three we will turn our eyes towards aesthetics and think through Marxism, asking how seemingly unrelated elements of American culture such as film, literature, and drama relate to the ideas explored all semester.

                               

Requirements

3 Reading Responses, 15%

Auto-Critique, 10%

Auto-Critique Revision, 10%

Essay 1, 20%

Essay 2, 25%

Discussion, 10%

Reading Quizzes, 10%

 

Possible Texts

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto

Karl Marx, excerpts from Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844

Karl Marx , excerpts from Capital

Tillie Olsen, Yonnondio:  From the Thirties

Clifford Odets, Waiting for Lefty

Various articles, essays, primary documents, and book excerpts to be posted on Blackboard.

Short films to be placed on Reserve

 

Flag(s): Writing

AMS 311S • Marxism And American Culture

31075 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BUR 228
show description

Throughout the twentieth century, Marxism has been cast as subversively un-American and as a threat to individuals living in America. Yet this ignores Marxism's long history in American political, social, and cultural life. Many Americans have embraced Marxism in diverse ways since the late 1800s, seeing it as a mode of political analysis and engagement, as well as a theoretical approach to history and art. In this course, students will explore these processes and examine how Americans have understood and transformed Marxism in light of their distinct experiences and political goals. In the first of three units, we will examine key writings by Karl Marx, paying close attention to key concepts later revised. In unit two, through analysis of philosophical tracts, speeches, literature, other primary documents, and secondary readings, we will investigate the ways individuals and groups have understood these ideas and sought to make them their own, processes entwined with ideologies of class, race, gender, and nation. Having thought about Marxism in this sense, in unit three we will turn our eyes towards aesthetics and think through Marxism, asking how seemingly unrelated elements of American culture such as film, literature, and drama relate to the ideas explored all semester.

                   

Requirements

3 Reading Responses, 15%

Auto-Critique, 10%

Auto-Critique Revision, 10%

Essay 1, 20%

Essay 2, 25%

Discussion, 10%

Reading Quizzes, 10%

 

Possible Texts

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto

Karl Marx, excerpts from Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844

Karl Marx , excerpts from Capital

Tillie Olsen, Yonnondio:  From the Thirties

Clifford Odets, Waiting for Lefty

Various articles, essays, primary documents, and book excerpts to be posted on Blackboard.

Short films to be placed on Reserve

 

Flag(s): Writing

AMS 311S • Marxism And American Culture

30720 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 228
show description

Throughout the twentieth century, Marxism has been cast as subversively un-American and as a threat to individuals living in America. Yet this ignores Marxism's long history in American political, social, and cultural life. Many Americans have embraced Marxism in diverse ways since the late 1800s, seeing it as a mode of political analysis and engagement, as well as a theoretical approach to history and art. In this course, students will explore these processes and examine how Americans have understood and transformed Marxism in light of their distinct experiences and political goals. In the first of three units, we will examine key writings by Karl Marx, paying close attention to key concepts later revised. In unit two, through analysis of philosophical tracts, speeches, literature, other primary documents, and secondary readings, we will investigate the ways individuals and groups have understood these ideas and sought to make them their own, processes entwined with ideologies of class, race, gender, and nation. Having thought about Marxism in this sense, in unit three we will turn our eyes towards aesthetics and think through Marxism, asking how seemingly unrelated elements of American culture such as film, literature, and drama relate to the ideas explored all semester.

                               

Requirements

3 Reading Responses, 15%

Auto-Critique, 10%

Auto-Critique Revision, 10%

Essay 1, 20%

Essay 2, 25%

Discussion, 10%

Reading Quizzes, 10%

 

 

Possible Texts

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto

Karl Marx, excerpts from Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844

Karl Marx , excerpts from Capital

Tillie Olsen, Yonnondio:  From the Thirties

Clifford Odets, Waiting for Lefty

James Boggs, The American Revolution:  Pages from a Negro Worker's Notebook

 

Various articles, essays, primary documents, and book excerpts to be posted on Blackboard.

Short films to be placed on Reserve

 

Flag(s): Writing

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