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Associate Prof. Nicole Guidotti-Hernández wins MLA Prize in United States Latina and Latino and Chicana and Chicano Literary and Cultural Studies

Posted: December 3, 2013

An excerpt from the MLA's press release:

The Modern Language Association of America today announced it is awarding its tenth biennial MLA Prize in United States Latina and Latino and Chicana and Chicano Literary and Cultural Studies to Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández, of the University of Texas, Austin, for her book Unspeakable Violence: Remapping U.S. and Mexican National Imaginaries, published by Duke University Press. Antonio López, of George Washington University, has received honorable mention for Unbecoming Blackness: The Diaspora Cultures of Afro-Cuban America, published by New York University Press. The prize is awarded for an outstanding scholarly study of Latina or Latino or Chicana or Chicano literature or culture.

The MLA Prize in United States Latina and Latino and Chicana and Chicano Literary and Cultural Studies is one of sixteen awards that will be presented on 11 January 2014, during the association’s annual convention, held this year in Chicago. The members of the selection committee were Arturo Arias (Univ. of Texas, Austin); Sheila Marie Contreras (Michigan State Univ.); and Laura Anne Lomas (Rutgers Univ., Newark), chair. The committee’s citation for the winning book reads:

Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández’s Unspeakable Violence: Remapping U.S. and Mexican National Imaginaries reconfigures the field of Latina/o and Chicana/o studies and leaves a lasting imprint in the humanities by illuminating the ways in which violence is not random. Guidotti-Hernández presents archival evidence to show that this phenomenon is not conjunctural to our historical moment but, rather, intrinsic to the founding of the United States. At the same time, her book engages a range of disciplinary and theoretical paradigms, deploying feminist, transnational, subaltern, colonial, and performance studies, among many other theoretical currents. Her research stands out in that it does not merely apply the conceptual contributions of these many fields to a United States and Mexican archive. Instead, Guidotti-Hernández reproblematizes their overall theoretical implications, thus making a major methodological and conceptual contribution to a range of fields.

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