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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Heather Teague

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ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

31255 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm JGB 2.216
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.

ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

30935 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am UTC 3.112
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

29950-29965 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 400pm-500pm BUR 108
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This course explores human cultural diversity and the relation of culture to human experience.  Cultural anthropology takes the position that, if we wish to understand the human condition, we must study the full range of human societies, past and present, and not just our own.  This introductory course will sample a broad range of cultures, ranging from hunter/gatherers, small scale tribal and village societies, to the emerging post-industrial cyberculture of tomorrow.  What do these cultures have in common, what makes each unique, and what is it like to live within them?  Our comparative approach will examine political and economic systems, religion, language, family and kinship, law, the arts, and other institutions to better understand ourselves and all of humankind.

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