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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Course Descriptions

ANT 301 • Physical Anthroplogy-Wb

30350 • Kappelman Jr, John W.
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthropology

30355-30405 • Shapiro, Liza J.
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm ART 1.102
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30410-30465 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MW 900am-1000am JES A121A
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30485 • Ravindran, Tathagatan
Meets MW 300pm-400pm CLA 0.112
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

30490 • Strong, Pauline
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.106
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

30515-30530 • Franklin, Maria
Meets MW 1000am-1100am FAC 21
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

30535-30550 • Denbow, James R.
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.112
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

30575 • Campbell, Craig
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 3.124
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30580 • Hosemann, Aimee
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LIN 312C)
show description

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 310L • Aztecs And Spaniards

30590 • Rodriguez-Alegría, Enrique R.
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 3.104
(also listed as LAS 315)
show description

The Aztec and the Spanish empires have attracted the attention of scholars and the public for a long time with stories of gold, human sacrifice, warfare, and the meeting of two different civilizations. In this class we will study both empires, taking advantage of the varied lines of evidence available for their study, especially historical and archaeological evidence, as well as monuments and works of art. The focus of the class will be on how imperial expansion affected the daily life of people in the Aztec empire and after the Spanish conquest. In addition to studying the daily life of different people in these empires, we will examine some of the themes that have fascinated both scholars and the general public, including human sacrifice, conquest warfare, and religion. The goal of the class is to examine social and cultural heterogeneity in both of these empires, to familiarize students with the diverse lines of evidence we have to study these empires, and to understand processes of historical change among the Aztecs and the Spanish empire. The class will be roughly divided equally between the Aztec empire and the Spanish empire. Prior experience in archaeology is not required to join the class.

ANT 310L • Israel: Space/Place/Landscape

30595 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.120
(also listed as GRG 309, J S 311, MES 310)
show description

This multidisciplinary, interactive workshop is designed to foster dialog, debate and creative projects between lower-division undergraduate students with interests in Jewish Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Anthropology, and Geography.

The core component of this class is the final project. Following the introductory unit, teams of students will then propose one site, space, place or landscape in Israel/Palestine to explore in depth, and propose a conceptual framework for doing so. Each team will be responsible for exploring social, cultural, political, phenomenological, aesthetic and affective processes related to the site they have selected. This experimental seminar is for students who want to experience a collaborative learning environment, gain a set of multidisciplinary analytic skills, learn about space in Israel, interact with students who may have different disciplinary and political viewpoints, and want to learn and write about space, spatiality and spatialization.

Hot Middle Eastern breakfast beverages served in class!

ANT 310L • Mex Amer/Lat Folk Across US

30599 • Gonzalez, Rachel
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JES A203A
(also listed as MAS 319)
show description

This is an introductory course to the field of Folklore and ethnography among U.S. Latina/o communities. Folklore is the study of artistic communication in everyday life  and gaining meaning through its connections the contemporary and  historical contexts of its artists' communities. This course will introduce students to the form and function of basic genres of folklore study that take the form of verbal and material artistry.

These genres include, but are not limited to: Folk Speech, Jokes, Riddles, Narratives, Festivals, Food Culture, Religion and Spirituality, Body Art and Material Culture.

This course examines  the use of everyday artistry  amongst regional  U.S. Latino communities. As a group, students will be asked to discuss the similarities and  variations  of Latino cultural communities across the United  States  through their expressive traditions. These will include discussions of such communities as Mexican Americans across the Southwest, Dominican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Midwestern Latinos and transnational Latino migrants in the New  South. The examination of everyday artistry will illustrate the process by which U.S. Latina/o communities express their Latino identities differently based on experiences of race, class, region  and migration  experiences. It will further shed light on larger national  (mis)understandings of U.S. Latina/a communities as socially unified, but not culturally homogenous communities of exiles, migrants, nationals, citizens and refugee Americans.

Tentative Grading Policy:

  • Minute papers: 5%
  • Field Write-Ups: 10%
  • Unit Reivew Essays: 25%
  • Writing Meeting: 5%
  • Midterm Exam: 20%
  • Final Exam: 15%
  • Final Collection Portfolio: 20%

ANT 310L • Primate Cognition

30600 • Hopkins, Mariah E.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.174
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

One of the most defining characteristics of the primate order is our extraordinary capacity

for learning and retention. This course provides an introduction to non-human primate

knowledge of the physical world (space & objects, tools & causality, features &

categories, quantities), as well as primate social knowledge (cooperative problemsolving,

social strategies, forms of communication, social learning, theory of mind). Nonhuman

primate cognition will be examined within an evolutionary and comparative

framework, with emphasis placed on comparing and contrasting non-human primate

cognition with that of humans and other taxonomic groups (e.g. birds, cetaceans,

carnivores, rodents). This is a lower division course open to all students.

Course Format: Lecture & Discussion. Prerequisites: None.

ANT 310L • Black Queer Diaspora Aesths

30610 • Gill, Lyndon K.
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 1.102
(also listed as AFR 317E, WGS 301)
show description

Exploration of over two decades of work produced by and about black queer subjects throughout the circum-Atlantic world. Provides an introduction to various artists and intellectuals of the black queer diaspora, as well as an examination of the viability of black queer aesthetic practice as a form of theorizing.

ANT 320L • Speech Play And Verbal Art

30615 • Webster, Anthony K.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as LIN 373)
show description

This course explores the sociocultural and linguistic foundations and uses of speech play and verbal art. We will explore a variety of kinds of speech play and verbal art (from jokes, to songs, to stories, to puns, to poetry). Issues to be discussed will revolve around the social uses of speech play and verbal art (what is being commented on and what is being done through such poetic uses of language), questions of translation, aesthetics, and changes in the uses and aesthetic judgments of speech play and verbal art. Far from a marginal pursuit of anthropology, this class will place a concern with speech play and verbal art at the center of questions about identity, power and inequality, and language ideologies. Speech play and verbal art become central to understanding the language, culture, society, and individual nexus.

ANT 322M • Art Of The Body In India

30619 • Harzer, Edeltraud
Meets W 300pm-600pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as ANS 379, WGS 340)
show description

This course introduces students to clothing, ornaments, hair, hair coverings such as turbans, shaved hair, top knot and body paint which gives an individualized expression of one's own values and esthetics in South Asia. Although there is a great regional diversity, certain traditional patterns especially in women's apparel can clearly be discerned as heavily indebted to customs in antiquity. Examples of this still survive in sculptural representations which the students will be able to observe, along with the fashions in DVDs. Various apparel is used for different occasions, but almost every facet has some symbolic function. Clothing and ornaments in India are still fashioned individually to order. Therefore it is important to be familiar with the right merchants in the area and also goldsmith. Students learn through the study of the art of the body different lifestyles, socio-economic positions in the society, but also religious symbols and proprieties. A person's appearance is addressed with care, with respect to one's environment while living quarters for most inhabitants of India represent only a utilitarian function.  

ANT 322M • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist

30620 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
show description

This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican

immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating

back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the

course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of

Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law,

3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship.

ANT 324L • Activist Research Practicum

30623 • Hale, Charles R.
Meets MW 300pm-430pm SRH 1.320
(also listed as AFR 372C, LAS 324L)
show description

From this upper-division seminar, designed especially for anthropology majors, students will learn the basics of anthropological research methods, and gain hands-on experience doing “activist research” with an Austin-based organization.  Coursework will consider the politics of anthropological research, tracing the evolution from its colonial beginnings, through upheaval and critique in the 1960s and 1970s, to various “post-colonial” responses to these criticisms.  After working through conventional research methods, we will focus on “activist anthropology,” as one means to confront the problems associated with anthropology’s colonial legacy. Together we will explore the complexities of activist research methods, while each student conceives and carries out an activist research project in conjunction with an organization in the Austin area.  Once this “practicum” portion of the course begins (roughly February 4), the seminar will meet once rather than twice a week.  From February 4 on, students are expected to devote an average of 6 to 8 hours a week to their activist research project. 

ANT 324L • Biomedicine, Ethics, & Cul

30624 • Traphagan, John W.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am RLM 7.114
(also listed as ANS 361, R S 373M)
show description

This course examines moral dilemmas that have been generated or intensified by recent advances in medical technology. We will explore ethical questions related to topics such as allocation of medical resources, stem cell research and cloning, organ transplantation, abortion, human experimentation, genetic screening, in vitro fertilization, pharmaceutical use and distribution, prolonging life and the right to die, suicide, euthanasia, and diagnosis and treatment of illnesses such as Alzheimer disease, AIDS, and mental disorders. These topics will be considered from a global perspective emphasizing how cultural values inform ethical decision-making and how different ethical/cultural systems address and define moral issues that arise in relation to medical care. We will consider ethical theories that have been used in the West to consider medical practice and compare these with approaches in non-Western cultures such as Japan. The course will emphasize use of case studies to explore issues in medical ethics and to develop the ability to apply ethical theories in ways sensitive to variations in cultural values.

 

Grading:

Midterm One      30%Midterm Two     30%Final                   40%

 

Texts:

Beauchamp, Tom L. and James F. Childress. Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 6th Edition. Oxford University Press.Martin, Emily.  The Woman in the Body.  Beacon Press.  Santorro, Michael A.  and Thomas M. Gorrie.  Ethics and the Pharmaceutical Industry.  Cambridge University Press.  Traphagan, John W.  Taming Oblivion: Aging Bodies and the Fear of Senility in Japan.  State University of New York Press.  Veatch, Robert M., Amy Haddad, Dan D. English.  Case Studies in Biomedical Ethics: Decision-Making, Principles, and Cases.  Oxford University Press.

ANT 324L • Black Women/Transnatl State

30625 • Smith, Christen
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GEA 127
(also listed as AFR 372F, LAS 324L, WGS 340)
show description

This course surveys black women’s experiences living with and confronting state

oppression around the world. From the United States to Brazil, black women experience

similar patterns of political, social and economic inequality. Transnationally, racism,

sexism, patriarchy, homophobia, and classism affect the quality of life of black women,

particularly within nation-states with legacies of slavery and colonialism. This course

takes an historical, social and theoretical look at the roots of this inequality and how

black women have chosen to respond to it locally and globally. How have interlocking

forms of oppression affected black women’s citizenship within the modern nation-state?

How have black women, in turn, sought to organize themselves in response to this

oppression?

Objectives 1) To think critically about the multiple forms of oppression that affect black women’s

lives globally; 2) To consider how black women’s political identity has been defined by

experiences with oppression transnationally; 3) To define and articulate black women’s agency in

response to oppression

Key Topics: Racism, sexism, patriarchy, homophobia, classism, transnationalism,

representation, agency, black feminism.

ANT 324L • Food And Culture

30633 • Hosemann, Aimee
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm ART 1.110
show description

 In the era of competing Paleo and Whole-Foods Plant-based diets and a burgeoning class of celebrity

chefs, anthropologists have been asking: when we eat, what else are we consuming? This course

examines cultural and linguistic anthropological views on the ways we eat, and how we talk about out what

we eat, in the contemporary era. We consider not just what's on the plate or in the smoothie, but also how

food - and the effect of food on the body - influences eaters' expressions of personal identity and their

relations with other people. We will combine scholarly literature with videos and readings about food topics

that circulate in popular culture, considering how flows of dietary images and discourses shape

race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and other identifications.

ANT 324L • Creation And Evolution

30634 • Friesen, Steven J.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JES A303A
(also listed as R S 346)
show description

The aim of this course is to promote fundamental scientific and religious literacy, critical thinking, and civil discourse.  Students explore definitions of science, religion, and mythology; the scientific basis of evolution; the debate on intelligent design; scientific and mythic cosmologies; the bases of human knowledge; the role of science and religion in morality and ethics; and contemporary politics surrounding science education.  The class is team-taught by specialists in physical anthropology and in religious studies.  Course materials -- including written essays, video interviews and debates -- serve as the fulcrum for in-depth classroom discussions in which students must articulate their ideas about challenging topics in a compelling, comprehensive and compassionate manner.  Students are further expected to record and share their ideas in concise, high-quality essays.

ANT 324L • Indigenizing Queer Theory

30635 • TallBear, Kim
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as WGS 335)
show description

This course will introduce students to emerging working by indigenous queer theorists, largle from the U.S., although international indigenous perspectives will be brought in where available.  The course will also present work that may not fall specifically within queer theory literatures but which examine cultural conflicts between the west and indigenous worldviews and practices (both in the past and present).  For example, conflicts surrounding monogamy and marriage, or smae-sex marriage will be covered.  Broader issues covered will include gender binaries, sexual identities and practices, their regulation by the colonial state and implications then for indigenous people.  The course will foreground indigenous standpoints, indigenous cultural practices and analytical and ethical frameworks to help us think through class topics.  Course readings will be drawn from anthropology, cultural studies, literaure, film and media, and gender and women's studies/feminist studies.

ANT 324L • Veiling In The Muslim World

30644 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 303
(also listed as ANS 372, ISL 372, MEL 321, R S 358, SOC 321K, WGS 340)
show description

This course will deal with the cultural significance and historical practices of veiling, “Hijab”, in the Muslim world. The issue of veiling as it relates to women has been subject to different interpretations and viewed from various perspectives, and with recent political developments and the resurgence of Islam, the debate over it and over women’s roles in Muslim countries has taken various shapes.  A number of Muslim countries are going back to their Islamic traditions and implementing a code of behavior that involves some form of veiling in Public /or segregation to various degrees for women. In some Muslim nations women are re-veiling on their own. In others, women resist the enforcement of such practices. We will examine the various perspectives, interpretations and practices relating to Hijab in the Muslim world with respect to politics, religion, feminism, culture, new wave of women converts and the phenomenon of “Islamic fashion” as a marketing tool.    

Prerequisites:  Upper Division Standing

Texts

Readers Packet. Sold at Speedway Copy Center/ Dobie Mall

1- Faegheh Shirazi. The Veil Unveiled: Hijab in Modern Culture. University Press of Florida, 2001, 2003

2- Fatima Mernissi. The Veil And The Male Elite: A Feminist Interpretation Of Women's Rights In Islam (Paperback)

Grading

Active participation (assigned article with discussion question) 10%, Regular Class Attendance 5%, 3 quizzes (Lowest grade will be dropped) 20%, Midterm Exam 30%, Final Research Paper 20%, and Oral Presentation %15

ANT 324L • Hist Of Hindu Relig Traditn

30649 • Brereton, Joel
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 203
(also listed as ANS 340, CTI 375, HIS 364G, R S 321)
show description

History of Hindu Religious Traditions

This course examines the principal themes of traditional Hinduism, the dominant religion of the Indian subcontinent. It gives special attention to the historical development of the tradition and its relation to social and cultural life in India. To the extent possible, the course will examine different forms of religious expression created within India. These include written texts that have been significant in the Hindu tradition, but they also comprise rituals that have been central to religious life, patterns of social action that embody Hindu values, and images and architecture that display the form and powers of the world.  

Written Requirements:
(1)  Nine microthemes (of the twelve or more posted). These microthemes are short (approximately one page), interpretive essays on assigned topics regarding the required reading or films.
(2)  Three quizzes.
(3)  Final essays due or written at the time of the final exam.

Grading:
Microthemes  ………………………………………………   45%
Three quizzes………………………………………………   30%
Final essays   ………………………………………………   20%
Attendance…………………………………………………     5%

Required Texts:
Anantha Murthy, U.R., Samskara. tr. by A. K. Ramanujan.  
Dimmitt, C. and J.A.B. van Buitenen, Classical Hindu Mythology:  A Reader in the Sanskrit Purāṇas.
Flood, Gavin, ed. The Blackwell Companion to Hinduism. PCL Library e-book
Hawley, John Stratton and Vasudha Narayanan, The Life of Hinduism. PCL Library e-book.
Miller, Barbara Stoler, tr.,  The  Bhagavad-Gita.
Narayan, R.K., tr.,  The Mahābhārata

Topics:
Origins: The Vedic Tradition
The Way of Insight: Religious Knowledge
The Formation of the Tradition: The Great Epics
The Way of Devotion: Worship of the Deities in Classical Hinduism
The Way of Action: Village Life and Regional Hinduism
Hinduism in Contemporary Society

ANT 324L • Archaeol Of African Thought

30650 • Denbow, James R.
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm SAC 4.174
show description

This course uses archaeological, anthropological and historical works to examine the

development and transformation of African societies from the Neolithic through the

slave trade and the beginning of the colonial period. The course will discuss the

historic and prehistoric foundations of contemporary African societies south of the

Sahara, focusing especially on equatorial and southern Africa. The intention is to

develop an understanding of the cultural dynamics of African societies and traditions,

and their transformations through time. This provides an interpretive framework from

which to examine emerging archaeological perspectives on the Atlantic slave trade and

the cultural foundations of the Diaspora in the New World.

ANT 324L • Gis/Rem Sns Archaeol/Paleo

30655 • Reed, Denné N.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 1.402
(also listed as GRG 356T)
show description

 This course surveys archeological and paleontological applications of remotely sensed data such as aerial

photography and satellite imagery for use in locating field sites, planning field logistics and conducting landscape

analysis. The remote sensing component of the course covers remote sensing data acquisition, image georectification,

image processing and classification.

The GIS component of the course builds on the remote sensing component and adds to it the analysis of map features

stored in databases. The course introduces databases theory and practice, and moves through the various stages

of GIS workflow: the planning and design of GIS projects, building geospatial datasets, various methods of geospatial

analysis and a short introduction to map layouts and reports.

This course covers GIS and remote sensing from an applied perspective and students are expected to invest lab time

in completing tutorials on GIS and RS methods as well as applying these methods to individual projects.

Prerequisites and Expectations:  This course is designed to compliment ANT 324L Digital Data Systems in

Archeology, which has a greater emphasis on data acquisition and field methods. This is NOT an introductory

course in GIS and remote sensing . This is an accelerated course is GIS and RS fundamentals. There are no enforced

prerequisites, but students should have a comfortable working knowledge of computers and an introductory

GIS or remote sensing course is recommended but not required.

ANT 324L • Sex & Power In Afr Diaspora

30660 • Gill, Lyndon K.
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm SAC 5.102
(also listed as AFR 372G, WGS 340)
show description

Exploration of various experiences and theories of sex, intimacy, and desire alongside intellectual and artistic engagements with power hierarchies and spirituality across transnational black communities. Subjects include the concept of "erotic subjectivity" from various theoretical and methodological angles, principally within African diasporic contexts.

ANT 324L • Archaeology Of Climate Change

30670 • Rosen, Arlene
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SAC 4.174
(also listed as GRG 356)
show description

Climate change has impacted human societies over the course of human

existence on the planet. It has played a role in everything from hominin evolution to the rise and

fall of civilizations through to the present day economic and ethical decision-making. In this

course we will examine why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and

discuss case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different

geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems. We will

explore aspects of resilience and rigidity of societies and issues of environmental sustainability

in the past as well as the present. Finally we will compare and contrast modern responses to

climate change on a global scale with those of past societies.

Goals: To familiarize students with the evidence for climate change and methods of climate

change research; to increase their understanding of the social, economic and technological issues

human societies faced in the past when dealing with climate change. To understand what were

adaptive and maladaptive human strategies. To help students evaluate the modern politics and

social responses to climate change. On successful completion of this course a student should

understand how climate change is recorded and the basic climatic record for the period of human

occupation of the earth. To be familiar with current debates about how human societies adapt to

climate change. To be able to think critically about issues and arguments proposed in the

literature, and to write a coherent essay arguing a point of view.

ANT 324L • Digital Dat Sys In Archaeol

30675 • Jarvis, Jonathan H
Meets W 300pm-600pm T5D 1.102
show description

This course provides the basic knowledge and skilss needed to operate digital equipment (e.g. GPS and Total Data Stations) commonly used for collecting location data on archaeological sites.  Classroom instruction on mapping and grid systems will be translated into "hands-on" instrument operation in simulated archaeological field conditions.  An introduction to GIS software and its applications in archaeology will be provided.  Data collected during simulated field operations will be processed and mapped using GIS software.  An overview of near-surface sensing techniques, including a field demonstration with a magnetometer, will be included.

 

ANT 325L • Jewish Cuba

30680 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as J S 365, LAS 324L, R S 366)
show description

Cuba has a small Jewish community (between 1,000-1,500) whose origins are presumed to date back to 1492. By some accounts, the contemporary community is dying, and by others, it is vibrant. No matter the assessment, it is a community that has been written about and analyzed disproportionately for its size. As noted Cuban-American Jewish anthropologist Ruth Behar has proposed, Jewish Cuba presents the challenge of focusing on a small community to understand large philosophical and cultural issues: Diaspora, preserving identity in hybridized social worlds, and the concept of home. In learning about Jewish Cuba, students of are not only exposed to a nationally-specific case study in Jewish Latin America, but have the opportunity to study the relationship between state politics and Jewish life, Judaism under communist regimes, religious and linguistic revitalization movements, migration, and cultural survival. To explore these themes and concepts, this course uses scholarly texts and ethnographic accounts, but also personal memoirs, films, photographs, and documentaries about Jewish Cuba.

Core questions we address in the course are: What is Home? What is Diaspora? What is Revolution?  How do we write about it?

Note: This course carries a Writing Flag and a Global Cultures Flag.

ANT 325L • Amer Jewish Material Cul

30685 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 112
(also listed as J S 365, R S 346)
show description

This course introduces students to a burgeoning field of American Jewish cultural studies that deals with what cultural theorist Arjun Appadurai calls, “the social value of things.” Focusing on the interplay between material culture and Jewish identity, thought, and practice in contemporary America, the course explores how Jews think about, work with, use, wear, display and “perform’ objects in the course of their everyday lives. This is not a course just on the production of fine art by or about Jews, so much as it is about the everyday arts of adornment, celebration, liturgy, spirituality, memorialization and identity and the ways in which these various meanings are negotiated within distinct domains of prayer, performance, entertainment and display. Borrowing from the central concern of cultural commentator, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, we will pose the question, "What does it mean to show?"—or in this case, “to show, Jewishly?” -- and explore the agency of display in a variety of American Jewish settings: in the home, on the street, in houses of worship, on the body, in celebration and in public displays such as museum exhibits, world’s fairs, festivals, and other touristic attractions. We will look at how the everyday artifacts of American Jewish life are made to "perform" their meanings for us by the very fact of being consumed, collected, arranged, worn, addressed, touched, kissed, and carried, and about the powerful messages conveyed not only by the objects themselves but by the specific ways in which these objects are addressed and interacted with. In examining the meaning and value of things in the context of religious practice or cultural display students will have a chance to explore broader theoretical topics about what it means to be Jewish in a multi-cultural, multinational, multi-denominational democracy such as the United States, as seen through an exploration of issues of memory, sense of place, identity, performativity, belief, and spirituality. Drawing from the fields of folklore, Jewish studies, cultural studies, religious studies, literature, museum studies, film, and photography, the course introduces students to the vibrancy and meanings of Jewish material culture in American Jewish life and thought. The course will emphasize the development of critical thinking skills and cultural analysis. The class format will entail active, participatory, and empowering ways of learning based on class discussion, class field trips, and original oral historical and field-based research. The course is intentionally designed to be student-centered. Students will be discussing and presenting material during class sessions and interacting with one another and the instructor on a regular basis. Students will also have the opportunity to participate directly in the curatorial process of cultural representation, either through the planning and/or implementation of their own exhibit, or a critical analysis of a particular display of objects owned, made, collected, worn, displayed, used, venerated, and symbolized in American Jewish culture.

ANT 326F • Great Discovs In Archaeology

30695 • Wade, Mariah D.
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as EUS 346)
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Archaeology shapes the way we understand the human past, and the history of archaeology was shaped by the great discoveries in archaeology and the people who made them. For instance, things that today we take for granted, such as travel agencies, photography, and postcards, or how we understand the politics of modern archaeology and our role in them, or the claims of countries for the return of art objects are all connected to the history of archeology and its discoverers. This course surveys the stories and myths behind some of those discoveries as well as the background of the discoverers. In the process we will discuss how they acquired knowledge, formulated hypotheses, and the impact their early discoveries had on the ways we know the world, think about ourselves, and on how archaeology is practiced today.

ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact

30700 • Wilson, Samuel M.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.306
(also listed as LAS 324L)
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"Cultures in Contact" is a multi-disciplinary course which combines Historical, Anthropological, Geographical and Literary analyses of the continuing "contact period" in the New World.  The issues addressed span the last 500+ years of cultural interaction in the Americas, looking especially at the processes of cultural interaction, competition, cooperation, and synthesis that have taken place among people from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.

ANT 330C • Theories Of Culture & Society

30705 • Keeler, Ward
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 4.118
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This course examines the theoretical approaches that have established the intellectual

foundations of contemporary socio-cultural anthropology. ThisIt course aims to provide

undergraduate students a preliminary grounding in the anthropological theory of culture. A short

tour through some of the important ideas and debates of the 20th century (and beyond), the course

aims at reading carefully as opposed to voluminously.

The course is primarily intended for anthropology majors.

 

 

ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy

30710 • Shapiro, Liza J.
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm SAC 5.172
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An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

ANT 346M • Comparative Primate Ecology

30715 • Lewis, Rebecca J.
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SAC 5.172
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All primates are a part of a broader ecological system that includes other primates as well

as other animal and plant species. This class will cover the basics of ecology (the study

of how organisms interact with their environment). We will examine how the basic

principles of animal ecology can help us understand primate behavior. We will look at a

wide range of primates from a comparative perspective as we explore primate habitats,

diets, life histories, and communities, as well as the concept of the niche, environmental

influences on reproductive strategies, plant-animal interactions, cognitive ecology, and

much more. Because most primate species are threatened, endangered, or even facing

extinction, we will also focus on how various aspects of ecology are used in the

conservation of primates.

ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

30720-30735 • Kappelman Jr, John W.
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm SAC 5.172
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This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.

ANT 348K • Primate Conservation

30740 • Hopkins, Mariah E.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 4.174
(also listed as GRG 356T)
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This course surveys the theory and practices of conservation

biology, as applied specifically to primates. Topics will include species and community

characteristics influencing extinction risk, current threats to primates, and potential

conservation strategies.

Prerequisites: This is an upper division course. Prior background in physical

anthropology or ecology is recommended, but not required. Ability to perform basic

algebra is necessary.

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

30745 • Kirk, Chris
Meets TTH 1000am-1230pm SAC 5.172
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This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

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