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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Course Descriptions

ANT 301 • Physical Anthroplogy-Wb

31185 • Kappelman Jr, John W.
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthropology

31230-31240 • Kirk, Chris
Meets MW 100pm-200pm JES A121A
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31245-31280 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets TTH 1230pm-130pm ART 1.102
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31285-31310 • Sturm, Circe
Meets MW 100pm-200pm FAC 21
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

31311 • Hosemann, Aimee
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm SAC 4.118
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31325-31330 • Covey, R. Alan
Meets MW 100pm-200pm UTC 3.134
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31360 • Valdez, Jr., Fred
Meets MW 900am-1000am GAR 0.102
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31365-31390 • Wade, Mariah D.
Meets MW 200pm-300pm WEL 2.246
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

31400-31410 • Keeler, Ward
Meets MW 1000am-1100am CLA 0.112
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31420 • Keating, Elizabeth L.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LIN 312C)
show description

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 310L • Intro To Jewish Latin America

31430 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.118
(also listed as HIS 306N, J S 311, LAS 315, R S 313)
show description

What can we learn about Latin American social worlds when we look at the place of Jews within it? Conversely, what we learn about Jewish social worlds when they unfold in Latin America?  This course examines both of these questions. Specifically, we consider the role of Latin America as both a refuge from and a source of antisemitism, a hub of immigration, a site of Zionism, and of Jewish success and philanthropy.  We also address themes of displacement, longing, belonging, marginalization, prejudice, immigration, community, cultural continuity, and memory, while considering Sephardi and Ashkenazi difference, and inter-generational conflict among Jewish Latin Americans. Overall, through reading, writing exercises, independent research and in-class films, the course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how Jews constructed individual lives and vibrant communities in predominantly Hispanic, Catholic countries of Latin America.

With these themes in mind, the course is divided into four units: 1) Historical literacy is a substantive introductory unit, which provides basic context from 1492 until the post-World War II period; 2) Jewish group identities in Latin American features readings on Jewish life and cultural forms in select national contexts (e.g. Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Dominican Republic and others); 3) Memoir and personal narrative engages students in critical reading of creative non-fiction and ethnography that focuses on individual lives; 4) Contemporary realities explores current events, contemporary trends and popular culture in Jewish Latin America. Finally, over the course of the semester, drawing on course motifs, students will produce their own research papers addressing a specific research question in the Latin American national context of their choice.

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

ANT 310L • Anthropol Of Race/Ethnicity

31440-31450 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 900am-1000am CLA 0.112
(also listed as AFR 317D, AMS 315D)
show description

This course examines how and why these forms of identity matter so intensely, both in

this country and around the world. Our aim is to understand the fundamental dynamics

shaping racial and ethnic identity by drawing on theories and methods from

anthropology. The first third of the course will cover key concepts and the basic forces

that make ethnicity and race important. The second portion of the course will develop a

cultural perspective on these topics by surveying a range of ethnographic work on these

forms of identity. The final third of class will address a variety of ways that race and

ethnicity operate in the sphere of public culture. Rather than attempt to present a survey

of various groups and traditions, the aim of this course is to introduce students to the

challenges of producing reliable knowledge claims about race and ethnicity.

 

ANT 310L • Introduction To South Asia

31455 • Visweswaran, Kamala
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm JGB 2.102
(also listed as ANS 302K, WGS 301)
show description

This is an intensive survey course designed to introduce students to the history, politics,

and culture of the Indian subcontinent through a South Asia regional perspective. Central

to the course is the study of rural inequality in South Asia through the lenses of

ethnography and political economy with a critical focus on political democracy, land

reforms, and economic liberalization. Students will also be introduced to the study of

ethnic and communal conflict and to contemporary debates about development through

an analysis of social movements.

ANT 314C • Intro Mesoamerican Archaeol

31460 • Rodriguez-Alegría, Enrique R.
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 315)
show description

Introduction to ancient Mesoamerica from the time of emerging social inequality in the formative period until the Spanish conquest of Mexico-Tenochtitlan in the sixteenth century

ANT 320L • Indigenous Langs Of Amers

31465 • England, Nora C.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.104
(also listed as LAS 322, LIN 350)
show description

Examines various aspects of languages in the Americas, including their linguistic structures, the cultural domains in which they exist, and their histories of language contact and change.

ANT 322M • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

31470 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
show description

This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans from 1519 to the present.  The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic and racial identities of Mexican Americans.  The geographic focus of the course is Mexico and the United States Southwest

ANT 324L • Anthropology Of The Himalayas

31475 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 210
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

This course looks at the history and culture of the Himalayan region, including Northeast India, (briefly) sections of Pakistan and Afghanistan, Tibet but especially Nepal. Some understanding of Asian history, politics and religion will be helpful (but not necessary) as our attempt will not be a comprehensive survey of the region. The Himalayas have been the site of a great deal of anthropological attention and as such we will be simultaneously be exploring several key theoretical, historical and methodological issues within the discipline of anthropology as we learn about places and people in the region. Particular attention will be paid to the area as a site for negotiating identity (caste and indigeneity), development politics, the environment, tourism, diasporas as well as the current political tensions in the region. At the conclusion of the class, students should have a stronger idea of the important role this area has played in the political, religious and social imagination of the world and an appreciation of concepts such as ritual theory, social movements, modernity and gender studies.

ANT 324L • Archaeol Excavation Analysis

31477 • Franklin, Maria
Meets F 900am-1200pm SAC 4.174
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

ANT 324L • Art & Archaeol Of Anc Peru

31480 • Runggaldier, Astrid
Meets TTH 800am-930am DFA 2.204
(also listed as LAS 327)
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

ANT 324L • Development And Its Critics

31485 • Hindman, Heather
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 210
(also listed as ANS 361)
show description

 

This course will consider how international development practices emerged from post-World War II policies of reconstruction and Cold War strategies of gaining alliances through aid. Looking particularly at Asia and the Global South, the course will consider how the needs of donor countries in the mid-20th Century were made to align with (or not) the needs of new nations and recently decolonized territories. 

With this historical field as a background, the class will examine various trends in international development practice since the 1980s, including sustainable development, women in development (WID), social entrepreneurship, microfinance and the recent rise of voluntourism. We will examine these practices both from the metropole and from their on-the-ground implementation sites.

Although a look at development economics and statistics will be a part of the class, albeit mainly from a critical perspective, the course will take a more ethnographic approach, examining case studies of development saturated sites and locations where large projects were put in place.

ANT 324L • Ethnographic Writing

31487 • Stewart, Kathleen C.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 4.118
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

ANT 324L • Relig/Fam Japanese Society

31490 • Traphagan, John W.
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 134
(also listed as ANS 372, R S 352)
show description

More than any other social institution, the family represents the primary locus of religious activity for contemporary Japanese.  This course explores the structures of family, kinship relationships, and religion in Japan since the Meiji Restoration (1868) with a strong focus on the post-war era and examines how both religion and family have been used as concepts and institutions for the creation of national identity as well as the expression of individual identities.  Students will develop a strong understanding of contemporary Japanese religious ideas and rituals and their connections to kinship structures, with particular attention focused on how family and kinship structures and ideologies have changed in the post-war era.

ANT 324L • Primitive Technology

31495 • Valdez, Jr., Fred
Meets M 300pm-600pm T5D 1.102
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

ANT 324L • Intro To African Prehistory

31500 • Denbow, James R.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.174
(also listed as AFR 322)
show description

This course provides an overview of human biological and cultural evolution in Africa.

While the roots of humankind go back almost 6 million years on the continent, the earlier

materials will only be briefly discussed as the course will focus on the last 200,000

years–the period when modern humans developed and diversified.

The African continent is over three times the size of the United States and today

there are more than a thousand different languages spoken in Africa; ethnic and

ecological diversity is great. Apart from Egypt, Ethiopia, the Swahili coast and North

Africa, however, written sources only document the last few centuries and most were

written from non-African perspectives. In this class, archaeological data will be used to

expand upon anthropological and historical accounts to provide a longer and less

"Eurocentric" view of the continent and its historical development. No prior knowledge

of Africa or of archaeology is assumed.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed

to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should

therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering

the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

ANT 324L • Sacred & Ceremonl Textiles

31505 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 103
(also listed as ISL 372, MEL 321, R S 358, WGS 340)
show description

From the birth to death textiles, clothing, and other material culture affects our daily lives. The communicative power of textiles and other types of material objects reflects both the everyday and ceremonial lives of people in a society. Although this course focuses on textiles and material objects indigenous to the Islamic world, some examples of non-Muslim communities will be included to draw a comparison. An attempt will be made to shed light on the culture of various Islamic societies. The study of the social and historical background of a community is essential for the interpretation of meanings and symbolism associated with textiles and other elements of material objects. Such a study will be combined in the course with topics like ceremonial gatherings; ceremonial textiles; adornment (jewelry, tattoos, body-painting); body modifications (piercing and body-reshaping); and the role of material objects in public and private celebrations. One of the areas which material objects represent relates to practices of rituals, taboos, and rotes of passage in the societies, which can be traced to the pre Islamic era. Muslim communities in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East will be the primary focus of the course, and an attempt will be made to trace the common origins of ritual practices and their representation as a result to of diffusion and contact with other regional practices. Course presentations will be supported by videos, slide show and various material objects.

Texts

Reader packet.

Grading

In Class presentations 15%

Attendance/ & participation 10%

First Exam 35%

Second Exam 40%

ANT 324L • Polit Of Race/Violnc Brazil

31508 • Smith, Christen
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 4.174
(also listed as AFR 374E, LAS 324L)
show description

This course explores race/gender/sexuality, violence and everyday life in Brazil. Brazil’s history has been

characterized by moments of violent encounter, from colonization, to slavery, to clashes between police

and residents across its major cities today. These violent encounters have been, in many ways, racialized,

gendered and sexualized. This class investigates the race/gender/sexuality aspects of multiple forms of

violence in Brazil, and how this violence creates, defines and maintains social hierarchies in the nation.

Throughout the course we will think through the question “what is violence?” as we discuss the concept’s

physical, structural and symbolic forms. The course pays particular attention to the politics of blackness

and the unique relationship black Brazilians have to the nation-state. We will also discuss the politics of

writing and theorizing violence when doing social analysis, and the precarious balance between defining

and addressing issues of violence, and glorifying it.

Objectives: 1) To think critically about violence not only as a physical encounter, but a multilayered

phenomenon that manifests itself in different ways; 2) To consider how race functions in Brazil and what

violence has to do with it; 3) To better understand the politics of discussing and writing about race and

violence particularly within the field of anthropology.

Key topics: Colonization, slavery, blackness, whiteness, racial democracy, urban conflict, police

repression, death, gender, sexuality, urban cleansing/gentrification, land conflict, imprisonment, symbolic

violence, structural violence, physical violence, genocide.

ANT 324L • Urban Unrest

31515 • Tang, Eric
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SZB 370
(also listed as AAS 330, AFR 372F, AMS 321, URB 354)
show description

How and when do cities burn? The modern US city has seen its share of urban unrest, typified by street protests (both organized and spontaneous), the destruction of private property, looting, and fires. Interpretations of urban unrest are varied: some describe it as aimless rioting, others as political insurrection. Most agree that the matter has something to do with the deepening of racism, poverty and violence. This course takes a closer look at the roots of urban unrest, exploring a range of origins: joblessness, state violence, white flight, the backlash against civil rights gains, new immigration and interracial strife. Urban unrest is often cast as an intractable struggle between black and white, yet this course examines the ways in which multiple racial groups have entered the fray. Beyond race and class, the course will also explore unrest as a mode of pushing the normative boundaries of gender and sexuality in public space. Course material will draw from film, literature, history, geography and anthropology.

 

Required Texts:

The majority of readings will be available as pdf on Blackboard. Students must acquire the following texts:

Robert F. Williams, Negroes With Guns

Robin D.G. Kelley, Yo Mama’s Dysfunctional: Fighting the Culture Wars in Urban America

Dan Georgakis and Marvin Surkin, Detroit: I Do Mind Dying: A Study in Urban Revolution

Robert Gooding Williams eds. Reading Rodney King/Reading Urban Uprising

 

 

ANT 325J • The Photographic Image

31530 • Campbell, Craig
Meets T 330pm-530pm SAC 4.118
show description

This course applies concepts and practices from anthropology and cultural studies to photography

and the study of memory, place, and everyday life. The course aims at developing counter-intuitive

and subversive approaches to practices of looking (observation) and techniques of representation.

Whereas photographs are often taken to be simple documentary technologies, we will invert this idea

and explore how images can be transient and ephemeral by focusing on sites of encounter and orders

of engagement. This course is organized as a split theory/hands-on exploration of the photographic

image and image-making. At all points in the course students are drawn into the use of imagemaking

as an interpretive and critical engagement with course readings. We will begin with

techniques of visual inquiry established by visual anthropologists and documentarians as well as

artists working in the vein of documentary traditions. Students taking this course will work primarily

with still photographic images. The goal of this course is to learn about the field of visual

anthropology and to gain skills in using photographic methods in research. Students will be expected to

have at their disposal a camera (digital or analogue).

ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

31535 • Gottesman, Itzik N
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 116
(also listed as GSD 360, J S 363)
show description

Course Description

Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folk life of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the “official” Jewish religion as un-Jewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them The Dybbuk,1939), folklore collections and field trips (among them, to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. For example, the high literacy rate among Jews over the centuries and the people's close connection to the written word led to the development of specifically Jewish interpretations of internationally disseminated beliefs. Folklore genres—folktale, legend, folksong, folk music—custom, belief and, of course, Jewish humor will be included.

 Grading Policy

  • Attendance, homework and class participation: 30%
  • Four short papers 30%
  • Midterm and final paper: 60%

Reading List

  • Joshua Trachternberg, Jewish Magic and Superstition
  • Joachim Neugroschel, Great Tales of Jewish Fantasy and the Occult
  • Moses Gaster, Maaseh Book
  • I. B. Singer, The Satan in Goray
  • Elizabeth Herzog/Mark Zborowski, Life is With People

ANT 325L • Multicultural Israel

31540 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.118
(also listed as J S 365, MES 341)
show description

Israel has the highest proportion of migrants of any country in the world. The notion of absorption—the social and economic integration of Jewish immigrants—has remained an explicit ideal since the founding of the modern state of Israel in 1948. Yet absorption is also an ideological tool that often runs counter to the contemporary lived experience of citizenship, participation, nation building, minority rights, and the conflicting interests of today’s multicultural publics. Taking these tensions as a starting point, this course explores the complex social fabric that comprises contemporary Israeli society, and that shapes Israeli identity, practice and politics. We will focus on the lived experience of Israel’s increasingly diverse population. This includes populations associated with the majority: veteran Ashkenazim and Mizrahim; more recent Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union, Ethiopia, Latin America and France; religious communities such Haredim and modern-Orthodox. It also includes ethnic and religious minorities such as Arab-Israelis/Palestinians, Bedouins, Christians, Muslims, Druze, and Black Hebrews, as well as laborers from all over the globe who migrate to Israel for work. How fluid are boundaries between these groups? How different are their interests, tastes and desires? How committed are various publics to a coherent nation-building project and to contemporary Zionism? To explore the breadth of multicultural Israel without sacrificing cultural specificity and theoretical depth, the course is organized into three integrated units: a) historical background of Israel and its populations; b) Israel’s citizen-state relationships, identity and belonging, and c) ethnographic case studies of Israel-specific multicultural issues, and general contemporary multicultural theory.

Note: This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

ANT 325N • Lang & Speech In Amer Socty

31550 • Hosemann, Aimee
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as AMS 321, LIN 373, SOC 352M)
show description

 

 In this course, we take as our central concern an exploration of American society through language use by Latin@ populations. We understand that this is a tremendously diverse population as we take “America” in its broad hemispheric sense, and so we seek to understand differences and similarities in the ways Latin@ groups (those tracing some Latin American descent) use language to create and participate in society. We do so by investigating how language is used by individuals from these communities on a daily basis, in a wide variety of contexts. As part of our investigation leads us to consider identity-building processes, which are a product of interaction, we consider also the ways non-Latin@s talk to/about Latin@s. We make use of the existing scholarly literature, as well as more “popular” sources. Students will construct and carry out original research projects.

ANT 326D • Native Americans In The Plains

31555 • Wade, Mariah D.
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CLA 0.122
show description

From the middle 18th century through the late 19th century the Great Plains region underwent drastic changes in terms of the environment, demography, and cultural diversity. The rapid influx of various groups of people into the Plains, from Native American groups to European settlers, made the Plains the ultimate theater to rehearse short-term strategies and long-term policies. This course will survey the ethnohistory of some of the most influential Native groups on the Plains, from the arrival of the Spanish through the reservation period. We will explore the relationships and interaction between European settlers and Native groups, as well as the outcome of some scientific expeditions and military campaigns. In this course, we will adopt a long-term perspective to make sense of the development of European policies and movements, the changing configurations among Native groups, and the pivotal importance of resources such as the buffalo, the horse, and the gun. We will also look at specific events and historical figures, such as Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and General Custer, whose actions became symbolic of a turbulent historical period.

ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact

31560 • Wilson, Samuel M.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BEL 328
(also listed as LAS 324L)
show description

"Cultures in Contact" is a multi-disciplinary course which combines Historical, Anthropological, Geographical and Literary analyses of the continuing "contact period" in the New World.  The issues addressed span the last 500+ years of cultural interaction in the Americas, looking especially at the processes of cultural interaction, competition, cooperation, and synthesis that have taken place among people from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.

ANT 336L • Natv Amer Culs North Of Mex

31565 • TallBear, Kim
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as AMS 321)
show description

This upper-division undergraduate course examines contemporary articulations of indigenous cultures and practices in the U.S. and Canada. Because the present cannot be understood without understanding historically how we got to here, this course includes histories that inform the contemporary. We will cover critical developments that shape and are shaped by late 20th century and early 21st century indigenous life. Issues include but are not limited to the American Indian Movement; IdleNoMore; tribal and First Nation citizenship politics; the politics of race and indigeneity in the U.S. and Canada; gaming and other economic development strategies; residential schools; evolving kinship practices; indigenous feminisms, masculinities, and sexualities; indigenous environmental and religious politics (including how “environment” and “religion” are inadequate for understanding those politics!); food sovereignty movements; and science, technology and Native Americans. Course readings come from anthropology, U.S. and Canadian indigenous studies, history, and cultural studies. We will read scholarly work, blogs, and other popular literature. The course features several guest speakers, some via Skype.

 

ANT 340C • Ethnographic Research Methods

31570 • Sturm, Circe
Meets W 300pm-600pm SAC 5.124
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Understanding human behavior is immensely challenging. Fortunately, there are tools

to help us make sense of social, cultural and political complexity. This course offers an

introduction to the various methods and techniques used in conducting ethnographic

research such as participant observation, interviewing, collecting life histories and

genealogies, archival research, working with material culture, social media-based

research, and visual ethnography. Our primary objectives will be to explore research

design, what constitutes evidence, how to analyze data, and strategies for writing up

and presenting results. We will pay particular attention to the ethical considerations

entailed in anthropological research, including questions of knowledge production,

power, location, experience, translation and representation. The course is run largely as

a “hands–on” workshop, in which students practice a variety of ethnographic methods

(both inside and outside of class), engage in ethnographic writing exercises, and actively

guide one another’s work. Students will apply what they learn during the course to

designing their own ethnographic research project, conducting independent field

research, and presenting their findings to the class. By the end of the semester, they will

have a firm grounding in ethnographic research methods and be better prepared for

more advanced work.

ANT 346L • Primate Social Behavior

31575 • Di Fiore, Anthony
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SAC 5.172
(also listed as WGS 323)
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This course focuses on the study of primate social behavior. It explores the basic theoretical principles that guide primatologists.

Topics covered include: evolutionary theory, primate diversity, social and mating systems, sexual selection, life history, cooperation, competition, intelligence, communication, and human behavior.

ANT 349D • Anthropological Genetics

31580 • Bolnick, Deborah A.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.118
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This course explores the intersection of genetics and anthropology.  We will cover the basic principles of molecular genetics and population genetics as relates to the study of humans and other primates.  We will examine the ways in which genetics can contribute to the field of anthropology, as well as how anthropological knowledge can illuminate genetic findings.  Students will gain hands-on experience in genetic analysis, and will learn to understand and evaluate molecular anthropology research.  Topics to be covered include: human genetic diversity, human evolution and migration, ancient DNA, primate evolution and behavior, genetic ancestry and identity, genetic essentialism, admixture, eugenics, and the ethical, legal, and social implications of human genetics research.

ANT 350C • Primate Sensory Ecology

31585 • Kirk, Chris
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 5.172
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Primate Sensory Ecology is a course designed for advanced undergraduates in physical anthropology and the biological sciences. This course provides an opportunity for detailed study of primate sensory systems from an ecological and comparative phylogenetic perspective.
    The core topics covered in this course are the special senses of hearing, vision, and smell, with a special emphasis on the adaptive and ecological significance of sensory adaptations in primates. For each of these senses, lectures and readings will provide a comprehensive review of the following concepts: 1) general anatomy and physiology, 2) development and genetic regulation, 3) functional morphology and mechanics, 4) neural control and regulation, 5) psychophysics, 6) biological role and behavioral ecology, 7) phylogenetic history and fossil record. Additional senses that will be covered in a less-comprehensive fashion include touch, taste, balance and equilibrium, and the Jacobson's organ.
In studying each sensory system, a strong emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between variant morphologies and behavioral capabilities. This dual focus on morphology and behavioral ecology will provide students with an explicit understanding of the effect that the  functional design of a sensory system has on an organism's adaptive niche. All information will be presented within a comparative phylogenetic framework, so that evolutionary novelties (e.g., the haplorhine retinal fovea) can be understood in terms of the macroevolutionary processes responsible for the novel feature's appearance. This approach will further emphasize the importance of certain evolutionary changes in primate sensory systems as key innovations. Toward this end, discussions of current literature will cover a number of special topics in addition to the more basic aspects of sensory system morphology and function.

ANT 351E • Primate Evolution

31590 • Shapiro, Liza J.
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 5.172
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This course is an examination of the fossil record for (nonhuman) primate evolution.  The fossil record will be examined after a basic grounding in the anatomy, ecology, and systematics of living primates.  Each of the major radiations of fossil primates will be explored with respect to adaptive diversity, functional morphology, and systematics.

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

31595 • Valdez, Jr., Fred
Meets MW 1000am-1200pm SAC 4.174
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The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

 

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

31597 • Kappelman Jr, John W.
Meets TTH 1230pm-100pm SAC 5.172
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This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

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