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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Course Descriptions

ANT 301 • Physical Anthroplogy-Wb

30220 • Kappelman Jr, John W.
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthropology

30225-30275 • Shapiro, Liza J.
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm JES A121A
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30305 • Hosemann, Aimee
Meets MW 100pm-200pm GEA 105
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

30310-30345 • Ozcan, Omer
Meets MW 200pm-300pm ART 1.102
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30380 • Valdez, Jr., Fred
Meets MW 900am-1000am GAR 0.102
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30410 • Covey, R. Alan
Meets TTH 930am-1030am GSB 2.124
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 304T • Intro To Texas Archaeology

30445-30450 • Wade, Mariah D.
Meets MW 300pm-400pm CLA 0.112
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People have been in Texas since about 12,000 years ago and the evidence of their presence throughout time is fascinating.  Ever wondered how we know and can prove that? This course introduces students to Texas archaeology through lectures, interactive virtual labs and hands-on laboratory sections that emphasize experimentation. Texas geographic and environmental diversity provided prehistoric and historic peoples with unique resources and possibilities, and people used that diversity to make choices and develop specific cultural characteristics while interacting with other peoples from the surrounding regions.

Doing archaeology requires teamwork, critical thinking and multidisciplinary approaches. In archaeology, it is often more important to ask relevant questions than provide ready answers. The lectures and labs in this course aim to emphasize these requirements as well as how archaeology relates to other sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the natural science and technology (Part II) component of the common core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and empirical and quantitative skills.

ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

30470 • Hosemann, Aimee
Meets MW 1000am-1100am CLA 0.112
show description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

30475 • Keating, Elizabeth L.
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LIN 312C)
show description

The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 310L • Intro East Austin Ethnography

30484 • Jones, Omi Osun Joni L.
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CAL 21
(also listed as AFR 317D, AMS 315)
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In this course, students will study ethnographic methods including fieldwork, observant participation, interviewing, and oral histories. Archival research will also be conducted. Students will conduct fieldwork at specific sites in Austin with an emphasis on East Austin communitites. This course provides students with skills in critical ethnography by foregrounding the racial politics that shape policy-making and community-building.

Grading breakdown:

Project Focus 10%

Interview 10%

Oral History 10%

Observant Participation Notebook 30%

Research Project 30%

Participation 10%

ANT 314C • Intro Mesoamerican Archaeol

30500 • Rodriguez-Alegría, Enrique R.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 315)
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This course is an introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, the area roughly

covering Mexico and the northern half of Central America, from the time of

emerging social inequality in the Formative Period until the Spanish conquest of

Mexico-Tenochtitlan in the sixteenth century. By studying archaeological

evidence from several sites in this region we will address a few important

theoretical issues in archaeology. These issues include: 1) the relationship

between people, the environment, and social organization 2) the study of elites

and commoners in archaeological cultures, and 3) the use of historical and

archaeological data in reconstructing the past. During the course of the

semester we will examine varied lines of evidence, including archaeological

artifacts (especially pottery, obsidian, and ceramic figurines), human remains,

architecture, murals, sculpture, and historical evidence (esp. codices and colonial

accounts) to assess the role of evidence and theory in how we conceptualize the

past in Mesoamerica. In addition, we will address issues that have captured the

general public’s imagination in recent years, including the end of the world, the

Maya collapse, human sacrifice, and others. Thus, the class will be of interest to

archaeology majors and other students as well.

ANT 322M • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

30510 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GDC 5.302
(also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
show description

FLAGS:   CD

ANT 324L • Black Male Crisis

30516 • Gordon, Edmund T.
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm CLA 1.104
(also listed as AFR 374D, WGS 340)
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This course focuses on the “Crisis” of African American males in the U.S. In doing so it explores patriarchy, gender relations, and stereotypes as they affect black women and men. The course will use black culture as a means of exploring the different ways in which black men and women encounter anti-black racism in this society, the ways in which they resist, and the impact this has on their everyday experiences and cultural practices. The emphasis on patriarchy in the black communities is a theoretical stance that understands gender as a social construction that orders power inequalities in human societies in articulation with processes of race and class. The course shows how this frames black everyday cultural practices, the interactions between black men and women, and the ways that black men and women are perceived by the larger society.

Grading breakdown:

Take Home Exam 1 – 25%

Take Home Exam 2 – 25%

Essays (5-10 pages, 2) – 40%

Attendance and Participation – 10%

ANT 324L • Graffiti/Poster Art: Islm Wrld

30520 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 101
(also listed as ISL 373, MEL 321, MES 342, R S 358, WGS 340)
show description

Too many portrayals of Islamic societies are treated as superficially as the issues involving the hijab and veiling. Among the hip and the fashionable, the religious fronts and political systems in contemporary Muslim societies (particularly in the Middle East and North Africa), a complex and complicated phenomenon has been developing for decades:  the “art of the wall,” namely, graffiti and poster art.

Poster art and graffiti are employed by various groups within the Islamic world to project their ideas through the mediums of photography, video, the film of documentary makers, the paint and ink of professionals, anonymous or amateur designers and artists to record the political and social events within urban areas. Such visual records depicting aspects of everyday life give voice to the people living and working within the Muslim world. An observer can see acts of rebellion as the anonymous young population in Muslim societies experiments with ways to test the limits of freedom. This is done with creativity and often with courage, which may cause concern to the political systems ruling over people whose freedom of speech and action are limited.

In this course, the students are introduced to a common and general principle of Islam, followed by a study of differences in culture and linguistic background of the people in lands of a Muslim majority. The major part of the semester is devoted to analysis and studying graffiti and poster art as it relates to social and political events unfolding. It is expected that the students become interested and learn that the interpretation of today’s Muslim youth through popular culture, expressed in the art and work of talented people manifesting their identities and personal expression about the world around them, provides a valuable access to learning and getting closer to the cultures that may seem strange, illogical, or somewhat hostile to the principles of “Western democracy.” This is an opportunity for us to look at the body and soul of people of ancient civilizations and of a recent troubled history with high hopes for a bright future from the perspective of those from the inside looking out.

 

Texts

Reader packets TBD

 

Grading Policy

TBD

ANT 324L • Human Securities/Insecurities

30525 • Cons, Jason
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.106
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This course explores the various debates, concepts, and issues clustered around human security from an anthropological standpoint. The concept of human security is relatively new, yet it refers to a serious of longstanding challenges including, but not limited to, the deprivations of poverty, vulnerability to environmental change, and risk in conflict and post-conflict situations. In short, it is often referred to as freedom from fear, freedom from want, and freedom to live life with dignity. This course will ask what “human security” as a term adds to and enables within global intervention. It will ask what is gained or lost when considering issues such as conflict and climate together as "human security." It will explore a range of issues in the broad field of human security, touching on theoretical and practical concerns around climate change, violent conflict, and humanitarian intervention.  It will explore the various meanings of “human” and “security” embedded within the term. Students will engage with these issues through ethnographies of security and insecurity, analyses of the foundational approaches to human security, and in-depth case studies.

ANT 324L • Japan Rel & Westrn Imagination

30530 • Traphagan, John W.
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 134
(also listed as ANS 340, R S 352)
show description

FLAGS:   GC

Description

This course focuses on how Japanese religious traditions, particularly Zen, have been viewed from the perspective of people living in non-Japanese societies since the end of World War II.  Using Ruth Benedict’s book The Chrysanthemum and the Sword as a starting point, we will explore different ways in which non-Japanese have imagined Japanese religious and ethical ideas and both explained Japanese behavior and adopted (often stereotyped) ideas about Japan into their writings about philosophy and life.  We will discuss and deconstruct works by authors such as Alan Watts, Eugene Herrigel (Zen in the Art of Archery), and Roberg Pirsig (Zen in the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance) as a framework for thinking about how Japanese religious and ethical ideas have been imagined in the West. 

Grading

  • Weekly reading reaction papers, 30%
  • Final, take home exam, 40%
  • Group project, 30%

Texts

We will discuss and deconstruct works by authors such as Alan Watts, Eugene Herrigel (Zen in the Art of Archery) and Robert Pirsig (Zen in the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance) as a framework for thinking about how Japanese religious and ethical ideas have been imagined in the West.

ANT 324L • Science, Magic, & Religion

30537 • CROSSON, JONATHAN
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 134
(also listed as R S 373)
show description

In this course, we will interrogate the concepts of magic, science, and religion as culturally and historically constructed categories.  We will critically examine how the construction of science and religion, as well as the opposition of empirical knowledge and belief, were central to both the Enlightenment and the formation of the social and natural sciences.  Drawing on recent critiques of these foundational distinctions, we will question common-sense understandings of these categories and their relations, exploring the following questions:

  •  How did the experimental sciences emerge out practices of “natural magic” or evidence law?
  • How do our notions of religion and science reflect certain assumptions?  What are other ways of categorizing practices we might deem as religion or science?
  • How have the divisions between science, magic and religion, or between rationality and superstition, undergirded projects of modernity, colonization, and development?

 

Texts

  • Danny Burton and David Grandy.  Magic, Mystery, and Science.
  • George Saliba.  Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance.
  • Helen Verran.  Science and an African Logic.
  • Karol Weaver.  Medical Revolutionaries:  The Enslaved Healers of Eighteenth Century Saint Domingue.
  • Harry West.  Ethnographic Sorcery.

 

Grading

  • Eight Reading Quizzes (35%)
  • Topic, Research Question, and Thesis Statement (5%)
  • Revised Thesis Statement + Draft of Introduction + Outline of Paper (10 %)
  • Final Paper (30%)
  • Participation in Class Discussions (10%)
  • Oral Presentation (10%)

ANT 324L • Ritual & Religion In Korea

30538 • Oppenheim, Robert M
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm CLA 0.118
(also listed as ANS 340, R S 352)
show description

FLAGS:   GC

ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

30560 • GOTTESMAN, ITZIK
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GDC 2.402
(also listed as GSD 360, J S 363, R S 357, REE 325)
show description

FLAGS:  Wr  |  GC 

Course Description

Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well-known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folklife of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the "offical" Jewish religion as unJewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted. The influence of the Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism, also led to the introduction of many customs.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them "The Dybbuk" 1939), folkore collections and field trips (among them - to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. For example, the high literacy rate among Jews over the centuries and the people's close connection to the written word led to the development of specifically Jewish interpretations of internationally disseminated beliefs. Folklore genres -folktale, legend, folksong, folkmusic, custom, belief and, of course, Jewish humor will be included.

Grading Policy

Attendance, homework and class participation: 30%

Four short papers 30%

Midterm and final paper: 40%

Reading List

Joshua Trachternberg   Jewish Magic and Superstition

Joachim Neugroschel   Great Tales of Jewish Fantasy and the Occult

Moses Gaster    Maaseh Book

I. B. Singer    The Satan in Goray

Elizabeth Herzog/Mark Zborowski   Life is With People

ANT 325L • Multicultural Israel

30565 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.118
(also listed as J S 365, MES 341)
show description

Multicultural Israel: Perspectives from Haifa

Fall 2015

JS 365 * ANT 325L * MES 325

SAC 5.124 Thursdays, 9am-12pm

Dr. Amelia Rosenberg Weinreb

Office hours: by appointment

amy.weinreb@austin.utexas.edu

Course description

This course brings Haifa, Israel, into the seminar classroom through videoconference technology and live, virtual teaching. UT Students interact directly, in real time, with Israeli students, citizens and scholars from diverse of backgrounds, take virtual fieldtrips with the instructor, and learn about multicultural theory, practice, and challenges in the contemporary Israeli context. Haifa, considered Israel’s most diverse and integrated city, is home to Arabs, Christians, Jews, Druze and to the Bahá'í World Center as well as Jewish immigrants from around the world, particularly the former Soviet Union and Ethiopia. Teaching a course from Haifa provides a natural backdrop to lectures, discussions, and students’ individual research and writing projects on multiculturalism.This three-hour, once weekly course is run as series of lively, fast-paced, interactive workshop in which students are encouraged to articulate and synthesize ideas with clarity, accuracy and sensitivity, and defend positions through evidence based on our common reading list. I will be asking for your feedback regularly so there is an open flow of communication and room for improvement during the semester.

Special units and features include:

  • Ability for UT students and Haifa students to prepare questions for one another and interact and exchange ideas live
  • Virtual walking tours of neighborhoods, markets and public spaces so students can document and observe individually and as a group
  • Local current events and national issues discussed with a variety of residents
  • A short, engaging sequence of guest lectures from University of Haifa faculty
  • Ability to re-watch recorded class meetings for review
  • Online quizzes, paper submission, and tests through Canvas
  • Use of Google hangouts for group collaboration and individual supervision from instructor

ANT 346L • Primate Social Behavior

30585 • Lewis, Rebecca J.
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SAC 5.172
(also listed as WGS 323)
show description

This course focuses on the study of primate social behavior. It explores the basic theoretical principles that guide primatologists.

Topics covered include: evolutionary theory, primate diversity, social and mating systems, sexual selection, life history, cooperation, competition, intelligence, communication, and human behavior.

ANT 346M • Comparative Primate Ecology

30589 • Lewis, Rebecca J.
Meets MWF 900am-1000am SAC 5.172
show description

Comparative Primate Ecology will explore the following topics with respect to primates: population ecology, community ecology, feeding adaptations, foraging strategies, ranging behavior, and life history strategies.

ANT 351E • Primate Evolution

30595 • Shapiro, Liza J.
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 5.172
show description

This course is an examination of the fossil record for (nonhuman) primate evolution.  The fossil record will be examined after a basic grounding in the anatomy, ecology, and systematics of living primates.  Each of the major radiations of fossil primates will be explored with respect to adaptive diversity, functional morphology, and systematics.

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

30600 • Valdez, Jr., Fred
Meets MW 1000am-1200pm SAC 4.174
show description

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

 

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

30610 • Kappelman Jr, John W.
Meets TTH 1230pm-100pm SAC 5.172
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

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