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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Fall 2004

ANT 324L • Cultural Studies & Gender Studies-W

Unique Days Time Location Instructor
28370 TTh
12:30 PM-2:00 PM
EPS 1.128
Stewart

Course Description

This course will be cross-listed with women's and gender studies. It will explore some of the current intersections and productive tensions between gender studies and cultural studies. Themes will include the vitality and volatility (whether "good" or "bad") of gendered forms and forces, the ways in which everyday life is saturated with the impacts of such forces and their complex, shifting, and often incommensurate effects, forms of agency and subjectivity, the ways in which gendered forces might animate seemingly unrelated registers and domains, the roles of the senses, affects and aesthetics in cultural politics, and forms of bodily desire, expression, and "housing" (including, for instance, sexuality, body-building, tattooing and piercing, dieting, cutting, nesting, home-remodeling, and homeless living).

As a writing component course, students will begin with ethnographic research and writing projects and will be asked to write through various ethnographic experiments (such as changing or adding voices, shifting point of view, writing autobiographically or attempting forms of realist description). Some of the readings will highlight new theories and experimental forms of writing emerging at the intersection of gender studies and cultural studies including various forms of what Sedgwick calls "weak theory" (and theories of difference, articulation, conjuncture, performativity and relationality rather than essence or identity), experiments with writing that are both theory and performance, or both creative and non-fiction, or both autobiographical and about the world, and theories and writings that try to follow (and embody or perform) the emergent, the speculative, and the moving.

Texts

A writing component course, students will begin with ethnographic research and writing projects and will be asked to write through various ethnographic experiments (such as changing or adding voices, shifting point of view, writing autobiographically or attempting forms of realist description). Some of the readings will highlight new theories and experimental forms of writing emerging at the intersection of gender studies and cultural studies including various forms of what Sedgwick calls "weak theory" (and theories of difference, articulation, conjuncture, performativity and relationality rather than essence or identity), experiments with writing that are both theory and performance, or both creative and non-fiction, or both autobiographical and about the world, and theories and writings that try to follow (and embody or perform) the emergent, the speculative, and the moving.

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