Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
anthropology masthead
Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

"Weaving Consciousness: Women and Indigenous Identity in Chiapas, Mexico"

Thu, November 9, 2006 • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM • UTC 2.112A

"Weaving Consciousness: Women and Indigenous Identity in Chiapas, Mexico"

Thursday, November 9th, 7-9pm, UTC 2.112A (University Teaching Center, next to the Perry Castaneda Library, University of Texas, 21st street)

Celia Santiz Ruiz is a Tzotzil and Spanish-speaking indigenous woman from the tiny community of Bayalemo', in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. She is also a founding member of Jolom Mayaetik (Mayan Women Weavers), in San Cristobal, Chiapas. The cooperative is 10 years old.

Facilitated by a Spanish/English translator, and illustrating her talk with a slide show, Ms. Santiz will cover these topics:

- A personal and general account of the life of a traditional Mayan woman.

- Her own experience in departing from the traditional pattern: gender, family, political/leadership roles.

- Life changes: an historical view of her generation in the Mayan areas of Chiapas.

- Influence of her mother's generation: the movement for indigenous women's rights, growing along side, within and without the Zapatista movement, military and para-military intrusion,and macro-economic development plans.

- Jolom Mayaetik - a Mayan women's weaving cooperative: what it means internally to members; how they seek external relations; the meaning for equality and social justice.

- Jolom Mayaetik - Economics and independence and the idea of choice for Mayan women and of "moving ahead."

- Jolom Mayaetik - Craft and the preservation of tradition.

- The presentation will then open to questions and discussion. Ms. Santiz is a weaver. She will bring a back-strap loom and demonstrate its use.

Sponsored by: Ms. Santiz's visit has been made possible by Center for Women's and Gender Studies, College of Liberal Arts, Gender and Sexuality Center,The Humanities Institute, Lozano Long Institute for Latin Ameri


Bookmark and Share
bottom border