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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Adam Gordon is a physical anthropologist who received his Ph.D. at the University of Texas at...

Fri, April 17, 2009 • 6:30 PM • GAR 0.102

Adam Gordon is a physical anthropologist who received his Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin in 2004, under the supervision of John Kappelman. His dissertation research investigated the role of sexual selection and ecological forces in the evolution of sex-specific size differences across the Order Primates, and used those relationships to make inferences regarding selection pressures that affected extinct species within the human evolutionary lineage. While at UT, Adam coordinated the Physical Anthropology Lecture Series for one year, served as one of two student representatives on the Graduate Studies Committee for the Department of Anthropology for two years, and served as a committee member on the Liberal Arts Graduate Research Fellowship Selection Committee for three years. After leaving UT, he spent four years as a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology at The George Washington University, and is currently in his first year as an assistant professor at the University at Albany – SUNY. Adam’s research has been funded by grants from the Mathers Foundation, the University at Albany, and the National Science Foundation, and has been published in journals such as Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, Journal of Human Evolution, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Journal of Archaeological Science, and International Journal of Primatology. He is a reviewer for various journals, serves on several dissertation committees, and enjoys a good chat over a cold beer. To get to know Adam a bit better before the keynote address, read his selected articles on Homo floresiensis and its relationship to other hominins, and innovative sampling methods to address size dimorphism and social implications in Australopithecus afarensis.

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