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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Aimee Hosemann

Lecturer , Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-2858
  • Office: SAC 5.166
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: Tuesdays and Thursdays 12 p.m.-1:45 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

31311 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm SAC 4.118
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 325N • Lang & Speech In Amer Socty

31550 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as AMS 321, LIN 373, SOC 352M )
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 In this course, we take as our central concern an exploration of American society through language use by Latin@ populations. We understand that this is a tremendously diverse population as we take “America” in its broad hemispheric sense, and so we seek to understand differences and similarities in the ways Latin@ groups (those tracing some Latin American descent) use language to create and participate in society. We do so by investigating how language is used by individuals from these communities on a daily basis, in a wide variety of contexts. As part of our investigation leads us to consider identity-building processes, which are a product of interaction, we consider also the ways non-Latin@s talk to/about Latin@s. We make use of the existing scholarly literature, as well as more “popular” sources. Students will construct and carry out original research projects.

ANT F302 • Cultural Anthropology

81615 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am SAC 4.174
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31560 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LIN 312 )
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The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

ANT 325N • Lang & Speech In Amer Socty

31432 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm SAC 4.174
(also listed as LIN 373 )
show description

 

 In this course, we take as our central concern an exploration of American society through language use by Latin@ populations. We understand that this is a tremendously diverse population as we take “America” in its broad hemispheric sense, and so we seek to understand differences and similarities in the ways Latin@ groups (those tracing some Latin American descent) use language to create and participate in society. We do so by investigating how language is used by individuals from these communities on a daily basis, in a wide variety of contexts. As part of our investigation leads us to consider identity-building processes, which are a product of interaction, we consider also the ways non-Latin@s talk to/about Latin@s. We make use of the existing scholarly literature, as well as more “popular” sources. Students will construct and carry out original research projects.

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