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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Darrell G. Creel

Professor Emeritus Ph.D., University of Arizona

Director of Texas Archaeological Research Laboratory (TARL); Associate Professor Emeritus
Darrell G. Creel

Contact

Biography

In the past ten years, most of my research has been focused on the prehistoric Mimbres culture in southwestern New Mexico. Additional areas of research interest that overlap to a varying extent with my Mimbres research include (1) use of ceramic compositional analysis to address questions of exchange, interaction, and migration, and (2) more recently, use of near surface geophysical sensing technologies in archeological research. Each of these areas of research is represented by publications and by presentations at numerous professional meetings.



Courses taught: 2006-07 On leave during Fall semester, Ant 322K Southwestern Archaeology

2005-06 Ant 322K Southwestern Archaeology (both semesters), Ant 376P Research Internship

2004-05 Ant 322K Southwestern Archaeology, Ant 462M Archaeological Techniques, Ant 698A, B Thesis (both semesters)

2003-04 Ant 322K Southwestern Archaeology, Ant 462M Archaeological Techniques, Ant 376P Research Internship, Ant 384M The American Southwest, Ant 662 Archaeological Field Methods

Ant 679HA Honors Tutorial Course (both semesters)

 

Interests

Archeology; Texas, Plains, Southwest, Southeast U.S.

ANT 322K • Southwestern Archaeology

30975 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 3.134
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This course presents a survey of Southwestern Archaeology from the earliest human occupation through the early exploration by the Spanish.  Most of the course will focus on the main cultural traditions in the region: Anasazi, Mogollon, and Hohokam.  For these traditions, as well as for earlier cultures, variations in livelihood, architecture, community organization, material culture, mortuary practices, and relations with neighboring groups will be described.  Other issues to be presented are (1) the introduction of agriculture and its effect on subsistence and settlement pattern, (2) regional interaction and trade, (3) the rise of social complexity, and (4) the native cultures in the Southwest at the time of Spanish exploration.

ANT 462M • Archaeological Techniques

31400 • Spring 2011
Meets W 200pm-600pm T5D 1.101
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This course is concerned with archaeological field techniques in general.  A preliminary introduction to field procedures is provided through lectures, readings, and actual hands-on work with instruments and field situations on campus as well as four one-day weekend field trips.  Although a one-semester course is not enough to qualify one as a field archaeologist, this course serves as a basic introduction not only to the procedures themselves but also to the reasons for them, and (through lectures) to alternative techniques as employed on different kinds of field projects.  This course is the normal precursor to our summer archaeological field course.Class meetings alternate between lectures and demonstration/discussion sessions.

ANT 362K • Archaeol Of Texas And Vicinity

30210 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm EPS 2.136
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This is a survey course designed to examine the major archæological regions of Texas and related areas in adjacent states and northeastern Mexico.  Basic course format will involve lectures, accompanied by slides, handouts, and demonstration materials.  In addition to the texts listed below, there will be additional readings to provide the student with a broader perspective on Texas archæology.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 462M • Archaeological Techniques

30460 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm T5D 1.101
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Archaeological Field Techniques

Anthropology 462M, Spring 2010

 

 

TTH:  3:00-5:00

Lecture Room:  Pickle Research Campus, Building 5D, Room 1

 

Professor:  Darrell Creel 

Office:  Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, Pickle Research Campus Building 5, Room 1.

Telephone:  471-6007

E-Mail:  dcreel@tarl.utexas.edu

Office Hours:  Tuesdays and Thursdays:  1:00-3:00 pm, or by appointment.

 

 

Class Philosophy and Requirements 

 

Required TextArchaeology, Basic Field Methods. By Stewart, R. Michael, Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, 2002

 

Purpose:  This is a beginning course in archaeological procedures related to field work.  It is a course in techniques rather than concepts or theories, though theory will, of course, be important.  Archaeological Field Techniques is a preparation for fieldwork, not a field school.  The single technique that is most emphasized is keeping notes and records.  One of the primary themes of the course is the interplay of research goals, practice, theory, and field conditions (hard reality).  You are encouraged to think about these general issues constantly throughout the course.

 

Attendance, readings and participation:  It will be very important to attend ALL class sessions.   Much material covered in the lectures and during outdoor exercises may not be presented in the text and cannot be obtained at a later time.  Some of the more complex issues covered in the text will form the core of discussion in lectures.  Consequently, it is important that you read the material scheduled each week (not including the first week, of course) prior to class.  This is especially true when case studies and guest lectures are to be presented.  And yes, if it’s presented in class, in the texts, or in the field, it may well be on the exam!  

 

Course requirements and grading:  There are six (6) requirements for this course: (1) a compass-pace map and site recording form for an actual archeological site, (2) a GPS shape file for the same site (meaning you have to demonstrate ability to use a GPS unit), (3) demonstrated ability to set up and use at Total Station; (4) preparation of a surface contour map based on data from a Total Station, (5) an excavation level form and specimen inventory,  and (6) a term paper (proposal) of 10-15 pages (see handout for details – due May 7).  The final course grade will be computed as follows: 15% for site form and compass-pace map, 10 % for the GPS shape file, 15% for Total Station capability, 15% for the contour map, 15% for the excavation level form and artifact inventory, and 30% for the term paper.

 

Term paper:  The term paper will be elaborately described in class, and we will have a hand-out to help guide you in writing the paper.  You will be writing a professional-styled research proposal in a standard format.  Term paper proposals are due on April 1.    Turn in a brief written statement on what you will write about and how you will orient your presentation.  You are urged to turn in rough drafts of your paper to the TA for comments at any time in the semester prior to the due date.   The term paper is due on May 7. 

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY:  Regular attendance is considered essential since new information not in the textbook will be introduced during each class meeting.  Attendance during days with outdoor activities is particularly important since three requirements will be done only on those days.  Absences for observance of religious holidays are accommodated as per University policies.

 

POLICY ON SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY:  Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University Extension program or The University.  Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of The University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.

 

POLICY ON ACCOMMODATION OF DISABILITIES:  The University’s policy on accommodation of disabilities will be followed.

 

 

 

Course Schedule

(This schedule is subject to change)

 

January 19 Lecture:   Introduction to course.  The nature and philosophy of the course, as well as a brief discussion of course requirements.  Presentation of the basic theoretical perspectives involved in, and basic to, this course.

 

January 21 Lecture:   (1) Continuation of previous lecture: the scientific method; research design.  Identifying, illuminating and solving problems in archaeological research.  Importance of background research. (2) Field records and record keeping.

Reading:  Stewart: Chapters 1-4.

 

January 26 Lecture:  Writing a research proposal. 

Reading:  Hand-out on Grant and Proposal Format and Writing.

 

January 28 Lecture: (1) Site designation systems.   (2) Introduction to map systems (latitude/ longitude, township/range/section and 1/4 section, Universal Transverse Mercator) and (3) map reading.  Ground reconnaissance.

Reading:  Stewart: Chapter 6 thru page 121

 

February 2 Lecture:  Formation processes

Reading:  to be assigned.

 

Feb 4, 9 Lecture:  Archaeological surveying techniques.  Survey project orientation. Systems of designating what you find during a survey.  GPS use.   

Reading:  Stewart:  Chapter 6, pp 133-143, Chapter 8 thru page 229.

 

February 11 This entire class meeting will be devoted to an actual search for sites using systematic survey procedures.  Dress for walking on a rocky surface through dense shrubs/trees that can tear clothing and skin.  You will need a clipboard, pencil and eraser (preferably mechanical), compass (type to be discussed in class), backpack, and water.  Specific meeting location at Pickle Research Campus to be provided in advance.

     Reading:  Stewart: Chapter 6, pp 121-133.

Assignment:  site form with compass-pace map due Feb 17

 

February 16 Lecture: Spatial control techniques: datums and grids 

Reading:  Stewart: Chapter 6, pp 145-154.

 

February 18 Lecture: Geoarchaeology relative to site location and assessment.  

Reading:  Stewart: Chapter 7. 

 

Feb 23-Mar 9 Lecture:  Introduction to documentation and mapping using surveying instruments; weather permitting, most of this and the following 4 classes will be held outside where we will be learning to use a Total Station and transit (outside).

     Reading:  Stewart: Chapters 6, pp 121-133.

Assignment:  contour map due March 10

 

March 11 Lecture:  Geophysical sensing techniques and applications.

Reading:  Stewart: Chapter 8, pp 229-232.

 

March 15-19  Spring Break.  

 

March 23 Lecture:  Design of testing and excavation plans relative to research design. Types/number of collected materials, documentation, ownership, screening, etc.

Reading:  Stewart: Chapter 8, pp 235-236 and Chapter 9, pp 239-298.

 

March  25 Lecture:  Power machinery in site location, testing, excavation, and backfilling. Testing and excavation records and collections.  Cataloguing, provenience, packaging, special treatment, dating samples.

Reading:  Stewart: Chapter 9, pp 282-283, 294-298, 301-304.

 

March  30 Lecture:  Testing and excavation plans and profiles.

Reading:  none.

 

April 1 Lecture:  Excavation and documentation of features including human remains.  Legal, 

ethical, practical issues.  

Reading:  Stewart: Chapter 8, pp 304-310; Chapter 9, pp 262-270, 277-280.

Assignment:  Your grant proposal term paper topic is due today!  Turn in a brief written statement on the subject of your proposal and how you will orient your presentation.

 

April 6 Lecture:  Deep and/or stratified multicomponent sites.  Stratigraphic excavation.  Testing and excavation of non-architectural sites (including hunter-gatherer sites), caves, rockshelters, bone beds, and sites on stable surfaces.Safety

Reading:  Stewart: Chapter 9 remaining portions (applies to remainder of course)

 

April 8 Lecture:  Introduction to testing and excavation of architectural sites.

Reading:  To be provided

 

April  13 Lecture:  Testing and excavations of mounds and agricultural features.  Excavation of human remains

Reading:  To be provided

 

April  15 Lecture:  Field photography.

Reading:  see textbook index for the various sections on photography.

 

 

Apr 20-May 4 During these class meetings, you will learn how to lay out a grid and a 1x1 meter square.  You will then excavate at least one 10 cm level in test units at Rogers Spring site, document the excavation, as well as wash and catalogue any artifacts found.  

Assignment:  completed excavation level form and specimen inventory.

 

May 6 Course evaluation 

Assignment:  Your term paper (grant proposal) is due today – bring them to class.


ANT 322K • Southwestern Archaeology

30420 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GSB 2.124
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COURSE NAME:  Southwestern Archaeology
COURSE NUMBER: ANT 322K
UNIQUE NUMBER:  30420
MEETING DAY AND TIME: TTH 12:30-2:00 AM

INSTRUCTOR:  Darrell Creel, Ph.D.
PHONE: 471-0060 (in Schoch 2.114) or 471-6007 (at the Texas Archeological Research Laboratory)
EMAIL: dcreel@tarl.utexas.edu
OFFICE and HOURS:  TTH 2-4:00 and by appointment

TEACHING ASSISTANT:  Shannon Iverson

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course presents a survey of Southwestern Archaeology, focusing on the period 1500 BC-AD 1600 and the three main cultural traditions of the region: Anasazi, Mogollon, and Hohokam.  For these traditions, variations in livelihood, architecture, community organization, material culture, mortuary practices, and relations with neighboring groups will be described and discussed.  Other issues to be presented are (1) the introduction of agriculture and its effects on subsistence and settlement pattern, (2) changing social organization and the rise of complexity, (3) aggregation and abandonment, (4) the Chaco phenomenon, (5) Casas Grandes and the Salado, and (6) the Rio Grande Classic Pueblo period and relationships with the Southern Plains.

PREREQUISITES:  No specific course prerequisite, but Introduction to Archaeological Studies (ANT 304) is especially helpful and is preferred.

EXAMS and GRADING:  Four exams, each counting 25 %.  Each exam will be multiple choice. NO FINAL EXAM, but the last regular exam will be on the last class date, December 3.  If a student arrives late on an exam date and after another student has already finished the exam and left the room, the late student will not be allowed to take the exam that date and will have to take a separate exam at a later date/time (to be arranged).  There will be no makeup of exams without an excused absence as defined by The University.  If you know you have to miss an exam with an excused absence, notify me or the TA in advance if at all possible to schedule a makeup exam.

TEXTBOOKS (required):  The Archaeology of Ancient Arizona, by J. Jefferson Reid and Stephanie Whittlesey; and Ancient Puebloan Southwest, by John Kantner

ATTENDANCE POLICY:  Regular attendance is considered essential since new information not in the textbooks will likely be introduced during each class meeting.  Lack of attendance will adversely affect grades only insofar as students will not be exposed to material certain to be covered on exams.  In addition, much information, especially information that gives students a good feel for Southwestern archaeological sites and remains, will be presented via powerpoint. Absences for observance of religious holidays are accommodated as per University policies.

POLICY ON SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY:  Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University Extension program or The University.  Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of The University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.

POLICY ON ACCOMMODATION OF DISABILITIES:  The University’s policy on accommodation of disabilities will be followed.  Students with diabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

DATE                                   TOPIC                                                             READING
Aug 27-Sept 3    Introduction, Geography, Native    Reid & Whittlesey
    Peoples, Intellectual Frameworks,    Chapter 1; Kantner
        Chapters 1, 2
   
Sept 8-10    Early Occupation: Paleoindian & Archaic    Reid & Whittlesey
        Chapters 2-3 to page
        58; Kantner Chapter 3
        to page 59

Sept 15-22    Introduction of Agriculture & Early Villages    Reid & Whittlesey
        remainder of Chapter
        3; Kantner remainder
        of Chapter 3
Sept 24    Exam 1
Sept 29-Oct 20    Major SW Cultural Traditions, AD 700-1130    Reid & Whittlesey
        Chapter 4 to page
        100, Ch 6 to p.145, Ch
        7 to p.198, Ch 8 to
        224; Kantner
        remainder of Chapter 3,
        Ch 4
Oct 22    Exam 2
Oct 27-Nov 5    Major SW Cultural Traditions, AD 1130-1300    Reid & Whittlesey
        Chapter 4 to page
        107, Ch 6 to p.151, Ch
        7 to p.198, Ch 8 to
        224; Kantner
        Chapters 5, 6
Nov. 10    Exam 3
Nov 12-Dec 1    Major SW Cultural Traditions, AD 1300-1700     Reid & Whittlesey
        Chapter 4 to page
        110, Ch 6 to p.165, Ch
        7 to p.204, Ch 8 to
        294, Ch 9, 10; Kantner
        Chapter 7, 8
Dec. 3    Exam 4

Publications

Recent Publications

2006 Excavations at the Old Town Ruin, Luna County, New Mexico, 1989-2003. Volume 1. US Bureau of Land Management, New Mexico State Office, Santa Fe

2006 Environmental Variation and Prehistoric Culture in the Mimbres Area. In Culture and Environment in the Ancient Southwest, edited by David Doyel and Jeffrey Dean. University of Utah Press.

2006 Evidence for Mimbres Social Differentiation at the Old Town Site. In Mimbres Society, edited by Valli Powell and Patricia Gilman, University of Arizona Press.

2005 D. Creel, D. Hudler, S. Wilson, C. Schultz, and C. Walker A Magnetometer Survey of Caddoan Mounds State Historic Site. Technical Report 51. Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, University of Texas at Austin.

2005 (C. Descartes, Darrell Creel, R. Speakman, S. Wilson, and M. Glascock) Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis of Pottery from the George C. Davis (41CE19) Site, Texas. North American Archaeologist 25(2):121-138.

2004: A Magnetometer Survey of Caddoan Mounds State Historic Site. Technical Report 51. Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, University of Texas at Austin. Coauthored with Roger Anyon.

2003 (with Roger Anyon) New Perspectives on Mimbres Communal Pitstructures and Implications for Ritual and Cultural Developments. American Antiquity 68:67-92.

2003 Darrell Creel, Tiffany Clark, and Hector Neff, Production and Long Distance Movement of Chupadero Black-on-white Pottery in New Mexico and Texas. Chapter 6, in Geochemical Evidence for Long Distance Exchange, edited by Michael Glascock, pp 109-132. Bergin and Garvey, Westport, Connecticut.

2002 Darrell Creel, Matthew Williams, Hector Neff, and Michael Glascock. Neutron Activation Analysis of Black Mountain Phase Ceramics and Its Implications for Manufacture and Exchange Patterns. In Chemical Sourcing in the Southwest, edited by Donna Glowacki and Hector Neff. UCLA Press.

1999 The Black Mountain Phase in the Mimbres Area. In The Casas Grandes World, edited by Curtis Schaafsma and Carroll Riley, pp.107-120. University of Utah Press.

1999 S. Decker, S. Black, T. Gustavson, D. Creel, and H. Iceland. The Woodrow Heard Site, 41UV88: A Holocene Terrace Site in the Western Balcones Canyonlands of Southwestern Texas. Studies in Archeology 33, Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, University of Texas at Austin. 1997 Stephen Black, Linda Ellis, Darrell Creel, and Glenn Goode. Hot Rock Cooking on the Greater Edwards Plateau: Four Burned Rock Midden Sites in West Central Texas. Texas Archeological Research Laboratory Studies in Archeology 22 and Texas Department of Transportation Archeology Studies Program, Report 2.

1999 (M. Hegmon, M. Nelson, R. Anyon, D. Creel, H. Shafer, and S. LeBlanc) Systematics of Late and Post Mimbres Occupations in the American Southwest. The Kiva 65:143-166.

1997 Ceremonial Cave: An Overview of Investigations and Contents. In The Hueco Mountain Cave and Rockshelter Survey: A Phase I Baseline Inventory in Maneuver Area 2D on Fort Bliss, Texas, by Federico Almarez and Jeff Leach. Appendix A. pp 75-88. Archaeological Technical Reports No. 10. Anthropology Research Center, The University of Texas at El Paso.

1994 (with Charmion McKusick) Prehistoric Macaws and Parrots in the Mimbres Area, New Mexico. American Antiquity 59:510-524.

1991 The Importance of Bison Hides in Late Prehistoric Exchange in the Southern Plains. American Antiquity 56:40-49.

1990 (with Robert Scott and Michael Collins) A Faunal Record from West Central Texas and Its Bearing on Late Holocene Bison Population Changes in the Southern Plains. Plains Anthropologist 35:55-69.

1989 A Primary Cremation at the NAN Ranch Ruin, Grant County, New Mexico, with Comparative Data on other Cremations in the Mimbres Area. Journal of Field Archaeology 16:309-329.

1989 Anthropomorphic Rock Art Figures in the Middle Mimbres Valley, New Mexico. The Kiva 55:71-86.

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