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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Enrique R. Rodriguez-Alegría

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Chicago

Enrique R. Rodriguez-Alegría

Contact

Biography

Courses taught:
Introduction to Mesoamerica, Colonial Latin America, Social Inequality in Mesoamerica, Food and Politics, Ceramic Analysis

Recent Publications:

2013  Stoner, W. D., J. K. Millhauser, E. Rodríguez-Alegría, L. Overholtzer and M. D. Glascock.  “Taken with a Grain of Salt: Experimentation and the Chemistry of Archaeological Ceramics from Xaltocan, Mexico.” Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory.

2013 E. Rodríguez-Alegría, John Millhauser, and Wesley Stoner.  “Trade, Tribute, and Neutron Activation: The Colonial Political Economy of Xaltocan, Mexico.”  Journal of Anthropological Archaeology  32:397-414.  

2012  The Menial Art of Cooking: Archaeological Studies of Cooking and Food Preparation.  Edited by Sarah Graff and E. Rodríguez-Alegría.  The University Press of Colorado.

2012  “From the Stone Age to the Store-Bought Age: Corn Tortillas and Grinding in Xaltocan, Mexico.”  In The Menial Art of Cooking: Archaeological Studies of Cooking and Food Preparation.  Edited by Sarah Graff and E. Rodríguez-Alegría.  The University Press of Colorado.

2012  “The Discovery and Decolonization of Xaltocan, Mexico” in Lost in Transition: Decolonizing Indigenous Histories at the “Prehistoric/Colonial” Intersection in Archaeology, edited by Maxine Oland, Siobhan Hart, and Liam Frink.  University of Arizona Press.

2012  Jaime Mata-Míguez, Lisa Overholtzer, E. Rodríguez-Alegría, and Deborah A. Bolnick.  “The Genetic Impact of Aztec Imperialism: Ancient Mitochondrial DNA Evidence from Xaltocan, Mexico.”  American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 149(4):504-16.

2011  John Millhauser, E. Rodríguez-Alegría, and Michael D. Glascock.  “Testing the accuracy of portable X-ray fluorescence to study Aztec and Colonial obsidian supply at Xaltocan, Mexico.” Journal of Archaeological Science, 38:3141-3152.

2010 J.G. Iñañez, J.J. Bellucci, E. Rodríguez-Alegría, R. Ash, W. McDonough, R.J. Spekman  “Romita pottery revisited: a reassessment of the provenance of ceramics from Colonial Mexico by LA-MC-ICP-MS”  Journal of Archaeological Science  37:2698-2704.

2010 “Incumbents and Challengers: Indigenous Politics and the Adoption of Spanish Material Culture in Colonial Xaltocan, Mexico” Historical Archaeology 44(2):51-71.

2008 “The Aztecs After the Conquest”, in The Aztec World, edited by Elizabeth Brumfiel and Gary Feinman, pp.195-208. Abrams.

2008 “De la Edad de Piedra a la Edad de más Piedra” Cuadernos de Arqueología Mediterránea Vol. XVII: 15-30. Barcelona.

2008 “Narratives of Conquest, Colonialism, and Cutting-edge Technology.” American Anthropologist. 110(1):33-41.

Interests

archaeology, history, ethnohistory, Mesoamerica, the Spanish empire in Latin America, Mexico, Puerto Rico, archaeometry (INAA and LA-ICP-MS), colonialism, religious conversion, food

ANT 314C • Intro Mesoamerican Archaeol

31460 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 315 )
show description

Introduction to ancient Mesoamerica from the time of emerging social inequality in the formative period until the Spanish conquest of Mexico-Tenochtitlan in the sixteenth century

ANT 380K • Epistemology/Agnotology/Ethics

31625 • Fall 2014
Meets W 100pm-400pm SAC 5.118
show description

How do archaeologists use evidence to figure out what happens in the past?  How do we formulate questions about the past?  How do we assess which questions are appropriate, and which answers are adequate?  What do we do when we simply do not know what happened?  In short, how do we know what we know?  In this class, we will study archaeological epistemologies, agnotology, and the ethics of knowledge.  Epistemology refers to the way we create knowledge: how we ask questions, how we determine the right questions to ask, how we formulate explanations and models of the past, and how we determine which kinds of knowledge are acceptable when formulated with archaeological data.  Agnotology refers to the study of ignorance: what is ignorance, how do we work in archaeology in spite of our ignorance on a lot of aspects of the past, which lines of evidence or interpretations we purposefully choose to ignore, and how we even create ignorance as we create knowledge in archaeology.  The ethics of knowledge refers to how we use archaeological knowledge and ignorance, and their effect on society and living people.  The varied topics we will cover in this class include bridging arguments in archaeology, analogical reasoning, the direct historical approach, the hypothetico-deductive model, post-processual critiques in archaeology, inference to the best explanation, induction, abduction, agnotology, and collaborations with descendant communities, among others.  Any student from any discipline who wants to learn how archaeologists formulate knowledge is welcome in my class.  No previous knowledge of archaeology is necessary.  

 

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31210-31235 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1100am SZB 104
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 384M • Aztecs And Spaniards

31545 • Fall 2013
Meets W 200pm-500pm SAC 5.124
(also listed as LAS 391 )
show description

The Aztec and the Spanish empires have attracted the attention of scholars and the public for a long time with stories of gold, human sacrifice, warfare, and the meeting of two different civilizations.  In this class we will study both empires, taking advantage of the varied lines of evidence available for their study, especially historical and archaeological evidence, as well as monuments and works of art.  The focus of the class will be on how imperial expansion affected the daily life of people in the Aztec empire and after the Spanish conquest.  In addition to studying the daily life of different people in these empires, we will examine some of the themes that have fascinated both scholars and the general public, including human sacrifice, conquest warfare, and religion.  The goal of the class is to examine social and cultural heterogeneity in both of these empires, to familiarize students with the diverse lines of evidence we have to study these empires, and to understand processes of historical change among the Aztecs and the Spanish empire. 

            The class will be roughly divided equally between the Aztec empire and the Spanish empire.  Prior experience in archaeology is not required to join the class. 

ANT 324L • Ceramic Analysis

31315 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SAC 4.174
show description

 Ceramics make up the bulk of archaeological artifacts and are frequently used to make inferences about past economies, social relations, political life, cultural practice, etc.  In this course we will learn basic techniques of ceramic analysis for archaeological research, and examine different aspects of ceramic production, exchange, use, and discard using a variety of archaeological and ethnographic sources.  The course will be a combination of lectures, discussion, and laboratory analysis.  Throughout the semester we will discuss a broad range of literature on ceramics, touching upon issues of technology, chemical characterization, decoration, and ethnoarchaeological research on contemporary ceramic producers.  In the lab portion of the class we will learn basic ceramic characterization techniques, including surface description, analysis of the paste, ceramic typologies, quantification, drawing, and others. This course will be useful to archaeology and art history majors, students who are going to field schools in the summer, and any student how wants to understand how to perform basic analysis of ceramic artifacts.  Successful completion of the class will depend upon completion of laboratory assignments, tests, and other assignments in class.

ANT 380K • Material Worlds

31435 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 900am-1200pm SAC 5.118
show description

This graduate course focuses on human engagements with the material world.  We will draw broadly from the literature in archaeology, art history, social anthropology, history, and other fields to try to understand how humans interact with things, and how things factor in the creation of our worlds, ideas, and lived experiences.  Anthropologists have debated for decades the importance of materiality and whether the discipline should focus on ideas and theoretical abstractions, or whether it should remain solidly grounded in materiality and the world of things.  In this class we will study this debate and examine the possibilities that the literature surrounding this debate presents for our research.  Topics covered will include, among others, recent theories of materiality and the creation of social groups and individuals through material culture, anthropological debates related to thought and the material world, theories of value, the use of material culture as evidence in anthropological and historical studies, definitions of art and material culture, production, exchange, consumption, monumentality, and others. Class requirements include active participation in seminars and discussions, as well as completion of written assignments for the class.  Students will complete analyses of objects and assemblages of objects as exercises during the semester.

ANT 310L • Intro Mesoamerican Archaeol

30945 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WAG 101
(also listed as LAS 310 )
show description

This course is an introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, the area roughly covering Mexico and the northern half of Central America, from the time of emerging social inequality among the Formative Period Olmec until the Spanish conquest of Mexico in the sixteenth century.  By studying archaeological evidence from several sites in this region we will address a few important theoretical issues in archaeology.  These issues include:  1) the relationship between social organization, culture and the environment, 2) the role of sex, gender, and sexuality in the construction of social inequality, and 3) the use of material culture in the transformation of relationships of power.  During the course of the semester we will examine varied lines of evidence, including archaeological artifacts (especially pottery, obsidian, and ceramic figurines), human remains, architecture, murals, sculpture, and historical evidence (esp. codices and colonial accounts) to assess the role of evidence and theory in the formation of how we conceptualize the past in Mesoamerica.  Thus, the course will not only serve as an introduction to Mesoamerican prehistory and the early colonial period, but it will also be a critical evaluation of the role of evidence and theory in the formation of knowledge about the past.

ANT 384M • Ceramic Analysis

31125 • Fall 2011
Meets W 200pm-500pm SAC 4.116
show description

In this course we will learn basic techniques of ceramic analysis for archaeological research, and examine different aspects of ceramic production, exchange, use, and discard using a variety of archaeological and ethnographic sources.  Such an intensive focus on ceramics might seem an odd endeavor from an anthropological perspective, but ceramics make up the bulk of archaeological artifacts and are frequently used to make inferences about past economies, social relations, political life, and cultural practice.  The course will be a combination of seminar and laboratory analysis.  Throughout the semester we will discuss a broad range of literature on ceramics, including technological analysis, chemical characterization, the literature on style and function, and ethnoarchaeological research on contemporary ceramic producers.  In the lab portion of the class we will learn basic ceramic characterization techniques, including surface description, analysis of the paste, ceramic typologies, photography, drawing, and others.  Successful completion of the class will depend upon student participation in class discussion, completion of laboratory assignments, a descriptive report on a small collection of archaeological ceramics, and a research design or proposal presented as a term paper.

ANT 324L • Colonial Latin Amer Archaeol

30285 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm JGB 2.216
(also listed as LAS 324L )
show description

ANT324L/LAS324: Archaeology of Colonial Latin America

Unique numbers 30285, 40510

Spring 2010  T-Th 11:00-12:30

Classroom: JGB 2.216

 

Instructor: Enrique Rodríguez

Office: EPS 1.110C

Office hours: Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 or by appointment.  Please take advantage of office hours!

Email: see email rules below

 

Teaching Assistant: Emily Root-Garey

TA’s office: EPS 2.136

 

 

Course overview:  This course will focus on the Spanish colonies in Latin America, answering three general questions during the course of the semester:

1) How did Indigenous people, European colonizers, and Africans act in the colonial                         period? What were their daily lives like?  What kinds of material goods did                                     they use?

2) How can archaeological and historical data be used in conjunction to reconstruct                                     what happened in the colonial period in Latin America?

3) What do concepts like acculturation, syncretism, creolization, etc, mean, and how have                                     they helped historical and anthropological knowledge about the past?

 

As we answer the questions written above, we will consider also an important and often passionate debate taking place on college campuses and other public forums every year between those who argue that European colonialism was a disaster for indigenous people in the Americas, and those who argue that it brought progress to indigenous civilizations. 

 

Rather than focusing on Latin America as a unitary or homogeneous culture, we will study different regions and sites to learn from the variation encountered within the Spanish empire in what we know today as Latin America.  We will begin in the Caribbean, examining historical events, and aspects of daily life and colonial administration, religious conversion, and demography.  We will then focus on Mexico and Central America, examining the same issues, and finally on South America.  To complete the course successfully, students must be able to compare and contrast patterns and historical developments in different regions.

 

This is an archaeology course; therefore, students should be prepared to engage with readings in archaeology, and students should draw upon archaeological as well as historical evidence in class discussion and exams. No previous experience in archaeology is required, and students who are not Archaeology majors or who have never taken a course in archaeology are certainly encouraged to join the class.  This class will increase literacy in archaeology for non-archaeology majors and it will help students understand how to combine archaeological and historical evidence in the study of the past. 

 

 

 

 

Goals and objectives:

The course has three main goals: 

1.         To examine in detail the daily lives of people in the Spanish colonies in different regions in Latin America.

2.         To create an understanding of how to integrate historical and archaeological evidence to learn about the past.

3.         To examine the ways that culture and everyday life are related to struggles for power in particular historical situations.

 

Students with disabilities: Any student with disabilities should talk to me as soon as possible so that we may make arrangements that will make for a better learning experience and that will allow the student to show his or her abilities fully.

 

Other classroom rules:

            NO laptop computers, newspapers, or calculators in class or during exams.  Please turn off your cell phones.  Texting is not allowed in class.

            Academic dishonesty will be dealt with according to University rules.

 

Grading:  Successful completion of this course will require learning from readings, lectures, slideshows, in-class exercises, and film.  Topics covered in the readings and in the classroom will, at times, be entirely different.  Exams will cover material and lines of evidence discussed in class and in the readings.

 

            Students are also expected to attend class and to participate.  Participation will require completing the readings before class. 

 

            Reading commentaries: There will  be 11 reading commentaries due during the semester.  At the end of the semester, the lowest three (3) scores of each student’s commentaries will be dropped, and only the eight (8) highest scores will be counted.  Under normal circumstances, there will be no chances to turn commentaries in late.  Any student who misses a commentary will get a 0 for the week’s assignment and that score will be dropped if it is one of the three lowest scores.  Specific instructions on commentaries will be handed out at the beginning of the semester.

 

            Exams: There will be three exams during the semester, on the dates provided in the syllabus.  Under normal circumstances, there will be no make-up exams.  Talk to me as early as possible if you know you will not make it to an exam.  If you miss an exam, please bring specific documentation of the reason why you missed it, and we can talk about scheduling an exam for you only under exceptional circumstances

 

Students may discuss with me their exam grade individually.  Once we have discussed the grade, I might agree to re-grade the exam.  Re-grading does not guarantee a better grade.  In fact, your grade might suffer during a re-grading if I find errors that I did not find on my first grading. Therefore, students are advised to make sure you have specific reasons why your grade should improve before showing up to discuss your grade.

 

 

 

Final grades will be calculated as follows:

1.     Exam 1: 20%

2.     Exam 2: 25%

3.     Exam 3: 30%

4.     Reading commentaries: 25%

 

 

TEXTBOOKS AND OTHER READINGS

 

Burkholder, Mark, and Lyman L. Johnson.  2007.  Colonial Latin America. (7th ed.)  Oxford University Press. REQUIRED.  The readings from the Colonial Latin America textbook appear in the weekly schedule below with the acronym CLA.

 

Course packet available at Abel’s Copies.  REQUIRED.

 

Readings marked as “on JSTOR” can be found at www.jstor.org on any campus computer.  I will explain in class how to log on to jstor, and I will post instructions on the Blackboard site for the class.

 

Email rules:

1.     Email if you have a medical emergency that will prevent you from making it to an exam.  Do not email if you will not make it to lecture, unless you will miss more than two lectures in a row.

2.     Email if I ask you to email me.

3.     Email if you cannot make it to office hours and you need to schedule an appointment outside of office hours.

4.     Do not email to continue class discussion; please use office hours.  Also, if you have a question about the material, please bring it up in class.  Other students will most likely benefit from it.

5.     Do not use email to turn in assignments, to send attachments, or to ask about the exam.  Please see me in office hours and bring your exam.

6.     My email is: chanfle@mail.utexas.edu

 

 

 

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

The readings from the Colonial Latin America textbook appear with the acronym CLA.

 

I.     Introduction (January 19, 21)

A.    Social history and social archaeology

B.    Timelines and scope of the class

C.    Central issues of the class

                                               i.     Acculturation, syncretism, and other approaches to cultural change

                                             ii.     History and archaeology: a combination of a diversity of sources

                                            iii.     Cross-cultural comparison and historical studies

D.   Readings:

                                               i.     CLA, pp. 23-33: “The Iberian World in the Late Fifteenth Century”. (The readings from the Colonial Latin America textbook appear with the acronym CLA.)

 

II.   Points of departure (January 26, 28)

A.    Spain before the conquest

                                               i.     Social life in Spain

                                             ii.     The goals and strategies of conquest

B.    Readings:

                                               i.     Jordan, Kurt A.  2009  “Colonies, Colonialism, and Cultural Entanglement: The Archaeology of Postcolumbian Intercultural Relations”.  In International Handbook of Historical Archaeology, edited by Teresita Majewski and David Gaimster, pp. 31-49.  Springer.  (We will read pages 31-37 only). COURSE PACKET.

                                             ii.     Deagan, Kathleen  2001  “Dynamics of imperial adjustment in Spanish America: ideology and social integration.”  In Empires: Perspectives from Archaeology and History, edited by S.E. Alcock, T.N. D’Altroy, K.D. Morrison, and C.M. Sinopoli, pp. 179-194. COURSE PACKET. 

 

III.         THE CARIBBEAN: THE CONQUEST (February 2, 4)

A.    Caribbean chiefdoms and the Taíno

B.    The conquest of the Caribbean

C.    Readings:

                                               i.     CLA, pp. 41-49: “First Encounters in the New World”.

                                             ii.     Deagan, Kathleen.  2004.  “Reconsidering Taino Social Dynamics After Spanish Conquest: Gender and Class in Culture Contact Studies”  American Antiquity 69(4):597-626.  On JSTOR.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

IV. THE CARIBBEAN: DAILY LIFE (February 9, 11)

A.    Gender and colonialism in the Caribbean

B.    Readings:

                                               i.     Wilson, Samuel M.  2007  The Archaeology of the Caribbean.  Cambridge.  Pp. 155-169.  COURSE PACKET.

                                             ii.     Scaramelli, Franz  2008  “Encounter, Exchange and Technological Innovation in the Tropical Lowlands of the Orinoco, Venezuela.”  Cuadernos de Arqueología Mediterránea 17:73-82.  COURSE PACKET.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

V.    THE CARIBBEAN: AFRICAN SLAVES (Feb. 16, 18)

A.    History of slavery

B.    Archaeological contributions

C.    Readings:

                                               i.     CLA, pp. 33-41: “Atlantic Africa in the Fifteenth Century” and pp. 144-155: “Slavery and the Slave Trade”.

                                             ii.     Singleton, Theresa.  2001.  “Slavery and Spatial Dialectics on Cuban Coffee Plantations” World Archaeology 33(1):98-114.  Available on JSTOR.

                                            iii.     Orser, Charles, and Pedro P.A. Funari.  2001.  “Archaeology and Slave Resistance and Rebellion”  World Archaeology 33(1):61-72.  Available on JSTOR.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

VI. MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA: THE CONQUEST (February 23, 25

***EXAM 1 February 25***

A.    The Aztec and the Maya

B.    The conquest of Mexico: between an event and a process

C.    Readings:

                                               i.     CLA pp. 1-19: “Amerindian Civilization”, and  52-59: “The Conquest of Mexico”.

 

VII.        MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA: DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL POWER (March 2, 4)

A.    Case study: food in Mexico City and Xaltocan, Mexico

B.    Readings:

                                               i.     CLA, 195-224: Chapter Six.

                                             ii.     Charlton, Thomas H., Cynthia L. Otis Charlton, and Patricia Fournier García  2005.  “The Basin of Mexico A.D. 1450-1620: Archaeological Dimensions”.  In The Postclassic to Spanish-Era Transition in Mesoamerica: Archaeological Perspectives, edited by Susan Kepecs and Rani T. Alexander, pp. 49-64.  University of New Mexico Press.  COURSE PACKET.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

VIII.     MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA: DEMOGRAPHY AND CASTE

(March 9, 11)

A.    Disease and the conquest

B.    Demographic changes: population collapse and inter-ethnic marriage

C.    Readings:

                                               i.     CLA, pp. 123-135: “Changes in the Colonial Population”

                                             ii.     Danforth, Marie et al. 1997.  “Gender and health among the Colonial Maya of Tipu, Belize” Ancient Mesoamerica 8(1):13-22.  COURSE PACKET.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

                                            iii.     White, Christine, Lori E. Wright, and David M. Pedergast  1994.  “Biological Disruption in the Early colonial Period at Lamanai” in In the Wake of Contact: Biological Responses to Conquest, edited by Clark Spencer Larsen and George R. Milner, pp. 135-145.  COURSE PACKET.

 

SPRING BREAK (March 15-19)

 

IX. MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA: THE COLONIAL CHURCH

(March 23, 25)

A.    Religious conversion and syncretism

B.    Religious architecture as “theater”

C.    Readings:

                                               i.     CLA, pp.107-122: The Colonial Church.

                                             ii.     Graham, Elizabeth.  1991.  “Archaeological Insights into Colonial Period Maya Life at Tipu, Belize” in Columbian Consequences, Vol. 3: The Spanish Borderlands in Pan-American Perspective.  Edited by David Hurst Thomas, pp. 319-335.  Smithsonian Institution Press: Washington.  COURSE PACKET.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

X.    MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA: TRADE AND PRODUCTION

(March 30, April 1) ***Exam 2 on April 1***

 

A.    Production, labor, and resistance

B.    Readings:

                                               i.     CLA, pp. 134-144: “Indian Labor”, pp. 157-174: “The Mining and Sugar Industries”, and “International Trade and Taxation.

                                             ii.     Alexander, Rani T.  2005  “Isla Civiltuk and the Difficulties of Spanish Colonization in Southwestern Campeche”.  In The Postclassic to Spanish-Era Transition in Mesoamerica: Archaeological Perspectives.  Edited by Susan Kepecs and Rani T. Alexander, pp. 117-138.  University of New Mexico Press.  COURSE PACKET.

                                            iii.     Brumfiel, E. 1996.  “The Quality of Tribute Cloth: the Place of Evidence in Archaeological Argument” American Antiquity 61(3):453-462.  Available on JSTOR.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

 

XI. SOUTH AMERICA: THE CONQUEST (April 6, 8)

A.    The Inca empire

B.    Before and after the conquest of the Inca

C.    Readings:

                                               i.     CLA, pp. 19-23: “The Inca”, pp. 60-93.

                                             ii.     Van Buren, Mary.  1996.  “Rethinking the Vertical Archipelago: Ethnicity, Exchange, and History in the South Central Andes”.  American Anthropologist 98(2): 338-351.  Available on JSTOR.

 

XII.        SOUTH AMERICA: DAILY LIFE AND POWER (April 13, 15)

A.    Comparative perspectives on daily life, material culture, and power.

B.    Readings:

                                               i.     Van Buren, M. 1999.  “Tarapaya: An Elite Spanish Residence near Colonial Potosi in Comparative Perspective” Historical Archaeology 33(2):101-115.  COURSE PACKET.

                                             ii.     Jamieson, R.W.  2000. “Doña Luisa and Her Two Houses” in Lines That Divide: Historical Archaeologies of Race, Class, and Gender.  Edited by J.A. Delle, S.A. Mrozowki, and R. Paynter, pp. 142-167.  COURSE PACKET.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

 

XIII.     SOUTH AMERICA: DEMOGRAPHY AND CASTE (April 20, 22)

A.    Comparative perspectives on demographic change and the caste life

B. Readings:

                                               i.     CLA, pp. 225-248: The Family and Society.

                                             ii.     Ubelaker, D. 1994.  “The Biological Impact of European Contact in Ecuador”, in In The Wake of Contact, edited by Clark Spencer Larsen and George R. Milner, pp. 147-160.  COURSE PACKET.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

XIV.      SOUTH AMERICA: THE COLONIAL CHURCH (April 27, 29)

A.    Comparative perspectives on religious conversion

B.    Readings:

                                               i.     Rostworowski, María.  1998.  “Pachacamac and El Señor de los Milagros” in Native Traditions in the Postconquest World.  Edited by E. H. Boone and T. Cummins, pp. 345-360.  Dumbarton Oaks.  AVAILABLE ONLINE at http://www.doaks.org/BONTC.html

                                             ii.     Wernke, Steven A.  2007  “Analogy or Erasure?  Dialectics of Religious Transformation in the Early Doctrinas of the Colca Valley, Peru”  International Journal of Historical Archaeology 11(2):152-182.  Available at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/wernke/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/wernke_ijha_2007.pdf  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

XV.         THE ANDES: TRADE AND PRODUCTION (May 4, 6)

***Exam 3 on May 6***

A.    Comparative perspective on production and trade

B.    Issues of provisioning in the Andes

C.    Regional comparisons and closing remarks

D.   READ:

                                               i.     deFrance, S.D.  1996. “Iberian Foodways in the Moquegua and Torata Valleys of Southern Peru” Historical Archaeology 30(3):20-48.  COURSE PACKET.  **Commentary due on Tuesday**

 

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

30330-30335 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 400pm-500pm WAG 420
show description

ANT304/ARY301: INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGICAL STUDIES

 

Fall 2009

Lecture: MW 4:00PM- 5:00PM   WAG 420

Instructor: Enrique Rodríguez            

Instructor’s office: EPS 1.110C

Office Hours: Mondays, 1:30-3:30

Email: see email rules below

 

Teaching Assistant, Lab Supervisor: Emily Root-Garey

TA’s office: EPS 2.136

TA’s office hours: TBA

 

Unique numbers and Lab schedules:

30330              TH 300PM- 400PM               EPS 2.136

30335              TH 400PM- 500PM  EPS 2.136

30900              TH 300PM- 400PM   EPS 2.136

30905              TH 400PM- 500PM   EPS 2.136

***Please show up only to your lab.  If you wish to change lab hours you must do so by registering for the appropriate lab.  No exceptions.

 

            Archaeology is a subfield of anthropology that studies the human past through its material remains.  Archaeologists have studied a variety of aspects of the past, including the relationship between humans and the ecosystem, politics, changes in technology and production, gender, race, sexuality, health, capitalism, and more.  To study the past, archaeologists use a variety of lines of evidence, including landscapes, ceramics, lithics, human remains, chemical data, faunal remains, written documents, and others.  In this course we will discuss the many faces of archaeology and the varied methods and theoretical approaches that archaeologists have used to study the past.

 

            Throughout the semester, we will study some of the basic developments of archaeological method and theory in the last century.  At the same time, we will study sites, archaeological cultures, and case-studies that will aid in illustrating the different theoretical perspectives and methodological advances that we are focusing on.  Thus, the course will not only serve as an introduction to human prehistory, but it will also be a critical evaluation of how methods and techniques have helped us shape our views on human prehistory.  We will end the semester with important information on ethics, the politics of the past, and careers in archaeology.

 

            Goals of the course:

1.     To provide students with an introduction to the development of archaeological methods and theory.

2.     To examine major topics in human prehistory, including technological change, agriculture, social inequality, imperialism and colonization, and others.

3.     To provide students with an introduction to some of the basic techniques of archaeological laboratory work and inference.

 

Students with disabilities: Any student with disabilities should talk to me as soon as possible so that we may make arrangements that will make for a better learning experience and that will allow the student to show his or her abilities fully.  Students with disability must contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 to ensure that reasonable accommodations are provided for them. 

 

Other classroom rules:

            NO laptop computers, newspapers, or calculators in class.  Please turn off your cell phones.   Texting is not allowed in class.

           

            Academic dishonesty will be dealt with according to University rules.

 

Grading:  Successful completion of this course will require learning from readings, lectures, slideshows, in-class exercises, and films.  Topics covered in the readings and in the classroom will, at times, be entirely different.  Students are expected to read before class and to participate in discussion and labs. 

 

            Labs:  There will be one hour of laboratory work per week.  Students are required to attend the lab session that matches their unique number.  If a student wishes to change lab sessions, they must change their registration.  Students may NOT make up for missed labs.  NO EXCUSES.  We will discuss lab assignments in detail in class.  Students must protect lab equipment and teaching collections and use them according to the rules that we will specify during the lab orientation.  Labs are required to pass the class.  Any student who misses more than four labs, regardless of performance in the rest of the class, will automatically receive an F in the class.

 

Exams:  There will be two exams during the semester, and one final exam.  Under normal circumstances, there will be no make-up exams.  Talk to me as early as possible if you know you will not make it to an exam.  If you miss an exam, please bring documentation of the reason why you missed it, and we can talk about scheduling an exam for you. 

 

Students may discuss with me their exam grade individually.  Once we have discussed the grade, I might agree to re-grade the exam.  Re-grading does not guarantee a better grade.  In fact, your grade might suffer during a re-grading if I find errors that I did not find on my first grading. Therefore, students are advised to make sure you have specific reasons why your grade should improve before showing up to discuss your grade.

 

The final exam will take place during finals week, not during the semester.  NO EXCEPTIONS.  It is scheduled for Friday, December 11 from 7 to 10PM.  I will confirm or correct this date and time in class, in case there are any changes to the finals schedule.

 

           

            Final Grades will be calculated as follows

1.     Exam 1:                 15%

2.     Exam 2:                 20%

3.     Final exam:            25%

4.     Labs:                     40%

 

Email rules:

1.     Email if you have a medical emergency that will prevent you from making it to an exam.

2.     Email if I ask you to email me.

3.     Do not email to continue class discussion; please use office hours.  Also, if you have a question about the material, please bring it up in class.  Other students might benefit from it.

4.     Do not use email to turn in assignments, to send attachments, or to ask about the exam.  Please see me in office hours and bring your exam.

5.     My email is: chanfle@mail.utexas.edu

 

Readings

The following book is available at the COOP:

 

            Scarre, Chris (editor)  2009  The Human Past.  2nd edition.  Thames & Hudson.

 

In addition, there is a course packet, available at Abel’s copies.  Both are required.

 

 

CLASS SCHEDULE

 

Week 1 (August 26): Introduction: What is archaeology?

Lab: No lab this week.

 

Week 2 (August 31-Sept 4): Sites and survey.

            Topics: Introduction to site formation processes, survey techniques, and basic                                  artifact categories.

            Lab: Students MUST show to the first lab on Thursday, for a lab

orientation and the first lab assignment. 

            Readings:

                        The Human Past, chapter 1.

 

Week 3 (Sept. 7-11): Archaeological excavation.

            NO CLASS ON MONDAY (Labor day)

Topics: Overview of field techniques, stratigraphy, seriation, and absolute dating. 

Lab: Archaeology and hypothesis testing.

            Readings:

                        Course packet: Sutton and Yohe, Archaeology, Chapters 4 and 5.

 

Week 4 (Sept. 14-18): Earthlings.

Topics: Human beings and the earliest artifacts.

Lab: Archaeological survey.

Readings:

            The Human Past, Chapter 4, pp. 124-151.

Course Packet: Dolni Vestonice, The Cave of Lascaux

 

Week 5 (Sept. 21-25): Colonizing the world.

Topics: Foragers in the past and today, faunal analysis.

Lab: Field methods in archaeology.

Readings: 

            The Human Past, Chapter 4, pp.151-172.

            Course Packet: Monte Verde

 

Week 6 (Sept. 28-Oct.2): The origins of agriculture and sedentary life.

            ***EXAM 1 Monday September 28***

Topics: The origins of agriculture and its consequences for human

health.

            Lab: The African Burial Ground.

            Readings:

The Human Past, Chapter 5, and Chapter 9 pp.306-333.

 

 

Week 7 (Oct. 5-9): Social/evolutionary typologies and stages of complexity: North America.

            Topics: the “rise” of social inequality, archaeological indicators of social

inequality.  Moundbuilders in North America.

Lab: Stratigraphy and seriation.

Readings:

            The Human Past, Chapter 18.

           

 

Week 8 (Oct. 12-16): Antiquarianism and culture history: ancient Egypt

            Topics: Archaeological theory: antiquarianism, 19th and 20th century culture-

history, and general cultural reconstruction. 

Lab: Ceramics and archaeological inference.

            Readings: 

The Human Past, Chapter 10.

 

Week 9 (Oct. 19-23): Mesoamerica 

            Topics: monuments and households, comparative analysis of contexts.

            Lab: Lithics.

            Readings:

The Human Past, Chapter 16.

 

Week 10 (Oct. 26-30): Explanation in archaeology: Processualism

Topics:  Archaeological theory: the scientific method, biological/ecological

models, Marxism.

            Lab: Culture and society in the past.

            Readings: 

Course Packet: Renfrew and Bahn, pp.473-481.

                       

Week 11 (Nov. 2-6): The Andes

***EXAM 2 Monday Nov 2***

Topics: the legacy of the New Archaeology today, empires.

            Lab: African Burial Ground, part 2.

            Readings:

The Human Past, Chapter 17.

 

Week 12 (Nov. 9-13): Explanation in archaeology: Post-processual archaeology

            Topics: questioning objectivity in archaeology; archaeologies of gender,

sexuality, race; landscape archaeology.

            Lab: Gender in space.

            Readings: 

                        Course Packet: Renfrew and Bahn, pp.494-503.

Course Packet: Fagan, Theoretical Approaches: People as Agents of

Change.

 

Week 13 (Nov. 16-20): Historical archaeology

            Topics: Marxism and critiques of capitalism, archaeological and historical data.

            Lab: Archaeological project design.

            Readings:

                        Course Packet: Kelly and Thomas, Archaeology, Chapter 14.

 

Week 14 (Nov. 23-25): Ethics and professionalization

            Topics: the politics of the past, ethics in archaeology

            Lab: No lab this week.  Thanksgiving. 

            Readings:

                        Course Packet: Images of the Past, Chapter 12.

                        Course Packet: Kelly and Thomas, Archaeology, Chapter 15.

 

Week 15 (Nov.30-Dec. 4): Professionalization

.           Topics: cultural resource management, graduate school.

            Lab: Final review.

            Readings:

                        The Human Past, Chapter 19.

 

*** Final exam will take place during finals week***

 

ANT 383M • Archaeologies Of Technology

30585 • Fall 2009
Meets W 900-1200 EPS 1.130KA
show description

ANT383M: Archaeologies of Technology

Unique no.: 30585, 30735

Fall, 2009

Wednesdays, 9:00- 12:00

EPS. 1.130KA

Instructor: Enrique Rodríguez

Office: EPS 1.110C

Office hours: TBA

 

 

            Technology and ideas about technology form a central part of how people in general and anthropologists specifically think about the world.  Technology has been used to classify history and prehistory into different eras (Paleolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age, etc.), and to describe differences between “primitive” and “modern”, “rational” and “cultural”, etc.  Ideas about technology form an important part of narratives of progress in Western countries and underdevelopment in the Third World, and of explanations of processes of European colonialism in the Americas.  Archaeologies of Technology is a graduate seminar that will critically examine how ideas related to technology have influenced Anthropology and how technology has been involved in social, cultural, and economic change in specific case studies.  The seminar will begin with an introduction to the literature on Science, Technology, and Society (STS).  We will examine a variety of archaeological approaches to technology, including behavioral, evolutionary, and social constructionist approaches, among others.   We will then consider a variety of topics and case studies related to communication technologies (origins of writing, calendars, etc.), agricultural intensification, ceramic production, stone tool production, metallurgy, and European colonialism. 

 

Students with disabilities: Any student with disabilities should talk to me as soon as possible so that we may make arrangements that will make for a better learning experience and that will allow the student to show his or her abilities fully.

 

Assignments:

Attendance and participation are required, as is, of course, completion of readings before class.  Assignments will consist of student presentations and discussion of class readings, a term paper, and an oral presentation of the term paper in class.

 

Discussion of readings:

Students will be in charge of leading discussion of the different readings.  Whether as presenters or not, all students are expected to have done the reading for the week and to participate in class.  Please note that participation is required and graded.  Students should make informed contributions to class by asking questions about the readings, reacting to other students’ ideas and comments, and being active in discussion. 

 

My goal with the participation requirement is to encourage a cooperative class, in which students are ready to contribute to the discussion and development of ideas.  I will pass out a roster starting the third week of class.  You must circle your name on the list if you are present and ready to be called to lead discussion.  If you circle your name more than two thirds of the times that I pass the list around, your grade will go up half a grade at the end of the semester (e.g. from C to C+, or from B+ to A-).  If you circle your name one third or less of our classes, your grade will go down one increment.  There is no need to email or explain if you are not prepared to lead class.

 

I also encourage students to bring films, slide shows, and to come up with ideas for field trips to view exhibits or anything related to the class.  Please let me know if you come up with any ideas so that we can all plan ahead. 

 

            Term paper:

            The main assignment for the semester will be a term paper.  You will first turn in an annotated bibliography of 8 to 10 sources that will be central to your paper.  You will then present your paper in class, and then turn in a final, well-polished version of the paper at the end of the semester.  We will discuss topics in class, but remember that they must be related to technology.

 

Grades will be determined as follows:

            Attendance and participation:                                                             20%

            Oral presentation of term paper:                                                         20%

            Annotated bibliography:                                                                         30%

Term paper:                                                                                                 30%

           

 

 

 When formulating this syllabus, I organized the readings first by theoretical approach, and then by archaeological material or technological function.  There are other productive ways of organizing this syllabus and thinking about the readings, and I invite students to do their research for their own papers in other ways.  For example, topics that would make for good papers include gender and technology, race, human evolution, ethnicity, warfare, ownership of the means of production, etc.

 

 

Week 1. August 26.  Introduction to STS.

Week 2. September 2.  Introduction: What is technology?

            Dobres, Marcia-Anne  2000  Technology and Social Agency.  Malden,                                               Massachusetts: Blackwell.  Chapter 1:10-46.

            Heidegger, Martin  1982 The Question Concerning Technology.  The                                       Question Concerning Technology.  Translated by W. Lovitt.  Harper,                             NY.  Pp. 3-35. 

            Dosi, Giovanni and Marco Grazzi  2009  On the Nature of technologies.                                 Cambridge Journal of Economics.  (Advance Access on the                                        internet).

            Pfaffenberger, Bryan  1992  Social Anthropology of Technology. Annual                                Review of Anthropology.  21:491-516. 

Week 3. September 9.  Early anthropological works on culture and technology.

 

Childe, V. Gordon  2004  “Archaeological Ages as Technological Stages.” 

In Foundations of Social Archaeology: Selected Writings of V. Gordon Childe, edited by Thomas C. Patterson and Charles E. Orser Jr., pp. 47-70.  Altamira: Walnut Creek.

 

            Mauss, Marcel  2006  Techniques, Technology and Civilisation.  Edited by                               Nathan Schlanger.  New York: Durkheim Press/Berghahn Books.                                    Chapters:  9, 10, 12.

Morgan, Lewis Henry  1963 (1877)  Ancient Society.  Part I.  Meridian

Books, Cleveland.

Flannery, Kent V.  1972  “Culture History v. Cultural Process: A

Debate in American Archaeology.”  In Contemporary Archaeology, edited by Mark Leone.  Pp. 102-107.  Southern Illinois University Press, Carbondale. 

 

Week 4. September 16.  Evolutionary perspectives:

            Bamforth, Doug and Peter Bleed  1997  Technology, Flaked Stone                                           Technology, and Risk.  AP3A 7:  Rediscovering Darwin: Evolutionary                              Theory in Archeological Explanation.  Pp.109-139.        (The                                                    Archaeological papers of the AAA series should be available online                      on Anthrosource).

            Kuhn, Stephen L. 2004  Evolutionary Perspectives on Technology and                          Technological Change.  World Archaeology 36(4):561-570.

            O’Brien, Michael J.  and R. Lee Lyman 2000  “Darwinian Theory and                                         Archaeology.”In Applying Evolutionary Archaeology: A Systematic                              Approach.  New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum.                                                              (NOT on PCL reserves; electronic copies available on University                            Library catalog).

            Neff, Hector  1992  “Ceramics and Evolution” Archaeological Method and              Theory 4:141-193.

Week 5. September 23. Behavioral perspectives:

            Schiffer, Michael B.

2005   “The Electric Lighthouse in the nineteenth Century: Aid to            Navigation   and Political Technology.”  Technology and Culture       45:275-305.

 

            -----2001  Anthropological Perspectives on Technology.  Chapters 1, 7, 9,                              14.

Week 6. September 30. Social constructionist perspectives:

            Guille-Escuret, Georges  2002  “Technical Innovation and Cultural                                            Resistance”.  In Technological Choices: Transformations in Material                             Cultures since the Neolithic, edited by Pierre Lemonnier, New York:                                  Routledge.  Pp. 372-398.

            Killick, David 2004  “Social Constructionist Approaches to the study of                                    Technology” World Archaeology.  36(4):571-578.

            Latour, Bruno  2002  “Ethnography of a ‘High-Tech’Case” in                                                       Technological Choices: Transformations in Material Cultures since                                the Neolithic, edited by Pierre Lemonnier, New York: Routledge.  Pp.                      372-298.

            Lemonnier, Pierre  1986  “The Study of Material Culture Today: Toward an                              anthropology of Technical Systems”  Journal of Anthropological                                   Archaeology 5:147-186.

            ----2002  “Introduction”.  In Technological Choices: Transformations in                                     Material Cultures since the Neolithic, edited by Pierre Lemonnier,                                 New York: Routledge.  Pp. 1-35.

Week 7. October 7.  Technology, population, and food production:

            Hayden, Brian  1981  “Research and Development in the Stone Age:                          Technological Transitions among Hunter-Gatherers.”  Current                                        Anthropology  22(5):519-548.

            Kolata, Alan L.  1991  “The Technology and Organization of Agricultural                                  Production in the Tiwanaku State”  Latin American Antiquity 2(2):99-                            125.

            Morrison, Kathleen  1994  “The Intensification of Production:                                                       Archaeological Approaches.”  Journal of Archaeological Method                             and Theory 1(2):111-159.

            Vessuri, Hebe M.C.  1980  “Technological Change and the Social                                             Organization of Agricultural Production” Current Anthropology                                     21(3):315-327.

Week 8. October 14.  Communication technologies: writing and not writing:

            Schmandt-Besserat, Denise 1997  How Writing Came About.  Austin:                                       University of Texas Press.

            Urton, Gary  1998  “From Knots to Narratives: Reconstructing the Art of                                  Historical Record Keeping in the Andes from Spanish Transcriptions                              of Inka Khipus”.  Ethnohistory 45(3):409-438.

 

Week 9. October 21. Ceramic technologies:

Crown, Patricia L. and W.H. Wills  1995  “Economic Intensification and the

Origins of Ceramic Containers in the American Southwest.”  In The Emergence of Pottery: Technology and Innovation in Ancient Societies, edited by William K. Barnett and John W. Hoopes, pp. 241-254.  Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.

 

McClure, Sarah B.  2007  “Gender, Technology, and Evolution: Cultural                                   Inheritance Theory and Prehistoric Potters in Valencia, Spain.”                           American Antiquity 72(3):485-508.

Moore, A.M.T.  1995  “The Inception of Potting in Western Asia and

Its Impact on Economy and Society.”  In The Emergence of Pottery: Technology and Innovation in Ancient Societies, edited by William K. Barnett and John W. Hoopes, pp. 39-54.  Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.

 

Sassaman, Kenneth E.  2000  “Agents of change in hunter-gatherer

technology.”  In Agency in Archaeology, edited by Marcia-Anne Dobres and John Robb, pp. 148-168.  Routledge. 

 

            Vandiver, Pamela B., Olga Soffer, Bohuslav Klima, Jiri Svoboda  1989  “The                             Origins of Ceramic Technology at Dolni Vestonice,                                                            Czechoslovakia.”  Science.  246(4933):1002-1008.

Week 10. October 28.  Lithic technologies:

            Andrefsky, William  1994  “Raw-Material Availability and the Organization                               of Technology.”  American Antiquity 59(1):21-34.

            Gero, Joan  1991  “Genderlithics: Women’s Role in Stone Tool Production.”               In Engendering Archaeology: Women and Prehistory.  Edited by                           Joan Gero and Margaret Conkey, pp. 163-193. 

            Mitchell, Peter J.  2000  “The Organization of Later Stone Age Lithic                                          Technology in the Caledon Valley, South Africa”.  The African                                        Archaeological Review.  17(3):141-176.

            Stone, Tammy  1994  “The Impact of Raw-Material Scarcity on Ground-                                  Stone Manufacture and Use: an Example from the Phoenix Basin                                  Hohokam” American Antiquity 59(4):680-694.

Week 11. November 4.  Metallurgy:

 

            Sofaer Derevenski, J. 2000. “Rings of life: the role of early metalwork in                                   mediating the gendered life course.” World Archaeology 31: 389-                              406. 

 

            Gordon, R. B. and Killick, D. 1993  “Adaptation of technology to culture                                  and environment: bloomery iron smelting in America and Africa.”                                Technology and Culture 34: 243-70. 

 

            Lechtman, H. 1984. “Andean value systems and the development of                                     prehistoric metallurgy”. Technology and Culture 25: 1-36. 

 

            Pollard, Helen Perlstein  1987  “The Political Economy of Prehispanic                                         Tarascan Metallurgy”  American Antiquity 52(4):741-752.

 

            Reid, Andrew, and Rachel MacLean  1995  “Symbolism and the Social                                   Contexts of Iron Production in Karagwe.”  World Archaeology                                      27(1):144-161.

 

Week 12. November 11. Colonialism and technology

Douglas Bamforth  2003  “Discussion”  In Stone Tool Traditions in the

Contact Era.  Edited by Charles Cobb, pp.175-172.  The University of Alabama Press: Tuscaloosa.

 

            Ramenofsky, Ann F.  1998  “Evolutionary Theory and the Native American                             Record of Artifact Replacement.”  In Studies in Culture Contact:                                  Interaction, Culture Change, and Archaeology, Occasional Paper                             No. 25.  Edited by James G. Cusick, pp. 77-101.  Center For                                                Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University,                                            Carbondale.

            Bauer, Arnold J.  1990  “Millers and Grinders: Technology and Household                               Economy in Mesoamerica”. Agricultural History.  64(1):1-17.

 

Applying to the graduate program

Here are the answers to some common questions regarding the graduate program and admissions:

Q: Are you admitting students next year?

A: Maybe.  It depends on how many students we can fund, and on the quality of the applicants.  I always recommend that people apply because even if we have limited admissions, perhaps their application will rise to the top.  Give it a good shot.

Q: What can I do to increase my chances of admission?

A:  The answer to this question includes everything you already know:

--A good statement of purpose is absolutely necessary for admission.  Be clear about what your goals are in graduate school.  Tell us what topics and regions interest you and why.  Tell us why you think Texas would be a good school for you, given your interests.  Mention what faculty that you would like to work with. 

--The higher your GPA, the better your chances of admission.

--The higher your GRE, the better your chances of admission.

--Good letters of recommendation are necessary for admission.

--You should have field experience in archaeology, whether in field schools, as part of archaeological projects, CRM, or all of the above. 

Q: Is there funding for graduate students?

A: Yes.  In recent years we have admitted students only if we can fund them with a combination of stipend, tuition, and teaching assistantships.  Regardless of their funding necessities, I always encourage students to apply for external funding from the National Science Foundation, Ford Foundation, Ford International, and any other agency for which they may qualify.  All of my students are required to apply for external funding on the first year of graduate school.

Q: What is your area of specialization?

A: I am an archaeologist and I work primarily in Central Mexico on the Aztecs and Spanish colonizers.  I have worked in Mexico City, with the Programa de Arqueologia Urbana of the Templo Mayor Museum, doing research on Spanish colonizers and their material belongings, their interaction with indigenous people, and their everyday lives.  I have also worked in Xaltocan, a town north of Mexico City, doing research on indigenous people before and after the Spanish conquest of the town.  I have used a variety of methods in my research, including archaeological excavation, NAA, ICP-MS, lithic typology, XRF, ceramic typology, archival research, and others. I have many interests, including materiality, food, cooking, gender, and on and on.  You can get a good idea of my interests by consulting my publications page.

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