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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Mariah D. Wade

Professor Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Associate Professor
Mariah D. Wade

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 232-4876
  • Office: SAC 4.146
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: Mondays and Wednesdays 10 a.m.-11 a.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

Interests

Archaeology and ethnohistory of North America, colonial and post-colonial American Southwest, Iberian Bronze and Iron Ages and Roman Period; Portugal, North America

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31365-31390 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 200pm-300pm WEL 2.246
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 326D • Native Americans In The Plains

31555 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CLA 0.122
show description

From the middle 18th century through the late 19th century the Great Plains region underwent drastic changes in terms of the environment, demography, and cultural diversity. The rapid influx of various groups of people into the Plains, from Native American groups to European settlers, made the Plains the ultimate theater to rehearse short-term strategies and long-term policies. This course will survey the ethnohistory of some of the most influential Native groups on the Plains, from the arrival of the Spanish through the reservation period. We will explore the relationships and interaction between European settlers and Native groups, as well as the outcome of some scientific expeditions and military campaigns. In this course, we will adopt a long-term perspective to make sense of the development of European policies and movements, the changing configurations among Native groups, and the pivotal importance of resources such as the buffalo, the horse, and the gun. We will also look at specific events and historical figures, such as Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and General Custer, whose actions became symbolic of a turbulent historical period.

ANT 324L • Bronze & Iron Age Atlantic Eur

31642 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SAC 4.174
show description

This course aims to cross ideological, disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological boundaries between Bronze Age/Iron Age studies in Europe and explore varied approaches in the understanding of these two major archaeological periods from a transnational perspective. Although we will consider Eastern and Central Europe, there will be some focus on Western Europe as this area has often been neglected. 

 

ANT 326E • Plains Archaeol: Prehist/Hist

31435 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.118
show description

Life on the Plains has never been easy. The ecological characteristics of the Plains enabled varied human populations to adapt and change in response to environmental and historical circumstances. This course explores the evidence of human activities on the Great Plains, with a primary focus on the central and southern plains from prehistoric to historic times (ca. 11.000 BP to ca. AD 1850). We will review, critically, the principal environmental concepts used to define the plains, discuss the impact of specific resources such as the bison, and examine a number of archaeological sites as well as some relevant historical records. 

ANT 380K • Archaeology Of Bronze Age/Iron

31535 • Fall 2013
Meets T 200pm-500pm SAC 4.174
show description

This course aims to cross ideological, disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological boundaries between Bronze Age/Iron Age studies in Europe and explore varied approaches in the understanding of these two major archaeological periods from a transnational perspective. Although we will consider Eastern and Central Europe, there will be some focus on Western Europe as this area has often been neglected. 

 

ANT 326C • Native Americans In Texas

31310 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am SAC 4.174
show description

ANT 362K • Archaeol Of Texas And Vicinity

31385 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm SAC 4.174
show description

This class is a survey of the prehistoric and early historic archaeology of the south central portion of North America, centered on Texas. The course will present the prehistoric cultural developments in this area from the perspective of important archaeological sites and nationally significant, innovative research efforts. There will be a reader and web-based assigned readings but no textbook. Grades will be based on two exams and two web-based summaries of specific archaeological sites in the region. 

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31050-31075 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 200pm-300pm GAR 0.102
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 326F • Great Discovs In Archaeology

31355 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am UTC 3.134
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

Archaeology shapes the way we understand the human past, and the history of archaeology was shaped by the great discoveries in archaeology and the people who made them. For instance, things that today we take for granted, such as travel agencies, photography, and postcards, or how we understand the politics of modern archaeology and our role in them, or the claims of countries for the return of art objects are all connected to the history of archeology and its discoverers. This course surveys the stories and myths behind some of those discoveries as well as the background of the discoverers. In the process we will discuss how they acquired knowledge, formulated hypotheses, and the impact their early discoveries had on the ways we know the world, think about ourselves, and on how archaeology is practiced today.

ANT 384M • Spanish Missions

31450 • Spring 2012
Meets W 200pm-500pm SAC 5.118
(also listed as LAS 391 )
show description

The course addresses the development of the mission as an institution from its beginning through the secularization process. The focus will be on the Franciscan missions in northern Mexico (Coahuila), Texas and California (1600s through 1800s). We will discuss the Laws of the Indias regarding the enslavement of Native Americans, the concept of “reducción” in light of the policies of Christianization, Catholic rituals and their impact on Native American groups, daily routines, the politics and economics of the use of the Native American labor force, and gender issues related to role assignments and division of space. We will consider the differences between the Jesuit and Franciscan ethos and its influence on missionary work and the institution, particularly the differences between missions for agriculturists and those established hunting and gathering Native populations.

ANT F662 • Field Archaeology-Por

81840 • Summer 2011
Meets
show description

The University of Texas Portugal Archeological Field School will take place at the site of Bagunte, Vila do Conde. The field school will consist of a six-week excavation program combined with lectures, laboratory work, andstudy visits to museums and archaeological sites. Students will be excavating an Iron Age/Roman hilltop fortified settlement and be trained on basic archeological methods and techniques. In the course of training,students will learn a variety of field techniques including survey and mapping with a total station, soil identification, stratigraphy and note-taking. Participants will clean, sort and categorize artifacts and ecofacts and be trained in cleaning, identifying and conserving ceramics and metals. Students are expected to participate fully in all phases offieldwork as a team and develop observational skills and critical thinking.

ANT 326D • Native Americans In The Plains

31370 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SAC 4.174
(also listed as AMS 321 )
show description

From the middle 18th century through the late 19th century the Great Plains region underwent drastic changes in terms of the environment, demography, and cultural diversity. The rapid influx of various groups of people into the Plains, from Native American groups to European settlers, made the Plains the ultimate theater to rehearse short-term strategies and long-term policies. This course will survey the ethnohistory of some of the most influential Native groups on the Plains, from the arrival of the Spanish through the reservation period. We will explore the relationships and interaction between European settlers and Native groups, as well as the outcome of some scientific expeditions and military campaigns. In this course, we will adopt a long-term perspective to make sense of the development of European policies and movements, the changing configurations among Native groups, and the pivotal importance of resources such as the buffalo, the horse, and the gun. We will also look at specific events and historical figures, such as Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and General Custer, whose actions became symbolic of a turbulent historical period.

ANT 336L • Native Americans In Texas

30180 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GRG 102
(also listed as AMS 321G )
show description

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the history and cultures of the Native American peoples north of Mexico.  A variety of approaches will be considered in the course, including ethnographic, historical, ecological, linguistic, literary, and autobiographical approaches.

 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Anthropology 302.

ANT 324L • Plains Archaeol: Prehist/Hist

30315 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 900-1000 EPS 2.136
show description

Course Title:

Plains Archaeology: Prehistory and History

Ant 324L (Unique # 30315)

MWF 9:00-10:00 AM

EPS 2.136

Spring 2010

 

Instructor:

            Dr. Mariah F. Wade            Office: EPS 1.204

Office Hours: Wednesday 11:00-12:00 & 1:00 -2:00 PM or by appointment

Telephone: 512-232-4876                        Email: m.wade@mail.utexas.edu

 

Course Description:

Life on the Plains has never been easy. The ecological characteristics of the Plains enabled varied human populations to adapt and change in response to environmental and historical circumstances. This course explores the evidence of human activities on the Great Plains, with a primary focus on the central and southern plains from prehistoric to historic times (ca. 11.000 BP to ca. AD 1850). We will review, critically, the principal environmental concepts used to define the plains, discuss the impact of specific resources such as the bison, and examine a number of archaeological sites as well as some relevant historical records.

 

Requirements: Upper division standing or consent of the instructor.

 

Required Text Books:

1998            Archaeology on the Great Plains, edited by W. Raymond Wood

Supplementary Readings in Electronic Reserves 

 

Policies and Administrative details

  • Pre-requisites            There are no pre-requisites for this course other than those shown above. Students should have taken Ant. 301/ 304 or have some knowledge of Archaeology, otherwise they might have problems following the material.
  • Attendance is required
  • Blackboard            Lecture materials will be placed on Blackboard after the class, but maps, photos and drawings will not be included as they seem to clog the system.  Some maps and information sheets will be on the Course Page at Eres.
  • Assignment policy            All assignments are to be delivered at the beginning of class. There will be no exceptions, except when the absence is unavoidable in which case the student is expected to contact me, and I will require proof of the problem.
  • Short papers            The analytical/discussion papers are to be well-written, comprehensive and address the prompt provided.                        
  • Poster Project            Information on the Poster Project will be given later in class. But, as the name indicates, you will be expected to create a poster that will include text and images related to a topic, an archaeological time period or an archaeology site.  You will choose between doing the project individually or as a pair. In either case you will give a 5 minute presentation on the finished product.
  • Scholastic honesty            Scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated and the rules of the University of Texas will apply. Please make sure that you well aware of the content of these rules, by visiting this site: http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/integrity/

      Plagiarism      You may also want to see these other sites, which include information about       plagiarism and how to deal with web sources. Use of web material, particularly text, as to be      referenced as completely as if you were dealing with a library book.

  • http://newark.rutgers.edu/%7Eehrlich/plagiarism598.html
  • http://www.indiana.edu/%7Ewts/wts/plagiarism.html
  • Computers            Students have access to the Student Microcomputer Facility (SMF). Please visit this site for more information: http://www.utexas.edu/smf/
  • Disabilities            The University of Texas at Austin provides students with qualified disabilities with academic adjustments to their needs. For more information please visit this site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/  or call 471-6259. If you have a disability please let me know as soon as possible.  
  • Cell phones            Please make sure that your cell phones and other electronic devices are turned off while in the classroom.
  • Recording             According to University Rules tape-recording of lectures is not permitted, unless permission has been granted by the instructor.
  • Contact                        You can contact me by email, by coming to the office hours, or by appointment. Emails received after 9:00 pm will be answered the following day.

 

Evaluation and Grading:

Ten (10) short analytical/discussion papers based on specific class readings. These one-page papers are to be typed, double-spaced and delivered in class. 5 points each: 50 points

             Poster Project: 30 points

            Attendance/Class Participation: 20 points

 

Assignments:

  • All reading assignments have to be completed before class.
  • Class attendance is required (see above)

 

Syllabus

 

Week 1

January 20 -22

            Introduction

            The history of archaeology in the Plains –overview

            Definition of the Plains – Environment and Culture Areas

 

Week 2

January 25-29

            Climate and Topography

 

Week 3

February 1-5

            The History of the Prehistory of the Plains

            Problems of Taxonomy

 

Week 4

February 8- 12           

The Direct Historical Approach

            Paleo-Indians

 

Week 5

February 15–19

            Paleo-Indians – Hunters

 

Week 6

February 22-26

            Late Paleo Indians/Plains Archaic – Hunters and gatherers

 

Week 7

March 1-5

            Archaic - Mobile Foragers

 

Week 8

March 8 - 12

            The Archaic – Mobile Foragers

 

Week 9

q      March 15 – 20       Spring Break

 

Week 10

March 22 -26

            The Plains Woodland Complexes

            Early Village Tradition

            The Central Plains Tradition

 

Week 11

March 29 – April 2

            Early and Late Village Tradition

            The Middle Missouri Tradition

 

Week 12

 April 5-9

            Late Village Tradition/ Late Prehistoric

            The Coalescent Tradition

 

Week 13

April 12 – 16

            The Southern Plains

            Early and Late Villagers

            The Arrival of the Europeans

 

Week 14

April 19 - 23

            The Late High Plains Hunters

            Historic Plains and Riverine Groups

 

Week 15

April 26- 30

            The Late High Plains Hunters

            Historic Plains and Riverine Groups

            Conflict and Removal

 

Week 16

 May 3-7

            Conflict and Removal

            Review and Conclusions

q      Poster Presentations: May 3, and 5

q      May 7th  is the last day of class

 

 

 

 

 

ANT 324L • Great Discoveries In Archaeol

30445 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 WAG 101
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

Course Title: Great Discoveries in Archaeology

ANT 324L (Unique #30445)

EUS 346 (Unique #36450)

TTH  9:30-11:00

WAG 101

Fall 2009

 

Instructor:     Dr. Mariah F. Wade

                        Office: EPS 1.204

Office Hours:     T 11:00 – 1:00 PM or by appointment

                        Telephone: 512-232-4876; Email: m.wade@mail.utexas.edu

Teaching Assistants:

            Ms. Eunice Garza:

 Office hrs: TH 8:30-9:30 am or by appointment.              Email: eunicecgarza@yahoo.com

            Mr. Shawn Marceaux:

Office hrs: T 11:00-12.00 or by appointment.  Email: shawnmarceaux@mail.utexas.edu

Office: EPS 4.110; Telephone: 512-232-6297

 

Course Description:

Archaeology shapes the way we understand the human past, and the history of archaeology was shaped by the great discoveries in archaeology and the people who made them. This course surveys the stories and myths behind some of those discoveries as well as the background of the discoverers. In the process we will discuss how they acquired knowledge, formulated hypotheses, and the impact their early discoveries had on the ways we know the world, think about ourselves, and on how archaeology is practiced today. For instance, things that today we take for granted, such as travel agencies and postcards, or how we understand the politics of modern archaeology and our role in them, or the claims of countries for the return of art objects are all connected to the history of archeology and its discoverers.

 

Requirements: Upper division standing or consent of the instructor.

 

Required Text Books:

1996 Eyewitness to Discovery edited by Brian Fagan

 Frauds, Myths and Mysteries, Science and Pseudoscience in Archaeology Kenneth L. Feder (most recent edition).

Both books are available at the UT CO-OP. Please see announcement on Blackboard

Feder’s textbook has a website

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072869488/information_center_view0/

 

 Supplementary Readings and maps will be in Electronic Reserves

 

Policies and Administrative details

  • Pre-requisites                        
  • There are no pre-requisites for this course other than those shown above.
  • Attendance                        
  • I will not take attendance, but failure to attend class may result in a poor grade because most of the exam material will come from lectures and discussions in class.
  • Class participation            
  • Students who do not participate in the class discussions will not be
  • penalized, but those who do will be rewarded as their questions and comments will enhance the discussion and benefit everyone.
  • Blackboard                        
  • Lecture materials will be placed on Blackboard after the class. Other materials will be placed in the Course Page at ERes
  • Test policy                        
  • There will be no make-up tests, except when the absence is unavoidable in which case the student is expected to contact me, and I will require proof of the problem.
  • Tests                                    
  • Exams will include a mixture of short answers, identifications and mini-essays. Fact sheets provided before the exam will include material for questions and topics for the mini-essays.
  • Poster Project                        
  • Information on the Poster Project will be given later in class. As the title indicates, the student will be expected to create a poster that will include text and images related to a topic, to an archaeologist and his or her discovery, or to an archaeological site. All projects must be related to course material unless the student has obtained prior consent from the instructor.  Each student will give a 3 to 5 minute class presentation on the finished product.
  • Scholastic honesty            
  • Scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated and the rules of the University of Texas will apply. Please make sure that you are well aware of the content of these rules by visiting this site:
  • http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/integrity/

Plagiarism                       

You may also want to see these other sites, which include information about plagiarism and how to deal with web sources. Use of web material, particularly text, has to be referenced as completely as if you were dealing with a library book.

  • http://newark.rutgers.edu/%7Eehrlich/plagiarism598.html
  • http://www.indiana.edu/%7Ewts/wts/plagiarism.html
  • Computers                        
  • Students have access to the Student Microcomputer Facility (SMF). Please visit this site for more information: http://www.utexas.edu/smf/
  • Disabilities                        
  • The University of Texas at Austin provides students with qualified disabilities with academic adjustments to meet their needs. For more information please visit this site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/ or call 471-6259. If you have a disability please let me know at the beginning of classes. 
  • Cell phones                        
  • Please make sure that your cell phones are turned off while in the classroom.
  • According to University Rules any recording of lectures is not permitted, unless the instructor has granted permission.
  • Contact:                        
  • You can contact me or the TAs by email, by coming to the office hours, or by appointment.  Emails received after 10:00 pm will not be answered until the following day.

 

Evaluation and Grading:

            Tests #1 and # 2: 20 points each.

            Students can elect to drop, or not to take, one of these 2 tests). NOTE: Only one of these two test grades counts to the final grade.

            2 take home assignments: 10 points each

            Test # 3: 30 points
            Poster Project: 30 points

 

Assignments:

  • Reading assignments have to be completed before class.
  • There are no make – up tests (see above)
  • Class attendance is expected (see above)

 

Schedule

 

Week 1

August 27

Introduction           

 

Week 2

September 1-3

Human Origins

           

Week 3

September 8-10

Time is of the essence: Bones, tools and humankind

 

Week 4

September 15-17

Whose skull is it, anyway?

           

 

Week 5

September 22-24

Egypt and the Near East

But can they write?

 

Week 6

September 29 -October 1

Egypt and Near East

                                    TEST 1 – October 1st

                       

Week 7

October 6-8

Egypt and Near East

 

Week 8

October 13-15

Greece and the Aegean

 

Week 9

October 20-22                       

Greece and the Aegean                       

                                   

TEST 2 - October 22nd  -Optional test – Upgrade or make-up test

 

Week 10

October 27-29

Europe

 

Week 11

November 3-5

Africa

 

Week 12

November 10-12

Asia and the Pacific

 

Week 13

November 17-19

North America                       

TEST 3 – November 19th

 

Week 14

November 24 (Thanksgiving Holiday – 26-28)

South America

 

Week 15

December 1-3

            Conclusions and Group discussions of Poster Projects.

 

 

What you should expect to get (and know!) when you finish this course

 

A sense of history and the importance of archaeology to the understanding of humankind and its achievements and failures

q  The history of archaeology and its relevance to modern thought: archaeology helps us to understand how humans leave their footprints in the physical world.

q  The interconnectedness of scientific thought: the history of archaeology is part of the history of geology, paleontology, biology, zoology, geography, political history…

q  The discoverers, their discoveries, and the historical context that affected both.

q  How and why the early history of archaeology raised questions that led to the development of modern archaeological techniques.

q  A synthetic chronology of major archaeological discoveries and events.

q  The politics and reasons that lead modern countries to claim the return of art objects.

q  A deeper understanding of how colonization affected the development of archaeology and archaeological thought, and how the politics of gender directed the ways archaeologists viewed humankind and its achievements.

q  The historical links between archaeology and travel, photography and spying.

 

ANT 324L • Iberian Prehistory & Hist-Por

81330 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 300pm-430pm
(also listed as LAS 324L )
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

ANT 324L • Native Amers In The Plains-W

29905 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 EPS 2.136
(also listed as AMS 321 )
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

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