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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Mariah E. Hopkins

Lecturer Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Contact

Biography

Research Interests: Primate Behavior & Ecology; Primate Spatial Cognition; Conservation Medicine; Spatial Data Analysis

Interests

Spatial modeling of disease, wildlife ecology and management, conservation biology; Panama

ANT 310L • Primate Cognition

31605 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.174
show description

This course provides an introduction to non-human primate knowledge of the physical world (space & objects, tools & causality, features & categories, quantities), as well as primate social knowledge (cooperative problem-solving, social strategies, forms of communication, social learning, theory of mind). Non-human primate cognition will be examined within an evolutionary and comparative framework, with emphasis on comparing and contrasting non-human primate cognition with that of humans and other taxonomic groups (birds, cetaceans, carnivores, rodents). This is a lower division course open toa ll students.

ANT 347C • Methods In Primate Biology

31725 • Spring 2014
Meets W 100pm-200pm SAC 5.124
show description

This course focuses on the study of primate behavior and the methods by which animal behavior is observed and documented.  Students will learn how to conduct library research, formulate hypotheses and predictions, devise research projects to test these predictions, collect and analyze data, and write comprehensive research reports describing these results.

1 lecture hour and 3 lab hours per week.

ANT 310L • Primate Cognition

31285 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 301
show description

One of the most defining characteristics of the primate order is our extraordinary capacity

for learning and retention. This course provides an introduction to non-human primate

knowledge of the physical world (space & objects, tools & causality, features &

categories, quantities), as well as primate social knowledge (cooperative problemsolving,

social strategies, forms of communication, social learning, theory of mind). Nonhuman

primate cognition will be examined within an evolutionary and comparative

framework, with emphasis placed on comparing and contrasting non-human primate

cognition with that of humans and other taxonomic groups (e.g. birds, cetaceans,

carnivores, rodents). This is a lower division course open to all students.

 

ANT 348K • Primate Conservation

31458 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 4.118
(also listed as GRG 356T )
show description

This course surveys the theory and practices of conservation

biology, as applied specifically to primates. Topics will include species and community

characteristics influencing extinction risk, current threats to primates, and potential

conservation strategies.

This is an upper division course. Prior background in physical

anthropology or ecology is recommended, but not required. Ability to perform basic

algebra is necessary.

 

ANT 348K • Primate Conservation

31360 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WEL 3.266
show description

This course surveys the theory and practices of conservation biology, as applied specifically to primates.  Topics will include species and sommunity characteristics influencing extinction risk, current threats to primates, and potential conservation strategies.

ANT 310L • Primate Cognition

31084 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm ART 1.110
show description

ANT 348K • Primate Conservation

31065 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 5.172
(also listed as GRG 356T )
show description

This course surveys the theory and practices of conservation biology, as applied specifically to primates. Topics will include species and community characteristics influencing extinction risk, current threats to primates, and potential conservation strategies

ANT 310L • Primate Cognition

30050-30065 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 1000am-1100am JGB 2.216
show description

One of the most defining characteristics of the Order Primates is our extraordinary capacity for learning and retention. This course provides an introduction to non-human primate knowledge of the physical world (space & objects, tools & causality, features & categories, quantities), as well as primate social knowledge (cooperative problem-solving, social strategies, forms of communication, social learning, theory of mind). Non-human primate cognition will be examined within an evolutionary and comparative framework, with emphasis placed on comparing and contrasting non-human primate cognition with that of humans and other taxonomic groups (e.g. birds, cetaceans, carnivores, rodents). Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. This is a lower division course open to all students. No pre-requisites required.

ANT 348K • Primate Conservation

30445 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm WEL 3.422
(also listed as GRG 356T )
show description

1

ANTH 348K/GRG 356T: PRIMATE CONSERVATION

T/TH 11-12:30

Classroom: WEL 3.422

Computer Lab: MEZ 2.120

Instructor: Mariah E. Hopkins, PhD TA: Gabrielle Russo

Department of Anthropology email: gabrielle.russo@mail.utexas.edu

Email: hopkins@austin.utexas.edu TA Lab: EPS 2.104

Phone: 512-471-0054 Office Hours: to be determined

Office: EPS 1.108

Office Hours: Wed 11-12 or by appt.

Course Description: This course surveys the theory and practices of conservation

biology, as applied specifically to primates. Topics will include species and community

characteristics influencing extinction risk, current threats to primates, and potential

conservation strategies.

Prerequisites: This is an upper division course. Prior background in physical

anthropology or ecology is recommended, but not required. Ability to perform basic

algebra is necessary.

Required Text: Cowlishaw, G. & R. Dunbar. 2000. Primate Conservation Biology.

Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Additional Readings: Provided via blackboard (check regularly!) and in-class.

Computer Programs (Freeware) Used: Vortex 9 Population Viability Analysis

Software (B. Lacey, Chicago Zoological Society) and Landscape Species Selection II

(Wildlife Conservation Society). Both computer programs require a PC, or a Mac that

runs Windows.

Course Objectives:

1. To understand how the characteristics of primate species (i.e. behavior, ecology,

demographics, physiology, and biogeography) influence extinction risk

2. To become familiar with the major threats to primates, as well as the organizations

working to conserve them.

3. To garner the tools necessary to evaluate feasible conservation plans, incorporating

information from past conservation successes and failures.

Course Format: Lecture, Discussion, & Laboratory Exercises

2

____________________________________________________________________

Grading:

Exams (60% of total grade):

-Midterm (30% of grade): Tuesday, March 9, 2010, in-class

-Final (30% of grade): Saturday, May 15, 2010, 7:00–10:00 pm

Should you have a conflict with an exam date, you must notify the instructor within the

first week of class. Make-up exams or rescheduling will only be allowed in extreme

circumstances in accordance with university policies (see below).

Homework (30% of total grade): Five homework assignments will be given. Late

homeworks will be penalized 10% for each day late. I do not accept homework via email

unless prior arrangements have been made. All assignments will require the use of a

computer. The programs necessary can be downloaded for free on PCs or Macs running

Windows, but they will also be made available at a computer lab on campus.

Participation (10% of total grade): A large part of this class (especially in the latter

2/3) will be in a ‘seminar’ format. Attendance and regular participation is required.

_______________________________________________________________________

TOPICS COVERED IN THIS COURSE (Order may be modified):

PRIMATE BIOLOGY

1. Introduction to Primate Conservation

2. Primate Taxonomy & Threat Status (C&D: Chpt 2).

3. A closer look at the IUCN Red List & Primate Census Techniques

4. Primate Population Biology (C&D: Chpt 6)

5. Extinction (C&D: Chpt 7; HOMEWORK I)

6. Species Differences in Extinction Risk: Behavior (C&D: selections from Chpt

3).

7. Species Differences in Extinction Risk: Ecology. (C&D: selections from Chpt

4).

8. Forests without Primates? What we lose when we lose primates.

9. Identifying Conservation Targets I: Which Species possess the biological

characteristics that are most likely to lead to extinction?(C&D: Chpt 5)

10. Population Viability Analysis I: Estimating population persistence with Vortex

(C&D: Appendix 2) (COMPUTER LAB; HOMEWORK II)

3

THREATS TO PRIMATE POPULATIONS

11. Habitat Disturbance (C&D: Chapter 8)

12. Subsistence Farming/Cattle Herding

13. Hunting/Bushmeat Trade (C& D: Chapter 9)

14. Disease –Which Diseases are the biggest threats? Sources of Disease,

Population Impacts, & Available Treatments.

15. Human-Wildlife Conflicts

16. Indigenous Traditions

17. War & Political Unrest

18. Economic Constraints

19. Climate Change

20. Identifying Conservation Targets II: Identifying the most imminent threats

(C&D: Chapter 10).

21. Population Viability Analysis II: Incorporating threats and environmental

change in Vortex (COMPUTER LAB; HOMEWORK III)

IMPLEMENTING CONSERVATION PLANS

22. Who is responsible for conservation?

23. Partnerships: NGOs, Governments, AID Agencies, Scientists, Communities,

Individuals (C&D: Appendix 3)

24. National & International Conservation Law: International Conventions,

Regional Agreements, Determination of Compliance, Law Enforcement

25. What should we conserve? Getting to Know Species Selection II Software.

(COMPUTER LAB; HOMEWORK IV)

26. Protected Areas Management/Transfrontier Protected Areas (C&D: Chapter 11)

27. Managing unprotected populations

28. Community involvement/empowerment

29. Ecotourism: Is it really the answer?

30. Habitat Restoration

31. Sanctuaries, rehabilitation and release.

32. Ex-situ Conservation I: Role of Zoos & Genetic Banks

33. Population Viability Analysis III: Evaluating Potential Conservation Strategies

(COMPUTER LAB; HOMEWORK V)

34. Ex-situ Conservation II: Role of Education and the Media

35. Links between Ex-situ & In-Situ Conservation

36. Role of Scientists & Field Primatologists.

37. Who finances conservation plans?

4

STATEMENT OF POLICIES

______________________________________________________________________

PARTICIPATION: As participation is a portion of your grade, it benefits you to be

present in class regularly. Power-point slides from class will be made available via

blackboard. However you are required to know all material discussed in class, not just the

points on the power-point slides. In addition, attending class will help you to identify

which portions of the readings will be incorporated in the exams.

CREDIT/NO-CREDIT: In order to pass you must be present at both exams.

ADD/DROP/WITHDRAWAL:

For appropriate deadlines, please see your academic advisor. Important dates can also be

found at http://registrar.utexas.edu/calendars/09-10/index.html.

Q DROP POLICY

The State of Texas has enacted a law that limits the number of course drops for academic

reasons to six (6). As stated in Senate Bill 1231: “Beginning with the fall 2007 academic

term, an institution of higher education may not permit an undergraduate student a total

of more than six dropped courses, including any course a transfer student has dropped at

another institution of higher education, unless the student shows good cause for dropping

more than that number.”

COURSE EVALUATIONS:

The standard Instructional Assessment and Evaluation form will be used.

RE-GRADING POLICY: You must dispute a grade within one week of receipt. All

disputes must be presented during my office hours, and you must accompany each

dispute with a clear and concise explanation in writing of why a re-grade is necessary.

USE OF BLACKBOARD:

In this class I use Blackboard—at http://courses.utexas.edu —to distribute course

materials, to communicate and collaborate online, to post grades, to submit assignments,

and to give you online quizzes and surveys. You can find support in using Blackboard at

the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan

accordingly.

CLASS WEB SITES AND STUDENT PRIVACY:

Web-based, password-protected class sites will be associated with all academic courses

taught at the University. Syllabi, handouts, assignments and other resources are types of

information that may be available within these sites. Site activities could include

exchanging e-mail, engaging in class discussions and chats, and exchanging files. In

addition, electronic class rosters will be a component of the sites. Students who do not

want their names included in these electronic class rosters must restrict their directory

5

information in the Office of the Registrar, Main Building, Room 1. For information on

restricting directory information, see the General Information Catalog or go to:

http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs.

USE OF E-MAIL FOR OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE:

Email is recognized as an official mode of university correspondence; therefore, you are

responsible for reading your email for university and course-related information and

announcements. You are responsible to keep the university informed about changes to

your e-mail address. You should check your e-mail regularly and frequently to stay

current with university-related communications, some of which may be time-critical. You

can find UT Austin’s policies and instructions for updating your e-mail address at

http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.php.

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS HONOR CODE:

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom,

leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is

expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect

toward peers and community.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY & SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY:

All students must abide by the University Code of Academic Integrity. For details see:

http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acint_student.php. Plagiarism is a serious offense.

Though discussion of course topics is encouraged, copying of work in part or full is not

permitted. Talking of any kind during exams is also prohibited. If you are unsure of what

constitutes plagiarism please see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_avoid.php.

Should plagiarism occur, a zero will automatically be given to both the student who

copies and the student who provided the work. Penalties can also include failure of the

course and disciplinary action at the university level. Students who violate University

rules on scholastic dishonesty (see: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php) are

subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or

dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students,

and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly

enforced. For further information, visit the Student Judicial Services web site

http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/, and the General Information Catalog

DOCUMENTED DISABILITY STATEMENT:

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic

accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact

Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

RELIGIOUS HOLY DAYS:

By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days

prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an

examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I

will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after

the absence.

6

EMERGENCY EVACUATION POLICY:

Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble

outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made. Please be aware of

the following policies regarding evacuation:

• Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building.

Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you

entered the building.

• If you require assistance to evacuate, inform me in writing during the first week

of class.

• In the event of an evacuation, follow my instructions or those of class instructors.

• Do not re-enter a building unless you’re given instructions by the Austin Fire

Department, the UT Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services

office

ANT 324L • Special Topics In Gis Modeling

30480 • Fall 2009
Meets W 100pm-400pm GRG 206
(also listed as GRG 356T )
show description


SPECIAL TOPICS IN GIS: ANALYSIS OF MOVEMENT (Fall 2009)

 

ANT 324L (30480)/ GRG 356T (37794)

Time: Wed 1-4;

Location: GRG 206

 

Instructor: Mariah E. Hopkins, PhD

Email : hopkins@austin.utexas.edu

Office: EPS 1.108

Office Hours: Tuesday (1-3 PM) and by appointment

 

TA: Carla Klehm

Email: cklehm@gmail.com

Office Hours: Monday (2-4 PM) and by appointment

Office Hours Location: EPS 2.136

 

 

**********************************************************************

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

The analysis of movement patterns has become increasingly pertinent to a wide variety of fields. For example: 1. Anthropologists study the movements of individuals to explain social grouping patterns; 2. Public health officials study human movements to identify the sources of disease outbreaks; 3. Hydrologists study the movement of water in order to predict impacts to landscapes; and 4. Conservation biologists study wildlife movements in order to design appropriate protected areas.

 

This course provides an introduction to spatial data analysis and agent-based modeling within a GIS framework, through a topical focus on movement analyses.

Lectures draw on examples of movement analyses from diverse fields, including anthropology, ecology & evolution, criminology, hydrology, transportation engineering, and public health, in order to introduce students to the theory behind movement analyses as well as to potential applications. Topics covered include methods used widely for spatial data analysis (e.g. introductory spatial statistics, raster analysis, individual-based movement models, etc.) that are applicable both within and beyond the field of movement studies. Laboratory sections focus on allowing students to garner practical experience with pertinent software. Prior coursework in GIS is required (or consent of instructor). Familiarity with basic statistical principles will also be helpful.

 

Prerequisites: Introductory GIS course or consent of instructor.

 

Course Format: Lecture, Laboratory, & Discussion

 

Texts: GIS Analysis Volume 2: Spatial Measurements & Statistics (Andy Mitchell, Required); GIS Tutorial II: Spatial Analysis Workbook (David W. Allen); GIS Fundamentals—A First Text on Geographic Information Systems, 3rd ed. (Paul Bolstad)

 

Readings: Readings will be provided periodically throughout the course via blackboard, and will be discussed in-class.

 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

************************************************************************

Students will gain:

 

1.     Theoretical knowledge of techniques used for spatial data analysis (including introductory spatial statistics and GIS modeling).

2.     Practical experience applying methods to real world problems using appropriate software.

 

 

COURSE PLAN

************************************************************************

NOTE: THIS COURSE PLAN IS TENTATIVE.  ORDER MAY BE CHANGED AND TOPICS MAY BE ADDED OR REMOVED THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER DEPENDING ON THE CAPABILITIES, NEEDS, & INTERESTS OF THE CLASS.

 

Week 1 (Aug 26):

Lecture: Introduction to GIS Modeling & Distance Analysis

Laboratory: Multiple & Differential Buffer Application, Quantifying Nearness, Spider Diagrams, Distance Surfaces

 

Week 2 (Sept 2):

            Lecture: Route Selection/ Network Analysis /Location Allocation Models

            Laboratory: Cost Surfaces & Network Analysis

 

Week 3 (Sept 9):

            Lecture: Space-Time Analysis I

Laboratory: Tracking Analyst, Path Analysis, Habitat-Use Measurements

                       

Week 4 (Sept 16):

            Lecture: Space-Time Analysis II

Laboratory: Mapping & Quantifying changes in Location, Magnitude & Value, Linear Directional Means

 

Week 5 (Sept 23):

            Lecture:  Introductory Spatial Statistics (Quantifying Distributions)

Laboratory: Mean Center, Weighted Centers, Standard Distance, Standard Deviational Ellipses

 

 

Week 6 (Sept 30):

            Lecture: Introductory Spatial Statistics (Clustering of Values)

            Laboratory: Neighborhood Statistics, Getis-Ord General G Statistic, Ripley’s K

 

Week 7 (Oct 7):

            Lecture: Introductory Spatial Statistics (Spatial Autocorrelation)

            Laboratory: Moran’s I, LISA statistics, Hot Spot Analysis

 

Week 8 (Oct 14):

            Lecture: Introductory Spatial Statistics (Spatial Regression)

            Laboratory: Spatial Regression

 

Week 9 (Oct 21): MidTerm I (Covering Weeks 1-7); No Lecture/Lab.

           

Week 10 (Oct 28):

            Lecture: Cell-Based Models

            Laboratory: Cellular Automata Modeling

 

Week 11 (Nov 4):

            Lecture: Agent Based Models

            Laboratory: Getting Familiar with Net Logo

            Netlogo (http://ccl.northwestern.edu/netlogo/).

 

Week 12 (Nov  11):

            Lecture: Agent Based Models

            Laboratory:  Exploring the Net Logo Command Interface

           

Week 13 (Nov 18):

            Lecture: Agent Based Models

            Laboratory: Building a Simple Net Logo Model

           

Week 14 (Nov 25):

            Lecture: Agent Based Models

            Laboratory:  Modifying existing Net Logo Models

           

Week 15 (Dec 2):

            Lecture: Course Wrap-Up

            Laboratory: Course Wrap-Up

 

Final Exam (Dec 11th 2-5 PM)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STATEMENT OF POLICIES

______________________________________________________________________

 

GRADING POLICY:

 

Assignments (60%): Weekly assignments will be worth approximately 60% of a student’s total grade. There will be 12 mandatory assignments in total and they will include work with GIS software, as well as accompanying readings and write-ups. Completion of most assignments will require additional out of class time.

 

Exams (40%): There will be two exams in this course, each worth 20% of the

student’s total grade. The first exam will be given in class on October 21st.  The second exam will be given during this course’s final exam period (December 11, 2-5 PM).

 

 

GIS SOFTWARE ACCESS:  Students have unlimited access to the Environmental Information Systems Laboratory in GRG 302. The lab’s hours are 8am-5pm, but after hours access can be granted via Proxy HID cards upon request. A student license of ArcView 9.3 can also be provided upon request to the instructor.

 

LATE ASSIGNMENTS: Late assignments will be penalized 20% per day. For example, if an assignment is worth 30 points, if you turn that assignment in one day late, the maximum total points possible will be 24 points (80%).

 

CREDIT/NO-CREDIT: In order to pass you must be present at both the midterm and the final.

 

ADD/DROP/WITHDRAWAL:

For appropriate deadlines, please see your academic advisor. Important dates can also be found at http://registrar.utexas.edu/calendars/09-10/index.html.

 

Q DROP POLICY

The State of Texas has enacted a law that limits the number of course drops for academic reasons to six (6).  As stated in Senate Bill 1231: “Beginning with the fall 2007 academic term, an institution of higher education may not permit an undergraduate student a total of more than six dropped courses, including any course a transfer student has dropped at another institution of higher education, unless the student shows good cause for dropping more than that number.”

 

 

 

COURSE EVALUATIONS:

The standard Instructional Assessment and Evaluation form will be used.

 

RE-GRADING POLICY: You must dispute a grade within one week of receipt. All disputes must be presented during my office hours, and you must accompany each dispute with a clear and concise explanation in writing of why a re-grade is necessary.

 

USE OF BLACKBOARD:

In this class I use Blackboard—at http://courses.utexas.edu —to distribute course materials, to communicate and collaborate online, to post grades, to submit assignments, and to give you online quizzes and surveys. You can find support in using Blackboard at the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., so plan accordingly.

 

CLASS WEB SITES AND STUDENT PRIVACY:

Web-based, password-protected class sites will be associated with all academic courses taught at the University.  Syllabi, handouts, assignments and other resources are types of information that may be available within these sites.  Site activities could include exchanging e-mail, engaging in class discussions and chats, and exchanging files.  In addition, electronic class rosters will be a component of the sites.  Students who do not want their names included in these electronic class rosters must restrict their directory information in the Office of the Registrar, Main Building, Room 1.  For information on restricting directory information, see the General Information Catalog or go to: http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs/gi07-08/app/appc02.html#Chapter-9-Educational-Records.

 

 

USE OF E-MAIL FOR OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE:

Email is recognized as an official mode of university correspondence; therefore, you are responsible for reading your email for university and course-related information and announcements. You are responsible to keep the university informed about changes to your e-mail address. You should check your e-mail regularly and frequently to stay current with university-related communications, some of which may be time-critical. You can find UT Austin’s policies and instructions for updating your e-mail address at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.php.

 

 

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS HONOR CODE:

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY & SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY:

All students must abide by the University Code of Academic Integrity. For details see: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acint_student.php. Plagiarism is a serious offense. Though discussion of course topics is encouraged, copying of work in part or full is not permitted. Talking of any kind during exams is also prohibited. If you are unsure of what constitutes plagiarism please see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_avoid.php.  Should plagiarism occur, a zero will automatically be given to both the student who copies and the student who provided the work. Penalties can also include failure of the course and disciplinary action at the university level.  Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty (see: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php) are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University.  Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.   For further information, visit the Student Judicial Services web site http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/, and the General Information Catalog

 

DOCUMENTED DISABILITY STATEMENT:

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

 

RELIGIOUS HOLY DAYS:

By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

 

EMERGENCY EVACUATION POLICY:

Occupants of buildings on the UT Austin campus are required to evacuate and assemble outside when a fire alarm is activated or an announcement is made.  Please be aware of the following policies regarding evacuation:

·      Familiarize yourself with all exit doors of the classroom and the building. Remember that the nearest exit door may not be the one you used when you entered the building.

·      If you require assistance to evacuate, inform me in writing during the first week of class.

·      In the event of an evacuation, follow my instructions or those of class instructors.

·      Do not re-enter a building unless you’re given instructions by the Austin Fire Department, the UT Austin Police Department, or the Fire Prevention Services office

 

 

 

 

 

 

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