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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Shannon Speed

Associate Professor PhD

Director of Native American & Indigenous Studies; Associate Professor
Shannon Speed

Contact

Biography

Research

human rights; indigenous rights; indigenous migration; immigration detention; gender; Mexico; activist research; Latin America; Chiapas;

Research Subject Headings: Gender, Human rights and social justice, Identity, Peace and conflict, Policy, Race and ethnicity

Affiliated Research/Academic Units

International Research

Regions of Academic Interest: Latin America, North America

Interests

Human rights, indigenous rights, indigenous migration, immigration detention, gender, Mexico, and activist research; Latin America, Chiapas.

ANT 324L • Global Indigenous Issues

31655 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as LAS 324L )
show description

This course explores contemporary issues of indigenous peoples throughout the world. Today, even as

virtually all nations in the world have voted in favor of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous

People, Indigenous communities, tribes and nations continue to confront a range of issues that challenge

their ability to maintain their cultures, govern themselves, and decide their futures. Through films,

literature and social science readings, this course looks at those issues, and focuses on how indigenous

peoples are actively working to oppose their oppression and create sustainable futures.

Designed as a capstone course for the Indigenous Studies Undergraduate Certificate program, the course

enrollment is limited and the course is intensive both in the amount of reading and discussion

participation and in the level of analysis expected.

Topics include: Colonialism, Indigenous People and Nation States, Human Rights, Political

Sovereignty/Autonomy, Gender, Land and Territory, Resource Extraction, Migration, Incarceration.

ANT 391 • Indigenous Theory Of The Amers

31580 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 900am-1200pm SAC 5.124
(also listed as LAS 391 )
show description

ANT S324L • Global Indigenous Issues

82000 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTH 100pm-300pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as LAS S324L )
show description

This course explores contemporary issues of indigenous peoples throughout the world. Today, even as virtually all nations in the world have voted in favor of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, Indigenous communities, tribes and nations continue to confront a range of issues that challenge their ability to maintain their cultures, govern themselves, and decide their futures. Through films, literature and social science readings, this course looks at those issues, and focuses on how indigenous peoples are actively working to oppose their oppression and create sustainable futures.

 

Designed as a capstone course for the Indigenous Studies Undergraduate Certificate program, the course enrollment is limited and the course is intensive both in the amount of reading and discussion participation and in the level of analysis expected.

 

Topics include: Colonialism, Indigenous People and Nation States, Political Sovereignty/Autonomy, Gender, Resource Extraction, Migration, Incarceration.

ANT 391 • Oral History And Social Change

31345 • Fall 2012
Meets W 900am-1200pm SAC 5.124
show description

ANT 391 • Indigenous Theory Of The Amers

31502 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 1100am-200pm SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 391 )
show description

ANT 324L • Global Indigenous Issues

31005 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as LAS 324L )
show description

This course explores contemporary issues of indigenous peoples throughout the world. Today, even as virtually all nations in the world have voted in favor of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, Indigenous communities, tribes and nations continue to confront a range of issues that challenge their ability to maintain their cultures, govern themselves, and decide their futures. Through films, literature and social science readings, this course looks at those issues, and focuses on how indigenous peoples are actively working to oppose their oppression and create sustainable futures.

 

Designed as a capstone course for the Indigenous Studies Undergraduate Certificate program, the course enrollment is limited and the course is intensive both in the amount of reading and discussion participation and in the level of analysis expected.

 

Topics will include: Indigenous People and Nation States, Human Rights, Colonialism, Political Sovereignty/Autonomy, Gender, Land and Territory, Resource Extraction, Migration, Incarceration, and Education.

ANT 324L • Activist Research Practicum

31280 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm SAC 4.118
show description

In this upper-division seminar, designed especially for anthropology majors, students will learn the basics of anthropological research methods, and gain hands-on experience, from an “activist research” perspective.  Coursework in the first four weeks will consider the politics of anthropological research, tracing the evolution from its colonial beginnings, through upheaval and critique in the 1960s and 1970s, to various “post-colonial” responses to these criticisms.  The remainder of the course will focus on one such response, known as “activist anthropology.”  Together we will explore the complexities of activist research methods, while each student conceives and carries out an activist research project in conjunction with an organization in the Austin area. Throughout the remainder of the semester, students are expected to devote an average of 6 to 8 hours a week to their activist research project. 

ANT 391 • Activist Proseminar

30299 • Fall 2010
Meets TH 900am-1200pm EPS 1.130KA
show description

This proseminar provides a base in politically-engaged, or activist, research. The first weeks will be led by the instructor of record, and will entail readings and discussion on the ethics, politics and practice of engaged research. The remainder of the semester will involve guest lectures and guest-assigned readings, involving faculty from anthropology as well as other departments on campus. The goal of these weeks is to develop an understanding of the breadth and range of perspectives in the theory and methods of activist scholarship.

 

Requirements:

Final 20 page reflection paper, due in class on the last class day.

10 minute presentation of reflection paper, last class day.

Guest lecturers in fall 2010 will include Jemima Pierre (Anthropology/AADS), Martha Menchaca (Anthropology/Borderlands), Edmund Gordon (Anthropology/AADS), Charles Hale (Anthropology/LLILAS), and Eric Tang (AAADs/Asian American Studies)

 

ANT 324L • Indigenous Rts/Auton In Mexico

81450 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm EPS 2.136
(also listed as LAS 324L )
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

ANT 324L • Activist Research Practicum

29830 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm EPS 2.136
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

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