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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Circe Sturm

Professor Ph.D., University of California, Davis

Associate Professor; Faculty Undergraduate Honors Advisor
Circe Sturm

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 232-1561
  • Office: SAC 5.122
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: Mondays 2 p.m.-4 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

Interests

Race, sovereignty, and citizenship; comparative colonialisms; race and indigeneity; dominance, resistance, and subjectivity; Native North America, Central America, and Europe

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31285-31310 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 100pm-200pm FAC 21
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 340C • Ethnographic Research Methods

31570 • Fall 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm SAC 5.124
show description

Understanding human behavior is immensely challenging. Fortunately, there are tools

to help us make sense of social, cultural and political complexity. This course offers an

introduction to the various methods and techniques used in conducting ethnographic

research such as participant observation, interviewing, collecting life histories and

genealogies, archival research, working with material culture, social media-based

research, and visual ethnography. Our primary objectives will be to explore research

design, what constitutes evidence, how to analyze data, and strategies for writing up

and presenting results. We will pay particular attention to the ethical considerations

entailed in anthropological research, including questions of knowledge production,

power, location, experience, translation and representation. The course is run largely as

a “hands–on” workshop, in which students practice a variety of ethnographic methods

(both inside and outside of class), engage in ethnographic writing exercises, and actively

guide one another’s work. Students will apply what they learn during the course to

designing their own ethnographic research project, conducting independent field

research, and presenting their findings to the class. By the end of the semester, they will

have a firm grounding in ethnographic research methods and be better prepared for

more advanced work.

ANT 324L • Ethnogrphic Theory/Practice

31700 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.118
show description

This course explores the complex relationship between anthropological ideas and ethnographic practice.  The goals of the course are two-fold: 1) to introduce a broad spectrum of concepts, issues, and their theories of culture, and 2) to critically examine how these theories and ideals shape anthropological methods and writings. Students will read and critique five ethnographies on five different cultures, each with vastly different approaches to their respective subjects.  This course employs lecture and discussion, classroom exercises, films, and creative writing exercises.

ANT 391 • Rsch & Grant Proposal Writing

31895 • Spring 2014
Meets T 200pm-500pm SAC 5.124
show description

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31095-31130 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm WEL 1.316
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 324L • Black-Natv Amer Rels In The Us

31340 • Fall 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm SAC 4.118
(also listed as AMS 321 )
show description

This course explains the entwined histories, cultures and identities of African American and Native American people in North America.  Long neglected in popular and scholarly accounts, the Black Indian experience sheds new light on comparative experiences of racial formation, including how race, power, and indigeneity work in different ways for different people in contemporary US society.  Students will be exposed to a range of voices, including Black Indian artists, scholars, and activists, as well as African American and Native American scholars working in a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, history, Native American Studies, African American studies, American studies and women’s studies.  The readings will range from primary historical documents and ethnographies, to creative and autobiographical accounts.  Course content will cover key issues and topics critical to Black Indian communities, such as American Indian slaveholding, cultural and linguistic exchange, kinship practices, forms of resistance, and ongoing struggles for tribal citizenship, with an in depth focus on several specific tribes as they are represented in the required texts.  The course will also look at the compelling rights claims between those associated with Civil Rights and those of tribal sovereignty.

 

ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31100-31105 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.112
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

ANT 340C • Ethnographic Research Methods

31325 • Spring 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm SAC 5.118
show description

Understanding human behavior is immensely challenging. Fortunately, there are tools

to help us make sense of social, cultural and political complexity. This course offers an

introduction to the various methods and techniques used in conducting ethnographic

research such as participant observation, interviewing, collecting life histories and

genealogies, archival research, working with material culture, social media-based

research, and visual ethnography. Our primary objectives will be to explore research

design, what constitutes evidence, how to analyze data, and strategies for writing up

and presenting results. We will pay particular attention to the ethical considerations

entailed in anthropological research, including questions of knowledge production,

power, location, experience, translation and representation. The course is run largely as

a “hands–on” workshop, in which students practice a variety of ethnographic methods

(both inside and outside of class), engage in ethnographic writing exercises, and actively

guide one another’s work. Students will apply what they learn during the course to

designing their own ethnographic research project, conducting independent field

research, and presenting their findings to the class. By the end of the semester, they will

have a firm grounding in ethnographic research methods and be better prepared for

more advanced work.

ANT 324L • Ethnographic Thry & Practice

31147 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 4.174
show description

This course explores the complex relationship between anthropological ideas and ethnographic practice. The goals of the course are two-fold: (1) to introduce a broad spectrum of concepts, issues, and theories of culture, and (2) to critically examine how these theories and ideas shape anthropological methods and writings. To do this, we will read and critiquefive ethnographies on five different cultures, each with vastly different approaches to their respective subjects. In teaching, I use a combination of lecture and discussion, interspersed with various classroom exercises, films and creative writing assignments. We begin the semester by asking, “what is ethnography?” and “what is theory?” Eventually we address more complicated issues such as how the construction of an ethnographic subject is shaped by pre-existing or dominant ideas about culture and how scholarly, political and personal agendas shape research projects, fieldwork strategies and ethnographic texts. We conclude the course by assessing where the study of culture is today, and by writing our own brief, creative ethnographies.

ANT 391 • Politics/Cond Of Indigeneity

31355 • Fall 2012
Meets TH 200pm-500pm SAC 5.118
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

This course explores the history, politics and ongoing conditions of indigenous people throughout the world. One organizing theme of the course will be the ongoing relationships between indigenous people and their respective settler-states, relationships that have been characterized by equal parts continuity and change. Though our primary focus will be on indigenous peoples in the Americas, including the United States, Canada and Latin America, we will also compare these experiences with those of Native people in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands. Our goal is to understand how indigeneity, as both a theoretical concept and a lived experience, intersects with ideas about sovereignty, citizenship, race, culture, nationalism, post-colonialism and authenticity. Students will be exposed to a range of “voices,” including native and non-Native artists, scholars and activists. Course content will engage classic and recent theory, but readings will be largely ethnographic. They will cover key issues and topics critical to indigenous communities, including defining the indigenous and the Fourth World; comparative histories of colonialism; the various forms of legal inclusion and exclusion in the polities of indigenous people and their settler states; the relationship between sovereignty and citizenship; the politics of indigenous political recognition and identification; the image of the “native other” as it is appropriated and understood by settler-states; and, finally, global repatriation and human rights discourses as they relate to native people.

ANT 391 • Rsch & Grant Proposal Writing

31505 • Spring 2012
Meets M 900am-1200pm SAC 5.124
show description

 This graduate seminar is designed to teach research proposal writing skills that are needed to secure external funding. The overall course objective is to complete a fundable research proposal by the end of the semester. Students will draft a grant that follows an expanded National Science Foundation Model. Therefore, the course is best suited for graduate students in anthropology who have a clear research project in mind and are approximately a year away from applying for external funding. Advanced graduate students in other disciplines can enroll in the course, but only with special permission from the instructor.Over the course of the semester, students will identify and approach funding sources, produce a proposal with all necessary components—including a problem statement, literature review, theoretical framework, methodology and bibliography—learn to critique their own proposals and those of others, work with partners, and formally present their research to the class.

ANT 324L • Black-Natv Amer Rels In The Us

31000 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SZB 286
(also listed as AMS 321 )
show description

This course explores the entwined histories, cultures and identities of African American and Native American people in North America. Long neglected in popular and scholarly accounts, the Black Indian experience sheds new light on comparative experiences of racial formation, including how race, power and indigeneity work in different ways for different people in contemporary US society. Students will be exposed to a range of voices, including Black Indian artists, scholars and activists, as well as African American and Native American scholars working in a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, history, Native American Studies, African American Studies, American Studies and women’s studies. The readings will range from primary historical documents and ethnographies, to creative and autobiographical accounts. Course content will cover key issues and topics critical to Black Indian communities, such as American Indian slaveholding, cultural and linguistic exchange, kinship practices, forms of resistance, and ongoing struggles for tribal citizenship, with an in depth focus on several specific tribes as they are represented in the required texts. The course will also look at the competing rights claims between those associated with Civil Rights and those of tribal sovereignty.

ANT 336L • Natv Amer Culs North Of Mexico

30185 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 100
(also listed as AMS 321 )
show description

This upper-division undergraduate course examines contemporary articulations of indigenous cultures and practices in the U.S. and Canada. Because the present cannot be understood without understanding historically how we got to here, this course includes histories that inform the contemporary. We will cover critical developments that shape and are shaped by late 20th century and early 21st century indigenous life. Issues include but are not limited to the American Indian Movement; IdleNoMore; tribal and First Nation citizenship politics; the politics of race and indigeneity in the U.S. and Canada; gaming and other economic development strategies; residential schools; evolving kinship practices; indigenous feminisms, masculinities, and sexualities; indigenous environmental and religious politics (including how “environment” and “religion” are inadequate for understanding those politics!); food sovereignty movements; and science, technology and Native Americans. Course readings come from anthropology, U.S. and Canadian indigenous studies, history, and cultural studies. We will read scholarly work, blogs, and other popular literature. The course features several guest speakers, some via Skype.

 

ANT 391 • Rsch & Grant Proposal Writing

30340 • Fall 2010
Meets TH 1200pm-300pm EPS 1.128
show description

This graduate seminar is designed to teach research proposal writing skills that are needed to secure external funding. The overall course objective is to complete a fundable research proposal by the end of the semester. Students will draft a grant that follows an expanded National Science Foundation Model. Therefore, the course is best suited for graduate students in anthropology that have a clear research project in mind and who are approximately a year away from applying for external funding. Advanced graduate students in other disciplines can enroll in the course, but only with special permission from the instructor. Over the course of the semester, students will identify and approach funding sources, produce a proposal with all necessary components—including a problem statement, literature review, theoretical framework, methodology and bibliography—learn to critique their own proposals and those of others, work with partners, and formally present their research to the class.

ANT 324L • Ethnographic Thry & Practice-W

30290 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm EPS 1.128
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

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