Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
asianstudies masthead
Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Yukie Aida

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Yukie Aida

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-6049
  • Office: WCH 5.110
  • Office Hours: FALL 2014: M W F 1:10-2:10
  • Campus Mail Code: G9300

Biography

Educational Background

1988 Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Psychology, University of Texas at Austin.

1986 Master of Arts in Educational Psychology, University of Texas at Austin.

1982 Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

1981 Bachelor of Education in Elementary Education, Seattle University, Seattle, Washington.

1974 Diploma, English Language and English Literature, Bunkyo University Women's College, Tokyo, Japan.

Other Training

1994 Certificate, the Japan Foundation's 1994 Training Program for Teachers of the Japanese Language for Japanese Abroad held in Saitama, Japan,  November 24 - December 22, 1994.

Creative Products

Dictionaries

Aida, Y., Allemand, C., Hirayama-Cooke, C., Liu, P., Mizobe, M., Okita, Y., Suito, N., Tanaka, M.  (1998).  Vocabulary Dictionary Accompanying Yookoso Volume One.  New York:  The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Aida, Y., Allemand, C., Hirayama-Cooke, C., Liu, P., Mizobe, M., Okita, Y., Suito, N., Tanaka, M.  (1998).  Vocabulary Dictionary Accompanying Yookoso Volume Two.  New York:  The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

 

Contributions to Edited Books

Aida, Y.  (1997).  Electronic networking activities in Japanese language classrooms.  In H. Cook, K. Hijirida, & M. Tahara (Eds.), New Trends and Issues in Teaching Japanese Language and Culture (pp. 31-43).  Honolulu:  University of Hawaii, Second Language Teaching and Curriculum Center.

Aida, Y. (1996).  Reading authentic materials found in the Internet.  In M. Warschauer (Ed.), VIRTUAL CONNECTIONS: Online Activities & Projects for Networking Language Learners (pp. 298-300).  Honolulu, HI:  University of Hawaii Press.

Aida, Y.  (1996).  Virtual office hours in IRC (Internet Relay Chat).  In M. Warschauer (Ed.), VIRTUAL CONNECTIONS: Online Activities & Projects for Networking Language Learners (pp. 9-10).  Honolulu, HI:  University of Hawaii Press.

Aida, Y.  (1994).  A comparative study of students characteristics in the Japanese language classroom:  Business majors versus other majors.  In S. El-Badry, H. Lopez-Cepero, & T. Hoppe (Eds.), Navigating the Japanese Market:  Business and Socio-Economic Perspectives (pp. 267-280).  Austin, TX:  University of Texas at Austin, the IC2 Institute.

Articles Published

Aida, Y., & Suito, N.  (2007).  Students’ collaborative projects involving computer technology and Japanese language leaning.  Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Computer Assisted Systems For Teaching & Learning Japanese, (pp. 201-204), held at the University of Hawaii, Kapiolani Community College.  http://castelj.kshinagawa.com/proceedings/

Aida, Y., Aguila, A., & Himmel, N.  (2007).  Distance learning of the Japanese language:  An empirical report.  Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Computer Assisted Systems For Teaching & Learning Japanese, (pp. 269-272), held at the University of Hawaii, Kapiolani Community College.  http://castelj.kshinagawa.com/proceedings/

Suito, N., & Aida, Y.  (2007).  Japanese Online Self-Help Utility developed with students for students.  Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Computer Assisted Systems For Teaching & Learning Japanese, (pp. 249-252), held at the University of Hawaii, Kapiolani Community College.  http://castelj.kshinagawa.com/proceedings/

Aida, Y. (2007).  Quantitative and qualitative analyses of students’ views on the storytelling project.  Selected Papers from the Conference on Pragmatics in the CJK Classroom: The State of the Art, (pp. 5-20), held at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.   http://nflrc.hawaii.edu/CJKProceedings/

Aida, Y. (2004).  Story-telling of first year students of Japanese.  Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on OPI/the 12th Princeton Japanese Pedagogy Forum held at Princeton, NJ.

Aida, Y.  (1995).  Does high anxiety lead to low achievement or low achievement lead to high anxiety?  That's the question.  In H. Nara and M. Noda (Eds.), Proceedings of the 1995 Association of Teachers of Japanese Conference on Literature, Language, and Pedagogy, (pp. 321-328).  Middlebury, VT: the Association of Teachers of Japanese.

 

Aida, Y.  (1994).  Examination of Horwitz, Horwitz, and Cope's construct of foreign language anxiety:  The case of students of Japanese.  The Modern Language Journal, 78, 2, 155-168.

Aida, Y.  (1993).  Communication apprehension and power strategies in marital relationships.  Communication Reports, 6, 116-121.

Aida, Y.  (1992).  Language learning motivation and performance among students of Japanese.  Proceedings of the 21st Annual Meeting of Southwest Conference of the Association for Asian Studies at Shreveport, LA.

Aida, Y., & Falbo, T.  (1991).  Relationships between marital satisfaction, resources, and power strategies.  Sex Roles: A Journal of Research , 24, 43-56.

 

      Professional Association

Association of Teachers of Japanese

The Society for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language

Japanese Teachers Association of Texas

National Council of Japanese Language Teachers

 

Interests

Japanese language pedagogy / students beliefs about their own language performances

JPN 610D • Japanese II

31580-31585 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 800am-930am RLM 5.118
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Expands on skills acquired in Japanese 601D or its equivalent. Includes computer-assisted instruction.  Japanese 507 and 610D may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Japanese 601D or 506 with a grade of at least C.



JPN 320K • Readings In Modern Japanese I

31635 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm RLM 5.112
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Exploration of different types of texts written in a variety of grammar structures with rich vocabulary. Examination of similarities and differences between various aspects of Japanese culture and the student's own culture.  Prerequisite: Japanese 412L or 317C with a grade of at least C.

JPN 610D • Japanese II

32465-32470 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am RLM 5.124
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Expands on skills acquired in Japanese 601D or its equivalent. Includes computer-assisted instruction.  Japanese 507 and 610D may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Japanese 601D or 506 with a grade of at least C.



JPN 610D • Japanese II

32775-32780 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 800am-930am RLM 5.118
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Expands on skills acquired in Japanese 601D or its equivalent. Includes computer-assisted instruction.  Japanese 507 and 610D may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Japanese 601D or 506 with a grade of at least C.



JPN 320K • Readings In Modern Japanese I

32830 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm RLM 5.112
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Exploration of different types of texts written in a variety of grammar structures with rich vocabulary. Examination of similarities and differences between various aspects of Japanese culture and the student's own culture.  Prerequisite: Japanese 412L or 317C with a grade of at least C.

JPN 610D • Japanese II

32470-32475 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am RLM 5.124
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Expands on skills acquired in Japanese 601D or its equivalent. Includes computer-assisted instruction.  Japanese 507 and 610D may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Japanese 601D or 506 with a grade of at least C.



JPN 320L • Readings In Modern Japanese II

32515 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 302
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Continued development of Japanese reading and comprehension skills using authentic print and web-based resources.  Prerequisite: Japanese 320K with a grade of at least C.

JPN 610D • Japanese II

32340 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am CMA A3.112
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Expands on skills acquired in Japanese 601D or its equivalent. Includes computer-assisted instruction.  Japanese 507 and 610D may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Japanese 601D or 506 with a grade of at least C.



JPN 320K • Readings In Modern Japanese I

32390 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm RLM 5.112
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Exploration of different types of texts written in a variety of grammar structures with rich vocabulary. Examination of similarities and differences between various aspects of Japanese culture and the student's own culture.  Prerequisite: Japanese 412L or 317C with a grade of at least C.

JPN 610D • Japanese II

32270-32275 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am RLM 5.124
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Expands on skills acquired in Japanese 601D or its equivalent. Includes computer-assisted instruction.  Japanese 507 and 610D may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Japanese 601D or 506 with a grade of at least C.



JPN 320L • Readings In Modern Japanese II

32315 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 0.132
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Continued development of Japanese reading and comprehension skills using authentic print and web-based resources.  Prerequisite: Japanese 320K with a grade of at least C.

JPN 320K • Readings In Modern Japanese I

32335 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm RLM 7.112
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Exploration of different types of texts written in a variety of grammar structures with rich vocabulary. Examination of similarities and differences between various aspects of Japanese culture and the student's own culture.  Prerequisite: Japanese 412L or 317C with a grade of at least C.

JPN 320L • Readings In Modern Japanese II

32195 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 0.132
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Continued development of Japanese reading and comprehension skills using authentic print and web-based resources.  Prerequisite: Japanese 320K with a grade of at least C.

JPN 507 • First-Year Japanese II

32525-32530 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am RLM 5.114
show description

Continuation of JPN 506. Not open to native speakers of Japanese. 1) to acquire four skills in the
Japanese language: a) listening: able to understand simple everyday conversation with
repetitions. b) speaking: able to handle some survival situations through circulocutions and
repletions, within a limited topic. c) reading: able to read simple, short reading materials
including semi-authentic materials. d) writing: able to write short memos and letters somewhat
necessary for reading and writing. 2) to acquire a fundamental knowledge ofJapanese grammar
necessary for reading and writing. 3) to acquire some knowledge of the Japanese people and their
culture. Prerequisites: JPN 506 or the equivalent with a grade of at least C.

Texts/Readings:
Yasu-Hiko Tohsaku, Yookoso! An Invitation to Contemporary Japanese. Vol. One, 2nd edition,
(Chapters 4-7)
Workbook/Laboratory manual for Yookoso , Vol. 1, 2nd edition

Grading/Requirements: (May vary)
Various quizzes , Homework, Compositions, Tests, Oral performances, Skit, Final exam.

JPN 320L • Readings In Modern Japanese II

32590 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm RLM 5.126
show description

This course will mainly focus on developing reading adn writing skills. The goals of this course include:
1) review and reinforcement of basic grammar 2) expansion of vocabulary, expressions, andkanji
3) ability to read short essays, stories, and some newspaper articles intensively (close reading) and
extensively (rapid reading) 4) ability to write simple essays and letters in Japanese 5)
acquisition of general knowledge of Japanese culture Prerequisites: JPN 320K or the equivalent with a
grade of at least C.

Texts/Readings:
An Integrated Approach to Intermediate Japanese, Miura and McGloin, 1994 Japan Times,
(Chapters 7-15)

Grading (may vary):

Attendance/class participation: 8%; Homework: 9%; Quizzes: 15%; Kanji quizzes,Vocabulary
quizzes, Hand-written composition: 10%; Letter: 5%; Diary/Journal: 8%l Chapter tests: 25%;
Final exam: 20%
A=100-90 B=89-80 C=79-70 D=69-60 F=59-
Letter grades will be determined according to the above scale. There will be NO grading on a
curve

JPN 320L • Readings In Modern Japanese II

32595 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm RLM 7.116
show description

This course will mainly focus on developing reading adn writing skills. The goals of this course include:
1) review and reinforcement of basic grammar 2) expansion of vocabulary, expressions, andkanji
3) ability to read short essays, stories, and some newspaper articles intensively (close reading) and
extensively (rapid reading) 4) ability to write simple essays and letters in Japanese 5)
acquisition of general knowledge of Japanese culture Prerequisites: JPN 320K or the equivalent with a
grade of at least C.

Texts/Readings:
An Integrated Approach to Intermediate Japanese, Miura and McGloin, 1994 Japan Times,
(Chapters 7-15)

Grading (may vary):

Attendance/class participation: 8%; Homework: 9%; Quizzes: 15%; Kanji quizzes,Vocabulary
quizzes, Hand-written composition: 10%; Letter: 5%; Diary/Journal: 8%l Chapter tests: 25%;
Final exam: 20%
A=100-90 B=89-80 C=79-70 D=69-60 F=59-
Letter grades will be determined according to the above scale. There will be NO grading on a
curve

JPN 507 • First-Year Japanese II

31375-31380 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am JES A215A
show description

Continuation of JPN 506. Not open to native speakers of Japanese. 1) to acquire four skills in the
Japanese language: a) listening: able to understand simple everyday conversation with repetitions.
b) speaking: able to handle some survival situations through circulocutions and repletions, within a
limited topic. c) reading: able to read simple, short reading materials including semiauthentic
materials. d) writing: able to write short memos and letters somewhat necessary for
reading and writing. 2) to acquire a fundamental knowledge ofJapanese grammar necessary for reading
and writing. 3) to acquire some knowledge of the Japanese people and their culture. Prerequisites: JPN
506 or the equivalent with a grade of at least C.

Texts/Readings:
Yasu-Hiko Tohsaku, Yookoso! An Invitation to Contemporary Japanese. Vol. One, 3rd edition,
(Chapters 4-7)
Workbook/Laboratory manual for Yookoso , Vol. 1, 3rd edition

Grading/Requirements: (May vary)
Various quizzes , Homework, Compositions, Tests, Oral performances, Skit, Final exam

JPN 320K • Readings In Modern Japanese I

31415 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm RLM 7.112
show description

A) This course focuses on reading and writing skills at the intermediate to advanced levels. B) We will be
spending about two weeks for each chapter. C) The class is conducted in Japanese. D) Besides the
textbook, we will be reading outside sources such as fiction, newspaper articles, etc.

Texts/Readings:
An Integrated Approach to Intermediate Japanese . 2008
by Akira Miura and Naomi H. McGloin The Japan Times.

Grading/Requirements:

Lesson/Kanji/Vocabulary quizzes Compositions Homework Culture Notes quizzes Group Project Online Exercises
Final Exam

JPN 320K • Readings In Modern Japanese I

31420 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm RLM 6.104
show description

A) This course focuses on reading and writing skills at the intermediate to advanced levels. B) We will be
spending about two weeks for each chapter. C) The class is conducted in Japanese. D) Besides the
textbook, we will be reading outside sources such as fiction, newspaper articles, etc.

Texts/Readings:
An Integrated Approach to Intermediate Japanese . 1994
byAkira Miura and Naomi H. McGloin The Japan Times.

Grading/Requirements:
Lesson/Kanji/Vocabulary quizzes Compositions Homework Culture Notes quizzes
Final Exam E-mailing Group Project
Newspaper Publishing

JPN 507 • First-Year Japanese II

82010 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-100pm RLM 5.118
show description

Continuation of JPN 506.  Not open to native speakers of Japanese.1) to acquire four skills in the Japanese language:      a) listening:  able to understand simple everyday conversation with repetitions.      b) speaking:  able to handle some survival situations through circulocutions and repletions, within a limited            topic.      c) reading:  able to read simple, short reading materials including semi-authentic materials.     d) writing:  able to write short memos and letters somewhat necessary for reading and writing.2) to acquire a fundamental knowledge ofJapanese grammar necessary for reading and writing.3) to acquire some knowledge of the Japanese people and their culture.Prerequisites:  JPN 506 or the equivalent with a grade of at least C.

JPN 507 • First-Year Japanese II

31625-31630 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 800-930 RLM 5.126
show description

Course Syllabus (Spring 2010)
JPN 507 First-Year Japanese II

Classes            Tu & Th        @RLM        M, W, & F    @RLM

    #31625 (Blue)     8:00 - 9:30    5.126          8:00 - 9:00    6.112
    #31630 (Green)     8:00 - 9:30    5.126          9:00 - 10:00    6.112

Name            Office            Voice-mail       E-mail            Office Hours
(Instructor)
Yukie Aida    WCH 5.124    475-6042        y.aida@mail.utexas.edu     M & W
                                            4:10-5:40pm
(Teaching Assistant)   
Mai Tadokoro    WMB1.114    475-6796        maitadokoro@gmail.com    T & Th
                4:45-5:15pm
                                           
UT’s Policy Changes
    ? The One-Time Exception Policy has been eliminated for all Liberal Arts students.  Students will
  still be allowed to Q-drop (with their instructor's permission) up until the deadline, and may petition  
  to Q-drop after the deadline if they have an urgent, substantiated, non-academic reason.
? Students (both undergraduate and graduate students) must take this course with a letter grade if they 
  wish to advance to a next level.  Students taking this course with CR/NC will not be eligible for
  taking 412K or above in the future.

Prerequisite
    ? You must have finished JPN 506 with a grade of at least C or an equivalent.
? Students who studied first-year Japanese with materials/textbooks other than "Yookoso" should  
      consult the instructor immediately for further instruction.

I. Course Objectives
    This semester will focus on the following skills:
    1)    Listening: Ability to understand a larger range of everyday conversation through repetition.
    2)    Speaking: Ability to handle an increasing number of everyday situations through circumlocutions
            and repetitions, focusing on the topics of weather & climate, hobbies & leisure activities, food, and shopping.
    3)    Reading: Ability to read more complex reading materials including semi-authentic materials.
    4)    Writing: Ability to write more complex descriptions of things mainly pertaining to yourself (based on classroom activities and homework) while correctly using the Japanese writing system.

II. Course Materials
1)     Textbook: "Yookoso! An Invitation to Contemporary Japanese,"  By Yasu-Hiko Toosaku., 3rd edition.  Several copies of the textbook are on reserve at the Undergraduate Library (UGL) Reserve Desk (1st floor).
2)     Workbook/Laboratory Manual for Yookoso! An Invitation to Contemporary Japanese, 2nd edition.  Several copies of the workbook are on reserve at the PCL Reserves Desk (2.122).
    3)     CDs/Audio tapes:
        1. Listening Comprehension Program ( to accompany the textbook)
2. Audio Program ( to accompany the Workbook / Laboratory Manual) -- You will need this CD or audio tapes to complete the listening comprehension homework assignments. 


        ** You can listen to the CDs through “Real Player”.
Log on to        
http://www.laits.utexas.edu/itsaud/series.php?series_name=jp-0-02
---> Click “Using Audio” read instructions, then download free “Real Player”.  Chose the chapter you want.  Call 471-0407 if a password is required.
-- An other way is to log on to Yookoso site at
http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072408154/student_view0/index.html
---> Select a chapter you want from the pull down menu on the left hand side.  Click “Laboratory Audio Program”.  Then select the assigned section to complete the homework.
4)     Packet of handouts.  It is available at Texas Union Duplication Service.
5)    You will use your own paper to take a quiz.
6)    Online kanji practice site for Yookoso is http://www.wfu.edu/~takatay/YookosoKanji/
7)    Online Japanese practice websites created by UT students:
        http://www.laits.utexas.edu/japanese/StudentWorks.html

III. Course Structure
    ? During the lecture sessions:
        -Brief grammar explanations and grammar exercises will be given.
        -Reading and some writing practice including new kanji will be given.
        -Japanese cultural information related to the topic will be discussed.
        -Administrative information will be announced.
    ?During the activity sessions:
        -Dialogues and activities in the textbook will be followed by communicative practice.
-The sessions will be entirely in Japanese.  Questions which require explanations (in English) should be asked in lecture sessions.
?Come prepared.  Read appropriate textbook assignments and do the grammar exercises and activities    
        before class.  You are not allowed to read the textbook during class unless you are instructed to
        do so.

IV. Grading Policy
Your final course grade will be determined in the following way:
   
    1) Attendance & Class Participation    ?%        
    2) Homework Completion    7%       
    3) Homework Quality    5%       
    4) Vocabulary Quizzes (14-2)    8%       
    5) Grammar Quizzes (14-2)    8%       
    6) Writing Quizzes (9-1)    8%       
    7) Pop quizzes (many !!)    3%
    8) Compositions (2)    10%
    9) Oral Exams (2)    18%
    10) Skit Presentation    6%
    11) Chapter Test (1)    10%
    12) Final Written Exam    17%
                100%


Your grade will be determined by the plus/minus system shown below.  There will be NO grading on a curve.  You will have a grades record sheet in your packet (p. 59)

        A     (4.0)    94.0~
        A-    (3.67)     89.5.0-93.9
        B+    (3.33)    87.0-89.4
        B      (3.0)    84.0-86.9
        B-     (2.67)     79.5-83.9
        C+    (2.33)    77.0-79.4
        C     (2.0)     74.0-76.9 
        C-     (1.67)     69.5-73.9
        ?????????????????   
        You may not advance to a next level.
        D+    (1.33)     67.0-69.4
        D    (1.0)          64.0-66.9
        D-     (0.67)    59.5.0-63.9
        F     (0.0)    59.4 or less

V. Course Requirements
    1) Attendance & Class Participation
? Because of the cumulative nature of language learning, it is essential that students keep up with course work on a daily basis and attend all classes.  You are required to attend all classes and to prepare for the class according to the daily schedule.  When you have the perfect attendance record at the end of the semester, you will receive the extra 2% added to your course grade.  If you miss classes 3 times or less, you will receive the extra 1% added to your course grade.  Missing class more than 3 times will not get you any extra points.  Absence will not excuse a student in any way from responsibility for course material.  Notify your instructor as soon as possible if you cannot attend the class.  Only in RARE emergency cases (e.g., funerals with the announcement, car accidents with a written note from the police, sickness with a written note from the doctor), students will be allowed to make up work missed during their absences.  Your instructor will abide by this rule very strictly and reserve the right to judge whether to allow work to be made up or not.
? It is the policy of the UT that the student must notify the instructor at least 14 days prior to the classes scheduled on dates s/he will be absent to observe a religious holy day.
?Come to each class on time.  The quizzes will be given at the beginning of the class, so it is very important to be in class on time.  Two incidents of tardiness (coming late or leaving early) counts as one absence.  In addition, studying other subjects, chatting in English with your classmates, etc. may penalize you.
? No foods, No open containers (only bottled drink is allowed), No gums in the classroom, PLEASE.  Also, if you carry a cellular phone, please keep it off.
        ? Please respect each other and show consideration towards your instructor and classmates.
? Your active participation in class activities will greatly enhance your progress in Japanese.  Please do not be afraid of making mistakes/errors in the classroom.

    2) Homework -- No late / incomplete homework will count toward your grade.
? You will be given written homework assignments almost every day.  Do your homework promptly and carefully.  Try to answer all of the questions even though you are not sure of the correct answer--your teachers can help you with your mistakes but need to have something to correct.   In addition to the homework completion credits, you will receive a grade of 5pts (very good), 3 pts. (need to improve), or 1 (poor/sloppy) for the homework quality.  The criteria of grading are grammar accuracy, your handwriting (nice, big, clear handwriting), use of kanji, and correct spelling.  
        ? The instructor and TA use the marks below when checking homework as well as compositions:
        H: hiragana     KT: katakana    KJ: kanji        SP: spelling    V: vocabulary
        P: particle    G: grammar    FM: form        T: tense         ORD: order
           ?:  unclear    >: insertion    CJ: conjugation    // :  delete

        ? Write neatly.  Use only pencil (and erase carefully when you make an error).
        ? Homework is due at the beginning of each class, so turn it in before the class starts.  Do not
        leave homework at your instructor’s or TA’s office or mailbox without receiving permission to do
so in advance.
? Write your name and due date on each homework sheet.  If there are more than 2 pages, STAPLE them in the upper left corner.  Your instructor or TA is not responsible for missing pages when pages are not stapled together.  We will deduct some points if you continue to ignore this rule.
? If you need to turn in your homework early (e.g., one day early), you must provide the written note (stating which homework of what date you are turning in early) attached to your homework, so that the instructor or TA can understand your situation.  Without the written note, we will not accept and check the homework turned in early.
? You must complete your homework independently.   Unauthorized collaboration on homework and/or copying someone's homework and turning it in as your own will be considered as cheating and will result in a severe penalty.  Allowing other students to use your homework is also considered as scholastic dishonesty.    (Please read the UT’s policies on students’ scholastic dishonesty: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_whatis.php/)

    3) Vocabulary Quizzes  -- NO make-up / early quiz
        ? You will have 14 vocabulary quizzes.  See the schedule for the content of each quiz.
? The two lowest scores will be dropped.  If you have to miss a quiz due to an emergency situation, treat the missed quiz as a drop.

    4) Grammar Quizzes -- NO make-up / early quiz
? You will have 14 grammar quizzes to check your understanding of the new structures that you have studied in class.  It will mainly focus on new grammatical structures.  See the schedule for the content of each quiz.
? The two lowest scores will be dropped.  If you have to miss a quiz due to an emergency situation,   treat the missed quiz as a drop.

    5) Kanji & katakana Quizzes -- NO make-up / early quiz
        ? At the beginning of the semester, you will have 1 hiragana / katakana review quiz.
? You will have 8 kanji quizzes which focus mainly on new kanji in that chapter.  Study the kanji vocabulary for the quizzes.
? The lowest score will be dropped.  If you have to miss a quiz due to an emergency situation, treat the missed quiz as a drop.

    ? The above-mentioned quizzes will be given at the beginning of the class, so come to class on time.

    6) Pop Quizzes: -- NO make-up / early quiz
? You will have a pop quiz at the end of each lesson.  Pop quizzes are short (2 minutes or so) and deal with either Hiragana writing, Katakana writing, adjective conjugation, or verb conjugation.
? Make copies of the Pop quiz sheets (Verb and Adjective) included in the packet (pp. 60-63) and bring them to class to take the conjugation pop quizzes.

    7) Compositions
? You are going to use a computer to write compositions.  The computer training session will be provided at the beginning of the semester.  You will receive feedback on the draft, and then you are expected to turn in a corrected version based on the suggested feedback.  Please attach the first draft when turning in the corrected version in order to receive full credit.  Please note that without writing the draft, you won't receive any credit even if you turn in the "final" version by the deadline.
? You will write two compositions. The feedback sheet for each compositions, which is included in your packet, contains the composition topic and guidelines.  You must attach this feedback sheet to your draft.
? You will lose 10 pts. per day for late submission (for both draft and rewrite).  Also, a short draft or short rewrite as well as your non-compliance to the guidelines will lower your grade.
? In each composition, you should do your best to try to use new vocabulary and grammar patterns that you have learned.  In addition, use kanji as much as possible.
? “My computer/printer broke down yesterday.” is not a good excuse for not making the due date.
        ?Do not consult your Japanese friends, relatives, or classmates; write and revise by yourself.

    8) Oral exams -- NO make-up / early oral exam
? At the end of chapters 4 and 5, there will be an oral exam.  The oral exam guidelines are included in your packet.
? You need to sign up for oral exams in advance.  Without signing in, you cannot take the exams.  There will be no make up if you missed your scheduled time slot, so come on time (preferably at least 10 minutes early).

    9) Skit Presentation  -- NO make-up / early presentation
? Your partners and you will cooperate to create a skit in Japanese to present in the class.  Your       instructor will form the groups.  Turn in the skit draft and revision according to the schedule.       Unless participating in all the group activities such as skit writing, performance practice, and       presentation, you will receive no credit.  The skit instruction will be given in class later.  Please see the skit guideline on packet pages 46-48.
        ?Do not consult your Japanese friends, relatives, or classmates; write and revise by yourself
   
    10) Chapter Tests  -- NO make-up / early test
? You will have one written chapter test (Ch 6) to examine your understanding of the material in the chapter.  The test will include everything that has been covered in that chapter.
? Study “Language Notes” and “Culture Notes” in the textbook. (These sections may not be covered in class; however, you are expected to read them.)
? The listening section will be conducted in the beginning of the hour, so please come to classroom on time.  You will not be able to make up a missed listening section if you come late.

    11) Final Written Exam -- NO make-up / early exam
? All students are expected to take the comprehensive final written exam on the scheduled date and time, which will be announced later.  The exam will test your abilities in all language skills such as listening, reading, writing, and grammar within the context of what has been done in this course.  The format is similar to that of the written chapter tests, but it will include a kanji and katakana section.  The kanji and katakana section will be given in the beginning of the hour, followed by the listening section.  Be sure to come to the location on time.
    ? Make sure to check the final exam date before you purchase an airplane ticket.

?You cannot keep any of the tests and exams.  Make sure to return them to your instructor by the end of the class.  If they are not returned on the same day, you will not receive any credit for the exam.  Please go to your instructor's office if you need to look at them further. 


VI. Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty

Please know the Honor Code of the University of Texas at Austin.

The Honor Code states:
    The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the University is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

Students who violate the University’s rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University.  Since such dishonesty harms the individual students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonest will be strictly enforced.  For further information, please visit the Student Judicial Services web site at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/.  The Student Judicial Services Office is located at SSB4.104 (471-2841)

The following are some examples of behaviors regarded as "scholastic dishonesty".

    *Copying other students’ homework/exam answers.
    *Showing your homework/exam answers to other students.
    *Copying other peoples' work or phrases without citing.
    *Having someone else write a paper/composition for you.
*Seeking and Receiving extensive help from a native speaker of Japanese for doing homework or writing a composition.

VII. For Students with Disabilities
Any student with a documented disability (cognitive, physical, or psychological) who requires academic accommodations should contact the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259 as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

VIII. Studying Japanese
    ? In learning a foreign language, it is important to study every day.
? Actively participate in class. Use Japanese whenever possible, and do not be afraid of making mistakes.
    ? Spend as much time as possible studying with audio tapes or CD.
? Develop a systematic way of organizing the increasingly large amounts of materials for which you will be responsible.  Language learning requires constant review of previously-learned material.  You may want to make vocabulary cards or lists according to word groups.  Find your own learning and organizational style, and continue reviewing on a daily basis.  Read the “Study Hints” in the textbook pages 3, 13, 51, 83, 115-6, 122-3, and 134-5 for suggestions.

Excellent Web Sites for Learners of Japanese

1) http://www.laits.utexas.edu/japanese/joshu/index.htm

This is UT’s Japanese Program web site.  The site includes various activities and quizzes (for self-paced learning), grammar notes, and kanji review exercise, and lots more.  You can also read stories written by students in the previous semesters.

2) http://www.sabotenweb.com/bookmarks/language.html

    This web site contains more than 20 different J-E, E-J dictionaries, translation tools, kanji-    kana dictionaries.

3) http://www.laits.utexas.edu/japanese/JapanizingYourComputer.html

    This web site provides information on how to Japanize your PC.

JPN 320L • Readings In Modern Japanese II

31695 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm RLM 5.126
show description

R e a d in g s  in   M o d e r n   J a p a n e s e  II  (2010 Spring)
 
Class    #31695    ??? 2:00-3:00    RLM5.126
    #31700    ???3:00-4:00    RLM7.116

 I n s t r u c t o r :      Yukie Aida, Ph.D.  (????)
 Office Hours :         ?????????????????? o r  b y  appointment .
 T E L :           4 7 5 - 6 042   ( Office at WCH5.124)
 e-mail :           y.aida@mail.u t e x a s . e d u  

Prerequisite
You must have finished JPN 320K with a grade of at least C (70% or above) or an equivalent. 

UT’s Policy Changes
    ?    The One-Time Exception Policy has been eliminated for all Liberal Arts students.  Students will
    still be allowed to Q-drop (with their instructor's permission) up until the deadline, and may petition  
    to Q-drop after the deadline if they have an urgent, substantiated, non-academic reason.
?    Students (both undergraduate and graduate students) must take this course with a letter grade if they 
     wish to advance to a next level.  Students taking this course with CR/NC will not be eligible for
    taking 330 or above in the future.
    
Your E-mail Account
You must have an email account.  From time to time, I will use the UT’s Class E-Mail System to send important announcements to the entire class.  You should check your email inbox at least once a day for the announcements.

Course Materials
Textbook:    An Integrated Approach To Intermediate Japanese by Akira Miura and Naomi H. McGloin,  Revised edition.  The Japan Times, 2008.

Packet:                You are also required to purchase JPN320L course packet at the Texas Union                             Duplication Service.
                   
 Description  :    
 This  c o u r s e   f o c u s e s   o n  reading  a n d  writing skills  a t  the intermediate to advanced   l e v e l .     W e   will discuss w h a t   w e   r e a d   a f t e r  each reading session  in  o r d e r   t o   e x p a n d   o r a l   a n d   a u r a l  skills  as well.   The chapters covered are L7, 9, 13, 14(1)(2), 15(1)(2).  The reading of L8, 10, 11, 12 ??? will be assigned as outside reading assignments.
 
 G o a l s :   To obtain basic skills to utilize your Japanese abilities in your field.
       ?Reading skills    
      T o  build    u p   v o c a b u l a r y   a n d  kanji
      T o   become  familiar with l o n g , complicated   s e n t e n c e s
      T o   become familiar with    J a p a n e s e  discourse  s t y l e s
      T o   b e   a b l e   t o   u s e  a kanji dictionary and a Japanese-English dictionary
       ? Writing skills
      T o   b e   a b l e   t o  express y o u r   o w n  idea in    J a p a n e s e
      T o   b e   a b l e   t o  write short and long essays  in   J a p a n e s e
      T o   i m p r o v e   y o u r   h a n d writing a s  well as   w o r d  processing  skills .
      ? T o   b e   a   s e l f - directed l e a r n e r  

 U n f o r t u n a t e l y  learning a   l a n g u a g e   t a k e s   a   l o n g time  .     Y o u   h a v e   t o   l e a r n   J a p a n e s e   b y  yourself sometimes.     A l w a y s   e v a l u a t e   y o u r  progress  o r   learning    m e t h o d s .   Find    o u t   y o u r   o w n   m o s t  effective  a n d   ( c o s t   a n d  time)   efficient w a y s   t o   l e a r n   J a p a n e s e .  

 S c h e d u l e
 W e  will b e   s p e n ding a b o u t  two weeks  f o r   e a c h   c h a p t e r  so as to maximize retention of characters, vocabulary,
and grammatical structures.   The following is the pattern of classroom activities.  For homework assignment dues and quiz days, see the attached schedule.
 
     D a y    1          Learning of new kanjis
    Day 2         Grammar
     D a y   3        Grammar / new vocabulary         
    Day 4        Reading    ( ????
    Day 5        Reading (??????)
     D a y  6        Lesson quiz

 Assignments:
 1) Attendance and Class Participation
• It is essential that students attend all classes and keep up with course work on a daily basis.  When you have the perfect attendance record at the end of the semester, you will receive extra 1% added to your course grade.  If you miss classes 3 times or less, you will receive extra 0.5% added to your course grade.  Missing class more than 3 times will not get you any extra points.  Please see the section of Extra Points Project for information on how to earn more extra points to increase your grade.
• Come to class ON TIME. If you come late or leave early, it would not only damage your own learning but also disturb your classmates' learning.  Remember that all the quizzes will be given at the beginning of each class.  Two days of tardiness (coming late or leaving early) counts as one absence.  Also, please refrain from reading a newspaper, sleeping, or studying another subject during class.
• It is the policy of the UT that the student must notify the instructor at least 14 days prior to the classes scheduled on dates s/he will be absent to observe a religious holy day.
• No food, No open containers (only bottled drinks are allowed).  No chewing gums in the classroom, PLEASE.  Also, if you carry a cellular phone, please keep it off.
• I would like to maintain civility in the classroom.  Please respect each other and show consideration towards your classmates and instructor.
• Your active participation in class activities will greatly enhance your progress in Japanese.  Please do not be afraid of making mistakes/errors in class.
• Even before and after class, you should always try to speak ??? with the instructor and classmates.  Excessive use of English in the classroom will reduce your attendance/participation points and you might be asked to leave the classroom.

2)  ?????????
• There are several types of homework assignments.  The description of each homework will be given in class.  Homework will be given a grade of A (10 pts.), A- (9 pts.), B (8 pts.), C (7 pts.), D (6 pts.) or F (zero).  HW is due at the beginning of each class.  The criteria for grading are completion, clear writing, use of kanji, correct spelling, effort to use correct grammar patterns, etc.  Please use a pencil and eraser.  I will not accept homework late by more than 2 days.  Late homework will receive a considerable lower score.  Please know that some homework (bordered ones) will not be accepted if they are late.  Under a certain circumstance, you may turn in a HW assignment early with the instructor’s permission in advance.
    [Examples]
• Three grades down (e.g., 10 -> 7 or 9 -> 6) if you turn your HW at the next class meeting (e.g., due on Monday, and you turn in on Wed., or you turn in on Monday the HW due on Friday)  No HW will be accepted after that.
    • Two grade down if you turn your HW one day late (due on Monday, turn in on Tuesday).
    • One grade down if you turn your HW anytime after the class on the same day before 5pm.

    The Types of HW:
    ?)    Read the Culture Notes section of each chapter.
    ?)    Read the Grammar Notes section of each chapter.  Specific grammar items are indicated in the 
        schedule.
    ?)     Kanji Exercise -- Write each kanji or kanji compound marked with a * mark in the kanji list (you
    will have it in the packet) two times (????).  Please use the kanji practice sheets included in the packet also.
    ?)    Grammar Exercise pages -- Specific instructions will be given in class.
    ?)    Read the main text of each chapter and answer the questions about the content of the reading.
        The questions are given in the packet.
    ?)    Read the ?? texts and complete the T-F questions.  You must translate the T-F statements into
English before you decide if each of the statements is true or false.  You do not have to copy the Japanese sentences.  Please write double spaced.

• You must do your homework on your own.  Unauthorized collaboration on homework and/or copying someone's homework and turning it in as your own will be considered as cheating and will result in a severe penalty.  Allowing other students to use your homework is also considered as scholastic dishonesty.  (Please read the UT’s policies on students’ scholastic dishonesty: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_whatis.php/)

3) ???????? -- No score will be dropped.
• On the first day of each lesson, you will have a culture notes quiz.  This quiz assesses your understanding of cultural information presented in that chapter.  The format is True-False.  The questions are given in English.
    • With a justifiable reason, you may be allowed to take a make-up quiz for the missed one.

4)  ?????-- The lowest score will be dropped.
    • A short vocabulary quiz will be given for each lesson.
The format is as follows:  1)  You will be asked to provide a Japanese word in hiragana that fits a given English definition; and 2)  You will be asked to write an English equivalent for a Japanese word given.
    • No make-up/early quizzes under any circumstances.

5)  ?????  -- No score will be dropped.
• There is one kanji quiz for each lesson.  The kanji quiz tests your writing skill and knowledge of meanings of the kanjis. Your kanji recognition skill will be tested in the chapter quiz. 
    • With a justifiable reason, you may be allowed to take a make-up quiz for the missed one.

6)  ??????  -- No score will be dropped.
• You will have a pop quiz at the end of each lesson.  Pop quizzes are short (3 minutes or so) and deal with either Katakana writing, Kanji writing or recognition, adjective conjugation, verb conjugation, or vocabulary.  Conjugation Pop Q sheets are included in the packet pp. 34-37.
    • No make-up/early quizzes under any circumstances.


7)  ???????
    • Upon completion of each chapter, there will be a 50 minute lesson quiz.

8) ??
• You will read an article in Japanese and translate it into English.  The article is included in the packet (pp. 28-32).  Please type double spaced.  No collaboration with your classmates will be allowed.  You must translate it in your own words and expressions.  Use of translation tools (whether it is an online one or a hardware) is prohibited.
• You must provide a proof of your own work (e.g., list  of vocabulary and meanings, grammar notes, your notes on the text, etc.).
• Do not seek help from your Japanese friends or relatives.

9) ?????????? (See packet pages pp. 25-27)
    • You will be publishing a newspaper.  Please see the handouts in the packet for detailed explanation of this project. 

10)    ???????????
    • You will build your own portfolio of readings.  Select 3 readings each of which must be a different type.
    The reading could be:
        - a newspaper article or magazine article
        - a part of a novel or short story
        - an essay or editorial
        - a company / product description
        - a city guide / a travel guide
        - and etc.
        **Do not select any folktales, comic books, anime scripts, nor children’s books.
    • Each reading should be 1000+ characters long.
    • Your task is to read the text and to write a summary (main idea and significant details) of the content in     English (500 words or more).  Please turn in your summary together with the original text and a proof of     work (e.g., list of vocabulary and meanings, grammar notes, your notes on the text, kanji list and     definitions, etc.)      You can translate the text, but you can not use an online translation tool.
    • You will receive two scores: one for the quality of the summary and one for the quality of your work.

11)  ????
All students are expected to take the comprehensive final exam on the scheduled date and time.  The comprehensive final exam covers chapters 7, 9, 13, 14, and 15.  Please do not buy an airplane ticket without confirming the final exam date.


Grading        Your grades record sheet in included in the packet p. 33.

                Lesson quizzes (5)        17%        Kanji quizzes (5)               8%
                Final Exam                17%        Vocabulary quizzes (7)      8%
                Homework                12%        Culture Notes quizzes (5)      3%
                Translation                    9%   
                Pop quizzes                      3%             Group project            11%
                Reading summaries (3)    12%

    Your grade will be determined by the plus/minus system shown below.  There will be NO grading on a     curve.  You will have a grades record sheet in your packet (p. 59)

        A     (4.0)    95.0~
        A-    (3.67)     89.5.0-94.9
        B+    (3.33)    87.0-89.4
        B      (3.0)    84.0-86.9
        B-     (2.67)     79.5-83.9
        C+    (2.33)    77.0-79.4
        C     (2.0)     74.0-76.9 
        C-     (1.67)     69.5-73.9
        --------------------------------------------------------
        You may not advance to a next level.
        D+     (1.33)     67.0-69.4
        D     (1.0)          64.0-66.9
        D-     (0.67)    59.5.0-63.9
        F     (0.0)    59.4 or less

Policies on Scholastic Dishonesty

Please know the Honor Code of the University of Texas at Austin.
The Honor Code states:
         The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom,             leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the University is             expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect             toward     peers and community.

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University.  Since such dishonesty harms the individual students, and the integrity of the University,  policies on scholastic dishonest will be strictly enforced.  For further information, please visit the Student Judicial Services web site at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/.  The Student Judicial Services Office is located at SSB4.104 (471-2841)

The following are some examples of behaviors regarded as "scholastic dishonesty".
    • Copying other students’ homework/exam answers.
    • Showing your homework/exam answers to other students.
    • Copying other peoples' work or phrases without citing.
    • Having someone else write a paper/composition for you.
• Seeking and Receiving extensive help from a native speaker of Japanese or a friend with near perfect fluency in Japanese for doing homework, writing a composition, or other assignments.
    • Unauthorized collaboration on homework, translations, and compositions.

Students with Disabilities
Any student with a documented disability (physical or cognitive) who requires academic accommodations should contact the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259 as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.


Excellent Web Site for Learners of Japanese

1)      http://www.laits.utexas.edu/japanese/joshu/index.htm
This is UT’s Japanese Program web site.  The site includes various activities and quizzes (for self-paced learning), grammar notes, and kanji review exercise, and lots more.

2)     http://www.sabotenweb.com/bookmarks/language.html
This web site contains more than 20 different J-E, E-J dictionaries, translation tools, kanji-kana dictionaries.

3)     http://www.laits.utexas.edu/japanese/JapanizingYourComputer.html
    This web site provides information on how to Japanize your PC.




Tentative Schedule

    ?????    ???    ??????

1/20     ?    ???????/????

1/22    ?    ??????????????/ L????? pp. 38-42)        ? pp. 12-13

1/25    ?    L????? pp. 38-42-b)    ????????   

1/27    ?    ??        ????
                ?????#4-9

1/29    ?    ?????        ???? (TBA)

2/1    ?    ???    L??????    ???? (? p.  14)

2/3    ?    ??????    L????????    ?? (? pp. 138-9)
           
2/5    ?    L????
                     
2/8    ?    ????????(Bring packet pages 25-27.)    L8?????? p. 15)           
2/10    ?    L????? pp. 50-54)    ????????    L10?????? p. 17)

2/12    ?    ??        ????
                ?????#5-11

2/15    ?    ?????        ???? (TBA)

2/17    ?    ???    L??????    ???? (? p. 16)           
2/19     ?    ??????    L????????    ?? (? pp. 175-6)
   
2/22     ?    L????
                               
2/24     ?    Bring ??????to my office (WCH5.124) by 4pm.       
           
2/26     ?    L?????? pp. 74-80)    ????????   
               
3/1    ?    ??        ????
                ?????#?-??
                ????????
                ???????

3/3    ?    ?????        ???? (TBA)
               
3/5    ?    ???    L???????    ???? (? p. 20)

3/8    ?    ??????    L?????????   

3/10    ?    L?????       

3/12    ?    ?????????????        ?? (? p. 254)                       
3/15  ??3/19??????

3/22      ?    L????    ????????    L11?????? p. 18)
   
3/24      ?    ??        ????
                ?????#5-8
                ????????
                ???????   
                ????????

3/26      ?    ?????        ???? (TBA)
       
3/29      ?    ??????    L???????(1)    ?????? (? p. 21)
                ??????

3/31      ?    ????????????                                     
   
4/2    ?    ????????

4/5    ?    ??????    L??????????    ?????? (? p. 22)
       
4/7    ?    ?????????    L?????????    ?? (? p. 275)

4/9    ?    L?????

4/12    ?    ???????????????????????       

4/14  ?    ?????????????                                               L12?????? p. 19)

4/16  ?    L????    ????????       


            ??????        ????????
4/19  ?    ???????????????????    ?????????

4/21  ?    ??        ?????#5-12

4/22  ?    ????????        ???? (TBA)
       
4/26  ?    ??????    L??????????    ?????? (? p. 23)

4/28      ?    ????????????
   
4/30      ?    ??????    L??????????    ?????? (? p. 24)   
           
5/3    ?    ?????????    L?????????    ?? (? pp. 297-8)   

5/5    ?    L?????

5/7    ?    ?????????????        ??????       
       
5/10    ?    NO CLASS DAY    ?   

JPN 320L • Readings In Modern Japanese II

31700 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm RLM 7.116
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Continued development of Japanese reading and comprehension skills using authentic print and web-based resources.  Prerequisite: Japanese 320K with a grade of at least C.

JPN 320K • Readings In Modern Japanese I

31830 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm RLM 7.112
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Exploration of different types of texts written in a variety of grammar structures with rich vocabulary. Examination of similarities and differences between various aspects of Japanese culture and the student's own culture.  Prerequisite: Japanese 412L or 317C with a grade of at least C.

JPN 320K • Readings In Modern Japanese I

31835 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm RLM 6.104
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Exploration of different types of texts written in a variety of grammar structures with rich vocabulary. Examination of similarities and differences between various aspects of Japanese culture and the student's own culture.  Prerequisite: Japanese 412L or 317C with a grade of at least C.

JPN 320K • Readings In Modern Japanese I

81825 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm RLM 7.112
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Exploration of different types of texts written in a variety of grammar structures with rich vocabulary. Examination of similarities and differences between various aspects of Japanese culture and the student's own culture.  Prerequisite: Japanese 412L or 317C with a grade of at least C.

JPN 320L • Readings In Modern Japanese II

31230 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm RLM 5.126
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Continued development of Japanese reading and comprehension skills using authentic print and web-based resources.  Prerequisite: Japanese 320K with a grade of at least C.

JPN 320L • Readings In Modern Japanese II

31235 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm RLM 7.114
show description

Not open to native speakers of Japanese.  Continued development of Japanese reading and comprehension skills using authentic print and web-based resources.  Prerequisite: Japanese 320K with a grade of at least C.

bottom border