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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Chiu-Mi Lai

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., University of Washington

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-6054
  • Office: WCH 5.112
  • Office Hours: FALL 2014: M 1-2, 3-4; F 1-2
  • Campus Mail Code: G9300

Biography

Courses taught:
Undergraduate: Ideas and Concepts in Classical Chinese Literature; Decoding Classical Chinese Poetry; Communion with Nature in Traditional Chinese Literature; Identity and Memory in Asian American Literature; Why Chinese Has No Alphabet; Senior Seminar: Let Me Tell You About Asia: Perceptions of Asia in Fiction, Travelogues, and Memoirs; The Dead are Alive: Supernatural in Traditional Chinese Fiction; Cultural Outsider Memoirs of East Asia; Cultural Memory and the Classic Chinese Novel; Lost in Translation: History of Chinese Language and Translation

Graduate: Asian Studies Academic Writing (for non-native speakers of English)

ANS 372 • Supernat In Trad Chi Fict

31960 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 2.118
(also listed as C L 323 )
show description

[Open to all students -- All lectures, discussion and readings in English. Carries Global Cultures Flag]

 Required Text:

John Minford and Joseph S.M. Lau, eds. Classical Chinese Literature – An Anthology of

Translations, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Tang Dynasty (Columbia, 2002)

Other Readings:       Articles and book chapters will be posted onBlackboard.  (See Course Documents.) 

Course Description               

This course will provide an introduction to the so-called supernatural and otherworldly phenomena in traditional Chinese literature and “pseudo-history.”  Readings in English translation will encompass a selective sampling of prose, short fiction, and drama/opera from pre-modern China (end of imperialism in early 20th century).  Lectures and discussions will focus on the literary, cultural, historical, social, political, philosophical, and religious background against which these representative works arose.  Background reading will be assigned to supplement the primary works of literature and pseudo-history.  Course emphasis will be given to close and critical reading of primary works (in English translation) which were originally written in Classical Chinese and vernacular Classical Chinese.  Topics covered include otherworldly concepts of the Dao (the Way) and various interpretations of the afterlife, with an introduction to differences between spirits, souls, ghosts and other ethereal beings in various Chinese secular and religious belief systems.  Readings introduce Chinese notions of the supernatural in the form of such beings as immortals, goddesses, and shape-shifters. 

The grade for this course will be based on the following:

  • There is a class attendance policy for this course.
  • There is no final exam in this course.

15%     Class and online discussion, participation and preparation (Attendance policy)

50%     Reading and Discussion Questions (Response “Quizzes”)

20%     One Research Inquiry Paper (4-5 pages)

10%     One Oral Presentation/Lead Discussant

5%       Creative Writing – short story/prose/dramatic act (Evaluated CR/NC)

 

ANS 361 • Why Chinese Has No Alphabet

32160 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 0.118
(also listed as LIN 350 )
show description

[All lectures, discussion and readings in English.]

Course Description

This course will provide an introduction to the history of the evolution of the Chinese writing system and language. This course is open to all students and while recommended, no background in Chinese language, culture or linguistics is required. Course emphasis will be given to the study of the writing system and the cultural contexts that have preserved such a unique orthography from ancient to modern times. In this context, the course will include some discussion of the history of the Chinese language, including Chinese dialects. Lectures and discussions will focus on the cultural, historical, social, and political background against which Chinese writing and language have evolved.

            Introduction – Chinese Language and Writing; What is writing?  What is an alphabet?

I.              The Beginnings – Ancient Writing Systems, Proto-Writing, the Shang Bronze Age

II.            The Han Dynasty Milestone – Old Text/New Text Debates, Invention of Paper, “radicals” and the influential role of the Shuowen jiezi

III.           The Song Dynasty Milestone – Calligraphy, Painting, Invention of Printing, and “handwriting”

IV.           The Modern Milestone – Language Reform, Script transformation, Japanese/Western influence

V.             Contemporary Times – Chinese writing in the cyber age, influence of the English language/alphabet

COURSE EXPECTATIONS

This course will be graded on the Plus/Minus system.

There is a class attendance policy for this course.  After 2 absences (excused or unexcused), your class discussion grade will be deducted a full grade, and a half grade for each additional absence.  More than 10 absences will result in a failing grade for the course.  

 Your grade for this course will be based on the following (see below for details):

·          There is no written final exam.

I. 10% Class and online discussion, participation and “preparedness” (informal

    writing)

II. 50% Reading and Discussion Questions

III. 10% One Panel Oral Presentation

IV. 20% One “Written Report” (based on Panel Presentation Topic)

V. 10% Oral Comprehensive Interview

 

ANS 379 • Cul Outsider: Memoirs/E Asia

32225 • Spring 2014
Meets M 400pm-700pm CLA 0.108
show description

The focus of the capstone seminar is on the cultural outsider’s perceptions of East Asia as addressed in greater literature originally written in English (with a few exceptions), in the genres of memoirs and travelogues dating from as early as the writings of Marco Polo up to works published in contemporary America. Works selected for the seminar are to be read and discussed within the broad context of “travel literature” by visitors to greater East Asia:  China (including Hong Kong and Tibet), Taiwan, Japan, and Korea.   These travelers include missionaries, colonizers, POW's, journalists, scholars, teachers, students, and tourists. Through a sampling of these selected works, a main focus will be on the approach to the concept of “Asianness” in the distant and recent past as treated from the perspective of a cultural outsider.

Some major concepts and themes that emerge from these works concern Asian stereotypes, self-discovery and cultural identity formation, and exoticization of Asia and all things Asian (or “Oriental”). We will pose open-ended questions about these perceptions of Asia not as literary critics, but rather more as readers, or as fellow travelers to Asia. Thus, the course focus will be on primary, rather than secondary, sources and materials. Students will choose from the selected works below for oral panel presentations, leading class discussion, which in turn will form a focus for essays.

REQUIRED (excerpts available on Blackboard:

Isabella Bird, Unbeaten Tracks in Japan: The Firsthand Experiences of a British Woman in Outback Japan in 1878

Fuchsia Dunlop, Shark’s Fin and Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet-Sour Memoir of Eating in China

Stephanie Elizondo Griest, Around the Bloc: My Life in Moscow, Beijing, and Havana

Peter Hessler, River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze

Heinrich Harrer, Seven Years in Tibet

Bill Holm, Coming Home Crazy: An Alphabet of China Essays

Donald Keene, Chronicles of My Life: An American in the Heart of Japan

Helie Lee, Still Life With Rice: A Young American Woman Discovers the Life and Legacy of Her Korean Grandmother

Michael Meyer, The Last Days of Old Beijing: Life in the Vanishing Backstreets of a City Transformed

David Mura, Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei

John Nathan, Living Carelessly in Tokyo and Elsewhere: A Memoir

James O’Reilly et al., eds. Travelers’ Tales – true stories of life on the road: Hong Kong, including Macau and Southern China

Paisley Rekdal, The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee – Observations on Not Fitting In

Orville Schell, In the People’s Republic: An American’s first-hand view of living and working in China

Janwillem van de Wetering, The Empty Mirror – Experiences in a Japanese Zen Monastery

For Reference:
Wayne Booth, The Craft of Research; 3rd Ed: 2008
Julia Crane et al. Field Projects in Anthropology; 3rd Ed: 1992

Michael Harvey, The Nuts and Bolts of College Writing, 2003

Anthony Weston, A Rulebook for Arguments; 4th Ed:  2008

Course Grade Based On:

  • ·          This course is graded on the Plus/Minus System. 
  • There is a class attendance policy for this course.  After 1 absence (excused or unexcused), your class discussion grade will be deducted a full grade, and a half grade for each additional absence.  More than 8 absences will result in a failing grade for the course.  (Extenuating circumstances will be taken into consideration in consultation with the Office of the Dean of Students.) 
  • There is no written final exam.

 15% Class discussion, leading in-class discussions, in-class and online discussion and

                class“preparedness” (Informal in-class writing)

60% Critical and Analytical Writing (Discussion Questions, 2 papers, 1 revision,1 short report)

20% One Oral Panel Presentation and “Oral Defense Presentation”

5% Travelogue or Memoir Writing

 

ANS 372 • Decoding Clascl Chinese Poetry

31845 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.120
show description

The Moon in Chinese Poetry

This course will provide an introduction to the classical Chinese poetic tradition and is open to all students.  No previous background in Chinese language, culture or literature is required.  Readings in English translation will encompass a selective sampling of poetry from as early as the seventh century B.C.E. through the 9th century C.E.  Lectures and discussions will focus on the literary, cultural, historical, social, political, philosophical, and religious background against which these representative works in poetry arose.  While background reading will be assigned, the focus of lectures and discussion will be on the primary works of poetry.  Course emphasis will be given to poetry of the medieval period of the Tang dynasty (618-907) which is commonly referred to as the “golden age” of Chinese poetry.  Intensive focus and close readings will be given to poetry by four of pre-modern China’s greatest and most beloved poets:  Tao Yuanming 陶淵明 (or Tao Qian 陶潛) (365-427), Wang Wei 王維 (701-761), Li Bo 李白 (or Li Bai) (701-762), and Du Fu 杜甫 (712-770). 

The poet’s response to the human condition will form the framework within which we will consider our role as readers and our interpretation of the poetic treatment of the human response.  Lectures, readings and class discussion will examine these ideas and concepts in the context of the moon in Chinese literary memory.  Through this methodical process, we will begin to decode the literary language of classical Chinese poetry and poetic craft.  It is through this process of deciphering what can be puzzling or mysterious that the reader may emerge with yet another response to the human condition.  Herein lies the allure of classical Chinese poetry – we can still find our way to the Chinese poet’s world today. 

[All lectures, discussion and readings in English.]

Required Texts:

John Minford and Joseph S.M. Lau, eds. Classical Chinese Literature – An Anthology of Translations, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Tang Dynasty (Columbia, 2002)                     

Please purchase the following required texts (custom printed) at Paradigm Books (NOT at the Co-op):

  • David Hawkes, A Little Primer of Tu Fu (Rpt. Renditions, 1995)
  • Michael Sullivan, The Three Perfections: Chinese Painting, Poetry and Calligraphy (Revised edition: George Braziller, 1999) [out of print]

The final grade for this course will be based on the following:

  • This course will be graded on the Plus/Minus system.
  • There is no written final exam for this course.  No assignments will be accepted after last day of classes.
  • There is a class attendance policy for this course.
  • 15%     Class and online discussion, participation and “preparedness” -- Weekly Informal Writing and Lead Discussant work
  • 50%     Discussion Questions/ Expanded Written Responses
  • 25%     Critical Writing (Response Essay, Independent Project Paper)
  • 5%       Oral Presentation and leading discussion 
  • 5%       Creative Writing: imitation and matching poems (evaluated CR/NC)

 

 

ANS 361 • Lost In Transltn: Chi Lang/Lit

31695 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.120
show description

The Chinese Language and Translation

[This course carries the Global Cultures Flag and is open to all students – no previous background in Chinese language, culture or linguistics is required.]     

     Against the backdrop of China’s prominent international status and increasing global interest in the Chinese language, this course will delve into an in-depth study of the Chinese language and culture, including discussion of Chinese regional cultures and dialects.  Course emphasis will be given to the study of the modern Chinese language, with consideration given to the language spoken in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.  Cultural and political contexts of these geopolitical entities will be explored in order to understand emerging differences of all that falls under the common nomenclature of “Chinese.”  Lectures and discussions will focus on the cultural, social, historical, and political background against which the Chinese language has evolved and continues to evolve.  Of significance will be assessment of the increasing influence of usage of the English language in China and Taiwan. 

     Given China’s increased foreign interaction, this course will also include a discussion of translation and the Chinese language. In this context, the relationship between language and culture, as well as translation theories and approaches, will be studied and discussed.  Students will engage in a final project that will apply a selected translation theory to practice.  This final project will be a discussion of the selected translation theory applied and one of the following:  1) a small translation project from a foreign language into English; or 2) a comparison of different English-language translations of the same original language source.

 NOTE:  This is not a course for training in translation or interpretation.

 Course Topic Sections:

  • Section I – The Chinese Language (China, Hong Kong, Taiwan), Dialects, Minority Languages of China
  • Section II – Language and Culture: Language Attitudes, Cultural Usage and Habits
  • Section III – Translation Theories and Approaches, Global Influence of English

Course Grade based on:                               

  • There is a class attendance policy
  • There is no final exam in this course.

15%     Class discussion, participation, and preparation (Class Attendance Policy), including Informal         in-class and online (Blackboard) writing

50%     Reading and Discussion Questions (“quizzes” on lectures/readings/discussion)

10%     One Oral Presentation/Lead Discussant Work on Section I or II topics

25%     Final Project Paper on translation theory and practice (5-7 pages)

            and Oral Presentation on Final Project

 Required Text:

S. Robert Ramsey, The Languages of China (Princeton 1987)                                               

 Reading Selections on Blackboard include:

Peter W. Culicover and Elizabeth V. Hume, Basics of Language for Language Learners

John DeFrancis, The Chinese Language – Fact and Fantasy

Edwin Gentzler, Contemporary Translation Theories. Revised 2nd Ed. (Topics in

     Translation, 21)

Lydia Liu, ed. Tokens of Exchange: The Problem of Translation in Global Circulations

     (Post-Contemporary Interventions)

Jerry Norman, Chinese

Morry Sofer, The Translator’s Handbook, 7th Revised Edition (Translator's Handbook)

Lawrence Venuti, The Translator’s Invisibility: A History of Translation. 2nd Ed.

  Recommended:

Doug Leshan, A Handbook of English-Chinese Translation (Commercial Press 2002)

 

ANS 379 • Cul Memory/Classic Chinese Nov

31770 • Spring 2013
Meets M 400pm-700pm MAI 220D
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Course will meet  M 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM in MAIN 220E (not WCH 4.118)

This course meets with LAH 350 -- enrollment in the course requires a GPA of 3.5 in the major, or with permission of the instructor.  This course carries both the Writing and Global Cultures Flags. 

Cultural Memory and the Classic Chinese Novel

2013 Novel:  The Story of the Stone (Honglou meng, or Dream of the Red Chamber)

The course focus is on the masterpiece 18th c. Qing Dynasty Chinese novel, Dream of the Red Chamber (Honglou meng), with the alternate title of The Story of the Stone (Shitou ji).  Lectures and seminar-style discussion will examine the metaphors and mythology from Chinese cultural memory that are present in this classic novel.  In particular, the course will introduce American students to one of the most well-known of Chinese literary figures in Lin Daiyu, the novel’s female protagonist that holds a significant place in Chinese cultural memory. Lin Daiyu’s cultural significance is comparable to Juliet or Ophelia in Western cultural memory. This close study of the enduring appeal of the characterization of Lin Daiyu will include a perusal of antecedents for the Chinese “goddess” archetype in literary memory.  Lectures and readings will provide literary and socio-historical contexts for the novel. A selection of primary and secondary source readings will introduce a cross-section of influential works from classical literature and the major founding schools of Chinese thought. Complementary study will include the viewing of modern-day visual and dramatic representations of this novel.

The reading of the novel in this course is modeled after the original serial nature of the work, where segments of the story were serially released, and read and discussed with great fervor in both public and private spheres.  The attendant commentary and reimagining of the story belonged to the reading public.  One could argue that this was one of the earliest prominent works to spawn fan fiction.  We will consider the novel in this light of pop culture, and treat the work as a stellar example of how a lowbrow cultural practice has evolved into a highbrow dynamic. 

Required reading:

CAO Xueqin, translated by David Hawkes, The Story of the Stone, Vols. I, II, III (Penguin, 1973, 1977, 1980) [aka Honglou meng (Dream of the Red Chamber)]

CAO Xueqin and Gao E, translated by John Minford, The Story of the Stone, Vols. IV, V (Penguin, 1982, 1986)

Richard J. Smith, China’s Cultural Heritage – The Qing Dynasty, 1644-1912 (2nd ed.; Perseus/Westview, 1994)

  • Other Required Readings on Blackboard Course Site

Recommended:  Tang Xianzu, translated by Cyril Birch, The Peony PavilionMudan ting. 2nd ed

(Indiana, 2002)

 Course Grade Based On:

  • There is no final written exam in this course. 
  • There is a class attendance policy. 

I.          15%     Class and online discussion, participation and “preparedness” (including

                        in-class and online informal writing)

II.        50%     1-page Reading Response Writings (Weekly)

III.       25%     One 8-page Research Inquiry Paper

IV.       5%       One Oral Presentation/ Panel Discussion (on required text, CCH)

V.        5%       One Fan fiction piece (3-5 pages)

ANS 372 • Suprnatrl In Trad Chinese Fict

31655 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.120
(also listed as C L 323 )
show description

Meets with CL 323

[All lectures, discussion and readings in English.]

Required Text:

John Minford and Joseph S.M. Lau, eds. Classical Chinese Literature – An Anthology of

Translations, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Tang Dynasty (Columbia, 2002)

Supplementary Background Reading: Articles and book chapters will be posted on

Blackboard. (See Course Documents.)

Course Description

[This course is open to all students – no previous background in Chinese language, culture or literature is required.]

This course will provide an introduction to the so-called supernatural and otherworldly phenomena in traditional Chinese literature and “pseudo-history.” Readings in English translation will encompass a selective sampling of prose, short fiction, and drama/opera from pre-modern China (end of imperialism in early 20th century). Lectures and discussions will focus on the literary, cultural, historical, social, political, philosophical, and religious background against which these representative works arose. Background reading will be assigned to supplement the primary works of literature and pseudo-history. Course emphasis will be given to close and critical reading of primary works (in English translation) which were originally written in Classical Chinese and vernacular Classical Chinese. Topics covered include otherworldly concepts of the Dao (the Way) and various interpretations of the afterlife, with an introduction to differences between spirits, souls, ghosts and other ethereal beings in various Chinese secular and religious belief systems. Readings introduce Chinese notions of the supernatural in the form of such beings as immortals, goddesses, and shape-shifters.

Global Cultures

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

Course grade based on the following:

  • There is a class attendance policy for this course.
  • There is no final exam in this course.

15% Class and online discussion, participation and preparation (Attendance policy)

50% Reading and Discussion Questions (Response “Quizzes”)

20% One Research Inquiry Paper (5-7 pages)

10% One Oral Presentation/Lead Discussant

5% Creative Writing – short story/prose/dramatic act (Evaluated CR/NC)

ANS 361 • Why Chinese Has No Alphabet

31730 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BEN 1.126
(also listed as LIN 350 )
show description

This course carries the Global Cultures Flag.

Meets with LIN 350

[All lectures, discussion and readings in English.]

Required Texts:

William G. Boltz, The Origin and Early Development of the Chinese Writing System

Jerry Norman, Chinese

Tsuen-hsuin Tsien, Written on Bamboo and Silk – The Beginnings of Chinese Books and Inscriptions, Second Edition, 2004.

Further Reading:

John DeFrancis, The Chinese Language: Fact and Fantasy

Michael Loewe, Everyday Life in Early Imperial China

S. Robert Ramsey, The Languages of China

Michael Sullivan, The Three Perfections: Chinese Painting, Poetry and Calligraphy (Revised edition: George Braziller, 1999) [Out of print – Paradigm Books custom printing]

Course Description

This course will provide an introduction to the history of the evolution of the Chinese writing system and language. This course is open to all students and while recommended, no background in Chinese language, culture or linguistics is required. Course emphasis will be given to the study of the writing system and the cultural contexts that have preserved such a unique orthography from ancient to modern times. In this context, the course will include some discussion of the history of the Chinese language, including Chinese dialects. Lectures and discussions will focus on the cultural, historical, social, and political background against which Chinese writing and language have evolved.

COURSE EXPECTATIONS

This course will be graded on the Plus/Minus system. There is a class attendance policy for this course.

Your grade for this course will be based on the following:

I. 10% Class and online discussion, participation and “preparedness” (informal

writing)

II. 50% Reading and Discussion Questions

III. 10% One Panel Oral Presentation

IV. 20% One “Written Report” (based on Panel Presentation Topic)

V. 10% Oral Comprehensive Interview

ANS 378 • Senior Seminar In Asian Stds

31795 • Spring 2012
Meets M 400pm-700pm WCH 4.118
show description

This course carries the Writing and Global Cultures Flags

Seminar Topic: Let Me Tell You About “Asia” –Cultural Outsider Perceptions of Asia

in Memoirs and Travelogues

Course Description

The focus of this senior seminar is on “perceptions of Asia” as addressed in greater literature originally written in English (with a few exceptions), especially in the genres of memoirs, travelogues, and fiction, dating from as early as the writings of Marco Polo up to works published in contemporary America. Works selected for the seminar are to be read and discussed within the broad context of “travel literature” by visitors to Asia – travelers that include missionaries, colonizers, journalists, scholars, students, and tourists. Through a sampling of these selected works, a main focus will be on the approach to the concept of “Asianness” in the distant and recent past as treated from the perspective of a “cultural outsider.”

Some major concepts and themes that emerge from these works concern Asian stereotypes, self-discovery and cultural identity formation, and exoticization of Asia and all things Asian (or “Oriental”). We will pose open-ended questions about these perceptions of Asia not as literary critics, but rather more as readers, or as fellow travelers to Asia. Thus, the course focus will be on primary, rather than secondary, sources and materials. Students will choose from the selected works below for oral panel presentations, leading class discussion, which in turn will form a focus for essays.

REQUIRED TEXTS:*

*Other readings on Blackboard

Peter Hessler, River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze

Stephanie Elizondo Griest, Around the Bloc: My Life in Moscow, Beijing, and Havana

Marco Polo, trans. Ronald Latham, The Travels of Marco Polo

Anthony Weston, A Rulebook for Arguments; 4th Ed.: 2008

Recommended:
Wayne Booth, The Craft of Research; 3rd Ed: 2008
Julia Crane et al. Field Projects in Anthropology; 3rd Ed: 1992

Course Grade Based On:

This course is graded on the Plus/Minus System. There is a class attendance policy for this course.

10% Class discussion, leading in-class discussions, in-class and online discussion and

class “preparedness.” (Informal in-class writing)

70% Critical and Analytical Writing (Discussion Questions, 2 papers, 1 revision,1 short report)

5% One Oral Panel Presentation

10% Oral Comprehensive “Defense” (Exam)

5% Travelogue or Memoir Writing

ANS 372 • Decoding Clascl Chinese Poetry

31515 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 303
(also listed as C L 323 )
show description

Decoding Classical Chinese Poetry -- The Moon

Description:  This course will provide an introduction to the classical Chinese poetic tradition and is open to all students.  No previous background in Chinese language, culture or literature is required.  Readings in English translation will encompass a selective sampling of poetry from as early as the seventh century B.C.E. through the 9th century C.E.  Lectures and discussions will focus on the literary, cultural, historical, social, political, philosophical, and religious background against which these representative works in poetry arose.  While background reading will be assigned, the focus of lectures and discussion will be on the primary works of poetry.  Course emphasis will be given to poetry of the medieval period of the Tang dynasty (618-907) which is commonly referred to as the “golden age” of Chinese poetry.  Intensive focus and close readings on the moon will be given to poetry by four of pre-modern China’s greatest and most beloved poets:  Tao Yuanming 陶淵明 (or Tao Qian 陶潛) (365-427), Wang Wei 王維 (701-761), Li Bo 李白 (or Li Bai) (701-762), and Du Fu 杜甫 (712-770). 

The poet’s response to the human condition will form the framework within which we will consider our role as readers and our interpretation of the poetic treatment of the human response.  Lectures, readings and class discussion will examine these ideas and concepts in the context of the Chinese literary memory.  Through this methodical process, we will begin to decode the literary language of classical Chinese poetry and poetic craft.  It is through this process of deciphering what can be puzzling or mysterious that the reader may emerge with yet another response to the human condition.  Herein lies the allure of classical Chinese poetry – we can still find our way to the Chinese poet’s world today. 

Course grade based on:

Attendance Policy

20% Discussion

75% Writing and Oral Presentation

5% Creative Writing -- Imitation and Matching poems (evaluated CR/NC)

ANS 320 • China's Great Wall/Silk Rd Lit

31805 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MAI 220C
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

(LAH 350 meets with ANS 320)

China's Great Wall and Silk Road Literature -- Liberal Arts Honors

This course will examine some key concepts and genres in the Chinese cultural and literary tradition that were greatly shaped by foreign non-Chinese rule and influence, as represented by the iconic Great Wall and the Silk Road.  Course emphasis will be given to the literary fruits that were borne through empire expansion, war, and through extended periods of “foreign” non-Chinese rule, in particular the Yuan Dynasty under Mongol rule.  These literary records also reflect travel through regions along the Great Wall and explorations made possible by the Silk Road. Readings, lectures, and in-class and online discussions will focus on formative texts such as travelogues and other personal histories, frontier and border literature, and the great dramas/operas that emerged under Mongol rule. 

 Course Grade Based On:

        *There is no final exam in this course

 I.      15%        Class and online discussion, participation and “preparedness” (including

in-class informal writing)*     *Including a Class Attendance Policy

II.     40% Reading and Discussion Questions – Weekly 1-2 page Response Writings

III.   30% Two 8-10 page Papers (topics related to Oral Presentations, see below)

IV.       10%     Two Oral Presentations (15-20 minute formal presentations)

V.        5%       “Journal” writing throughout the term (on Blackboard)Reading

                        “notes” and pre-draft ideas (Evaluated CR/NC)

 Required Texts for Class Discussion:

 Wilt L. Idema and Stephen West, eds. with Introduction, Monks, Bandits, Lovers and

Immortals – Eleven Early Chinese Plays (Hackett, 2010)

Susan Whitfield, Life Along the Silk Road (University of California Press, 1999)

Required for Background Reading and Individual Research Projects:

J.I. Crump, Chinese Theater in the Days of Kublai Khan (rpt. Michigan, 1990)

Mark Edward Lewis, China’s Cosmopolitan Empire – The Tang Dynasty (Harvard, 2009)

Julia Lovell, The Great Wall – China Against the World 1000 B.C. - A.D. 2000 (Grove,

2006)

 Oral Presentation Topics from selected readings below in consultation with instructor; other readings may be added to accommodate student interest

 For Individual Presentation/Project:

 Shiamin Kwa and Wilt L. Idema, Mulan: Five Versions of a Classic Chinese Legend,

with Related Texts (Hackett, 2010)

Edward H. Schafer, The Golden Peaches of Samarkand – A Study of T’ang Exotics

(University of California Press, 1985)

Jonathan Spence, The Chan’s Great Continent – China in Western Minds (Norton, 1999)

Michael Sullivan, The Three Perfections: Chinese Painting, Poetry and Calligraphy

(Revised edition: George Braziller, 1999) [out of print – available at Paradigm

Books, 24th and Guadalupe]

Jack Weatherford, Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World (Crown, 2004)

Stephen H. West and Wilt L. Idema, eds. and trans. with Introduction, Wang Shifu, The

Story of the Western Wing (California, 1995)

Sally Hovey Wriggins, The Silk Road Journey with Xuanzang (Icon Editions, Westview,

2004)

Consult For Historical Background for Projects:

Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Cambridge Illustrated History – China, 2nd ed. (1996;

Cambridge, 2010)

Colin Mackerras, ed. Chinese Theater – From Its Origins to the Present Day (Hawaii,

1983)

Frances Wood, The Silk Road – Two Thousand Years in the Heart of Asia (University of

California Press, 2002)

Recommended:

On the Qing Dynasty under Manchu Rule:

Jonathan D. Spence, The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci (Penguin, 1985)

Historical Background:

Richard J. Smith, China’s Cultural Heritage – The Qing Dynasty, 1644-1912 (2nd ed.;

Westview Press, 1994)

ANS 361 • Lost In Transltn: Chi Lang/Lit

31865 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm BEN 1.108
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Lost in Translation -- History of Chinese Language and Translation

This course is open to all students and, while recommended, no background in Chinese language, culture or linguistics is required.  Against the backdrop of China’s prominent international status and increasing global interest in the Chinese language, this course will delve into an in-depth study of the Chinese language and culture, including discussion of Chinese regional cultures and dialects.  Course emphasis will be given to the study of the modern Chinese language as spoken in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.  Cultural and political contexts of these geopolitical entities will be explored in order to understand emerging differences of all that falls under the common nomenclature of “Chinese.”  
Given China’s increased foreign interaction, this course will also include a discussion of the history of translation of the Chinese language into different languages, with topics such as the imperial Qing dynasty’s large-scale Manchu translations of the Confucian classics and Japanese kanbun studies.  Discussion will also include early Chinese interactions with Buddhist missionaries and European Jesuit missionaries.  In this context, translation theories and practices will be discussed.   
Lectures and discussions will focus on the cultural, social, historical, and political background against which the Chinese language has evolved and continues to evolve.  Of significance will be assessment of the increasing influence of usage of the English language and the Internet in China and Taiwan.  Students will engage in a final project that will be either research-based in nature or, with instructor approval, a translation project (into English) with complementary analysis of translation theory or practice. 

NOTE:  This is not a course for training in translation or interpretation.

Course Topic Sections:

•    Section I – Introduction to the Chinese Language and Dialects, Pre-modern translation projects in Chinese history (including Japanese kanbun studies)
•    Section II – Language Attitudes, Cultural Usage and Habits, Idiosyncrasies in Chinese Semantics, Grammar and Syntax (China, Hong Kong, Taiwan)
•    Section III – Translation Theories and Approaches, Global Influence of English and the Internet

Texts:

Required Texts:

Jerry Norman, Chinese

S. Robert Ramsey, The Languages of China

Morry Sofer, The Translator's Handbook, 6th Revised Edition

Recommended Texts:

Doug Leshan, A Handbook of English-Chinese Translation

Mona Baker, In Other Words: A Coursebook on Translation


Reading Selections on Blackboard include:
Susan Bassnett, Translation StudiesEdwin Gentzler, Contemporary Translation Theories.       
Revised 2nd Edition (Topics in Translation, 21)                                                            

John DeFrancis, The Chinese Language -- Fact and Fantasy

Edwin Gentzler, Contemporary Translation Theories. Revised 2nd ed.

Lydia Liu, ed. Tokens of Exchange: The Problem of Translation in Global Circulations (Post-
Contemporary Interventions)                                                                                         
Jonathan Spence, The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci                         
 Richard J. Smith, China’s Cultural Heritage – The Qing Dynasty1644-1912       

Lawrence Venuti, The Translator's Invisibility: A History of Translation

Lawrence Venuti, The Translation Studies Reader


Grading:
        There is no final exam.

15% Class discussion, participation, and preparation (Class Attendance Policy),

        Informal in-class and Blackboard “brainstorming” writing

50% Reading and Discussion Questions (“quizzes” on lectures/readings/discussion)

10% One Oral Presentation on Section II or Section III

20%     Final project (8-page research report or translation of short work or excerpt into English, as approved by instructor)*

        *If translation project, 5% will be for an analysis of translation theory or practice

5%   Oral Presentation on Final project

ANS 378 • Senior Seminar In Asian Stds

31950 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WCH 4.118
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Let Me Tell You About Asia: Cultural Outsider Perceptions of Asia in Memoirs and Travelogues

This seminar is on “perceptions of Asia” as addressed in the greater literature of travelogues and memoirs. These works are to be read and discussed within the broad context of “travel literature” by visitors to Asia – early and modern travelers that include missionaries, colonizers, journalists, scholars, students, and tourists. A main focus will be on the approach to the concept of “Asianness” in the distant and recent past as treated from the perspective of a “cultural outsider.”

Course Grade Based On:

20%        Class discussion, leading in-class discussions, infomal writing, in-class and online discussion and class “preparedness.”*    *There is a class attendance policy in this course

60%     Critical and Analytical Writing (Discussion Questions, 2 papers, 1 revision,1 short report)

10% Two Panel Oral Presentations

5%   “Book Club” selection of additional title from list

5%   Travelogue or Memoir Writing

Required Texts:

Section I – The Early Explorers

Ronald Latham, The Travels of Marco Polo (Penguin 1958)

Section II – The Travelogue Adventurers

J.R. Ackerley, Hindoo Holiday: An Indian Journal (Penguin, 2009; New York Review

Books Classics, 2000)

David Mura, Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei (1990; Grove 2005)

Section III – The Contemporary Traveler

Stephanie Elizondo Griest, Around the Bloc – My Life in Moscow, Beijing, and Havana

(Villard, 2004)

 Recommended:

Wayne C. Booth et al. The Craft of Research (3rd ed.; Chicago 2008)

Julia Crane et al., Field Projects in Anthropology – A Student Handbook (Waveland,

1992)

 Required -- Available On Blackboard:

Eric Liu, The Accidental Asian -- Notes of a Native Speaker

John Van Maanen, Tales of the Field – On Writing Ethnography

Section I – The Early Explorers (Select one)

Engelbert Kaempfer, Kaempfer’s Japan: Tokugawa Culture Observed (trans. Beatrice

Bodart-Bailey)

Jonathan D. Spence, The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci 

Section II – The Travelogue Adventurers (Select one for presentation/paper)

Isabella Bird, Unbeaten Tracks in Japan

Isabella Bird, Korea and Her Neighbors

Heinrich Harrer, Seven Years in Tibet

 

Orville Schell, In the People's Republic – An American’s Firsthand View of Living and

      Working in China

Janwillem van de Wetering, The Empty Mirror – Experiences in a Japanese Zen

     Monastery

Akiko Yosano, Travels in Manchuria and Mongolia (trans. Joshua Fogel)

Section III – The Contemporary Traveler (Select one for presentation/paper)

Heinrich Harrer, Return to Tibet -- Tibet After the Chinese Occupation

John Hersey, Hiroshima

Peter Hessler, River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze

Bill Holm, Coming Home Crazy – An Alphabet of China Essays

James O’Reilly et al., eds. Travelers’ Tales: Hong Kong – including Macau and Southern China

Paisley Rekdal, The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee – Observations on Not Fitting In

Michael Shapiro, The Shadow in the Sun: A Korean Year of Love and Sorrow

Tim Ward, What the Buddha Never Taught

ANS 372 • Suprnatrl In Trad Chinese Fict

30785 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.120
(also listed as C L 323 )
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The Dead Are Alive -- The Supernatural in Traditional Chinese Fiction and Prose

This course is open to all students – no previous background in Chinese language, culture or literature is required.  This course will provide an introduction to the so-called supernatural and otherworldly phenomena in traditional Chinese literature and “pseudo-history.”   Readings in English translation will encompass a selective sampling of prose, short fiction, and drama/opera from pre-modern China (end of imperialism in early 20th century).  Lectures and discussions will focus on the literary, cultural, historical, social, political, philosophical, and religious background against which these representative works arose.  Background reading will be assigned to supplement the primary works of literature and pseudo-history.  Course emphasis will be given to close and critical reading of primary works (in English translation) which were originally written in Classical Chinese and vernacular Classical Chinese.   Topics covered include otherworldly concepts of the Dao (the Way) and various interpretations of the afterlife, with an introduction to differences between spirits, souls, ghosts and other ethereal beings in the Chinese secular and religious belief systems.   Readings introduce Chinese notions of the supernatural in the form of such beings as immortals, goddesses, and shape-shifters. 

Required Text:
John Minford and Joseph S.M. Lau, eds. Classical Chinese Literature: An Anthology of Translations (Columbia University Press)

GRADING:

* There is no final exam in this course.
15%     Class discussion, participation and preparation (Class Attendance policy)

70%     Writing --
           5%     Informal in-class and Blackboard “brainstorming” writing
           25%   Reading and  Discussion Questions
           40%   Formal Critical and Analytical Writing
10%    Oral Presentation (Final Paper)
5%    Creative Writing – short story/prose/dramatic act (Evaluated CR/NC)

ANS 361 • Why Chinese Has No Alphabet

30970 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BEN 1.126
(also listed as LIN 350 )
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Why Chinese Has No Alphabet

       This course will provide an introduction to the history of the evolution of the Chinese writing system and language.  This course is open to all students and while recommended, no background in Chinese language, culture or linguistics is required.  Course emphasis will be given to the study of the writing system and the cultural contexts that have preserved such a unique orthography from ancient to modern times.  In this context, the course will include some discussion of the history of the Chinese language, including Chinese dialects.   Lectures and discussions will focus on the cultural, historical, social, and political background against which Chinese writing and language have evolved.

 Required Texts:

William G. Boltz, The Origin and Early Development of the Chinese Writing System

(New Haven: American Oriental Society, 1994)

Jerry Norman, Chinese (Cambridge, 1988)

S. Robert Ramsey, The Languages of China (Princeton, 1987)

Further Reading:

John DeFrancis, The Chinese Language: Fact and Fantasy (Hawaii, 1984)

Michael Sullivan, The Three Perfections: Chinese Painting, Poetry and Calligraphy

(Revised edition: George Braziller, 1999) [Out of print – Paradigm Books custom printing]

Tsuen-hsuin Tsien, Written on Bamboo and Silk – The Beginnings of Chinese Books and Inscriptions, Second Edition (Chicago, 2004)

COURSE EXPECTATIONS

  • This course will be graded on the Plus/Minus system.
  • There is no written final exam for this course. 
  • Late assignments will be deducted by half a grade for each day past the due date.  No assignments will be accepted after the last day of classes (5/7/10).  Your final course grade will be based on work completed up to this date.

ATTENDANCE POLICY – More than 3 absences, final class participation grade deducted half a grade (e.g. A- to B+); additional half grades deducted for each additional 2 absences.

Your grade for this course will be based on the following (see below for details):

I.          20%     Class and online discussion, participation and “preparedness” (informal

writing)

II.         40%     Reading and Discussion Questions

III.       20%     Two “Written Reports” (based on Panel Topics)

IV.       20%     Two Panel Oral Presentations

 

SCHEDULE

Detailed class and reading assignments will be posted/handed out for each section.

All sections will be supplemented by lecture outlines and notes by instructor.

Weeks 1-8            Section I – Writing System

Panel Presentations in Weeks 5, 6, 7, 8

(Week 9 Spring Break)

Weeks 10-16       Section II – Language

Panel Presentations in Weeks 12, 13, 14

 

  • Section I Panel Forums – Writing Systems

Week 5 – Writing Mediums
Week 6 – Ancient and Early Writing Systems
Week 7 – Early Debates on Chinese Writing System, Calligraphic Scripts
Week 8 – Modern Chinese Orthography

 
  • Section II Panel Forums – Languages/Dialects

Week 12 – Spoken Chinese:  Historical Development, Adaptability and Idiomatic Usage of Tones and

Pronunciation (including phonetic usage), Grammar and Usage

Week 13 – Written Chinese:  Historical Development, Adaptability and Idiomatic Usage of Grammar

and Syntax (including semantic usage), Classical and Vernacular Chinese

Week 14 – Dialects and Minority Languages of China

 

 



 

ANS 372 • Decoding Clascl Chinese Poetry

31000 • Spring 2010
Meets W 400pm-700pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as C L 323 )
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Decoding Classical Chinese Poetry

                This course will provide an introduction to the classical Chinese poetic tradition and is open to all students.  No previous background in Chinese language, culture or literature is required.  Readings in English translation will encompass a selective sampling of poetry from as early as the seventh century B.C.E. through the 9th century.  Lectures and discussions will focus on the literary, cultural, historical, social, political, philosophical, and religious background against which these representative works in poetry arose.  While background reading will be assigned, the focus of lectures and discussion will be on the primary works of poetry.  Course emphasis will be given to poetry of the medieval period of the Tang dynasty (618-907) which is commonly referred to as the “golden age” of Chinese poetry.  Intensive focus and close readings will be given to poetry by four of pre-modern China’s greatest and most beloved poets, Tao Yuanming ??? (or Tao Qian ??) (365-427), Wang Wei ?? (701-761), Li Bo?? (or Li Bai) (701-762), and Du Fu ?? (712-770). 

The poet’s response to the human condition will form the framework within which we will consider our role as readers and our interpretation of the poetic treatment of the human response.  Lectures, readings and class discussion will examine these ideas and concepts in the context of the Chinese literary memory.  Through this methodical process, we will begin to decode the literary language of classical Chinese poetry and poetic craft.  It is through this process of deciphering what can be puzzling or mysterious that the reader may emerge with yet another response to the human condition.  Herein lies the allure of classical Chinese poetry – we can still find our way to the Chinese poet’s world today.

Required Texts:

John Minford and Joseph S.M. Lau, eds. Classical Chinese Literature – An Anthology of Translations, Volume I: From Antiquity to the Tang Dynasty (Columbia, 2002)

Please purchase the following required texts (custom printed) at Paradigm Books (NOT at the Co-op):

David Hawkes, A Little Primer of Tu Fu (Rpt. Renditions, 1995)

Michael Sullivan, The Three Perfections: Chinese Painting, Poetry and Calligraphy

(Revised edition: George Braziller, 1999) [out of print]

 Supplementary Background Reading:          Articles and book chapters will be posted on

Blackboard.  (See Course Documents.) 

Course Expectations

  • This course will be graded on the Plus/Minus system.
  • There is no written final exam for this course. 
  • Late assignments will be deducted by half a grade for each day past the due date.  No assignments will be accepted after the last day of classes (5/7/10).  Your final course grade will be based on work completed up to this date.
  • There is a class attendance policy for this course.

 Your grade for this course will be based on the following:

 10%     Class and online discussion, participation and “preparedness”

10%     Informal Writing, Lead Discussant

40%     Discussion Questions/ Expanded Responses

25%     Critical Writing (Response Essay, Independent Project Paper)

10%     Oral Presentation and leading discussion on independent project

5%       Creative Writing: "imitation and matching" poems (evaluated CR/NC)

ANS 378 • Senior Seminar In Asian Stds-W

31175 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MEZ 2.202
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Let Me Tell You About Asia: The Cultural Outsider's Perceptions of Asia in Travelogues and Memoirs

This seminar is on “perceptions of Asia” as addressed in the greater literature of travelogues and memoirs. These works are to be read and discussed within the broad context of “travel literature” by visitors to Asia – early and modern travelers that include missionaries, colonizers, journalists, scholars, students, and tourists. A main focus will be on the approach to the concept of “Asianness” in the distant and recent past as treated from the perspective of a “cultural outsider.”

ANS 361 • Why Chinese Has No Alphabet

30510 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BEN 1.126
(also listed as LIN 350 )
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Selected topics in south and east Asian anthropology, economics, history, geography, government, art, music, and philosophy.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Asian Studies 320 and 361 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 390 • Asian Studies Academic Writing

30640 • Spring 2009
Meets W 400pm-700pm MAI 220E
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Study of various Asian studies-related topics that do not focus on any single geographic region.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

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