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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

David M Sena

Assistant Professor Ph.D., University of Chicago

David M Sena

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-7965
  • Office: WCH 5.104C
  • Office Hours: FALL 2014: W F 12-1:30
  • Campus Mail Code: G9300

Biography

Courses taught:
Introduction to China; Early China: History and Archeology; World of the Confucians; Self-Cultivation in Traditional China; Writing and Authority in Early China; Introduction to Classical Chinese; Classical Chinese Philosophy.

Interests

Early Chinese history, language, and culture

ANS 372 • Self-Cultivation Trad China

31095 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 2.124
(also listed as CTI 375, R S 352 )
show description

Course Description
How does one transform oneself into a better person? This question lies at the heart of so many philosophical and religious traditions throughout the world. This was especially so in pre-modern China, where concern with self cultivation is fundamental to many intellectual and religious discourses, including Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. In this course we will examine ideas and practices in Chinese culture related to self cultivation as they are represented in writings drawn from a wide selection of philosophical, religious, and occult traditions. Far from providing a uniform understanding of this issue, these texts provide diverse examples of motivations, beliefs and techniques related to self cultivation. Whether the goal was to attain moral perfection, sagehood, immortality, buddhahood, or just tranquility, these beliefs and practices of self cultivation demonstrate a concern for human refinement that is deeply embedded within the culture of traditional China.

Grading
Final grades will be calculated according to the criteria below. Grades of plus/minus will be assigned as appropriate.

class participation: 20%
informal writing: 20%
short paper: 15%
midterm exam: 20%
final paper: 25%

Textbooks and Readings
Philip J. Ivanhoe, Confucian Moral Self Cultivation, 2nd ed. (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2000), ISBN: 0-87220-508-8.

Philip J. Ivanhoe and Bryan W. Van Norden, Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy, (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2006), ISBN: 0-87220-780-3.v

Additional required readings for the class will be distributed electronically.

CHI 322 • Intro To Classical Chinese

31370 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.202
show description

Course description
This course is designed to give students an introduction to classical Chinese, the written language of China from the sixth century B.C. through the second century A.D. and the foundation of the literary language of China in use until the early twentieth century.  Students will be introduced to basic syntax, grammar, and vocabulary through the reading of authentic texts ranging from a variety of literary genres including short proverbs, philosophical writings, and historical literature.

Course texts (selections from the following, available in a course packet)
Edwin G. Pulleyblank, Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar (Vancouver, University of British Columbia Press, 1995; rpt. 2000).

Paul Rouzer, A New Practical Primer of Literary Chinese (Cambridge and London: Harvard University Asia Center, 2007).

Harold Shadick,  A First Course in Literary Chinese (Ithaca: CornellUniversity Press, 1968).

Grading
Preparation, participation, pop-quizes and exercises: 35% (including attendance)
Tests: 30% (10% each)
Translation assignment: 15%
Final exam: 20%

ANS 302C • Introduction To China

31850 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as HIS 302C )
show description

Course Description
Geographically, linguistically, ethnically, and economically, China today is a land of diversity, characterized by striking regional variations. Yet underlying this diversity is a shared cultural heritage: a unifying set of historical, literary, and artistic traditions, philosophical and religious ideas, political institutions, and a common writing system. This course introduces the study of Chinese society and culture through an examination of the cultural unities and diversities, continuities and discontinuities that comprise the historical development of Chinese civilization. Topics include philosophy and religion; cosmology and the life cycle; literature and arts; science, technology and medicine; power and authority; gender, ethnicity, and cultural identity. This course provides a foundation for continued study of Chinese history and society for students who plan to go on to more specialized, upper-division courses including Chinese anthropology, history, literature, sociology, economics, law, policy, international business, art history, architecture, environmental science, and philosophy.

Course Goals
The primary learning goal for this course is to acquire a broad understanding of the historical development of civilization in China. This course adopts a "hands on" approach by asking students to consider primary historical evidence of both a textual and visual nature. Therefore, a second goal of this course is to develop one's ability to interpret texts and images as historical evidence by considering such material within its particular cultural, social, and political context. The ultimate goal of the course is to acquire a richer understanding of Chinese civilization and to develop research skills that will facilitate continued study of and coursework on China and East Asia.

This course carries a University Global Cultures Flag. The goal of this flag is to challenge students to explore the beliefs and practices of non-U.S. cultural communities in relation to their own cultural experiences so that they engage in an active process of self-reflection.

Course readings
Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Cambridge Illustrated History of China,2nd Edition (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010).

Additional required readings consisting of primary historical sources drawn from a wide variety of archaeological, literary, and archival materials will be distributed electronically via the course website.

Grading
Final grades will be calculated according to the criteria below. Grades of plus/minus will be assigned as appropriate.

Class participation and attendance: 10%
Quiz: 5%
3 Tests: 60% (20% each)
Final exam: 25%

ANS 379 • Writing/Authority: Early China

31990 • Fall 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.206
(also listed as CTI 345, HIS 364G )
show description

Course description

This course examines the critical role of writing in one of the world's oldest literate civilizations. Beginning with the origin of Chinese characters in the Bronze Age, we examine the crucial role of writing in staking claims of political, social, and religious authority in ancient and early Imperial China (ca. 1200 BCE-200 CE). Aiming to situate writing within the cultural practices in which it was generated, we explore a diverse array of textual artifacts, including inscriptions on bone, bronze, and stone and manuscripts on bamboo and silk, in addition to texts in the received literary tradition. Topics include the magico-religious dimensions of writing, the sociology of writing and textual production, and the role of cannon and commentary in articulating and challenging imperial claims of legitimacy.

Course readings
Selections from the following texts, available electronically:

  • Primary sources:
    Book of Documents
    Book of Poetry
    Analects of Confucius
    Records of the Historian
    Songs of Chu
    Huainanzi
  • Secondary scholarship:
    Mark Edward Lewis, Writing and Authority in Early China (1999).
    Edward L. Shaughnessy, Rewriting Early Chinese Texts (2006).

Grading
class participation: 20%
informal writing: 15%
short paper: 20%
midterm exam: 20%
final paper: 25%

ANS 372 • Early China: Hist And Archaeol

32195 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as AHC 330, HIS 364G )
show description

Course description
This course will examine the ancient roots of Chinese civilization, from the fluid mix of regional cultures in the Neolithic period (beginning ca. 8000 B.C.E.) through the establishment of the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.E.-220 C.E.). In addition to covering major political developments, we will pay close attention to religious, intellectual, and social trends, as well as to changes in the material culture of ancient China. Throughout the course we will focus particularly on recent archaeological discoveries. Nearly eighty years of scientific archaeology in China has produced a wide array of data that have revolutionized our understanding of ancient history. As new texts and artifacts continue to be unearthed, historians struggle to reconcile this new knowledge about the past with a received historical tradition that goes back 2000 years. This tension between received historical knowledge and modern archaeology puts archaeology at the heart of fierce historiographic debates. This course will explore these issues by examining early Chinese history in light of major archaeological discoveries of texts and materials, discussing both the content of the discoveries and their impact on the historiography of ancient China.

Course goals
There are three learning goals for this course. The first is to acquire a broad    understanding of the historical development of Chinese civilization from    its origins in the Neolithic period through the second century C.E. This    course adopts a "hands    on" approach by asking students to consider primary historical evidence of both    a textual and visual nature. Therefore, a second goal of this course is to    develop one's ability to interpret texts and images as historical evidence    by considering such material within its particular cultural context. The    third goal of the course is to understand the impact of modern archaeology    on the study of Chinese history and the historiographic    issues involved in combining archaeological evidence with traditional sources    of history. The ultimate goal of the course is to acquire a richer understanding    of both Chinese culture and the practice of studying the history of ancient civilizations.

Textbook
Li Feng, Early China: A Social and Cultural  History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013). 

Additional required readings consisting of primary historical sources drawn from a wide variety of archaeological, literary, and archival materials will be distributed electronically via the course website.

Grading
Class participation: 15%
Quiz: 5%
2 tests: 30% (15% each)
Presentation: 15%
Paper: 15%
Final exam: 20%

CHI 322 • Intro To Classical Chinese

32555 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.202
show description

Course description
This course is designed to give students an introduction to classical Chinese, the written language of China from the sixth century B.C. through the second century A.D. and the foundation of the literary language of China in use until the early twentieth century.  Students will be introduced to basic syntax, grammar, and vocabulary through the reading of authentic texts ranging from a variety of literary genres including short proverbs, philosophical writings, and historical literature.

Course texts (selections from the following, available in a course packet)
Edwin G. Pulleyblank, Outline of Classical Chinese Grammar (Vancouver, University of British Columbia Press, 1995; rpt. 2000).

Paul Rouzer, A New Practical Primer of Literary Chinese (Cambridge and London: Harvard University Asia Center, 2007).

Harold Shadick,  A First Course in Literary Chinese (Ithaca: CornellUniversity Press, 1968).

Grading
Preparation, participation, pop-quizes and exercises: 35% (including attendance)
Tests: 30% (10% each)
Translation assignment: 15%
Final exam: 20%

ANS 302C • Introduction To China

31775 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as HIS 302C )
show description

Course Description Geographically, linguistically, ethnically, and economically, China today is a land of diversity, characterized by striking regional variations. Yet underlying this diversity is a shared cultural heritage: a unifying set of historical, literary, and artistic traditions, philosophical and religious ideas, political institutions, and a common writing system. This course introduces the study of Chinese society and culture through an examination of the cultural unities and diversities, continuities and discontinuities that comprise the historical development of Chinese civilization. Topics include philosophy and religion; cosmology and the life cycle; literature and arts; science, technology and medicine; power and authority; gender, ethnicity, and cultural identity. This course provides a foundation for continued study of Chinese history and society for students who plan to go on to more specialized, upper-division courses including Chinese anthropology, history, literature, sociology, economics, law, policy, international business, art history, architecture, environmental science, and philosophy.

Course Goals The primary learning goal for this course is to acquire a broad understanding of the historical development of civilization in China. This course adopts a "hands on" approach by asking students to consider primary historical evidence of both a textual and visual nature. Therefore, a second goal of this course is to develop one's ability to interpret texts and images as historical evidence by considering such material within its particular cultural, social, and political context. The ultimate goal of the course is to acquire a richer understanding of Chinese civilization and to develop research skills that will facilitate continued study of and coursework on China and East Asia.

This course carries a University Global Cultures Flag. The goal of this flag is to challenge students to explore the beliefs and practices of non-U.S. cultural communities in relation to their own cultural experiences so that they engage in an active process of self-reflection.

Course textbooks and readingsPatricia Buckley Ebrey, Cambridge Illustrated History of China,2nd Edition (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010).

Additional required readings consisting of primary historical sources drawn from a wide variety of archaeological, literary, and archival materials will be distributed electronically via the course website.

Grading Final grades will be calculated according to the criteria below. Grades of plus/minus will be assigned as appropriate.

Class participation and attendance: 10%Quiz: 5%3 Tests: 60% (20% each)Final exam: 25%

For more information about this course, consult the course website.

ANS 372 • World Of Confucians

31755 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 2.122
(also listed as CTI 375, R S 352 )
show description

Course Description
In this course we examine the philosophy and historical context of classical Confucianism.  Focusing on the translated writings of Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi, as well as on recently discovered texts found in ancient tombs, this course examines the systems of thought in early Confucian writings.  In addition to discussing the history of ideas, we will also pay close attention to the cultural background of the period and to the social context in which these texts were written by considering such issues as literacy and the transmission of specialized knowledge in ancient China.  The focus of the course will be on the classical period (sixth through third centuries B.C.E.), but we will also consider the legacy of Confucian thought and institutions in the early empire and beyond.

Course Goals
The primary goal of this course is to help you develop your ability to read closely and understand seminal texts from the classical period of Chinese literature.  A fundamental principle in this course is that we cannot fully understand classical Confucian texts without considering the social, intellectual, and cultural milieu within which these texts were generated.  Therefore the second goal will be to learn how to use social and cultural history as a method for enhancing one's understanding of texts.  Third, in focusing on Confucian thinkers and texts, we aim to understand the philosophical content of this important tradition, to understand the how these ideas fit within the larger social and intellectual context of ancient China, and to assess their relevance to our own lives.

Grading

class participation: 20%
informal writing: 15%
short paper: 20%
midterm exam: 20%
final paper: 25%

Textbooks

The Analects of Confucius: A Philosophical Translation. Trans. Roger T. Ames and Henry Rosemont, Jr. New York: Ballantine, 1998 [PL 2478 L328].

The Essential Mengzi: Selected Passages with Traditional Commentary. Trans. Bryan W. Van Norden. Indianapolis: Hackett, 2009.

Hsun Tzu: Basic Writings. Trans. Burton Watson. New York: Columbia University Press, 1963 [B 128 H66 E55].

Additional readings available electronically.

CHI 322 • Intro To Classical Chinese

32115 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.118
show description

Course description
This course is designed to give students an introduction to classical Chinese, the written language of China from the sixth century B.C. through the second century A.D. and the foundation of the literary language of China in use until the early twentieth century.  Students will be introduced to basic syntax, grammar, and vocabulary through the reading of authentic texts ranging from a variety of literary genres including short proverbs, philosophical writings, and historical literature.

Prerequisites
This class is designed for students who have taken at least two years of modern Chinese and who have had no prior instruction in classical or literary Chinese.  All students must have attended CHI 612 or CHI 412L in residence at UT with a grade of at least C or else have the consent of the instructor.

Course texts
Paul Rouzer, A New Practical Primer of Literary Chinese (Cambridge and London: Harvard University Asia Center, 2007).

Grading
Preparation, participation, pop-quizes and exercises: 35% (including attendance)
Tests: 30% (10% each)
Translation assignment: 15%
Final exam: 20%

CHI 130D • Chinese Across Disciplines

32130 • Spring 2013
Meets F 1000am-1100am UTC 1.136
show description

CHI 130D is a 1-credit pass/fail course is offered in conjunction with ANS 372/RS 352/CTI 375 World of the Confucians. A selection of primary-source readings in the original literary Chinese language will be individually prepared by students and discussed in weekly 1-hour meetings with the instructor. Adequate language background and intensive preparation (approximately 3 hours per week) is required. Interested students should contact the instructor via e-mail.

Texts
Shijing, Lunyu, Mozi, Mengzi, Liji, Xunzi, Han Feizi, Zhuzi yu lei

Grading
CHI 130 is offered on a pass/fail basis only. Grades are based on student preparation.

ANS 302C • Introduction To China

31545 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as HIS 302C )
show description

Course Description
Geographically, linguistically, ethnically, and economically, China today is a land of diversity, characterized by striking regional variations. Yet underlying this diversity is a shared cultural heritage: a unifying set of historical, literary, and artistic traditions, philosophical and religious ideas, political institutions, and a common writing system. This course introduces the study of Chinese society and culture through an examination of the cultural unities and diversities, continuities and discontinuities that comprise the historical development of Chinese civilization. Topics include philosophy and religion; cosmology and the life cycle; literature and arts; science, technology and medicine; power and authority; gender, ethnicity, and cultural identity. This course provides a foundation for continued study of Chinese history and society for students who plan to go on to more specialized, upper-division courses including Chinese anthropology, history, literature, sociology, economics, law, policy, international business, art history, architecture, environmental science, and philosophy.

Course Goals
The primary learning goal for this course is to acquire a broad understanding of the historical development of civilization in China. This course adopts a "hands on" approach by asking students to consider primary historical evidence of both a textual and visual nature. Therefore, a second goal of this course is to develop one's ability to interpret texts and images as historical evidence by considering such material within its particular cultural, social, and political context. The ultimate goal of the course is to acquire a richer understanding of Chinese civilization and to develop research skills that will facilitate continued study of and coursework on China and East Asia.

Textbook
Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Cambridge Illustrated History of China, 2nd edition (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010) supplemented by a range of short primary source documents available electronically.

Grading
Class participation: 10%
Quiz: 5%
3 tests: 60% (20% each)
Final exam: 25%

ANS 379 • Writng/Authority: Early China

31690 • Fall 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 2.124
(also listed as HIS 364G )
show description

Course description
This course examines the critical role of writing in one of the world's oldest literate civilizations. Beginning with the origin of Chinese characters in the Bronze Age, we examine the crucial role of writing in staking claims of political, social, and religious authority in ancient and early Imperial China (ca. 1200 BCE-200 CE). Aiming to situate writing within the cultural practices in which it was generated, we explore a diverse array of textual artifacts, including inscriptions on bone, bronze, and stone and manuscripts on bamboo and silk, in addition to texts in the received literary tradition. Topics include the magico-religious dimensions of writing, the sociology of writing and textual production, and the role of cannon and commentary in articulating and challenging imperial claims of legitimacy.

Course texts
Mark Edward Lewis, Writing and Authority in Early China (1999).

Additional required readings available electronically.

Grading
class participation: 20%
informal writing: 15%
short paper: 20%
midterm exam: 20%
final paper: 25%

ANS 302C • Introduction To China

31430 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

Geographically, linguistically, ethnically, and economically, China today is a land of diversity, characterized by striking regional variations. Yet underlying this diversity is a shared cultural heritage: a unifying set of historical, literary, and artistic traditions, philosophical and religious ideas, political institutions, and a common writing system. This course introduces the study of Chinese society and culture through an examination of the cultural unities and diversities, continuities and discontinuities that comprise the historical development of Chinese civilization. Topics include philosophy and religion; cosmology and the life cycle; literature and arts; science, technology and medicine; power and authority; gender, ethnicity, and cultural identity. This course provides a foundation for continued study of Chinese history and society for students who plan to go on to more specialized, upper-division courses including Chinese anthropology, history, literature, sociology, economics, law, policy, international business, art history, architecture, environmental science, and philosophy.

TEXTS:

Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Cambridge Illustrated History of China, 2nd ed. (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010).

GRADING:

Class participation: 10%
Quiz: 5%
3 Tests: 60% (20% each)
Final exam: 25%

This course contains a Global Cultures flag.

CHI 322 • Intro To Classical Chinese

31923 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm MEZ 2.124
show description

Course description
This course is designed to give students an introduction to classical Chinese, the written language of China from the sixth century B.C. through the second century A.D. and the foundation of the literary language of China in use until the early twentieth century.  Students will be introduced to basic syntax, grammar, and vocabulary through the reading of authentic texts ranging from a variety of literary genres including short proverbs, philosophical writings, and historical literature.

Prerequisites
This class is designed for students who have taken at least two years of modern Chinese and who have had no prior instruction in classical or literary Chinese.  All students must have attended CHI 612 or CHI 412L in residence at UT with a grade of at least C or else have the consent of the instructor.

Grading
Final grades will be calculated according to the criteria below. Grades of plus/minus will be assigned as appropriate.

  • Preparation, participation, pop-quizes and exercises: 35% (including attendance)
  • Tests: 30% (10% each)
  • Translation assignment: 15%
  • Final exam: 20%

Course Materials
Course packet consisting of authentic classical Chinese texts drawn from a variety of sources.

ANS 372 • Self-Cultivatn In Tradit China

31925 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WEL 3.402
(also listed as CTI 375, R S 352 )
show description

How does one transform oneself into a better person? This question lies at the heart of so many philosophical and religious traditions throughout the world. This was especially so in pre-modern China, where concern with self cultivation is fundamental to many intellectual and religious discourses, including Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. In this course we will examine ideas and practices in Chinese culture related to self cultivation as they are represented in writings drawn from a wide selection of philosophical, religious, and occult traditions. Far from providing a uniform understanding of this issue, these texts provide diverse examples of motivations, beliefs and techniques related to self cultivation. Whether the goal was to attain moral perfection, sagehood, immortality, buddhahood, or just tranquility, these beliefs and practices of self cultivation demonstrate a concern for human refinement that is deeply embedded within the culture of traditional China.

This course carries a University Writing Flag.

TEXTS:

Philip J. Ivanhoe, Confucian Moral Self Cultivation, 2nd ed. (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2000), ISBN: 0-87220-508-8.

Philip J. Ivanhoe and Bryan W. Van Norden, Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy, (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2006), ISBN: 0-87220-780-3.

Additional readings on Electronic Reserve.

GRADING:
class participation: 20%
informal writing: 20%
short paper: 15%
midterm exam: 20%
final paper: 25%

CHI 322 • Intro To Classical Chinese

32310 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.118
show description

This course is designed to give students an introduction to classical Chinese, the written language of China from the sixth century B.C. through the second century A.D. and the foundation of the literary language of China in use until the early twentieth century. Students will be introduced to basic syntax, grammar, and vocabulary through the reading of authentic texts ranging from a variety of literary genres including short proverbs, philosophical writings, and historical literature.

TEXTS:

Paul Rouzer, A New Practical Primer of Literary Chinese

ANS 302C • Introduction To China

30640 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

Geographically, linguistically, ethnically, and economically, China today is a land of diversity, characterized by striking regional variations. Yet underlying this diversity is a shared cultural heritage: a unifying set of historical, literary, and artistic traditions, philosophical and religious ideas, political institutions, and a common writing system. This course introduces the study of Chinese society and culture through an examination of the cultural unities and diversities, continuities and discontinuities that comprise the historical development of Chinese civilization. Topics include philosophy and religion; cosmology and the life cycle; literature and arts; science, technology and medicine; power and authority; gender, ethnicity, and cultural identity. This course provides a foundation for continued study of Chinese history and society for students who plan to go on to more specialized, upper-division courses including Chinese anthropology, history, literature, sociology, economics, law, policy, international business, art history, architecture, environmental science, and philosophy.

TEXTS:

Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Cambridge Illustrated History of China, 2nd ed. (Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010).

GRADING:

Class participation: 10%
Quiz: 5%
3 Tests: 60% (20% each)
Final exam: 25%

This course contains a Global Cultures flag.

ANS 372 • Early China: Hist And Archaeol

30770 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm WEL 2.256
(also listed as HIS 364G )
show description

This course will examine the ancient roots of Chinese civilization, from the fluid mix of regional cultures in the Neolithic period (beginning ca. 8000 B.C.) through the establishment of the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.-A.D. 220). In addition to covering major political developments, we will pay close attention to religious, intellectual, and social trends, as well as to changes in the material culture of ancient China. Throughout the course we will focus particularly on recent archaeological discoveries and their impact on the historiography of ancient China. Nearly eighty years of modern archaeology in China has produced a wide array of data that have revolutionized our understanding of ancient history. As new texts and artifacts continue to be unearthed, historians struggle to reconcile this new knowledge about the past with a received historical tradition that goes back 2000 years. This tension between received historical knowledge and modern archaeology puts archaeology at the!
  heart of fierce historiographic debates. This course will explore these issues by examining early Chinese history in light of major archaeological discoveries of texts and materials, discussing both the content of the discoveries and their impact on the historiography of ancient China.

TEXTS:

Michael Loewe and Edward L. Shaughnessy, The Cambridge History of Ancient China (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999).

Sarah Allan, ed. The Formation of Chinese Civilization: An Archaeological Perspective (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2005), 85-123.

All required readings are available on Electronic Reserves.

GRADING:

Class participation: 15%
Quiz: 5%
Presentation: 20%
Midterm exam: 15%
Short paper: 20%
Final exam: 25%

ANS 302C • Introduction To China

31035 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 UTC 4.112
(also listed as HIS 306N )
show description

ANS 302C / HIS 306N
Introduction to China
Fall 2009
Syllabus
Course unique numbers: 31035 (ANS) & 39590 (HIS)
Meeting time: MWF, 11-12
Classroom: UTC 4.112
Course website at http://asnic.utexas.edu/asnic/dsena/courses/ans302c_introchina/
For the updated version of this syllabus, consult the course website.
Course Description
Geographically, linguistically, ethnically, and economically, China today is a land of
diversity, characterized by striking regional variations. Yet underlying this diversity is a
shared cultural heritage: a unifying set of historical, literary, and artistic traditions,
philosophical and religious ideas, political institutions, and a common writing system.
This course introduces the study of Chinese society and culture through an examination
of the cultural unities and diversities, continuities and discontinuities that comprise the
historical development of Chinese civilization. Topics include philosophy and religion;
cosmology and the life cycle; literature and arts; science, technology and medicine;
power and authority; gender, ethnicity, and cultural identity. This course provides a
foundation for continued study of Chinese history and society for students who plan to go
on to more specialized, upper-division courses including Chinese anthropology, history,
literature, sociology, economics, law, policy, international business, art history,
architecture, environmental science, and philosophy.
Course Goals
The primary learning goal for this course is to acquire a broad understanding of the
historical development of civilization in China. This course adopts a "hands on" approach
by asking students to consider primary historical evidence of both a textual and visual
nature. Therefore, a second goal of this course is to develop one's ability to interpret
texts and images as historical evidence by considering such material within its particular
political, social, and cultural context. The ultimate goal of the course is to acquire a richer
understanding of Chinese civilization and to develop research skills that will facilitate
continued study of and coursework on China and East Asia.
Instructor
David Sena
Assistant Professor, Department of Asian Studies
E-mail: davidsena@mail.utexas.edu
Tel: (512) 471-7965
Office: WCH 5.104C
Office hours: MWF 9:30-10:30am
Teaching Assistant
Euhwa Tran
E-mail: etran@mail.utexas.edu
Office: WMB 1.114
Office hours: TBA
Requirements

CHI 322 • Intro To Classical Chinese

31555 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.116
show description

CHI 322
Introduction to Classical Chinese
Fall 2009
Syllabus
Course unique number: 31555
Meeting time: MWF 1-2
Classroom: NOA 1.116
Course website at http://asnic.utexas.edu/asnic/dsena/courses/chi322_wenyan/
For the updated version of this syllabus, consult the course website.
Instructor
David Sena
Assistant Professor, Department of Asian Studies
E-mail: davidsena@mail.utexas.edu
Tel: (512) 471-7965
Office: WCH 5.104C
Office hours: MWF 9:30-10:30am
Course description
This course is designed to give students an introduction to classical Chinese, the written
language of China from the sixth century B.C. through the second century A.D. and the
foundation of the literary language of China in use until the early twentieth century. Students
will be introduced to basic syntax, grammar, and vocabulary through the reading of authentic
texts ranging from a variety of literary genres including short proverbs, philosophical writings,
and historical literature.
Prerequisites
This class is designed for students who have taken at least two years of modern Chinese and
who have had no prior instruction in classical or literary Chinese. All students must have
attended CHI 612 or CHI 412L in residence at UT with a grade of at least C or else have the
consent of the instructor.
Requirements
Preparation: The success of this class depends on the conscientious and timely preparation of
all students. Coming to class unprepared will not only hamper one's own progress but will
waste the time of every other student in the class. To be fully prepared, students should have
completed the following tasks BEFORE WE BEGIN to cover a new lesson in class:

ANS 372 • World Of Confucians

30570 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 2.202
(also listed as R S 352 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

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