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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Edeltraud Harzer

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., University of Washington

Edeltraud Harzer

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-3575
  • Office: WCH 5.135
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: T Th 11-12:15 & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: G9300

Biography

Courses taught:
First-year Sanskrit I and II; Second-year Sanskrit I and II; India; Culture of Food in India; Living Epics of India; India's Non-Conformist Thinkers; Rebirth & Karma: New Interpretations; History of Hindu Traditions; The Art of the Body in India

Interests

Sanskrit, Indian philosophy and literature

SAN 506 • First-Year Sanskrit I

32760 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 100pm-200pm PAR 210
show description

Introduction to basic grammatical principles, with reading of Ramayana episodes as illustrations.

SAN 312K • Second-Year Sanskrit I

32765 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 310
show description

Introduction to classical Sanskrit prose literature; readings from the  Epics and Kathasaritsagara.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 507 with a grade of at least C.

SAN 507 • First-Year Sanskrit II

33135 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.104
show description

Detailed study of problems of grammar and syntax; reading of extracts from Hitopadesha and the Bhagavad Gita.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 506 with a grade of at least C.

SAN 312L • Second-Year Sanskrit II

33140 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.202
show description

Introduction to classical Sanskrit poetry and philosophical literature; readings from the Upanishads and Kalidasa's Meghaduta.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 312K with a grade of at least C.

SAN 506 • First-Year Sanskrit I

32810 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 100pm-200pm PAR 210
show description

Introduction to basic grammatical principles, with reading of Ramayana episodes as illustrations.

SAN 312K • Second-Year Sanskrit I

32815 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CBA 4.342
show description

Introduction to classical Sanskrit prose literature; readings from the  Epics and Kathasaritsagara.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 507 with a grade of at least C.

ANS 379 • The Art Of The Body In India

31775 • Spring 2013
Meets W 400pm-700pm MEZ 1.202
show description

This course introduces students to clothing, ornaments, hair, hair coverings such as turbans, shaved hair, top knot and body paint which gives an individualized expression of oneʼs own values and esthetics in South Asia. Although there is a great regional diversity, certain traditional patterns especially in womenʼs apparel can clearly be discerned as heavily indebted to customs in antiquity. Examples of this still survive in sculptural representations which the students will be able to observe, along with the fashions in DVDs. Various apparel is used for different occasions, but almost every facet has some symbolic function. Clothing and ornaments in India are still fashioned individually to order. Therefore it is important to be familiar with the right merchants in the area and also goldsmiths. Students learn through the study of the art of the body different lifestyles, socio-economic positions in the society, but also religious symbols and proprieties. A personʼs appearance is addressed with care, with respect to oneʼs environment while living quarters for most inhabitants of India represent only a utilitarian function.

SAN 507 • First-Year Sanskrit II

32695 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm CBA 4.340
show description

This course is a continuation of the first semester SAN 506 course. The students read the simplified Ramayana started in the Fall semester. After about a month of the Ramayana, the reading material progresses to actual texts from Lanman's Sanskrit Reader. The reader is equipped with a dictionary, synchronized with the texts. What makes the Reader so valuable are the numerous notes, both grammatical and cultural. The first selection in Lanman’s reader is from the Mahabharata, followed by a nice selection of other enjoyable readings.

SAN 312L • Second-Year Sanskrit II

32700 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.204
show description

             This course is a continuation of the Second Year Sanskrit course I Fall semester 2010, which built directly on the grammatical, lexicographical and semantic foundation, given in the First Year Sanskrit course.  The structure of the continuing Second Year Sanskrit course II is similar to the Fall semester course with one main difference, the introduction and use of a NEW tool: a large dictionary.  The course will cover different kinds of Sanskrit: early epic, classical epic and first kavya, and Buddhist Sanskrit.

 

ANS 372 • India's Nonconformist Thinkers

31640 • Fall 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.204
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

INDIA'S NONCONFORMIST THINKERS W

 

Edeltraud Harzer

 

This course introduces Indian philosophy by focusing on the opponents of the mainstream and by examining the subversive challenge of their thought. Drawing on the dissenting voices, the course reconstructs a picture of debate and exchange. Thinkers such as Sankara, Nagarjuna, and Dignaga who revise and newly reformulate existing theories are of primary interest. Four major areas of philosophical concern will be representative of the multitude of ideas. The four are:

1. Value system (bridging philosophy and religion, liberation, free will, dharma, karma, Bhakti),

2. epistemic concerns, that is proving various truths by different means (examining the ways of establishing Self or No-self, why the belief of one group cannot be shared with another, etc.),

3. Revival in premodern times, channeling sentimentality.

4. Modern thinkers evaluating their own tradition. The novel approach of this course relies on viewing the brahmanical tradition through the eyes of its opponents. Thereby we can gain a more comprehensive picture of the intellectual milieu. The course will also include nonconformist thinkers of more recent times, such as Gandhi, his grandson Ramchandra Gandhi, and Daya Krishna.

This course contains a substantial writing component and fulfills part of the basic education requirement in writing.

 

TEXTS:

Hamilton, Sue. Indian Philosophy. A Very Short Introduction. Oxford, 2001. Keown, Damien. Buddhist Ethics. A Very Short Introduction. Oxford, 2005.

NON-CONFORMISTfall09w.doc 1 of 1King, Richard. Indian Philosophy An Introduction To Hindu And Buddhist Thought. Edinburgh, 1999. ON BLACKBOARD Matilal, Bimal. The Character of Logic in India. Ed. Ganeri & Tiwari, 1998.

Roy Perrett.

Hindu ethics [electronic resource] : a philosophical study

Honolulu, Hawaii : University of Hawaii Press, c1998.

 

 

SAN 506 • First-Year Sanskrit I

32560 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 100pm-200pm PAR 103
show description

Introduction to basic grammatical principles, with reading of Ramayana episodes as illustrations.

SAN 312K • Second-Year Sanskrit I

32565 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CBA 4.342
show description

Introduction to classical Sanskrit prose literature; readings from the  Epics and Kathasaritsagara.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 507 with a grade of at least C.

ANS 372 • Living Epics Of India

31770 • Spring 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as C L 323, R S 341 )
show description

The two epics, the Mahabharata and the Ramayana, are an essential part of the living cultural tradition of the Indian subcontinent that has survived for more than two thousand years.  There is no India without these two works.  Both have been preserved in oral as well as textual tradition.  They are brought alive in their performances, whether by storytelling (katha) or annual staging of gigantic theater productions.  The course will explore the cultural and religious aspects of the narratives.  These epics have been most influential in the formation of the values of the Indian peoples.  The Mahabharata, which includes the Bhagavadgita, represents an encyclopedia of the Hindu culture.  Since there are many “tellings” of each, we will sample different ones and study them as sources of information on other areas, such as social and political ideas, as well as a source book for mythology.  We will also compare similar works in other cultures.  These narratives form a living tradition and are normally performed.  As such we shall view videos and live performances as well as study the texts.

 

Texts

Hiltebeitel, Alf. Rethinking the Mahàbhàrata. A Reader's Guide to the Education of the Dharma King. 2001. Selections on Bb.Leslie, Julia. Authority and meaning in Indian Religions. Hinduism and the Case of Valmiki. 2003. Selections on Bb.Lutgendorf, Philip. The Life of a Text: Performing the Ramcaritmanas of Tulsidas. 1991.Richman, Paula. Many Ràmàyaõas: The Diversity of a Narrative Tradition in South Asia. 1991.Richman, Paula. Questioning Ramayanas. 2001.Sutton, Nicholas. Religious Doctrines in the Mahàbhàrata. Selections on BbMenon, Ramesh.  The  Ramayana.  2003. Narayan, R.K.  The  Mahabharata. 1996.

Grading

Attendance & participation in discussion (15%)Research paper, 12-15 pages (18-20 pages grad): 40%Short essay, 5-6 pages (8 pages grad): 15% Book and topic reviews: 15%Paper proposal: 15%

SAN 507 • First-Year Sanskrit II

32580 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm CBA 4.338
show description

Detailed study of problems of grammar and syntax; reading of extracts from Hitopadesha and the Bhagavad Gita.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 506 with a grade of at least C.

SAN 312L • Second-Year Sanskrit II

32585 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.204
show description

Introduction to classical Sanskrit poetry and philosophical literature; readings from the Upanishads and Kalidasa's Meghaduta.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 312K with a grade of at least C.

SAN 506 • First-Year Sanskrit I

32435 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm MEZ 1.118
show description

Introduction to basic grammatical principles, with reading of Ramayana episodes as illustrations.

SAN 312K • Second-Year Sanskrit I

32440 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.212
show description

Introduction to classical Sanskrit prose literature; readings from the  Epics and Kathasaritsagara.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 507 with a grade of at least C.

ANS 372 • Art Of The Body In India

31880 • Spring 2011
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as ANT 322M, WGS 340 )
show description

This course introduces students to clothing, ornaments, hair, hair coverings such as turbans, shaved hair, top
knot and body paint which gives an individualized expression of one's own values and esthetics in South Asia.
Although there is a great regional diversity, certain traditional patterns especially in women's apparel can
clearly be discerned as heavily indebted to customs in antiquity. Examples of this still survive in sculptural
representations which the students will be able to observe, along with the fashions in DVDs. Various apparel
is used for different occasions, but almost every facet has some symbolic function. Clothing and ornaments in
India are still fashioned individually to order. Therefore it is important to be familiar with the right merchants
in the area and also goldsmith. Students learn through the study of the art of the body different lifestyles,
socio-economic positions in the society, but also religious symbols and proprieties. A person's appearance is
addressed with care, with respect to one's environment while living quarters for most inhabitants of India
represent only a utilitarian function.

REQUIRED TEXTS:
Shukla, Pravina. 2008.The Grace of Four Moons. Dress, Adornment, and the Art of the Body in Modern
India. Indiana University Press.
Parry, Jonathan. 1994. Death in Banaras. Cambridge.
The rest of assignments will be available on the Blackboard (Bb.)
Selections from some of the books on the topic some of them are out of print, such as:
Fabius, Carine. 1998. Mehndi: The Art of Henna Body Painting.
Hiltebeitel, Alf. "Hair."
Leslie, Julia. "Signific3. ance of Dress for the Orthodox Hindu Woman." In Dress and Gender.Pp. 198-21
Mohapatra, R.P. Fashion Styles of Ancient India.

GRADING:

Attendance & participation in discussion (20%).
Two exams (each 10%, total 20%).
Response Essays eight in total (1-2 pages, 15%).
Presentation (10%)
Research paper 9-12 pages (35%).

SAN 507 • First-Year Sanskrit II

32840 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.204
show description

This course is a continuation of the introduction to the Sanskrit language. It builds directly on the
grammatical, lexicographic and semantic foundation, given in the first semester. The main difference in
the structure from the previous instruction is the introductions to reading actual Sanskrit texts from a
Reader. The Reader has selections from the Mahabharata, the Hitopadesa, the Vedas, etc. The handy
glossary and copious notes are instructive and make first steps for reading easy. The study of grammar
and syntax is based on the reading material. The students will be responsible for the preparation for the
reading passages studied in class. Prerequisite: SAN 506 or consent of instructor.

Texts/Readings:
Lanman, Sanskrit Reader.
Whitney, Sanskrit Grammar

Grading/Requirements:
Attendance - Mandatory
Mid-term 20% Final 30%
Five quizzes 5%ea. Homework 25%

SAN 312L • Second-Year Sanskrit II

32845 • Spring 2011
Meets T 1100am-1230pm WCH 4.134A
show description

The fourth semester in the two-year sequence of the Sanskrit courses designed to prepare the students
to be able to work with the original texts independently. Reading of texts from the critical editions, such
as the Epics, Mahabharata in particular, moving on to a Sanskrit drama (kavya) Bhesa, etc., and a
Buddhist hybrid text should provide a good sampling. This includes acquisition of skills in using the
extensive and complex grammatical tools for the study of Sanskrit.

ANS 340 • Hist Of Hindu Relig Traditions

30685 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 212
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 321 )
show description

This course introduces the beliefs, practices, and institutions which shaped the development of the religious traditions today called “Hinduism.”  The explorations of the complexities of the Hindu traditions include rituals, scriptures (such as the Vedas), caste system, complex mythology, philosophies, and religious teachers. Both the epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, with its imbedded Bhagavadgita, provide an important source for a value system shared by everybody in South Asia, including non-Hindus. Most South Asians living in the diaspora adhere closely to such a value system. Since women are not well represented in the texts, we will use ethnographic and audio-visual material to understand the religious lives of Hindu women.

Texts/Readings:

  • Rodrigues, Hillary. 2006. Introducing Hinduism.
  • Patton, Laurie. 2008. The Bhagavad Gita.
  • Wynne, Alexander. 2009. Mahabharata. Book Twelve. Peace. Volume Three. The Book of Liberation.

Grading/Requirements:

  • Attendance and participation 20%
  • Four Quizzes 20% (5% each)
  • Short paper 20%
  • Mid-term 20%
  • Final examination 20%

 

SAN 506 • First-Year Sanskrit I

31665 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm MEZ 1.118
show description

Introduction to the Sanskrit language. Elements of Sanskrit grammar. Practice in the Sanskrit writing
system and reading Sanskrit texts. Each new grammatical feature is accompanied by tailored
excercises. The textbook is based on traditional Indian grammar. Simple readings from the Ramayana
provide first experience of reading a text. The aim of the course is to provide a solid foundation for
reading and understanding classical Sanskrit.

Texts/Readings:
Madhav Deshpande. Samskrtasubodhini: A Sanskrit Primer. 2007.

SAN 312K • Second-Year Sanskrit I

31670 • Fall 2010
Meets F 1100am-200pm BEN 1.118
show description

The second year instruction in the study of Sanskrit builds directly on the grammatical, lexicographical
and semantic foundation, given in the First Year course. The main difference from the previous
instruction to reading actual Sanskrit texts from a Reader. The Reader has selections from the
Mahabharata, the Hitopadesa, the Laws of Manu, etc. The handy glossary and copious notes are
instructive and amke the first steps of reading easy. The study of grammar syntax is based on the
reading material. The students will be responsible for the preparation of the reading passages studied in
class. Prerequisites: SAN 507 or consent of instructor.

Texts/Readings:
Lanman. A Sanskrit Reader.
Whitney. A Sanskrit Grammar.
Whitney. The Roots, Verb-Forms and Primary Derivatives of the Sanskrit Language

ANS 372 • Karma: Ethical Theors Of India

31006 • Spring 2010
Meets M 400pm-700pm PAR 101
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 372 • Living Epics Of India

31009 • Spring 2010
Meets W 300pm-600pm PAR 303
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 372 • Living Epics Of India-W

31010 • Spring 2010
Meets W 300pm-600pm PAR 303
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

SAN 507 • First-Year Sanskrit II

31950 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 1200-100pm MEZ 1.204
show description

Detailed study of problems of grammar and syntax; reading of extracts from Hitopadesha and the Bhagavad Gita.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 506 with a grade of at least C.

SAN 312L • Second-Year Sanskrit II

31955 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CBA 4.342
show description

Introduction to classical Sanskrit poetry and philosophical literature; readings from the Upanishads and Kalidasa's Meghaduta.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 312K with a grade of at least C.

ANS 372 • India's Nonconformist Thnkrs-W

31145 • Fall 2009
Meets M 300pm-600pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

SAN 506 • First-Year Sanskrit I

32090 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 1200-100pm CBA 4.336
show description

FIRST YEAR SANSKRIT – 1 

SAN 506  

FALL 2009 

 

Professor Edeltraud Harzer Matthew Milligan (T.A.)  

Asian Studies Asian Studies 

W.C.Hogg 5.135 WMB 1.114 (basement) 

232-3575  

Office Hours: Office Hours:  

M 2:00-2:45, T & TH11:00-12:15 M W Th 2:00-3:00 

harzer@austin.utexas.edu                                 mattdmilligan@gmail.com 

 

Meeting Times: MW 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  CBA 4.336 

& TTh 12:30 PM 2:00 PM  MEZ 1.204 

Required Text:  Deshpande, Madhav. Samskrtasubodhini: A Sanskrit Primer.  

Filliozat, Pierre-Sylvain. The Sanskrit Language: an Overview. (2000) 

   

Attendance: 

New material is given on Tuesday and Thursday. Monday and Wednesday are 

for reviewing homework, drilling, and question and answer. Class attendance is 

MANDATORY for all classes (Monday through Thursday). You are allowed three 

unexcused absences. After three absences, each additional absence will reduce 

your final total (100 maximum) by one percentage point. 

 

Homework: 

Homework is due the next day of class after it is assigned. Most homework is 

assigned on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Occasionally, homework or handouts 

may be added or subtracted from the syllabus as we see necessary. Homework 

is graded for effort, not accuracy (though you may be asked to re-do particular 

homework if the level of error is unacceptable). If a homework is turned in late or 

not turned in, you will receive one black mark. You are allowed three black marks 

without penalty. Each black mark after three will reduce your homework total (30 

points maximum) by one point. 

 

Grading/Quizzes: 

There will be five (5) quizzes given throughout the term. The quiz with the lowest 

score will be dropped from consideration in grading. Quiz days are listed in the 

syllabus. No make-up quizzes will be given except in dire circumstances and you 

are permitted only one (1) make up quiz during the term. There are NO MAKE- 

UP EXAMS or separate arrangements for the midterm or final. 

 

Your final grade will be determined by the following criteria: Attendance=20%, 

Homework = 20%, Quizzes = 20% (5% each), Midterm = 20%, Final = 20%. 

                     The instructor reserves the right to make changes to the syllabus as needed.

WEEK 1------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

 

W Aug 26 Introduction to the Class. History of the Sanskrit Language. 

 

Th Aug 27 The Sanskrit Alphabet (Lesson 1) 

 homework: Practice Writing characters (10 times each) 

 

WEEK 2------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

 

M Aug 31 The Alphabet (continued): Transliteration and Conjunct Characters 

(Lesson 1) 

 homework: #1 and #2, pp. 26-27 (column one). 

 

Tu Sept 1 The Alphabet (continued): Transliteration and Conjunct Characters 

(Lesson 1) 

 homework: #1 and #2, pp. 26-27 (column two). 

 

Th Sept 3 The Alphabet (continued). 

 homework: #3 (first six lines) and #4 (first three verses), pp. 27-28. 

 

WEEK 3------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

M Sept 7         LABOR DAY — NO CLASS. Bring Homework Tuesday 

 

Tu Sept  8        Ligatures. Active Verbs in the Present Tense (Lesson 2). 

 homework: #1, p. 32. 

 

W Sept   9 QUIZ 1 

 

Th Sept 10 Active Verbs (continued). Pronouns and Simple Sentences (Lesson 2). 

 homework: #2 (first ten), #3 (first five), #4 (first five), pp. 32-33. 

 

WEEK 4------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

 

Tu Sept 15 Nouns: Masculine and Neuter -a ending (Lesson 3). The Case System (see 

also Lesson 5). 

 homework: #1 (first ten), #6 (first three), pp. 41 and 43. 

 

Th Sept 17 SANDHI: anusv?ra sandhi. visarga sandhi (Lesson 3). 

 homework: #2 (first ten), #3, #4 (first ten), pp. 41-42. 

 

WEEK 5------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

 

Tu Sept 22 Conjugation Classes 4, 6, and 10. Negation and Connectives (Lesson 4). 

 homework: #1 (first five), #2, #3, and #4, pp. 49-50. 

 

W Sept 23 QUIZ 2 

 

Th Sept 24 Conjugation (continued). Word-Internal sandhi (Lesson 4). 

 homework: #6 (first ten), #7, p. 51. 

 

WEEK 6------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

 

Tu Sept 29 The Case System (continued) (Lesson 5).         

 homework: #1 (first ten), #2 (first ten), p. 58-59. 

 

Th Oct  1 The Imperfect and the Imperative (Lesson 6). 

 homework: #1 and #2 (imperfect and imperative), p. 64. 

 

WEEK 7------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

 

Tu Oct  6 REVIEW 

 

W Oct  7 MIDTERM EXAMINATION. There will be no make-up or early exams 

for the midterm. 

 

Th Oct  8 Potential/Optative. api and m? (Lesson 6). 

 homework: #1 and #2 (optative), #3 (first six), p. 64. 

 

WEEK 8------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

 

Tu Oct 13 Personal Pronouns and Indeclinables (Lesson 7).  

 homework: #1 (first ten), #3 (first ten), pp. 70-71. 

 

Th Oct 15 Correlative sentences. 

 

WEEK 9------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

 

Tu Oct 20        Feminine Nouns, (?, ?, ?)  (Lesson 8).  

 homework: #1 (first ten sentences of section1), # 3 (first ten), pp.77-78. 

 

Th Oct 22 More Prounouns. yad, kim, and etad (Lesson 8). 

 More Correlative sentences. 

 

WEEK 10----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

 

Tu Oct 27 Masculine Nouns (i and u). visarga and Vowel sandhi (Lesson 9). 

 homework: #1, pp. 83-84. 

 

W Oct  28 QUIZ 3 

 

Th Oct  29 Middle Verbs (present tense). Vowel sandhi  (Lesson 10). 

 homework: #1 (first ten), #2 (first ten), pp. 91-92. 

 

 

WEEK 11----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

 

Tu Nov 3 Middle Verbs (continued). The Use of Clitics (Lesson 11). 

 homework: #2 (first paragraph), pp. 95-96. 

 

Th Nov 5 Gerunds and Infinitives (Lesson 12). 

 homework: #1 (first ten), #2 (first ten), pp. 103-105. 

 

WEEK 12----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

 

Tu Nov 10 Nouns in ?. Consonant sandhi (Lesson 13). 

 homework: #1 (first three), #2 (first ten), #3, pp. 111-112. 

 

W Nov 11 QUIZ 4 

 

Th Nov 12 Neuter Nouns and Adjectives (Lesson 14). 

 homework: #1 (first five), #4 (first three), pp. 116-118. 

 

WEEK 13----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

 

Tu Nov 17 Verbs with Prepositions (Lesson 15). 

 homework: #2 (first four), #4 (first four), pp. 125-127. 

 

Th Nov 19  The Passive Voice (Lesson 16). 

 homework: #2, #3 (first ten), p. 136 , #4 (first five), pp. 136-137.  

 

WEEK 14----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

 

Tu Nov 24 Past Participles (Lesson 22). 

 homework: #1 (first ten), #4 (first seven), pp. 182-183. 

 

Th Nov 26 Thanksgiving Holiday  

 

WEEK 15----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

 

M  Nov 30 QUIZ 5 

The rest of the final week will be devoted to review for the examination. Final 

examination time and place will be announced when the information is made available by 

the administration of the University. There will be ABSOLUTELY NO make-up, early 

exams, or separate arrangements for the final. 

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations 

should contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866- 

329-3986 (Video Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining 

authorized accommodations. 

SAN 312K • Second-Year Sanskrit I

32095 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CBA 4.336
show description

SAN 312 K        FALL 2009 

SECOND YEAR SANSKRIT I 

 

 

Professor Edeltraud Harzer    Grader Matt Milligan 

Asian Studies      Asian Studies  

harzer@uts.cc.utexas.edu                                 WMB 1.114 (basement)  

WCHogg 5.135      Office hours: 

Office hours:  M 2:00-2:45                                                          M W Th 2:00-3:00 

T TH 11:00 AM -12:20 PM 

and by appointment       

tel. 232-3575       

e-mail   harzer@austin.utexas.edu    mattdmilligan@gmail.com 

 

Class meets T TH 2:00-3:30 PM    CBA 4.336 

 

REQUIRED TEXTS 

Lanman. A Sanskrit Reader. 

Whitney. Sanskrit Grammar

Whitney. Roots, Verb-Forms and Primary Derivatives of the Sanskrit Language. 

    A Supplement to his Grammar. 

Apte. V.G. Sanskrit English Dictionary. (Hippocrene Concise) 

 

RECOMMENDED TEXT 

Macdonell. A.A. A Sanskrit grammar for Students. 

 

GRADING 

Attendance is NOT optional. Attendance and preparation (30%) 

Examinations: mid-term (25%) and final (25%) 

Five Quizzes (5% each=20%, worst quiz will be discarded) 

 

90-100 = A;  80-89% = B;  70-79% = C;  60-69% = D.   

 

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact 

Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (Video Phone) as soon as 

possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations. 

 

First reading class will be on Sept 1. Prepare thoroughly the beginning 

of the HITOPADESA in Lanman's Reader(PAGE 16, LINE 15). 

In addition to Lanman Reader, we shall also read selections from other works 

according to the students’ wishes. 

 

At the beginning we shall read 3/4 page per class unit (75 minutes.), 

We shall gradually increase the reading amount.  

 

The Quizzes will consist of translation and analysis of a single verse or a couple of sentences of the 

material read in class. They will take place at the end of a class session, 

during the last 20 minutes. Dates for QUIZZES and other EXAMS are listed here: 

 

September  15, 29 

MIDTERM  October 13  

October  27 

November 12 

December  3 

FINAL EXAM  December 12 (7:00-10:00 PM) 

ANS 372 • Culture Of Food In India-W

30530 • Spring 2009
Meets M 300pm-600pm PAR 303
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 341 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

SAN 507 • First-Year Sanskrit II

31480 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.204
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Detailed study of problems of grammar and syntax; reading of extracts from Hitopadesha and the Bhagavad Gita.  Prerequisite: Sanskrit 506 with a grade of at least C.

CHI 506 • Second-Year Sanskrit II

31485 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CBA 4.342
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Fall 2009 CHI506 First-year Chinese I  #31485 

 

REQUIRED:  Practical Chinese Reader I (available at Co-Op) 

                       Chinese 506 Reader (course packet) available at UT copy center  

                       located at Welch building. 

LECTURER: Chih-Wei Elsa Chang  

 Office Hours: T 12:30p-2:00p TH 1:30p-3:00p 

 Office: WCH5.116 (TEL: 475-6041) 

 E-Mail: elsa_cwc@yahoo.com 

TEACHING ASSISTANT: Lu Yi  

        Office Hours: TBA 

        Office: WMB 1.114, 475-6796 

        E-Mail: lvanne999@yahoo.com 

 

 

Grading Policy 

 

 Lesson Tests  35% 

 Vocabulary Quizzes 15% 

 Writings 10% 

 Oral Quizzes for Fall semester 15% 

 Reading Quizzes 5% 

 Final (written 70%, skit 30%) 20% 

 

 You can drop the score of  2 Tests (You can not drop T.14) 

   1 oral quiz (You cannot drop any reading quiz) 

   2 Vocabulary quizzes (1 Quiz5 = Q5a + Q5b) 

 

  No make-up tests or quizzes will be given and all missed tests or quizzes are counted  

                             as zero. 

 

 Note: Grading of all oral performance is based mainly on “tones”.  However, other  

                                       factors such as fluency or accuracy if performed below average will affect your  

                                       final score.  

 

All CHI 506 grades are calculated numerically throughout the semester.  For transcript purpose, 

letter grades are given at the end of the semester according to the conversion chart below: 

 

A+ = 97-100,   A = 94-96,   A- = 90-93          B+ = 87-89,    B = 84-86,   B- = 80-83 

C+ = 77-79,     C = 74-76,   C- = 70-73           D+= 67-69,    D = 64-66,   D- = 60-63  

F = 0-59   

 

 

1. Attendance:  Following rules are also apply to students of “pass-fail” grade. 

You are allowed a maximum of 4 “free” absences during the semester.  These 4 

days are set aside for your illness, social obligations, official duties, job 

interviews or any other things that you must attend to, so use them wisely.  

 

1. Each subsequent absence will result in a deduction of 0.5 point from your 

semester score. 

2. If you are absent 8 times (including the four “free” ones), you will be 

penalized one letter grade (e.g., A-B) at the end of the semester. 

3. If you are absent 15 times (including the “free” ones), you will get a “F” for 

the course automatically. 

4. Missing 10 minutes of each class (by either arriving late or leaving early) 

will be viewed as a ½ absence.  Missing ½ of the class is counted as

absence.  

 

Note:  1. It is not your teacher’s responsibility to remind you of your attendance record. 

     2. If you have only one absence for the semester, you can drop one more score of    

         your choice, and if you have no absence, you can drop two more scores (only  

         one in each category). You can not drop any grade for “Reading quiz”. 

     * You need to make a grade “C” or above to take 507. 

 

          

 

2. Homework 

 

Homework should be turned in at the beginning of each class meeting (those 

turned in at the end of the class will be considered late). Late homework should be 

turned in within a week to receive a grade. A 10-point deduction will take place 

for each extra day taken. Late works turned in after a week will only be corrected, 

not grades. You will receive a zero for that assignment. Late corrections on 

homework should also be turned in within a week to receive a grade. 

 

There are two versions for character writing: the traditional version is used in Taiwan; the 

simplified version is used in Mainland China. You can only choose one version for 

writing and characters written in the other version will be counted as mistakes.  However, 

you are required to recognize both versions as they both will be used in tests and quizzes.  

 

3. Quizzes and Tests 

 

Note:  1. Unless specified otherwise, all the “Pate #” mentioned in the following  

                sections refer to the page # in Chinese 506 course packet.  

 2. For each quiz or test, check the content in the following notes and  

                check the format and grading in your sample sheet.  

 3. Whenever “stroke order” is tested, the test includes all the characters,  

                not just the large characters on top of the first page of your writing  

                homework.  

 

 Quiz 1,2,3,4 --- Same format.  See “Sample Quiz 1,2,3,4” on P.236. 

                                       Each quiz covers two lessons.  Ex. Quiz 1 in on Lesson 5&6. 

 Quiz 5-14 (or 15 for spring semester) --- Same format.  See “Sample Quiz 5a  

                                      (L.13) and Quiz 5b (L.13) on P.237. 

 Quiz 15ab --- (for Fall semester only) counted as one complete quiz.  Chinese  

                                   characters are given (half in traditional version and half in  

                                   simplified version) and you write the pinyin, tone and English  

                                   meaning.  This includes all vocabulary.  

 Test 1-3 --- Same format.  See “Sample Test 1,2,3” on P.229&230. 

   

  Test 1 --- 1. Pinyin sections 1-4 (on P.1-4), pinyin chapters 1-4 (on P.3) 

                      The ones with * won’t be on this test. 

                   2. Vocabulary (Lesson 1,2 on P.17, 18& P.147) 

                   3. Radicals (on P.7) 

  Test 4 --- Lesson 10-12. See “Sample Test 4” on P.231. 

  

 Test 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 --- Same format.  Vocabulary only. See “Sample Test 5”  

                                                on P.232&P.233.  

 

   Test 5   --- Lesson 1-12 

   Test 7   --- Lesson 8-14 

   Test 9   --- Lesson 10-16 

   Test 11 --- Lesson 14-19 

   Test 13 --- Lesson 18-22. 

 

 Test 6, 8, 10, 12 --- Same format.  See “Sample Test 6” on P.234&235. 

 

   Test 6   --- Lesson 13, 14 

   Test 8   --- Lesson 15, 16 

   Test 10 --- Lesson 17, 18, 19 

   Test 12 --- Lesson 20, 21 

 

 Test 14 --- conducted in your TA’s office.  You and your partner will read the  

                              script that has no tone marks. (See “Skit Show” for details).  Your  

                              grade is based on your pronunciation, tone and fluency (similar to  

                              your Reading quiz).  The script must be your final version and you  

                              should make no modification other than very minors changes after  

                              this reading.  

 

 Reading Quiz --- Please see sample sheet on P.238 for grading method.  

  

Readings are from the Chinese 506 course packet.  You are quizzed on both 

traditional and simplified versions.  

Quiz 1 – week 4,5.    Pinyin chapters 1-12 (on P.13-16)  L. 1-10 (on P.119- 

                                  120 & P.132-133) 

Quiz 2 – week 8, 9.   L11-15 (including “reading texts”) on P.121-124 & P.  

                                  134-137) 

     Quiz 3 – week 12, 13   L.16-20 (including “reading texts”) on P. 124-127 & P.  

                                           137-140) 

      Note: If you miss your appointment, you will receive a zero for that quiz.  It is  

                your responsibility to rearrange your appointment with you teacher or  

                your classmate ahead of time.  A last minute cancellation is considered  

                a “no show”. Unless you can prove that you have a time conflict, you  

                must take the Quiz within the scheduled time.  

 

   Oral Quiz – Please see Sample sheet on P.238 for grading method.   

The questions are in Chinese 506 course packet and the recording of the 

questions is online.  The first 10 questions are based on the “Reading Text” 

(not the lesson itself) of each lesion in PRACTICAL CHINESE READER I.  

You must answer in complete sentences.  

Take lesson 13 as an example: the “Reading Text” is on your small textbook 

P. 132.  The questions are on your Chinese 506 course packet P.34. 

 

Skit Show – Grading method for “performance” is on P.238.  

This will be conducted on Tue. & Thu. Either in combined classes. 

You have to be present in both classes to receive a grade.   

 

Grading – script 50% (joined grade): Write your script in pencil.  

                 Performance 50% (individual grade): “tone” is 50% of this grade. 

Performance time – 5 minutes for 2 people.  You must memorize the script. 

Content – Choose your own topic.  Try to make your story coherent and  

                 interesting.  You will be asked to rewrite the script – 

 

 1. if the story is incoherent, too short or too long , or has too many mistakes.  

 2. if it contains improper language or any humor in poor taste. 

 3. if you use the vocabulary and the grammar that you have not learned in this  

             semester.  (For a few absolutely necessary key words, you can use English.). 

    However, you can look ahead in your textbook and use the vocabulary in the  

             remaining lessons.  

 

Length – 2 pages (single space) per person. (A required format is provided on  

               P.217.) Each student is required to write two pages of the script.   

               Staple all the pages together and turn in only one copy.  Write neatly.   

               No computer typing. 

Due Date – Script (1) – Write in Chinese characters with English in the blank  

                                      space above the Chinese sentences.   

           Script (2) – If you are not required to rewrite, just erase the  

                                      English and mark the tones in the space, or rewrite and  

                                      mark the tones. 

            ** Important: Before you mark the tones, remember to make a copy for each  

                                   player for the purpose of taking T14 (See previous page).  Bring the  

                                   original copy also to T14, so your teacher can use it for the test. 

 

           Note: Costumes, props and music are encourage, but try to control your setting-up  

                     time. You may ask your classmates to serve as part of the props, but you  

                     should keep their involvement to the minimum and still fulfill your own  

                     required performing time.  

 

 

 

* It is the policy of the University of Texas at Austin that the student must notify each 

instructor at least fourteen (14) days prior to the classes scheduled on dates he or she 

will be absent to observe a religious holy day.  For religious holidays that fall within the 

first two weeks of the semester, the notice should be given on the first day of the 

semester. 

 

*The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic  

adjustments for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the 

Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY. 

 

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