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Dr. Joel Brereton, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

John W. Traphagan

Professor Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

John W. Traphagan
" Man once surrendering his reason, has no remaining guard against absurdities the most monstrous, and like a ship without rudder, is the sport of every wind. T. Jefferson "

Contact

Interests

Medical anthropology, gender and aging, globalization, family and kinship, religion and ritual

ANS 372 • Relig/Fam Japanese Society

31938 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 134
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 352 )
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More than any other social institution, the family represents the primary locus of religious activity for contemporary Japanese.  This course explores the structures of family, kinship relationships, and religion in Japan since the Meiji Restoration (1868) with a strong focus on the post-war era and examines how both religion and family have been used as concepts and institutions for the creation of national identity as well as the expression of individual identities.  Students will develop a strong understanding of contemporary Japanese religious ideas and rituals and their connections to kinship structures, with particular attention focused on how family and kinship structures and ideologies have changed in the post-war era.

ANS 372 • Japanese Concepts Body/Self

32175 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 436A
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 352 )
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In this course, we will endeavor to navigate some of the extensive anthropological literature that has been written on Japanese conceptualizations of self and body and explore how these concepts intersect with ideas about religion and morality.  The "self" has been one of the central themes in ethnographic writing about Japan since Ruth Benedict's work The Chrysanthemum and the Sword was published in the 1940's.  We will consider how Japanese educational approaches contribute to the formation of paritcular forms of behavior; how selves change over the life course; Japanese conceptualizations of the body and person; and how Japanese ideas about self and body are expressed in medical practices.  The course is discussion-based and will incorporate films in addition to ethnographic writings.  Grading will be based upon five response papers and mid-term take-home and final take-home exams.

 

Assignments

Midpterm exam: 20%

Final exam: 30%

Five 2-page response papers: 50%

ANS 361 • Biomedicine, Ethics, & Cul

31830 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am CLA 0.128
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 373M )
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Selected topics in south and east Asian anthropology, economics, history, geography, government, art, music, and philosophy.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Asian Studies 320 and 361 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 394 • Ethnographic Research Methods

31960 • Fall 2013
Meets M 600pm-900pm BUR 436A
(also listed as ANT 391, R S 383T )
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This graduate seminar introduces students to the use of qualitative research methods in the social sciences and humanities. Although the course is situated in Religious Studies, it will cover basic ethnographic research techniques and theoretical issues related to research methodology that are appropriate for any discipline or field.  The aim of the course is to give students a general understanding of a variety of research methodologies and to combine this with theoretical discussion and practical experience.  We will explore debates and discussions related to the nature of qualitative data and the value and applicability of particular approaches; the conditions under which specific methods of data collection and analysis are most appropriate; ethical questions in qualitative research; and research design and implementation. Following this general introduction, we will devote the remainder of the class to covering practical aspects of qualitative research, including: gathering data through interviews, focus groups, observation and archival research; strategies for recording, coding and analyzing qualitative data; and evaluating and presenting qualitative research. The course will provide students with a solid foundation for using qualitative methods for PhD and MA thesis research.

Grading:

Attendance and Participation (10%)Regular Thought Papers (10%)Human Subjects Training (10%)Field Exercises (30%)Research Proposal Project (40%)Research Abstract (5%)Draft Proposal (5%)Final Proposal (30%)

 

Texts:

Hennink, Monique, Inge Hutte, and Ajay Bailey.  2010.  Qualitative Research Methods.  Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.Emerson, Robert M., Rachel I. Fretz and Linda L. Shaw. 2011. Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. George, Alexander L. and Andrew Bennett. 2005. Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Kvale, Steinar. 2008. Doing Interviews. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. Maxwell, Joseph A. 2005. Qualitative Research Design: An Interactive Approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Barbour, Rosline.  2008.  Doing Focus Groups.  Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. 

 

ANS 372 • Relig/Family In Japanese Socty

31740 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 228
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 352 )
show description

More than any other social institution, the family represents the primary locus of religious activity for contemporary Japanese.  This course explores the structures of family, kinship relationships, and religion in Japan since the Meiji Restoration (1868) with a strong focus on the post-war era and examines how both religion and family have been used as concepts and institutions for the creation of national identity as well as the expression of individual identities.  Students will develop a strong understanding of contemporary Japanese religious ideas and rituals and their connections to kinship structures, with particular attention focused on how family and kinship structures and ideologies have changed in the post-war era.

 

Texts

Readings may include (but are not limited to): Hashimoto, Akiko and John W. Traphagan.  2008.  Imagined Families, Lived Families: Kinship and Culture in Contemporary Japan.  SUNY Press.Halloway, Susan.  2010.  Women and Family in Contemporary Japan.  Cambridge University Press.  Kawano, Satsuki.  2010.  Nature’s Embrace: Japan’s Aging Urbanites and New Death Rites.   University of Hawaii Press.LaFleur, William.  1994.  Liquid Life: Abortion and Buddhism in Japan.  Princeton University Press.Traphagan, John W. 2004.  The Practice of Concern: Ritual, Well-Being, and Aging in Rural Japan.  Carolina Academic Press.Smyers, Karen.  1998.  The Fox and the Jewel: Shared and Private Meanings in Contemporary Japanese Inari Worship.  University of Hawaii Press.

 

Grading

Take-home mid-term    30%Take-home final    30%Reaction papers    40%

ANS 372 • Japanese Concepts Of Body/Self

31645 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 436A
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 352 )
show description

In this course, we will endeavor to navigate some of the extensive anthropological literature that has been written on Japanese conceptualizations of self and body and explore how these concepts intersect with ideas about religion and morality.  The “self” has been one of the central themes in ethnographic writing about Japan since Ruth Benedict’s work The Chrysanthemum and the Sword was published in the 1940’s.  We will consider how Japanese educational approaches contribute to the formation of particular forms of behavior; how selves change over the life course; Japanese conceptualizations of the body and person; and how Japanese ideas about self and body are expressed in medical practices.  The course is discussion-based and will incorporate films in addition to ethnographic writings.  Grading will be based upon five response papers and mid-term take-home and final take-home exams. 

 

Texts:

Gilbert Ryle.  2000.  The Concept of Mind.  University of Chicago Press. ISBN: 0226732967Traphagan, John.  2000.  Taming Oblivion: Aging Bodies and the Fear of Senility in Japan.  Albany:  SUNY Press.  ISBN: 0791445003Kondo, Dorinne. 1990.  Crafting Selves : Power, Gender, and Discourses of Identity in a Japanese Workplace. University of Chicago Press.  ISBN: 0226450449Cave, Peter.  2007.  Primary School in Japan: Self, Individuality and Learning in Elementary Education.  Routledge.  ISBN: 0415545366Ozawa-de Silva, Chikako.  2006. Psychotherapy and Religion in Japan: The Japanese Introspection Practice of Naikan.  Routledge.  ISBN: 0415545684.

 

Grading:

Mid-term exam:  20%Final exam: 30%Five 2-page response papers: 50%

ANS F361 • Biomedicine, Ethics, & Culture

82240 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 436A
(also listed as ANT F324L, R S F373M )
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This course examines moral dilemmas that have been generated or intensified by recent advances in medical technology. We will explore ethical questions related to topics such as allocation of medical resources, stem cell research and cloning, organ transplantation, abortion, human experimentation, genetic screening, in vitro fertilization, pharmaceutical use and distribution, prolonging life and the right to die, suicide, euthanasia, and diagnosis and treatment of illnesses such as Alzheimer disease, AIDS, and mental disorders. These topics will be considered from a global perspective emphasizing how cultural values inform ethical decision-making and how different ethical/cultural systems address and define moral issues that arise in relation to medical care. We will consider ethical theories that have been used in the West to consider medical practice and compare these with approaches in non-Western cultures such as Japan. The course will emphasize use of case studies to explore issues in medical ethics and to develop the ability to apply ethical theories in ways sensitive to variations in cultural values.

 

Texts:

Beauchamp, Tom L. and James F. Childress. Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 6th Edition. Oxford University Press.Martin, Emily.  The Woman in the Body.  Beacon Press.  Santorro, Michael A.  and Thomas M. Gorrie.  Ethics and the Pharmaceutical Industry.  Cambridge University Press.  Traphagan, John W.  Taming Obligion: Aging Bodies and the Fear of Senility in Japan.  State University of New York Press.  Veatch, Robert M., Amy Haddad, Dan D. English.  Case Studies in Biomedical Ethics: Decision-Making, Principles, and Cases.  Oxford University Press. 

 

Grading:

Midterm One      30%Midterm Two     30%Final                   40%

ANS 384 • Religion, Health, And Illness

31835 • Spring 2012
Meets M 600pm-900pm BUR 436A
(also listed as R S 383C )
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This graduate seminar explores conceptualizations of health and illness as they relate to religious ideas as expressed in different cultural contexts.  What does it mean to be healthy or ill?  How do different epistemologies influence epidemiology?  In what ways to people use various conceptual frameworks for thinking about healing to attain or re-attain health?  How do people describe the experience of illness and health?   And how do questions of these intersect with biomedical understandings of the body, health, and illness?  We will focus on critical readings of ethnographic studies focused on religion, health, and illness and will devote a considerable amount of attention to the uses of ritual as a method of dealing with illness. 

 

Texts

Boddy, Janice.  1989. Wombs and Alien Spirits: Women, Men, and the Zar Cult in Northern Sudan.  University of Wisconsin Press.  Ohnuki-Tierney.  1984. Illness and Culture in Contemporary Japan: An Anthropological View.  Cambridge University Press.  Ozawa-de Silva, Chikako.  2006. Psychotherapy and Religion in Japan: The Japanese Introspection Practice of Naikan.  Routledge. Drozdow-St. Christian, Douglass.  2006.  Elusive Fragments: Making Power, Propriety & Health in Samoa.  Carolina Academic Press.  Strathern, Andrew and Pamela Stewart.  2010. Curing and Healing: Medical Anthropology in Global Perspective.  Carolina Academic Press.  Leslie, Charles andAllen Young.  1992. Paths to Asian Medical Knowledge.  University of California Press.  

Grading

Five 2-page response papers: 50%Term paper:  50%

ANS S361 • Biomedicine, Ethics, & Culture

82133 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 220
(also listed as ANT S324L, R S S373M )
show description

This course examines moral dilemmas that have been generated or intensified by recent advances in medical technology. We will explore ethical questions related to topics such as allocation of medical resources, stem cell research and cloning, organ transplantation, abortion, human experimentation, genetic screening, in vitro fertilization, pharmaceutical use and distribution, prolonging life and the right to die, suicide, euthanasia, and diagnosis and treatment of illnesses such as Alzheimer disease, AIDS, and mental disorders. These topics will be considered from a global perspective emphasizing how cultural values inform ethical decision-making and how different ethical/cultural systems address and define moral issues that arise in relation to medical care. We will consider ethical theories that have been used in the West to consider medical practice and compare these with approaches in non-Western cultures such as Japan. The course will emphasize use of case studies to explore issues in medical ethics and to develop the ability to apply ethical theories in ways sensitive to variations in cultural values.

 

Texts

Beauchamp, Tom L. and James F. Childress. Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 6th Edition. Oxford University Press.Martin, Emily.  The Woman in the Body.  Beacon Press.  Santorro, Michael A.  and Thomas M. Gorrie.  Ethics and the Pharmaceutical Industry.  Cambridge University Press.  Traphagan, John W.  Taming Obligion: Aging Bodies and the Fear of Senility in Japan.  State University of New York Press.  Veatch, Robert M., Amy Haddad, Dan D. English.  Case Studies in Biomedical Ethics: Decision-Making, Principles, and Cases.  Oxford University Press.

 

Grading

Midterm One      30%Midterm Two     30%Final                   40%

ANS 372 • Relig/Family In Japanese Socty

31915 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 436A
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 352 )
show description

Religion and Family in Japanese Society

ANS 301M • Comparative Religious Ethics

30850 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 BEN 1.126
(also listed as R S 306 )
show description

MEETS WITH ANS 301M (30850)

Classroom: BUR 426
Office Hours: M 12:00pm – 2:30pm and by appointment
Tel: 232-0874; email: jtraphagan@mail.utexas.edu 

The aim of this course is to examine and contemplate ideas about right and wrong, concepts of the good and evil, and ways of thinking about ethical behavior as they are expressed in different religious traditions.  We will use a case study approach to compare moral ideas related to: sexuality and gender, social justice, the environment, and violence.  In looking at these topics we will discuss a variety of issues such as homosexuality, abortion, capital punishment, just war, responses to the ecological crises, and the relationship of humans to the natural world.  The course will focus on comparison across four broad areas of religious practice: Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, and Native American religions.  

Required Readings:

1570752400      Ethics and World Religions: Cross-Cultural Case Studies, Wolfe and Gudorf  
1570034710      ISLAMIC ETHICS OF LIFE: ABORTION, WAR & EUTHANASIA, BROCKOPP  
0748623302      Ethical Issues in Six Religious Traditions, Peggy Morgan, Clive Lawton  
079145018X      ENCOUNTER WITH ENLIGHTENMENT, CARTER  
0691050856      The Priority of Love: Christian Charity and Social Justice, Timothy P. Jackson

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

This course involves completion of four reflection papers and a final exam.  The final will be a take-home and will be distributed on the last day of class and be due during the final exam schedule (the date will be determined later in the semester).  The course is graded on the basis of total points earned—the maximum total points for the course is 1000.   
 
All written assignments are to be submitted using the SafeAssign function in Blackboard.  SafeAssign is a program designed to prevent plagiarism—your submissions will be compared to both a database of published works and the Internet to scan for possible plagiarism.  Assignments are valued as follows:
 
Assignment         Total Possible Points     Percentage of Grade     Due Date
Reaction Papers        600 (200 each)                      40                                       2/4, 2/18, 3/11
Ethnographic             300                                      20                                       4/22
Reflection
Plagarism Quiz          100                                       6.6                                      1/28
Final Exam                500                                       33.4                                    Handed out last day of class
Total                     1600                                 100  
 
Reaction papers are an important part of this course.  By “reaction paper” I mean a short paper in which you think about and react to the assigned reading for that period.  Each reaction paper is due in response to each of the first three assigned books.  In these papers, you must respond to the book—what are its strengths and weaknesses, and also to the argument of the author.  Does the author’s argument make sense?  Does he/she present a reasonable way of thinking about ethics?  Are you convinced by his/her argument (why or why not)?  Each reflection paper should be between 1,000 and 1,200 words in length.  
 
In addition to these reflection papers, you will also need to write one “ethnographic reflection” (1,200 to 1,500 words) in which you respond to and compare a pair of religious events or locations in terms of how ideas about right and wrong are presented.  You will have two options on this:  (1) you may visit two different religious locations (such as a church and mosque) and observe the services, paying close attention to issues related to the representation of morality, justice, etc.  You must also conduct an informal interview with one person from each site; (2) you may visit two different religious services in the virtual world known as Second Life and observe the activities, also paying close attention to the representation of morality, justice, etc.  If you select the Second Life option, you must also interview one person who is closely related to each sim you visit.   
 
Plagiarism quiz—on 1/28 you will be given a quiz that will test your knowledge of general and university policies and definitions related to plagiarism.  See number 3 under ground rules for more information.

Ground Rules

1. NO LOBBYING FOR INCREASES IN YOUR GRADES.  I will not under any conditions entertain emails or other contacts that involve attempts to lobby for a grade.  For example, if you calculate your final grade for the semester and it is a 79.4, do not send me an email (or any other communication) trying to explain why you think you deserve a B-.  Your grade is based upon your work, not upon your capacity to convince me that you deserve a particular grade.  If you disagree with your grade, you should go through the process of appeal outlined below.

2. NO OFFERING PRESENTS TO THE PROFESSOR OR TA.  Although I appreciate it when a student has enjoyed the class and wishes to thank me or my TA with a gift, the rules of the university forbid this, and I also do not wish to receive such presents as they represent a conflict of interest.  Please do not offer any sort of present, including candy, baked cookies, etc. at any time prior to, during, of after the course has ended.   

3. YOU MUST UNDERSTAND WHAT CONSTITUTES ACADEMIC DISHONESTY.  You will be required to read and understand the academic dishonesty site provided by Student Judicial Services and you will be tested on it.  This is your responsibility. The URL is http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php.  You will be quizzed on the contents of the site at the end of the second week of class.  

STANDARDS AND EXPECTATIONS

This course will employ the new plus and minus grading system.  Grades are assigned as follows: 93-100 = A; 90 – 92 = A-, 88 – 89 = B+, 83 – 87 = B, 80 – 82 = B-; 78 – 79 = C+, 73 – 77 = C, 70 – 72 = C-; 68 – 70 = D+, 63 – 67 = D, 60 – 62 = D-; below 60 = F.  There is no scaling of grades. You are expected to attend class regularly and to participate in discussion. There are no extra credit assignments in this class.  In general, I do not “bump” up final grades that are borderline.  An 89 is a B+, a 79 is a C+, etc.  I may make exceptions for students who have been regular contributors to class discussion.

GRADING RUBRIC

Grade / Expectations / Standards 

A, A-  The grade of A will be only given for exemplary work.  The paper, presentation, or exam demonstrates a detailed understanding of the topic and provides a creative and scholarly analysis of the issues.  There is a clear thesis and the thesis is well-supported.  It is clearly written, without typographical errors, spelling mistakes, or grammatical errors.
B+, B, B-  This grade will be given to an exam, presentation, or paper that presents material clearly, shows a basic understanding of the topic and provides a clear analysis of the issues.  It is well written, but may have some typographical errors, spelling mistakes, or grammatical problems (there are few, however).  There is room for improvement in both presentation and content/structure of the argument.
C+, C, C-  This grade will be given to a product that shows some problems in terms of understanding and analyzing the materials.  There are problems with writing, some typographical errors, spelling mistakes, or grammatical problems.  These are sufficient to hinder understanding of the writing and argument.  There are problems in the argument and its supporting data.   
D+, D, D-  This is given when there are significant problems related to understanding and analysis of materials.  The argument is poorly presented or is very weak.  There are major problems with writing, presentation style, spelling, grammar, etc.  
F  This grade is given when there are extremely serious deficiencies related to understanding and analysis of the topic at hand and there are major problems with writing, presentation style, spelling, grammar, etc.  The grade F indicates a very serious deficiency in the paper, presentation, or exam.
A/B, B/C, C/D  Grades such as A/B indicate a paper, presentation, or exam that is borderline.  This means that the paper is between the two grades.  An A/B indicates the paper, presentation, exam, etc. is closer to an A; a B/A indicates it is closer to a B.
 
Policy on Examination and Assignment Schedule:  Examinations are to be taken on the assigned date and time and assignments are to be turned in on the assigned date.  

  • Late assignments will not be accepted in this class; if you turn in an assignment late, I will not read it and you will not receive any credit for the assignment.   
  • If a due date conflicts with a religious holiday, you must contact the instructor prior to that date to arrange an alternative date to turn-in the assignment.  If you have some type of important event, and can prove it, I will be happy to discuss an alternate date and time for you to turn in your assignment—discussing it does not necessarily mean that I will approve the change in due dates.  You must give at least five business days prior notice in order to receive an exception to a due date.   
  • Emergencies will be handled on a case-by-case basis, but will require evidence that proves that you actually encountered a situation that prevented you from turning in your assignment on time.  Excuses such as being confused about a due date or failing to wake-up early enough to make it to class and turn in your assignment will not be considered acceptable and will receive a grade of zero.

Appealing Grades

It is important to understand that you earn your grades on assignments and exams and that you earn your final grade for the course—I do not assign grades to your work, rather, based upon the quality of the work you turn in, I arrive at an opinion about the grade which you have earned.  The grade you earn is based upon the quality of the work you turn in—there are no other criteria that are used to arrive at a grade.   
 
Should you find that you disagree with me on a grade you receive for an assignment you turn in, you have the option of appealing your grade.  If you want to appeal your grade, you must follow the steps below within two days of my returning the graded assignments.  If you are not in class to receive the returned assignment, you still have only two days from the date that I return them—you do not have two days from the date that you receive your graded assignment (once I have returned the assignment to the class, the clock is ticking).  Follow these directions—if you do not follow the directions, I may not be willing to consider your appeal:

  • Provide the original assignment with any comments I have written on it, including the grade given.  Keep a copy for yourself.  
  • Include a written explanation of why you believe that you have earned a grade different from the one I believe you have earned.  The written explanation must indicate clearly that you are appealing your grade. I will assume that you will be appealing for a higher grade, but should you want to lower your grade, you are welcome to appeal for that as well.  The written explanation should be no more than two paragraphs in length—it must be typed (single space is fine).  Part of the success of your appeal will be based upon the quality of your argument as to why the grade I believe you earned is not appropriate.  In your argument, you must indicate the exact grade that you believe you earned and explain why you believe this to be the case.   
  • Keep in mind that the amount of time or effort you put into an assignment is not an adequate reason for changing a grade.  If you spend four years working on something and turn in a product of poor quality, you will still receive a low grade.  While there is no question that there is a correlation between the amount of work and time you put into an assignment and the grade you earn, as an instructor I cannot take into account how much time/effort you put into the assignment beyond the evident quality of the work you turn in.  If you appeal your grade on the basis of the fact that you put a lot of work into the assignment, do not expect to receive a positive response.  I may sympathize with you and will be more than happy to discuss how you can improve the quality of your work; but I am unlikely to change your grade.   
  • Also keep in mind that asking me to “round up” a grade that is close to a higher grade is not considered an acceptable appeal.  You may appeal a grade only when you believe that I have made an error in grading or have been unfair in my conclusion about the grade you have earned.
  • NOTE:  In the case of a simple error in calculating your grade, you do not need to go through the above process.  Simply see me after class and point out the error.   
  • You may be asked to come to my office hours to discuss your appeal.  If this happens, come prepared to discuss/debate your appeal and to support your argument.
  • Should you wish to discuss an appeal prior to actually submitting it, you are welcome to do so during my next office hours following return of the assignment.  To do this you need to make an appointment with me within two days of receiving the assignment; you will then have two days following our meeting to write your appeal.   
  • If you want to appeal your final grade, you must provide all original graded materials for the semester to the instructor within five days of grades being posted to the CliPS online system.  All of the above apply to appeals of final grades; however, I may not be able to meet with you ahead of your appeal.   
  • Appealing a grade means that you are requesting that I re-evaluate your assignment(s) and the grade I believe you have earned.  It is possible, although unlikely, that I will lower your grade if I feel that you have earned a grade which is lower than the one I originally believed to be appropriate.   

POLICY ON Q-DROPS

As a rule, I will not sign forms requesting a Q-drop.  It is your responsibility to attend class and keep up with the work.  If you encounter an emergency during the semester that interferes with your attendance and studies, please call or visit my office to discuss the situation and see if there is an alternative to dropping the course.  If you come to my office with a Q-drop form at the end of the semester, having not attended class or completed the work, expect me to refuse to sign the form.

POLICY ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

You are expected to adhere to university requirements on academic honesty and integrity.  Behaviors such as plagiarism, unauthorized collaboration, copying of another student’s work, or cheating on examinations in any form will be viewed as an offense against the academic community and will be dealt with accordingly.  If you are uncertain about what constitutes academic integrity (for example, if you are uncertain about what constitutes plagiarism), you can either meet with the instructor or visit the web site of Student Judicial Services (http://www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs/).  In the event that a student is found engaging in behavior that violates university policies on academic integrity, as stipulated by the office of Student Judicial Services, the student will receive the grade of F for the course and will be reported to the office of Student Judicial Services, where further disciplinary action may be taken.  There will be no exceptions.

UNIVERSITY ELECTRONIC NOTIFICATION POLICY

All students should become familiar with the University's official e-mail student notification policy. It is the student's responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. The complete text of this policy and instructions for updating your e-mail address are available at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html.
 
In this course e-mail will be used as a means of communication with students. You will be responsible for checking your e-mail regularly for class work and announcements. 

POLICY ON LAPTOPS AND OTHER TECHNOLOGY USAGE IN CLASS

You are encouraged to bring your laptop computer to class to use for taking notes.  You also will have opportunities in class to work in groups and having your laptop may facilitate the ease of working together.  However, I do not want you to surf the web or otherwise use your computer for things not related to class while I am lecturing or when you are working in your groups.  Aside from the fact that it is rude, it is distracting to other students (particularly those behind you during lectures) and also distracts YOU from the lecture or discussion.  My lectures may be boring, but I still expect you to pay attention.  Don’t think that because I cannot see your screen, I don’t have any idea that you are surfing the web.  It is actually quite easy to tell when people are surfing the web simply by looking at their faces.  If I find that a student is not adhering to this policy, I will ask the student to meet me during office hours to discuss an appropriate penalty.  Expect a minimum of a 5% reduction in your final grade if you are caught using your laptop during class for purposes unrelated to the course.
 
Please turn off your cell phone before coming to class, unless you don’t mind my stopping class and asking you to answer a call while we all wait and listen (yes, I’ve done it before).
 
Some students, particularly those for whom English is not their first language, may wish to record lectures.  You are welcome to do so.  

DOCUMENTED DISABILITY POLICY

Students with disabilities who require special accommodations need to get a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). This letter should be presented to the instructor at the beginning of the semester and accommodations needed should be discussed at that time. We do not have any in-class exams, however, if you need any sort of special accommodation for assignments, you need to give me at least five business days notice so that we can work out what you need.  See following website for more information: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/providing.php.

CITATION STYLE

All papers for this course should follow the bibliographic and citation format of the American Anthropologist.  When an idea is taken from a particular book or article, the source should be noted in the text with the author's name, date of the publication, and page number, e.g., (Hendry 1995: 139) to indicate that this particular piece of information, or this idea, was taken from page 139 of a 1995 publication by Hendry.  If the item is quoted, it should be put in quotation marks, e.g., “Nowadays, both types of marriage persist, and it is not even always possible to classify a particular marriage as ‘love’ or ‘arranged’, although people like to talk as though it were” (Hendry 1995: 139). 

The book or article should then be listed in the bibliography, which lists only those items cited in the text, as follows:

Hendry, Joy
    1995      Understanding Japanese Society.  2nd edition. New York: Routledge.  
 
Failure to attribute ideas and quotations to their sources constitutes plagiarism and will be dealt with accordingly (see policy on academic honesty above).

Office Hours

My office hours for this semester are listed at the beginning of this syllabus. I will normally be in my office during those hours; however, I am often also in my office at other times. You are free to visit my office at any time—you are not limited to visiting during office hours.  If the door is shut, just knock.  If I am busy (with meetings, writing, other work, etc.) outside of office hours, I will let you know or I won’t answer the door.  

Tentative Schedule

Readings that are marked with the symbol § are available on Blackboard.  All case studies must be read prior to discussion on Friday of each week. Readings should be completed by Monday of each week, with the exception of week 1.

Week 1:  1/19 and 21:  Religion and Identity, Right and Wrong

Reading:  
Ethical Issues in Six Religions: Sections A – F, numbers 1, Sections A – F, numbers 6

Week 2:  1/26 and 28:  Christianity and Ethics

Jackson, Introduction – Chapter 2

Week 3:  2/2 and 4:  Christianity and Ethics

Jackson, Chapter 3 – end
First Reaction Paper Due at beginning of class on 2/4

Week 4:  2/9 and 11:  Islam and Ethics

Brockopp, Chapters 1 - 4

Week 5:  2/16 and 18:  Islam and Ethics

Brockopp, Chapters 5 - 9
Second Reaction Paper Due at beginning of class on 2/18

Week 6:  2/23 and 25:  Japanese Ethics

Carter, Chapter 1 - 3

Week 7:  3/2 and 4:  Japanese Ethics

Carter, Chapters 4 - 6
By 4 March, you must email the professor a brief statement explaining where you intend to do you ethnographic observation.  If you do not do this by the 4th, you will be downgraded 20% on your paper.

Week 8:  3/9 and 11:  Japanese Ethics

Carter, Chapter 7 - end
Third Reaction Paper Due at beginning of class on 3/11

Week 9:  3/16 and 18:  Spring Break

Week 10:  3/23 and 25:  Equality, Justice, and Difference

Reading
Ethical Issues in Six Religions: Sections A – F, numbers 7
EWR, Chapters 1, 7, 13

Week 11:  3/30 and 4/1:  Conflict and Violence

Reading
Ethical Issues in Six Religions: Sections A – F, numbers 8
EWR, Chapters 5, 10, 16

Week 12:  4/6 and 8:  Global Issues

Reading
Ethical Issues in Six Religions: Sections A – F, numbers  
EWR, Chapters 6, 11

Week 13:  4/13 and 15:  Marriage and Family

Reading:  
Ethical Issues in Six Religions: Sections A – F, numbers 3
Ethics and World Religions (EWR), Chapters 3, 4, 9,18

Week 14:  4/20 and 22:  Quality and Value of Life

Reading:
Ethical Issues in Six Religions: Sections A – F, numbers 5
EWR, Chapters 8, 14, 15,  
Ethnographic Reflection due at beginning of class on 4/22

Week 15:  4/27 and 29:  Comparative Religious Ethics

§ Little and Twiss, Comparative Religious Ethics, excerpt

Week 16:  5/4 and 6

§ Chao, Leaping into the Boundless: A Daoist Reading of Comparative Religious Ethics
§ Lovin, A Response to Chao

ANS 361 • Biomedicine, Ethics, & Culture

31093 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 BUR 112
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 373 )
show description

MEETS WITH ANT 324L & ANS 361
BUR 112
Instructor: John Traphagan, Department of Religious Studies
BUR 426; 232-0874; jtraphagan@mail.utexas.edu
Office Hours: MW 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Health-care professionals, bio-medical researchers, patients, and families in all societies have come to increasingly be faced with ethical issues that arise with the development of new medical technologies as well as awareness of alternative approaches to thinking about health and illness. This course focuses on ethical questions related to topics such as allocation of medical resources, stem cell research and cloning, organ transplantation, abortion, human experimentation, prolonging life and the right to die, suicide, euthanasia, and diagnosis and treatment of illnesses such as Alzheimer disease, AIDS, and mental disorders. We will explore these topics from a global perspective, emphasizing how cultural values inform ethical decision-making and how different cultural/ethical systems address and define moral issues that arise in relation to medical care. We will explore ethical theories that have been used in the West to consider medical practice and compare these with approaches in non-Western cultures such as Japan and India. The course will emphasize use of case studies to explore issues in medical ethics and to develop the ability to apply ethical theories in ways sensitive to variations in cultural values.

Throughout the course we will discuss and debate difficult moral issues and it is likely that members of the class will have different, sometimes profoundly different, ideas about what is right and wrong. You should feel free to express and support your position; this is an important component of the class. However, it is equally important that all members of the class respect the opinions of others and listen to their arguments.

Required Books

The following books are required and are available in the University Co-op. However, I encourage you to look for copies at Amazon.com or other Internet sites, as you may be able to find cheaper (new or used) copies of the books.

ISBN:0195143329 PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL ETHICS , BEAUCHAMP
ISBN:0807046191 WOMAN IN THE BODY (W/NEW INTRO), MARTIN
ISBN:0195309723 Case Studies in Biomedical Ethics, Veatch, Haddad, and English
ISBN:0791445003 TAMING OBLIVION, TRAPHAGAN

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

Assignment Total Possible Points     Percentage of Grade       Due Date
First Exam            400                                      25                                     9/25
Second Exam        400                                      25                                     10/23
Third Exam           500                                      31.25                                12/4
Pop Quizzes          200                                     12.5                                   Unannounced
Self Evaluation       100                                      6.25                                  12/2
Total                 1600                                100

Self Evaluation: You are required to write one self-evaluation on a form, available on Blackboard, that assesses your performance in the class.

STANDARDS AND EXPECTATIONS

This course will employ the new plus and minus grading system, that is effective for the Fall 09 semester. Grades are assigned as follows: 98 - 100 = A+, 93-96 = A; 90 - 92 = A-, 88 - 89 = B+, 83 - 87 = B, 80 - 82 = B-; 78 - 79 = C+, 73 - 77 = C, 70 - 72 = C-; 68 - 70 = D+, 63 - 67 = D, 60 - 62 = D-; below 60 = F. There is no scaling of grades. You are expected to attend class regularly and to participate in discussion. There are no extra credit assignments in this class. In general, I do not "bump" up final grades that are borderline. An 89 is a B+, a 79 is a C+, etc. I may make exceptions for students who have been regular contributors to class discussion.

GRADING RUBRIC

Grade / Expectations / Standards

A  The grade of A will be only given for exemplary work. The paper, presentation, or exam demonstrates a detailed understanding of the topic and provides a creative and scholarly analysis of the issues. There is a clear thesis and the thesis is well-supported. It is clearly written, without typographical errors, spelling mistakes, or grammatical errors.
B  This grade will be given to an exam, presentation, or paper that presents material clearly, shows a basic understanding of the topic and provides a clear analysis of the issues. It is well written, but may have some typographical errors, spelling mistakes, or grammatical problems (there are few, however). There is room for improvement in both presentation and content/structure of the argument.
C  This grade will be given to a product that shows some problems in terms of understanding and analyzing the materials. There are problems with writing, some typographical errors, spelling mistakes, or grammatical problems. These are sufficient to hinder understanding of the writing and argument. There are problems in the argument and its supporting data.
D  This is given when there are significant problems related to understanding and analysis of materials. The argument is poorly presented or is very weak. There are major problems with writing, presentation style, spelling, grammar, etc.
F  This grade is given when there are extremely serious deficiencies related to understanding and analysis of the topic at hand and there are major problems with writing, presentation style, spelling, grammar, etc. The grade F indicates a very serious deficiency in the paper, presentation, or exam.
A/B, B/C, B-/B+, etc.  Grades such as A/B indicate a paper, presentation, or exam that is borderline. This means thatthe paper is between the two grades. An A/B indicates the paper, presentation, exam, etc. is closer to an A; a B/A indicates it is closer to a B.

Policy on Examination and Assignment Schedule: Examinations are to be taken on the assigned date and time and assignments are to be turned in on the assigned date.

  • Late assignments will not be accepted in this class; if you turn in an assignment late, I will not read it and you will not receive any credit for the assignment.
  • If a due date conflicts with a religious holiday, you must contact the instructor prior to that date to arrange an alternative date to turn-in the assignment. If you have some type of important event, and can prove it, I will be happy to discuss an alternate date and time for you to turn in your assignment-discussing it does not necessarily mean that I will approve the change in due dates. You must give at least five business days prior notice in order to receive an exception to a due date.
  • Emergencies will be handled on a case-by-case basis, but will require evidence that proves that you actually encountered a situation that prevented you from turning in your assignment on time. Excuses such as being confused about a due date or failing to wake-up early enough to make it to class and turn in your assignment will not be considered acceptable and will receive a grade of zero.

Appealing Grades

It is important to understand that you earn your grades on assignments and exams and that you earn your final grade for the course-I do not assign grades to your work, rather, based upon the quality of the work you turn in, I arrive at an opinion about the grade which you have earned. The grade you earn is based upon the quality of the work you turn in-there are no other criteria that are used to arrive at a grade.

Should you find that you disagree with me on a grade you receive for an assignment you turn in, you have the option of appealing your grade. If you want to appeal your grade, you must follow the steps below within two days of my returning the graded assignments. If you are not in class to receive the returned assignment, you still have only two days from the date that I return them--you do not have two days from the date that you receive your graded assignment (once I have returned the assignment to the class, the clock is ticking). Follow these directions--if you do not follow the directions, I may not be willing to consider your appeal:

  • Provide the original assignment with any comments I have written on it, including the grade given. Keep a copy for yourself.
  • Include a written explanation of why you believe that you have earned a grade different from the one I believe you have earned. The written explanation must indicate clearly that you are appealing your grade. I will assume that you will be appealing for a higher grade, but should you want to lower your grade, you are welcome to appeal for that as well. The written explanation should be no more than two paragraphs in length-it must be typed (single space is fine). Part of the success of your appeal will be based upon the quality of your argument as to whythe grade I believe you earned is not appropriate.  In your argument, you must indicate the exact grade that you believe you earned and explain why you believe this to be the case.   
  • Keep in mind that the amount of time or effort you put into an assignment is not an adequate reason for changing a grade.  If you spend four years working on something and turn in a product of poor quality, you will still receive a low grade.  While there is no question that there is a correlation between the amount of work and time you put into an assignment and the grade you earn, as an instructor I cannot take into account how much time/effort you put into the assignment beyond the evident quality of the work you turn in.  If you appeal your grade on the basis of the fact that you put a lot of work into the assignment, do not expect to receive a positive response.  I may sympathize with you and will be more than happy to discuss how you can improve the quality of your work; but I am unlikely to change your grade.   
  • Also keep in mind that asking me to “round up” a grade that is close to a higher grade is not considered an acceptable appeal.  You may appeal a grade only when you believe that I have made an error in grading or have been unfair in my conclusion about the grade you have earned.
  • NOTE:  In the case of a simple error in calculating your grade, you do not need to go through the above process. Simply see me after class and point out the error.   
  • You may be asked to come to my office hours to discuss your appeal.  If this happens, come prepared to discuss/debate your appeal and to support your argument.
  • Should you wish to discuss an appeal prior to actually submitting it, you are welcome to do so during my next office hours following return of the assignment.  To do this you need to make an appointment with me within two days of receiving the assignment; you will then have two days following our meeting to write your appeal.   
  • If you want to appeal your final grade, you must provide all original graded materials for the semester to the instructor within five days of grades being posted to the CliPS online system.  All of the above apply to appeals of final grades; however, I may not be able to meet with you ahead of your appeal.   
  • Appealing a grade means that you are requesting that I re-evaluate your assignment(s) and the grade I believe you have earned.  It is possible, although unlikely, that I will lower your grade if I feel that you have earned a grade which is lower than the one I originally believed to be appropriate.   

POLICY ON Q-DROPS

As a rule, I will not sign forms requesting a Q-drop.  It is your responsibility to attend class and keep up with the work.  If you encounter an emergency during the semester that interferes with your attendance and work, please call or visit my office to discuss the situation and see if there is an alternative to dropping the course.  If you come to my office with a Q-drop form at the end of the semester, having not attended class or completed the work, expect me to refuse to sign the form.

POLICY ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

You are expected to adhere to university requirements on academic honesty and integrity. Behaviors such as plagiarism, unauthorized collaboration, copying of another student's work, or cheating on examinations in any form will be viewed as an offense against the academic community and will be dealt with accordingly. If you are uncertain about what constitutes academic integrity (for example, if you are uncertain about what constitutes plagiarism), you can either meet with the instructor or visit the web site of Student Judicial Services (http://www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs/). In the event that a student is found engaging in behavior that violates university policies on academic integrity, as stipulated by the office of Student Judicial Services, the student will receive the grade of F for the course and will be reported to the office of Student Judicial Services, where further disciplinary action may be taken. There will be no exceptions.

UNIVERSITY ELECTRONIC NOTIFICATION POLICY

All students should become familiar with the University's official e-mail student notification policy. It is the student's responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. The complete text of this policy and instructions for updating your e-mail address are available at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html.

In this course e-mail will be used as a means of communication with students. You will be responsible for checking your e-mail regularly for class work and announcements.

POLICY ON LAPTOPS AND OTHER TECHNOLOGY USAGE IN CLASS

You are encouraged to bring your laptop computer to class to use for taking notes. You also will have opportunities in class to work in groups and having your laptop may facilitate the ease of working together. However, I do not want you to surf the web or otherwise use your computer for things not related to class while I am lecturing or when you are working in your groups. Aside from the fact that it is rude, it is distracting to other students (particularly those behind you during lectures) and also distracts YOU from the lecture or discussion. My lectures may be boring, but I still expect you to pay attention. Don't think that because I cannot see your screen, I don't have any idea that you are surfing the web. It is actually quite easy to tell when people are surfing the web simply by looking at their faces. If I find that a student is not adhering to this policy, I will ask the student to meet me during office hours to discuss an appropriate penalty. Expect a minimum of a 5% reduction in your final grade if you are caught using your laptop during class for purposes unrelated to the course.

Please turn off your cell phone before coming to class, unless you don't mind my stopping class and asking you to answer a call while we all wait and listen (yes, I've done it before).

Some students, particularly those for whom English is not their first language, may wish to record lectures. You are welcome to do so.

DOCUMENTED DISABILITY POLICY

Students with disabilities who require special accommodations need to get a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). This letter should be presented to the instructor at the beginning of the semester and accommodations needed should be discussed at that time. We do not have any in-class exams, however, if you need any sort of special accommodation for assignments, you need to give me at least five business days notice so that we can work out what you need. See following website for more information: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/providing.php.

CITATION STYLE

All papers for this course should follow the bibliographic and citation format of the American Anthropologist. When an idea is taken from a particular book or article, the source should be noted in the text with the author's name, date of the publication, and page number, e.g., (Hendry 1995: 139) to indicate that this particular piece of information, or this idea, was taken from page 139 of a 1995 publication by Hendry. If the item is quoted, it should be put in quotation marks, e.g., "Nowadays, both types of marriage persist, and it is not even always possible to classify a particular marriage as ‘love' or ‘arranged', although people like to talk as though it were" (Hendry 1995: 139).

The book or article should then be listed in the bibliography, which lists only those items cited in the text, as follows:

Hendry, Joy
    1995      Understanding Japanese Society. 2nd edition. New York: Routledge.

Failure to attribute ideas and quotations to their sources constitutes plagiarism and will be dealt with accordingly (see policy on academic honesty above).

Office Hours

My office hours for this semester are listed at the beginning of this syllabus. I will normally be in my office during those hours; however, I am often also in my office at other times. You are free to visit my office at any time--you are not limited to visiting during office hours. If the door is shut, just knock. If I am busy (with meetings, writing, other work, etc.) outside of office hours, I will let you know or I won't answer the door.

Tentative Schedule

Readings that are marked with the symbol §, are available on Blackboard. All case studies must be read prior to discussion on Friday of each week. Readings should be completed by Monday of each week, with the exception of week 1.

Week 1 8/26-28: Introduction, Moral Norms

Lepore, "It's Spreading; Outbreaks, media scares, and the parrot panic of 1930" The New Yorker, 6/1/09. Have this read by Thursday.

Beachamp and Childress, Chapter 1
§ Case Study 1 (Smoking Bans) Discussed on Friday
http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/genbio/olc_linkedcontent/bioethics_cases/g-bioe-09.htm

Week 2 8/31 - 9/4: Moral Character

Beachamp and Childress, Chapter 2
Veatch, et al. pp. 3 - 19

Week 3 9/7 - 9/11: Moral Theories

Beachamp and Childress, Chapters 8 and 9
Veatch, et al. Chapter 1 - 3

Week 4 9/14 - 18: Autonomy

Beachamp and Childress, Chapter 4
Veatch, et al. Chapters 6

Week 5 9/21 - 25: Beneficence and Nonmaleficence

Beachamp and Childress, Chapters 5 and 6
Veatch, et al. Chapter 4
First exam on Friday 9/25

Week 6 9/28 - 10/2: Justice

Beachamp and Childress, Chapter 6

Week 7 10/5 - 10/9: Professional-Patient Relationship

Beachamp and Childress, Chapter 7
Veatch, et al. Chapters 7 and 8

Week 8 10/12 - 16

Film: TBA

Week 9 10/19-23: Life and Death

Veatch et al, Chapters 10, 18

Week 10 10/26 - 30: Human Experimentation

Veatch et al., Chapters 9, 16, and 17
Second exam on Friday, 10/23

Week 11 11/2 - 6: Biomedicine and aging

Traphagan, Taming Oblivion, Chapter 1 -4
Veatch et al., Chapter 12

Week 12 11/9 - 13

Traphagan, Taming Oblivion, Chapters 5 - end
Veatch, et al., Chapter 5

Week 13 11/16 - 2: Abortion

Veatch et al., Chapter 10

Week 14 11/23 - 27: Gender and Biomedicine

Martin, Intro through Chapter 4
Veatch et al., Chapter 11

Week 15 11/30 - 12/4: Gender and Biomedicine

Martin, remainder of book
Third exam on Friday 12/4

ANS 361 • Ethics In Japanese Society

31100 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BUR 436A
(also listed as R S 352 )
show description

Selected topics in south and east Asian anthropology, economics, history, geography, government, art, music, and philosophy.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Asian Studies 320 and 361 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 361 • Biomedicine, Ethics, And Cul-W

81675 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 GEA 127
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 373 )
show description

Selected topics in south and east Asian anthropology, economics, history, geography, government, art, music, and philosophy.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Asian Studies 320 and 361 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 361 • Death/Ritual/Medicine E Asia-W

30490 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 BEN 1.126
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 352 )
show description

Selected topics in south and east Asian anthropology, economics, history, geography, government, art, music, and philosophy.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Asian Studies 320 and 361 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 390 • Ritual, Culture, And Society

30656 • Spring 2009
Meets M 600pm-900pm BUR 436A
(also listed as ANT 391, R S 383 )
show description

Study of various Asian studies-related topics that do not focus on any single geographic region.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Publications

Books

  • Traphagan, John W. (ed.).  2007.  Culture, Care, and Aging in Asia:  Special Issue of the Journal of Long Term Home Health Care 25(1).
  • Hashimoto, Akiko and J. W. Traphagan (eds.).  In press.  Imagined Families, Lived Families: Culture and Kinship in Contemporary Japan.  Albany: State University of New York Press.
  • Thang, Leng Leng, Mui Teng Yap, John W. Traphagan (eds.).  2005.  Aging in Asia: Special Issue of the Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 20(4).
  • Thompson, C. S. and J. W. Traphagan (eds.). 2006. Wearing Cultural Styles in Japan:  Concepts of Tradition and Modernity in Practice.  Albany: State University of New York Press.
  • Traphagan, J. W. 2004. The Practice of Concern: Ritual, Well-Being, and Aging in Rural Japan.  Durham: Carolina Academic Press.
  • Traphagan, J. W. and John Knight (eds.)  2003. Demographic Change and the Family in Japan's Aging Society. Albany:  State University of New York Press.
  • Traphagan, J. W. 2000. Taming Oblivion: Aging Bodies and the Fear of Senility in Japan. Albany: State University of New York Press.
  • Aoyagi, K., P. J. M. Nas, and  J. W. Traphagan (eds.)  1998.  Toward Sustainable Cities: Readings in the Anthropology of Urban Environments.  Leiden: Institute of Cultural and Social Studies, University of Leiden.
  • Onodera, S., T. Nakamura, S. Aizawa, T. Oikawa, J. Traphagan and T. Watanabe.  1995 金ヶ崎の終戦:高谷野原飛行場をめぐる戦争と平和 [The End of the War in Kanegasaki: War and Peace around Kôyanohara Airfield].  Kanegasaki, Japan:  Kanegasaki Insatsu.

Refereed Journal Articles

  • Traphagan, John W.  Under review.  Intergenerational Ambivalence, Power, and Perceptions of Elder Suicide in Rural Japan.  Journal of Aging Studies
  • Kim, H. and John W. Traphagan.  In press.  From Socially Weak to Potential Consumer: Changing Discourses of Elder Status in South Korea.  Care Management Journals
  • Traphagan, John W.  In press.  Embodiment, Ritual Incorporation, and Cannibalism among the Iroquoians after 1300 C.E.  Journal of Ritual Studies.
  • Traphagan, John W.  In press.  Power, Intergenerational Conflict, and the Discourse on Filial Piety in Rural Japan.  Journal of Intergenerational Relationships.
  • Traphagan, John W. and Tomoko Nagasawa.  In press.  Long-Term Care Entrepreneurialism in Japan: Changing Approaches to Caring for Dementia Sufferers.  Care Management Journals.
  • Traphagan, John W.  2007.  Aging in Asia: Perspectives from Qualitative and Quantitative Research.  Journal of Long Term Home Health Care 25(2):16-17.
  • Traphagan, John W.  2006.  Power, Family and Filial Responsibility in Japan. Care Management Journals 7(4):207-214.
  • Yap, Mui Teng, Leng Leng Thang, and John W. Traphagan.  2005.  Aging in Asia—Perennial Concerns on Support and Caring for the Old.  Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 20(4):257-267.
  • Traphagan, J. W.  2005.  Interpreting Senility: Cross-Cultural Perspectives.  Care Management Journals 6(3):145-150.
  • Yap, Mui, Leng Leng Thang, and John W. Traphagan.  2005.  Introduction: Aging in Asia—Perennial Concerns on Caring for the Old.  Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 20(4):257-267.
  • Traphagan, J. W. 2005.  Heroes of the Antimodern: “Respect for the Elderly Day” and Writing the Narrative of the Elder Generation in Japan.  Journal of Ritual Studies 19(2):99-114.
  • Henderson, J. Neil and J. W. Traphagan.  2005. Cultural Factors in Dementia: Perspectives from the Anthropology of Aging Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders  19(4):272-274.
  • Traphagan, J. W. 2005.  Multidimensional Measurement of Religiousness/ Spirituality for Use in Health Research in Cross-Cultural Perspective.  Research on Aging 27(4):387-419.
  • Traphagan, J. W. 2005.  Interpretations of Elder Suicide, Stress and Dependency among Rural Japanese. Ethnology 43(4):315-329.
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