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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Afsar Mohammad

Senior Lecturer Ph.D, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Afsar Mohammad

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-1843
  • Office: WCH 5.136
  • Office Hours: FALL 2014: MW 12-1 & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: G9300

Biography

Courses taught:

First and second-year Telugu; South Asia and the Novel; Modern India and Literature; God is Local and Personal: Devotion in South India; South Asian Saints and Yogi; Pilgrimage in South Asia; Indian Poetry and Religions

Research areas:Telugu,  South Asian Literature and Religions, Fiction and Poetry

ANS 379 • South Asian Saints & Yogis

31115 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WCH 4.118
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when topics vary.  Asian Studies 378 and 379 may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: For Asian studies and Asian cultures and languages majors, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in Asian studies or Asian languages; for others, upper-division standing.

TEL 507 • First-Year Telugu II

32040 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm PAR 210
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 604 and 507 may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 506 with a grade of at least C.

TEL 312L • Second-Year Telugu II

32045 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CAL 22
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 612 and 312L may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 312K with a grade of at least C.

ANS 379 • Pilgrimage Networks And Islam

31988 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as ISL 340, MES 342, R S 358 )
show description

Performing a pilgrimage to Mecca is an ultimate religious obligation in Islam. Each year in the twelfth month of the Islamic calendar, millions of Muslims throughout the world travel to Mecca in Saudi Arabia to perform this obligation, hajj. The Prophet’s 631CE pilgrimage with his followers is now historically considered to be the first hajj performed by a clearly identified group of the Muslims. This pilgrimage became particularly famous in history for the Prophet’s heralding of a new era of Islam by defining certain practices such as destroying the idols, the five pillars of Islam, and re-constructing a Muslim community.

This course introduces us to these Muslim-related pilgrimage practices and their significance in contemporary Islam. Due to its high significance in Islam, several aspects of Muslim pilgrimage have now become a major component in current research in Islam from various disciplines such as religious studies, anthropology, history and politics. By closely reading few of these scholarly works, we look into the questions of the changing notions of pilgrimage and modern transformations of this classical ritual obligation.  

While studying various classical and historical sources of pilgrimage, we discuss how contemporary Muslim and non-Muslim communities understand this idea of pilgrimage. We analyze how these modern communities offer alternative interpretations or try to find different ways to meet this major religious requirement. Contemporary research also shows how Popular Islam with a blend of Sufism provides different pilgrimage modes to circulate the idea of local sainthood practices. We also read materials related to these variations of Sufi pilgrimage.

 

Required Texts:

 

  1. Bianchi Robert, Guests of God: Pilgrimage and Politics in the Islamic World, New York: Oxford University Press, ISBN-13: 978-0195342116.
  2. Eickelman, Dale and James Piscatori, Muslim Travellers: Pilgrimage, Migration, and the Religious Imagination, Berkeley: University of California Press, ISBN-13: 978-0520072527.
  3. Bigelow, Anna. Sharing the Sacred: Practicing Pluralism in Muslim North India, New York: Oxford University Press.  ISBN-13: 978-0195368239.
  4. Cooke, Miriam and Bruce Lawrence. Muslim Networks from Hajj to Hip-hop, The University of North Carolina Press. ISBN-13: 978-0807855881.
  5. Mohammad, Afsar. The Festival of Pirs: Popular Islam and Shared Devotion in South India, New York: Oxford University Press. 2013.

TEL 506 • First-Year Telugu I

32915 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 100pm-200pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 604 and 506 may not both be counted.

TEL 312K • Second-Year Telugu I

32920 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 612 and 312K may not both be counted.

ANS 340 • Muslim Sainthood Practices

32090 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as ISL 372, R S 341 )
show description

This course aims at introducing various classical, popular and modern Muslim saints in South Asia. We will read the life stories of these saints and focus on their contribution to religions in South Asia. We will try to understand various major concepts communicated and circulated by these saints and their ways of dealing with spiritual aspects. While focusing on their sainthood practices, we also study the nature of the dialogue which addresses the questions such as pluralism, localism and a new paradigm of spirituality that continually interacts with diverse modes of everyday life in South Asia. In order to understand their impact on visual and media cultures, we also watch two documentaries and compare these visual sources with sainthood literature.

 

Required Texts:

1.     Bellamy, Carla. The Powerful Ephemeral: Everyday Healing in an Ambiguously Islamic Place, University of California Press, 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0520262812.

2.     Renard, John. Friends of God: Islamic Images of Piety, Commitment, and Servanthood, University of California Press. ISBN-13: 978-0520251984

3.     Kugle, Scott. Sufis and Saints' Bodies: Mysticism, Corporeality, and Sacred Power in Islam. The University of North Carolina Press ISBN-10: 080783081X

4.     Mohammad, Afsar. Following the Pir: Shared Devotion in South India, New York: Oxford University Press.

5.     Ernst, Carl. Sufism: An Introduction to the Mystical Tradition of Islam. Shambhala. ISBN-13: 978-1590308844

 

 

Grading

Weekly responses (500 words) 10%

Book review (800 words) 15%

Midterm paper (2500 words) 15%

Peer-review of the mid-term papers 10%

Final paper (2500 words) 25%

Class presentation: 15 minutes (plus 10 minutes Q&A) 25%

TEL 507 • First-Year Telugu II

33290 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm JES A303A
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 604 and 507 may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 506 with a grade of at least C.

TEL 312L • Second-Year Telugu II

33295 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CAL 22
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 612 and 312L may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 312K with a grade of at least C.

ANS 361 • S. Asian Islam: Ethnographies

31815 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WCH 4.118
(also listed as ANT 324L, ISL 340, R S 341 )
show description

This course focuses on various contemporary ethnographies in the field of South Asian Islam. For almost a decade, there has been a consistent growth in the number of ethnographies being conducted in South Asia, most importantly, in India, Pakistan and Bangla Desh. Throughout this course, we focus on various manifestations of practising and living Islam and discuss two major questions: 1. What makes living Islam different than textual Islam? 2. What do we learn from ethnographies of contemporary Islam or Muslim societies?

Texts

1.      Metcalf, Barbara. Islam in South Asia in Practice, Princeton University Press. ISBN-13: 978-0691044200
2.      Frank J.Korom, Hosay Trinidad, University of Pennsylvania Press ISBN-13: 978-0812218251
3.      Flueckiger, Joyce. In Amma’s Healing Room: Gender and Vernacular Islam in South India, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. ISBN-13: 978-0253218377
4.      Marsdebn, Magnus. Living Islam: Muslim Religious Experience in Pakistan's North-West Frontier, Cambridge University Press  ISBN-13: 978-0521727495

5.      Bigelow, Anna. Sharing the Sacred: Practicing Pluralism in Muslim North India, Oxford University Press, USA. ISBN-10: 0195368231.

Grading

Weekly responses (500 words) 10%

Book review (800 words) 15%

Midterm paper (2500 words) 15%

Peer-review of the mid-term papers 10%

Final paper (2500 words) 25%

Class presentation: 15 minutes (plus 10 minutes Q&A) 25%

TEL 506 • First-Year Telugu I

32965 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 100pm-200pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 604 and 506 may not both be counted.

TEL 312K • Second-Year Telugu I

32970 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 612 and 312K may not both be counted.

ANS 379 • Indian Poetry And Religions

31780 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WCH 4.118
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

 

 

 

The University of Texas at Austin

 

Department of Asian Studies

 

 

Spring 2013: Asian Studies Course (ANS 379)

 

Indian Poetry and Religions

 

                                            Global Cultures and Writing Flag Course

 

                                               

 

 

Instructor: Afsar Mohammad, Ph.D

 

Class Meetings: Tue and Thu 11 to 12:30 at WCH 4:118

 

Office Hours: Tue and Thr 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. or by appointment

 

Office:  Homer Rainey Hall 3:102

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

This course focuses on the intersections of religion and poetry in the history of Indian literature.  The basic question that we explore is: Why religion and poetry are deeply connected in the making of Indian religions? From the Vedas to the recent post-modern/post-colonial manifestations of religious devotion and expressive forms, poetry continues to play its central role in the making of Indian religions. We focus on several streams of poetry beginning with the Vedic to contemporary and study various intersections of religion and poetry. Most importantly, we try to capture the contours of the Indian religious poetry expressed in multiple settings and many variations that include hymns, chants, bhajans, and long poetic narratives along with the new poetic conventions that deal with caste and gender identities as well.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Required Texts:

 

  1. Donald S.Lopez, Jr. Religions of India in Practice,      Princeton University Press.       

                                                                    ISBN-13: 978-0691043258

  1. Paula Richman, Extraordinary Child, University of Hawaii      Press.

                                                                        ISBN-13: 978-0824810634

  1. Vinay Dharwadker (TR), Kabir: The Weaver’s Songs,      Penguin India.

                                                   ISBN-13: 978-0143029687

  1. Syed Akbar Hyder, Reliving Karbala, Oxford University      Press.

                                                    ISBN-13: 978-0195373028

  1. A.K. Ramanujan (TR), Speaking of Siva, Penguin      Classics,

                                                    ISBN-13: 978-0140442700

  1. Narayana Rao, (TR), God on the Hill, Oxford      University Press.

                                                    ISBN-13: 978-0195677096

  1. Metcalf, Barbara , Islam in South Asia,

 

 

 

Grading Scale:

92-100 A

89-91  A-

86-88  B+

82-85  B

79-81  B-

76-78  C+

72-75 C

Class Attendance and Participation:

Regrettably, excessive unexcused absences and persistent failure to prepare the assignments on time have deleterious effects on final grades for the class.  On the other hand, vigorous and informed participation in class discussions can help a grade. Other factors, such as student’s progress or effort in the course, may also affect final grades for the class.

Assignments:

1. Informal and Formal Weekly responses to be posted on a blog. (500 Words): 10%

2. Book Review (800 Words): 15%

3. Mid-term paper (2500 Words):15%

4. Peer-review of the mid-term papers: 10%

5. Final paper (2500 Words): 25%

6. Class Presentation: 15 minutes (plus 10 minutes Q & A): 25%

 

Instructions:

  1. Students      have to sign for weekly responses and class presentations in the first week      of the semester.
  2. Students      should be prepared to work in groups in and outside the class. Peer-review      of the mid-term papers is just one form of this group work.
  3. Students      have to submit well-edited and proof-read writing assignments. Failure to      meet the basic writing requirements is an automatic low grade. Please do      not submit rough drafts or drafts in the progress and try to consult the      Writing Center on the UT campus before submitting any writing assignment.
  4. I’m very      particular about the class presentations and you should submit the outline      of your presentation one week before the class presentation. Be prepared      to a formal question and answer session after every presentation.

 

A Note on Peer Review:

  1. Students      share the mid-term papers for the purpose of peer review. The class is      divided into several groups and each group shares and discusses the      papers. The instructor will ask each group to present their discussions to      him and makes suggestions.

2.  Students share and discuss presentation outlines and major arguments in the presentations.

3.  Students share and discuss presentation outlines and major arguments in the presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

Tentative Calendar

 

January 15th : Introductions

 

January 17th : Reading: Anthony Yu “Literature and Religion” (PDF on the Blackboard)

 

Jan 22nd : Devotional Hymns from the Sanskrit

 

 

24th : Reading: Introduction from “Religions of India in Practice”

 

 

29th :     Verses from Gita, Ramayana and Mahabharata  

 

31st Tamil game songs to Siva / Norman Cutler

                       Tamil songs to God as child / Paula Richman

 

 February 5th : Speaking of Siva

 

7th :  Women's songs for auspicious occasions / Lindsey Harlan

                               Songs of devotion and praise. Bengali songs to Kālī 

   

 

        

12th and 14th:  God on the Hill    

 

 19th :      Sikh hymns to the divine Name / Hew McLeod

          21st:     Baul Songs                             

26th and 28th: Kabir: The Weaver’s Songs

March 5th and 7th  :   Buddhism: From Nagarjuna to the neo-Buddhist verses

           Selections from  “Verses from the Center: A Buddhist vision of the Sublime” (no

            readings, discussions in the class)

SPRING BREAK

Book Review Due: March  18th

 

19th  and 21st :  Reading: The Extraordinary Child

                                     

 

Mar 26th  : Islam in South Asia; Intro pp.1- 39

 

March 28th: Devotion and Praise , pp.48, 93

April 2nd  pp.113

4th  : Reading: Intro to “The Battle of Karbala” (start reading Reliving Karbala)

 

              Karbala and Muslim Poetry (Lecture and Discussion)

 

 

April 9th : Reliving Karbala

 

11th : Reliving Karbala

16th  Islam in South Asia , pp. 187

18th pp. 120

23rd  p.101

25th Presentations open

30th Presentations open

May 2nd Last class day REFLECTIONS

Final Paper due: May 10th

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEL 507 • First-Year Telugu II

32850 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm PAR 204
show description

Elementary Telugu has the two-semester program sequence. The course emphasizes the individual learning styles and preferences.  All the aspects of your linguistic performance: speaking, reading, writing and listening would be given equal consideration. Using essentially a communicative-interactive teaching methodology, supplemented with appropriate grammatical details, the students are, systematically and incrementally, introduced to materials that enable them to acquire cultural and linguistic literacy about Andhra. Students graduating from the program are expected to have complete mastery over the Telugu script, so they can read and write Telugu efficiently. They are expected to be able to carry on basic conversation in Telugu with native speakers, displaying a fair command of the contextually appropriate linguistic articulations of different speech acts in Telugu.

TEL 312L • Second-Year Telugu II

32855 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CAL 22
show description

Intermediate Telugu provides the second year of training in Telugu. In continuation to the first year Telugu, this course focuses on reading comprehension and oral comprehension along with more writing practice. Specially designed textual and audio-visual materials help the students to have a better understanding of Telugu language and culture. Reading passages followed by conversations and writing exercises helps to understand complex structures and their use. A wide variety of interesting exercises, graded compositions, reading comprehensions, listening comprehensions and translation passages will be used. In addition, this course provides an introduction to Telugu culture and literature with interesting short-stories, autobiographical writings, and Telugu movies, and documentaries, videos on culture, places and festivals.

ANS 379 • South Asian Saints And Yogis

31685 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 341 )
show description

Focusing on the idea of religious and cultural diversity, this course introduces to various holy figures and sainthood practices in South Asia as they are understood in modern times. Our emphasis will be on the intersections of classical and modern realms of these sainthood practices. We also try to understand their role in the everyday life in contemporary South Asia.  At the turn of modern times, several saints and yogis began to appear on the South Asian landscape and public sphere. In dialogue with modernity, these saints - from various backgrounds such as Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism and Christianity - made a profound impact on the emerging modern discourses and increasingly technological life-styles. Focusing on their life stories, teachings and cultic practices, this course explores their role in the making of modern South Asia at various intersections of history, religion, literature and philosophy. In this course, we will read the works of these saints and very few carefully selected secondary materials that put their practices and teachings in a perspective.  We will watch and analyze two documentaries made on these saints. We explore two major questions: 1. what role these “classical” models of holy persons are playing in a fast-changing and constantly shifting modern world? 2. If each religion has a discrete sainthood tradition, what are the specific religious/philosophical/everyday aspects that connect these saints of diversified worlds?

TEL 506 • First-Year Telugu I

32715 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 100pm-200pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 604 and 506 may not both be counted.

TEL 312K • Second-Year Telugu I

32720 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 305
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 612 and 312K may not both be counted.

ANS 378 • Senior Seminar In Asian Stds

31790 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WCH 4.118
show description

Course Description:


The idea of devotion is articulated in multiple ways in Asia,  
including poems, songs, narratives, sacred biographies, memoirs,  
autobiographies, personal essays and travelogues.  Our seminar ?For  
the Love of God: Devotional Literatures in Asia? focuses on various  
devotional literary genres popular in the major religious traditions  
in Asia. The course readings and other audio-visual materials help us  
to see how religious ideas find an expression in the diverse literary  
genres mentioned above. We will discuss major devotional literary  
practices of the Hindu, Islam, Sikh, Jain, Buddhist, Taoist,  
Confucian, Shinto and Christian traditions. By reading and discussing  
texts ancient and modern, we will try to comprehend the contours of  
these devotional practices and their significance in Asia.  We also  
watch two movies to understand how these aspects of devotional  
expressions translate into a modern medium of communication in Asia.


Required Texts:

1.      Lopez, Donald S. Religions of Asia in Practice, Princeton University Press.
2.      Hawley, John. Songs of the Saints of India, New York: Oxford  
University Press, 1988.
3.      Miller Barbara Stoller, The Bhagavad- Gita, New York: Bantam Books.
4.      Elias, Jamal. Death Before Dying: Sufi Poems of Sultan Bahu
5.      Ramanujan, A.K Speaking of Siva, Penguin
6.      Han Shan, The Collected Songs of Cold Mountain, Copper Canyon Press.

TEL 507 • First-Year Telugu II

32735 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.204
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 604 and 507 may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 506 with a grade of at least C.

TEL 312L • Second-Year Telugu II

32740 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.202
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 612 and 312L may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 312K with a grade of at least C.

ANS 372 • Modern India And Literature

31525 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as ANT 324L, C L 323 )
show description

India…one of the greatest classical worlds, it is a fascinating land of saints, spirituality and sentimentality. Yet this is only one side of the coin, for India too is a land of great sciences and endless debate. At the turn of the century, India returned to many of its classical splendors, fabulous concepts and ornate life styles while openly inviting the world of modernity. How and for what purpose did India undergo this transformation? This is the major question we will explore in this new course, MODERN INDIA AND LITERATURE.  Focusing on modern Indian literary masterpieces and a collection of poems, short stories, literary essays  and memoirs taken from modern Indian literatures and cultures, we try to understand the enigmatic ‘Modernity’ of India. We will also watch four major films in different Indian languages—Hindi, Bengali, Tamil and Telugu. This course allows us to explore how two major mediums of communication—literature and film—demonstrate an interconnected Indian history and cultural dynamic. These writings and films help us to visualize ‘another India’ which began to redefine its cultural history and everyday life after a very long colonial rule.  

Required Texts:

1.      Amit Chaudhury, The Vintage Book of Modern Indian Literature, ISBN-13: 978-0375713002

2.    Anantamurthy, Samskara, ISBN-13: 978-0195610796

3.      Jamila, An Autobiography of a sex worker.

4.      Narayana Rao Velcheru (tr), Hibiscus on the Lake: Twentieth-Century Telugu Poetry from India, ISBN-13: 978-0299177041

5.    Paula Richman, Ramayana Stories in Modern South India, ISBN-13: 978-0253219534

6.    Intizar Husain, A Chronicle of the Peacocks: Stories of Partition, Exile and Lost Memories, ISBN-13: 978-0195671742

7.    Karline Mclain, India's Immortal Comic Books: Gods, Kings, and Other Heroes

Assignments:

  1. Group Presentation or Individual Presentation
  2. Short Papers -2 (six pages each)
  3. Weekly responses (single page)

TEL 506 • First-Year Telugu I

32590 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 100pm-200pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 604 and 506 may not both be counted.

TEL 312K • Second-Year Telugu I

32595 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 2.124
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 612 and 312K may not both be counted.

TEL 330 • Telugu Language And Literature

32600 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Prerequisite: Telugu 312L with a grade of at least C.

ANS 340 • Pilgrimage In South Asia

31819 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 2.124
(also listed as C L 323, R S 341 )
show description

This course focuses on various manifestations of pilgrimage in the religions of South Asia. Pilgrimage is considered to be the most important goal of almost all devotional traditions including classical and modern religions. Many places have significant body of distinctive narrative practices and a repertoire of rituals. Some places even combine multiple religious traditions. In this course, we discuss about pilgrim sites, pilgrim narratives and the changing notions of pilgrimage. How do they change after the recent developments of religious polarizations? How this idea of pilgrimage differs for each discrete religious tradition? What are the responses of modernized communities to these ideas of pilgrimage? These are the three major questions we explore in this course.

 

Texts:

1.  Ann Gold, Fruitful Journeys2. Pnina Webner, The Pilgrims of Love3. Peter van der veer, Gods on Earth4. P.M.Currie, The shrine and cult of Khwaja Moinuddin Chisti5. William Sax, Mountain Goddess6. David Haberman, Journey through the Twelve Forests.

 

Grading:

1. Weekly informal Responses: 25%2. Mid-term short paper (7 pages): 25%3. Presentation : 25% 4. Final Paper (10 pages) : 25%

 

TEL 507 • First-Year Telugu II

32990 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.204
show description

First-Year Telugu II

TEL 312L • Second-Year Telugu II

32995 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.202
show description

Second-Year Telugu II

ANS 340 • Indian Poetry And Religions

30680 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SZB 286
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

This course focuses on the intersections of religion and poetry in the history of Indian literature.  The basic question that we explore is: Why religion and poetry are deeply connected in the making of Indian religions? From the Vedas to the recent post-modern/post-colonial manifestations of religious devotion and expressive forms, poetry continues to play its central role in the making of Indian religions. We focus on several streams of poetry beginning with the Vedic to contemporary and study various intersections of religion and poetry. Most importantly, we try to capture the contours of the Indian religious poetry expressed in multiple settings and many variations that include hymns, chants, bhajans, and long poetic narratives along with the new poetic conventions that deal with caste and gender identities as well.

TEXTS:

1.    Donald S.Lopez, Jr. Religions of India in Practice,Princeton University Press.  ISBN-13: 978-0691043258

2.    Paula Richman, Extraordinary Child, University of Hawaii Press.   ISBN-13: 978-0824810634

3. Vinay Dharwadker (tr), Kabir: The Weaver’s Songs, Penguin India. ISBN-13: 978-0143029687

 4. Syed Akbar Hyder, Reliving Karbala, Oxford university Press. ISBN-13: 978-0195373028

5. A.K. Ramanujan (tr), Speaking of Siva, Penguin Classics, ISBN-13: 978-0140442700

 6. Narayana Rao, (tr), God on the Hill, Oxford University Press. ISBN-13: 978-0195677096

GRADING:

1. Weekly informal Responses: 25%
2. Mid-term short paper (7 pages): 25%
3. Presentation : 25%
4. Final Paper (10 pages) : 25%

TEL 506 • First-Year Telugu I

31825 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 100pm-200pm RLM 7.112
show description

First-Year Telugu I

TEL 312K • Second-Year Telugu I

31830 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 2.124
show description

Second-Year Telugu I

ANS 340 • South Asian Saints And Yogis-W

30895 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm MEZ 2.124
(also listed as ANT 324L, R S 341 )
show description

ANS 340: South Asian Saints and Yogis

 

 

Class Meetings:  MW 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

Class Room:  MEZ 2.124

 

Instructor: Dr. Afsar Mohammad

 

Office: Homer Rainey Hall 3:102

Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday 1-2 p.m. and by appointment

 

 

 

 

Course Description

 

 

At the turn of the twentieth century, several saints and yogis began to appear on the South Asian landscape. In dialogue with modernity, these saints - from various backgrounds such as Hinduism, Islam and Christianity - made an impressive impact over the emerging modern discourses and life-styles. Focusing on their life stories, teachings and cultic practices, this course explores their role in the making of Modern South Asia at various intersections of history, religion, literature and philosophy. In this course, we will read the works of these saints and very few carefully selected secondary materials about various saints and yogis in South Asia.  We will also watch and analyze three most important movies and documentaries made on these saints.

 

Required Texts

 

  1. Kirin Narayan,  My Family and Other Saints, University of Chicago Press, ISBN-13: 978-8172237196
  2. John Stratton Hawley and Mark Juergensmeyer, Songs of the Saints of India, Oxford University Press. ISBN-13: 978-0195694208

 

  1. Lobsang P. Lhalungpa (tr) The Life of Mila Repa, Penguin , ISBN-13: 978-0140193503

 

  1. Christian Lee Noevetzke, Religion and Memory: A Cultural History of Saint Namdev in India, Columbia University Press, ISBN-13: 978-0231141840

 

  1. Karen Penchilis (ed), The Graceful Gurus: Hindu Female Gurus in India and the United States, Oxford University Press. ISBN-13: 978-0195145380

 

  1. Carl W.Ernst and Bruce Lawrence, The Sufi Martyrs of Love, Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN-13: 978-1403960276

 

 

 

Grading Policy and Requirements:

Weekly Responses (single page) -25 % 

Presentation 25%

Analysis Paper (5 pages) 15%

Final paper (10 pages) 35%

 

Attendance Policy and Class Participation:

Regrettably, excessive unexcused absences and persistent failure to prepare the assignments on time have deleterious effects on final grades for the class.  On the other hand, vigorous and informed participation in class discussions can help a grade. Other factors, such as student’s progress or effort in the course, may also affect final grades for the class.

 

Course Calendar (Tentative)

 

Jan 20th and 25th   Introducing South Asian Saints and Yogis

                              Documentary

February 1st                Introduction and Ravi Das (Songs of the Saints of India) pp. 1-32

 

 3rd                          Kabir

 

Feb 8th                   Nanak

 

10th                                     Surdas

15th                         Mirabai

17th                                     Tulsidas

22nd                         The Life of Gauri Ma (From The Graceful Gurus)

24th                                    Anandmai pp. 85-115

March 1st                Jayasri maa pp. 119-128

3rd                                       Mother Meera, pp. 129-145

8th                           Ammachi pp. 204-218

10th                         Gurumayi pp. 219-238

15th and 17th             Spring Break

22nd                                     Ramana Maharshi (Documentary)  

                    Reading : Rama?a Mahar?i: Mystic as Translator

 

24th and 29th           The Sufi Martyrs of Love

31st                         Afsar Mohammad,  Following the Pir (on the Blackboard) and Karen G.

                                Ruffle “Who Could Marry At a Time Like This?” (On the Blackboard)

Apr 5th                           Carla Bellamy  (on the Blackboard)

7th                           Introduction from Religion and Public Memory

12th                                      Practices of Memory from  Religion and Public Memory

 

14th                          Publics of Memory from Religion and Public Memory

19th                           Movie “The Hugging Saint”

21st                         Life of Mila Repa

26th                                     Life Of Mila Repa (Contd)

28th  :                      Reading, Kirin Narayan:  Refractions of the Field at Home: American

                               Representations of Hindu Holy Men in the 19th and 20th Centuries (On

                               the blackboard)

 

May 3rd                  My Family and Other Saints

 

5th  :                        Last Class Day

 

 

 

TEL 507 • First-Year Telugu II

32105 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.204
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 604 and 507 may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 506 with a grade of at least C.

TEL 312L • Second-Year Telugu II

32110 • Spring 2010
Meets WTH 530pm-700pm MEZ 1.202
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 612 and 312L may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 312K with a grade of at least C.

ANS 320 • South Asia And The Novel-W

31070 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm WEL 3.260
(also listed as ANT 324L, C L 323 )
show description

 1 

 

ANS 320/CL 323: SOUTH ASIA AND THE NOVEL 

FALL 2009 

  

 

 

 

 

Class Room: WEL 3.260 

 

Tue and Thursdays 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. 

 

 

Office Hours: Tues and Thurs 1-2 p.m. / By appointment 

 

Instructor:  Afsar Mohammad 

 

afsar@mail.utexas.edu 

 

 

 

 

 2 

Course Description 

 

   

This course is designed to introduce five major novels from various languages 

and cultures of South Asia.  For three decades, the novel has been a significant 

narrative genre in contemporary South Asia and we have seen fine novels being 

produced in South Asian languages during this period. While commonly 

considered as a derivative genre, the novel in South Asia has been unique in 

producing its own narrative strategies and thematic concerns. In addition, the 

novel occupies a prominent place in the making of modernity and post-colonial 

identities in South Asia.  What makes the South Asian Novel, “South Asian”? 

Why is this genre so important for contemporary South Asian writers? What is 

the relationship between the Novel and the making of modern South Asia? 

Exploring these three larger questions, in this course, we will closely read six 

novels and discuss at length their place in South Asian literature. We will also 

read some selected chapters from other novels and carefully selected essays to 

develop an understanding of the major shifts in the South Asian novel. We will 

also watch one or two movies to understand how the novel changes once it is 

translated into film.  

 

Required Texts 

 

1. Vikas Swarup, Slum Dog Millionaire 

2. Adiga Aravinda, The White Tiger 

3. Ghosh Amitav, The Sea of Poppies 

4. Selvadurai Shyam, The Funny Boy 

5. Shamsie Kamila, Burnt Shadows  

6. Devi Mahasweta, Dewana, Khoimala and the Holy Banyan Tree 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Reader : Available at Paradigm 

 

 

Grading Policy 

 

I. Informal writing (One page Weekly Responses and Reflections on readings): 25%  

 

II. Presentation:  – 25%  

 

III. Final Paper:  Literary Analysis: One essay (10-12 pages), 50%  

 

 3 

Additional Instructions 

Disability: Any student with a documented disability who requires academic 

accommodations should  

contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986  

(Video Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized  

accommodations. 

 

 

Lecture Topics (Tentative Calendar) 

 

 

Week 1 :  Introductions and  

                             General Introduction to the Novel and South Asian Literature 

 

- South Asian Texts and Traditions 

- Beginnings of the Novel in South Asia 

 

Readings for Thursday : 1. Harold Bloom “ Why Read?” 

                                        2. Rushdie “In Defense of the Novel, Yet Again?  

 

 

Week 2 : South Asian Novel and Modernity 

 

- Reform Movements and Novel 

- Nationalism and Novel 

- Rise of Vernacular Novel 

- Print Culture and Reading Public 

 

Readings: Ian Almond , Dissolving ‘Indianness’:How Europeans Read Indian Fiction?  

 

 

Week 3 :  Novel and Colonialism 

 

- Influence of English literary cultures.  

- Early Novels 

 

Readings : 1. Asaduddin , First Urdu Novel: Contesting Claims and Disclaimers 

                   2. Selected Chapters from    Premchand “ Godan”  

            Ruswa   ‘Umrao Jaan Ada’  

 

 

  Week 4 : Reading ‘ Slum Dog Millionaire’  

 

 

- Thursday : Film   Slum Dog Millionaire  

 4 

 

 

 

Week 5  :  Novel in the Post-Colonial South Asia: Reading ‘The White Tiger’  

 

                                   

Week 6 :  Ghosh Amitav, The Sea of Poppies   

                              

 

Week 7:    Discussing the   Movie : Ek Hazaar Chaurasi ki Maa  

 

                                 

                                  

                                               

 

Week 8 : Reading ‘Dewana’  

 

 

 

Week 9: History as Fiction :  

 

 

Week 10 :  Reading ‘Funny Boy’   

 

                            

                   

 

Week 11  : Autobiographical Novel (Readings from the Course Packet) 

                     

                    Readings:  Valmiki Omprakash, Joothan  

                        Bama ‘Sangati: Events’  

 

 

Week 12 : New Identities and the Novel 

 

- Dalit Novel : Limbale ‘The Outcaste’ 

- Muslim Identity : Rahi Masoom Raza, “Topi Shukla”  

 

 

Week 13 : Reading ‘Burnt Shadows’   

 

Week 14 : Novel and Film : Connected Histories 

 

                       Tuesday : Movie :Pather Panchali 

 

                       Thursday : Vibhuti Bhushan and Satyajit Ray 

                        

 5 

Week 15 :   

 

Mapping South Asian Novel: Recent Theories of Novel and South Asia 

 

 

 

 

TEL 506 • First-Year Telugu I

32250 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 100pm-200pm RLM 7.112
show description

University of Texas – Austin  

Department of Asian Studies  

 

 

Course Plan for Telugu 506  

 

Instructor: Afsar Mohammad  

Meets MW 1:00PM? 2:00PM   RLM 7.112 TTH 200PM? 330PM   CAL 22   

Instructor MOHAMMAD, MAHBOOB A Office HRH 3:102  

E?mail AFSAR@MAIL.UTEXAS.EDU  

Office Hours: Tuesday and Thursday 1?2 p.m.  

  

 

 

 

Course Description 

Tel 506 has two-semester sequence with five credits and five hours meetings every week. The 

course emphasizes all aspects of basic Telugu language performance : speaking, reading, writing 

and listening. All four aspects will be given equal consideration. Using essentially a 

communicative - interactive teaching methodology, supplemented with appropriate grammatical 

details, the students are systematically and incrementally introduced to materials that enable 

them to acquire linguistic and cultural literacy about Andhra. Students graduating from this 

program are expected to have complete mastery over the Telugu script, so they can read and 

write Telugu efficiently. They are expected to be able to carry on basic conversation in Telugu 

with native speakrs, displaying fair command of the contextually appropriate linguistic 

articulations of different speech acts in Telugu. Upon completion of this course, students will be 

able to : 1. Read Telugu script 2. Write in Telugu script using every day language 3. Express 

themselves, their likes and dislikes/emotions and Feelings etc., 4. Describe persons, places and 

objects etc. 5. Gain word power to read very short-stories and news items in Telugu newspapers. 

Grading Policy 

Class Attendance & Participation: 30% Daily Assignments: 30% Exams: 40% 

Texts 

Elementary Telugu course packet available at Paradigm Copy Center 

 There may be some more additional Xeroxed materials for class-work, reading, listening- 

comprehension, dictation, and pictorial learning in the class. 

Additional Materials: 

For news : www.eenadu.net 

Week to week calendar will be provided every Monday in the class.  

 

Additional Instructions 

Disability: Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should   

contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471?6259 (voice) or 1?866?329?3986   

(Video Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized   

accommodations.  

 

TEL 312K • Second-Year Telugu I

32255 • Fall 2009
Meets WTH 630pm-800pm BEN 1.106
show description

 

University of Texas – Austin  

Department of Asian Studies  

 

 

Course Plan for Telugu 312 K  

 

Instructor: Afsar Mohammad  

MWF 9:00 AM?10:00 AM MEZ 1.204 

 

 

Office HRH 3:102  

E?mail AFSAR@MAIL.UTEXAS.EDU  

Office Hours: Tuesday and Thursday 1?2 p.m.  

  

 

 

 

 

Course Description 

Tel312K provides the second year of training in Telugu. The course meets three hours per week 

and carries three hours of credit. In continuation to the first year Telugu, this course focuses on 

reading comprehension and oral comprehension along with more writing practice. Specially 

designed textual and audio-visual materials help the students to have a better understanding of 

Telugu language and culture. Reading passages followed by conversations and writing exercises 

helps to understand complex structures and their use. A wide variety of interesting exercises, 

graded compositions, reading comprehensions, listening comprehensions and translation 

passages will be used. In addition, this course provides an introduction to Telugu culture and 

literature with interesting short-stories, autobiographical writings, Telugu movies, 

documentaries, videos on culture, places and festivals. Upon completion of this course, students 

will be able to : 1. Read short-stories, short-essays with considerable ease. 2. Write in Telugu 

script using advanced language 3. Express themselves and develop an argument in Telugu. 4. 

Describe persons, places and objects etc., in detail. 5. Gain word power to comprehend news 

stories and literary content in Telugu. 

Grading Policy 

Class Attendance & Participation: 30% Daily Assignments: 30% Exams: 40% 

Texts 

Course packet available at Paradigm Copy Center 

Week to week calendar will be provided every Monday in the class.  

 

Additional Instructions 

Disability: Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should   

contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471?6259 (voice) or 1?866?329?3986   

(Video Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized   

accommodations.  

 

ANS 372 • Devotion In South India-W

30535 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 CBA 4.324
(also listed as C L 323, R S 341 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

TEL 507 • First-Year Telugu II

31631 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 200pm-300pm PAR 308
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 604 and 507 may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 506 with a grade of at least C.

TEL 612 • Accelerated Second-Year Telugu

31640 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 308
show description

Continuation of Telugu 604.  Telugu 612 and 312K may not both be counted; Telugu 612 and 312L may not both be counted.

TEL 312L • Second-Year Telugu II

31645 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm WEL 3.402
show description

Not open to native speakers of Telugu.  Telugu 612 and 312L may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Telugu 312K with a grade of at least C.

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