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Dr. Joel Brereton, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Gail Minault

Professor Ph.D., 1972, University of Pennsylvania

Gail Minault

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7214
  • Office: GAR 3.118
  • Office Hours: SPRING 2013: MW 1:30-3 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

19th and 20th century history of India, including religion and politics, intellectual and social history, and women's movements.

Courses taught

Her major teaching fields are the history of India, Islam in South Asia, and women in Asia.

Recent Publications

Professor Minault is the author of The Khilafat Movement: Religious Symbolism and Political Mobilization in India (1982). She edited The Extended Family: Women and Political Participation in India and Pakistan(1981) and co-edited Separate Worlds: Studies of Purdah in South Asia(1982) and Abul Kalan Azad: A Religious and Intellectual Biography (1988). She has also translated Voices of Silence (1986). Her latest work isSecluded Scholars: Women's Education and Muslim Reform in Colonial India (1997).

Interests

History of India and Pakistan; women's history, history of Islamic art

ANS 340R • European Empires In Asia

32105 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 4.110
(also listed as HIS 340R )
show description

This course covers the great age of European empires in the 19th and 20th centuries, when European powers established their rule over much of the rest of the world.  We will look at British rule in India and the Malay peninsula, Dutch rule in Indonesia, French rule in Indochina, and American involvement in the Philippines and Vietnam.  We will also look at relations between European and local peoples in terms of cultural contact, economic exploitation, and political domination, and the results of such relationships for both the Europeans and the Asians they ruled.  The results, as we shall see, were far-reaching and are still with us today.  We will also look at the 20th-century process of decolonization, as the old reasons for imperial domination lost their force, and as new national identities emerged in Asia.

 

Requirements for the course include 2 book reports, 2 map assignments, a mid-term and a final exam.

 

Textbooks (subject to change): T. Metcalf, Ideologies of the Raj B. Metcalf and T. Metcalf, India: A Concise History D.R. Sardesai, Southeast Asia: Past & Present D. Headrick, Tools of Empire A selection of novels for the book reports

 

Grading: Book reports, 25% each

Mid term, 25%

Final 25%

 

ANS 361 • Gandhi And Gandhism

32155 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as HIS 350L, R S 341 )
show description

This course will begin with a biographical account of Mahatma Gandhi, and proceed from there to various interpretations of the man, his life, his philosophy, and his influence.  We will look at his role in the Indian nationalist movement, his influence on the course of race relations in South Africa, and his impact on the thought of such leaders as Martin Luther King, Jr.  We will also look at such topics as his techniques of non-violent protest, his views on women, and his economic and social impact on modern India.

 

Requirements for the course include the weekly readings, which will be discussed in class.  Each student will also have to give occasional oral reports in class.  Such reports will then be written up in 2-3 pp. and submitted one week following the class presentation.  There will be a mid-term paper of approximately 8 pp. (a book report), and a final research paper of approximately 15 pp.

 

Required texts (subject to change):

 

            Judith Brown, Gandhi: Prisoner of Hope

            MK Gandhi, Autobiography

            R. Mukherjee, Penguin Gandhi Reader

            Joan Bondurant, Conquest of Violence

 

Grading:

 

            Class participation: 25%

            Oral Reports and short papers: 25%

            Mid-term paper: 20%

            Research paper: 30%

ANS 340P • European Expansion In Asia

31800 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS 340P )
show description

This course is about the age of discovery and the overall effects of East-West contacts in the early modern period.  After a discussion of trade and cultural relations on the eve of the age of discovery, we will look at the expansion into South and Southeast Asia of the Portuguese, Dutch, British, and French from approximately 1400 to 1800, the period when European explorers, freebooters, merchants, missionaries, and administrators went to “the Indies” in search of adventure, riches, spices, souls, and power.  We will examine the backgrounds to that expansion, the technology that made it possible, the cultures that the Europeans came into contact with, the scientific and cultural repercussions of expansion, and the trade between Europe and Asia, not only of goods, but also of ideas.

Texts:

J. Abu-Lughod, Before European Hegemony

J.H. Parry, The Age of Reconnaissance

K.N. Chaudhuri, Trade & Civilization in the Indian Ocean

Metcalf & Metcalf, A Concise History of India

D.R. Sardesai, Southeast Asia: Past & Present

Grading:

Requirements for the course include the assigned readings, two map assignments, two book reports, a mid-term and a final.  Percentages for the grade:  25% for each paper, 25% for each exam.

ANS 391 • Delhi & Lucknow In Col India

31955 • Fall 2013
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as HIS 382N )
show description

(Research Seminar) The cities of Delhi and Lucknow, as centers of administration and culture, made the transition from late Mughal to British administration in the 19th century.  They witnessed the end of the old order and the coming of the new.  They were centers of the revolt in 1857.  They were both home to distinctive cultures, sometimes rivals, sometimes complementary.  They were also centers of nationalist and local politics in the 20th century.  This seminar will look at these two distinctive Indian cities from the points of view of culture, religion, literature, and politics in this time of transition from Mughal to British to nationalist regimes, with historical and documentary readings, excerpts from creative literature, travel accounts, and memoirs, and will culminate in the presentation of students’ own research topics.

 

Texts:

R.E. Frykenberg, ed., Delhi Through the Ages

Khushwant Singh, ed., An Anthology of Writings on Delhi

HK Kaul, ed., Historic Delhi: An Anthology

Narayani Gupta, Delhi Between Empires

Mir Taqi Mir, Zikr-i-Mir, tr. by CM Naim

Ralph Russell, ed., The Oxford India Ghalib

Carla Petievich, Assembly of Rivals

Violette Graff, ed. Lucknow: Memories of a City

Abdul Halim Sharrar, Guzashtah Lucknow, tr. by ES Harcourt & F. Hussain

Veena Oldenburg, The Making of Colonial Lucknow

Mutiny Narratives

 

Grading:

This graduate seminar will involve extensive readings, class discussions and short papers based on the readings, and a longer research paper.  Class participation and reports of discussions will constitute approximately 45% of the grade, and research papers approximately 55%. 

ANS 346N • Hist & Cul Of India Since 1750

31675 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 3.102
(also listed as HIS 346N )
show description

ANS 361 • Partition Of India In Hist/Lit

31700 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS 350L, ISL 372 )
show description

This is an undergraduate seminar that will examine the causes and effects of the partition of British India in 1947 into the nation states of India and Pakistan.  The Partition rivals the Holocaust as one of the most horrific events of twentieth-century history.  Hundreds of thousands lost their lives, millions lost their homes, migrations of unimaginable magnitude took place. We will read historical accounts, but also literature—some autobiographical or biographical accounts, others fictional—that capture the sense of the times.  How does the partition of India compare to other partitions (Ireland, Palestine)?  Is partition a solution to major political and cultural problems, and if so which ones?  Does it avoid civil wars? Does it create more problems and conflicts than it solves?  These are philosophical as well as political questions, and they have not gone away, since the antagonisms that were supposed to be addressed by the partition persist, and since recent events in Bosnia and Iraq once again have presented us with questions about the wisdom, or not, or partitioning countries.

 

 

Grading:

Class participation, discussion, and reports – 30%;

Two short papers – 20% each;

Final research paper – 30%. 

Texts (subject to change)

 

 

Required:

Yasmeen Khan, The Great Partition

Gyanendra Pandey, Partition Remembered

Ritu Menon & Kamla Bhasin, Borders & Boundaries

Saadat Hasan Manto, Selected Stories

ANS 346M • Muslim India Before 1750

31580 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS 346M, ISL 372, R S 341 )
show description

This course deals with the history, art and architecture, and religions of India during the period of Muslim rule, from the tenth to the eighteenth centuries.  We will look at the emigre culture of the Sultanate period (ca. 1000-1500), and the composite culture of the the Mughal period (ca. 1500-1800), paying particular attention to the interaction of Islam with Indian religions, the development of distinctive architectural and artistic forms of expression, and the ideology and form of political institutions.  Toward the end of the course, we will also look at the earliest contacts between Europe and India from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries.

 

            Requirements for the course include the assigned readings, 2 short papers, 2 map assignments, a mid-term, a slide quiz, and a take-home final essay.  Since quite a few of the lectures involve art historical materials, the midterm will involve some, and the slide quiz will be exclusively, slide identifications.  That means that class attendance is important, and that slide shows are not recreational.  Papers will be two book reports on the choice of books listed above.  See separate sheets for detailed map and paper assignments.  Due dates are summarized below. 

 

Grades are given on the plus and minus system.  Percentages for the grade:  papers: 20% & 25%; mid-term 20%; slide quiz 10%, final essay 25%.

ANS 384 • Socl/Relig Reform Mod India

31730 • Fall 2012
Meets T 400pm-700pm UTC 1.136
(also listed as HIS 382N )
show description

Religious and social reform movements in 19th and 20th century India are not only examples of the intellectual encounter between East and West, and the precursors of nationalist political activity, but they also raise a number of intriguing interpretive questions.  For example: to what degree are these movements the result of western impact, and to what degree do they derive their sources of inspiration from indigenous patterns of change and dissent?  To what degree do even the most indigenous or “traditional” of these movements embody modernizing tendencies, such as the use of technological and organizational innovations?  Also to what degree are those movements the product of the social and religious fragmentation of India, and to what degree did they contribute to (or accentuate) that fragmentation?  There is, in addition, a gender dimension to this inquiry, as most reform movements were concerned, directly or indirectly, with women’s status.

Course requirements will include extensive readings and discussion, oral reports, short written reports, and a long research paper.

Textbooks: (subject to change)

K.W. Jones, Socio-Religious Reform Movements in British India

Gail Minault, Secluded Scholars: Women’s Education and Muslim Social Reform in Colonial India (excerpts)

Other readings on blackboard.

ANS 340R • European Empires In Asia

31710 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 4.110
(also listed as HIS 340R )
show description

This course covers the great age of European empires in the 19th and 20th centuries, when European powers established their rule over much of the rest of the world.  We will look at British rule in India and the Malay peninsula, Dutch rule in Indonesia, French rule in Indochina, and American involvement in the Philippines and Vietnam.  We will also look at relations between European and local peoples in terms of cultural contact, economic exploitation, and political domination, and the results of such relationships for both the Europeans and the Asians they ruled.  The results, as we shall see, were far-reaching and are still with us today.  We will also look at the 20th-century process of decolonization, as the old reasons for imperial domination lost their force, and as new national identities emerged in Asia.

 

Textbooks (subject to change):

T. Metcalf, Ideologies of the Raj 

B. Metcalf and T. Metcalf, India: A Concise History

D.R. Sardesai, Southeast Asia: Past & Present 

D. Headrick, Tools of Empire

A selection of novels for the book reports

 

Grading:

Book reports, 25% each

Mid term, 25%

Final 25%

ANS 361 • Gandhi And Gandhism

31735 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as HIS 350L, R S 341 )
show description

            This course will begin with a biographical account of Mahatma Gandhi, and proceed from there to various interpretations of the man, his life, his philosophy, and his influence.  We will look at his role in the Indian nationalist movement, his influence on the course of race relations in South Africa, and his impact on the thought of such leaders as Martin Luther King, Jr.  We will also look at such topics as his techniques of non-violent protest, his views on women, and his economic and social impact on modern India.

Requirements for the course include the weekly readings, which will be discussed in class.  Each student will also have to give occasional oral reports in class.  Such reports will then be written up in 2-3 pp. and submitted one week following the class presentation.  There will be a mid-term paper of approximately 8 pp. (a book report), and a final research paper of approximately 15 pp.

Required texts (subject to change):

Judith Brown, Gandhi: Prisoner of Hope

MK Gandhi, Autobiography

R. Mukherjee, Penguin Gandhi Reader

Joan Bondurant, Conquest of Violence

Grading:

Class participation: 25%

Oral Reports and short papers: 25%

Mid-term paper: 20%

Research paper: 30%

 

ANS 340P • European Expansion In Asia

31460 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS 340P )
show description

ANS 391 • Delhi & Lucknow In Col India

31635 • Fall 2011
Meets W 400pm-700pm WEL 4.224
(also listed as HIS 382N )
show description

The cities of Delhi and Lucknow, as centers of administration and culture, made the transition from late Mughal to British administration in the 19th century.  They witnessed the end of the old order and the coming of the new.  They were centers of the revolt in 1857.  They were both home to distinctive cultures, sometimes rivals, sometimes complementary.  They were also centers of nationalist and local politics in the 20th century.  This seminar will look at these two distinctive Indian cities from the points of view of culture, religion, literature, and politics in this time of transition from Mughal to British to nationalist regimes, with historical and documentary readings, excerpts from creative literature, travel accounts, and memoirs, and will culminate in the presentation of students’ own research topics.

This graduate seminar will involve extensive readings, class discussions and short papers based on the readings, and a longer research paper.  Class participation and reports of discussions will constitute approximately 45% of the grade, and research papers approximately 55%.  

Readings (subject to change) will include excerpts from the following:

R.E. Frykenberg, ed., Delhi Through the Ages

Khushwant Singh, ed., An Anthology of Writings on Delhi

HK Kaul, ed., Historic Delhi: An Anthology

Narayani Gupta, Delhi Between Empires

Mir Taqi Mir, Zikr-i-Mir, tr. by CM Naim

Ralph Russell, ed., The Oxford India Ghalib

Carla Petievich, Assembly of Rivals

Violette Graff, ed. Lucknow: Memories of a City

Abdul Halim Sharrar, Guzashtah Lucknow, tr. by ES Harcourt & F. Hussain

Veena Oldenburg, The Making of Colonial Lucknow

Mutiny Narratives

 

ANS 346N • Hist & Cul Of India Since 1750

31840 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am JGB 2.102
(also listed as HIS 346N )
show description

            This course will deal with the history, culture, and politics of India during the period of British rule, the nationalist movement, and independence.  We will pay special attention to cultural ideas, the interaction of religion and politics, and the careers of a number of nationalist leaders, including Mahatma Gandhi.  Recent developments in India and Pakistan will be covered, as far as possible, at the end of the course.

            Requirements for the course include map assignments, 2 book reports, a mid-term exam and a final.  Percentages of the grade: papers 25% each, exams 25% each.

 

Textbooks (subject to change):

            Thomas and Barbara Metcalf, A Concise History of India

            Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, Modern South Asia

            Stephen Hay, ed. Sources of Indian Tradition (vol. 2)

            Zareer Masani, Indian Tales of the Raj

            A selection of novels for the book reports

 

ANS 384 • Transmissn Of Knowl In So Asia

32015 • Spring 2011
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 382N )
show description

The transmission of knowledge involves educational institutions and the contents of their curricula, to be sure, but it also involves the reproduction of belief systems, cultural values, social forms, and political structures.  In South Asia, the traditional guru-shishya or ustad-shagird system involved a personal tie between the scholar and his master, the oral transmission of knowledge, and the mastery of certain authoritative texts.  With the arrival of the British, a new system of education based on transmission via the printed word was established.  Formal curricula, standardized textbooks, and impersonal examinations became the new norm.  The contrast between these two systems was striking, and debates over their relative merits, and over the language of instruction, raged in both official circles and among the Indian literate classes for years.  These debates, the Orientalist-Anglicist controversy, were by no means settled when English was made the medium of higher education and the culture of print became firmly entrenched.  Indeed, controversies over the relative merits of Indian and western cultures, literatures, sciences, and their attendant beliefs and social structures continued throughout the colonial period and are by no means resolved today.      

            This graduate seminar will involve extensive readings, class discussions and short papers based on the readings, and a longer research paper.  Class participation and reports of discussions will constitute approximately 45% of the grade, research papers approximately 55%. 

Readings will include excerpts from the following:

Roy Mottahedeh, The Mantle of the Prophet

Bernard Cohn, Colonialism and its Forms of Knowledge

Nigel Crook, ed., The Transmission of Knowledge in South Asia

C.A. Bayly, Empire and Information

Gauri Viswanathan, Masks of Conquest

Breckenridge & Vander Veer, eds. Orientalism and the Postcolonial Predicament

David Lelyveld, Aligarh’s First Generation

Gail Minault, Secluded Scholars

 

ANS 346M • Muslim India Before 1750

30705 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS 346M, R S 341 )
show description

History and Culture of India Before 1750
Muslim India

 

History/Asian Studies 346M/RS 341 – Fall 2010                                    Gail Minault
MWF 10-11                                                                                                Office: GAR3.118

GAR 1.126

Textbooks

Required:
Catherine Asher & Cynthia Talbot, India Before Europe

Ainslie Embree, ed. Sources of Indian Tradition Vol. I (2nd edn.)

            Blair & Bloom, Islam: 1000 Years of Faith & Power

Blair & Bloom, The Art and Architecture of Islam, 1250-1800

One of the following (for the first paper):
Ross Dunn, Adventures of Ibn Battuta

Amitav Ghosh, In an Antique Land

One of the following (for the second paper):

Francois Bernier, Travels in the Mogul Empire

Babur (tr. Thackston), The Baburnama

Reserves: Other recommended readings are on e-reserves, which can be accessed at any time.  Password for the course will be given out in class. The course also has a web page with images of some of the slides I will show.  This is will be especially useful for review at the time of the midterm (slide recognition question), and for the slide quiz toward the end of the semester.  The website URL is:  http://laits.utexas.edu/muslim_india/   (note underline between muslim and india).  Links to the slides are at the bottom of that webpage.  I am also in the process of digitizing all the slides that I will show and organizing them into sets that will eventually be available on line.  So stay tuned! 

            This course will deal with the history, art and architecture, and religions of India during the period of Muslim rule, from the tenth to the eighteenth centuries.  We will look at the emigre culture of the Sultanate period (ca. 1000-1500), and the composite culture of the the Mughal period (ca. 1500-1800), paying particular attention to the interaction of Islam with Indian religions, the development of distinctive architectural and artistic forms of expression, and the ideology and form of political institutions.  Toward the end of the course, we will also look at the earliest contacts between Europe and India from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries.

            Requirements for the course include the assigned readings, 2 short papers, 2 map assignments, a mid-term, a slide quiz, and a take-home final essay.  Since quite a few of the lectures involve art historical materials, the midterm will involve some, and the slide quiz will be exclusively, slide identifications.  That means that class attendance is important, and that slide shows are not recreational.  Papers will be two book reports on the choice of books listed above.  See separate sheets for detailed map and paper assignments.  Due dates are summarized below.  Grades are given on the plus and minus system.  Percentages for the grade:  papers: 20% & 25%; mid-term 20%; slide quiz 10%, final essay 25%.  Maps are OK’d, not graded, but they count against you if not done.  If they are not OK, however, you might have to redo them.  The History Dept’s statement on plagiarism/academic dishonesty is in the e-reserves for this course.  The university has an honor code.  Take it seriously.  Be wise, don’t plagiarize. 

            I enjoy meeting my students personally and urge you to visit my office at least once during the semester.  My office is Garrison 3.118.  My office hours are MW 1:30-3; and F 1:30-3, by appointment only.  Office phone, 475-7214; Email: gminault@mail.utexas.edu  Please do not call me at home. 

 

Summary of due dates (mark your calendars):
Wednesday, Sept. 22: 1st Map
Wednesday, Sept. 29: 1st Paper
Wednesday, October 13: Midterm exam (no makeups; includes slides).
Monday, October 25: 2nd Map
Wednesday, Nov. 3: 2nd paper
Friday, Nov. 12: Slide Quiz (no makeups)
Friday, Dec. 3: Take-home essay questions will be handed out; it will be due on Wednesday, December 8, between 2:00 and 5:00 PM, which is the day and time of the final exams scheduled for this class time slot.  You may hand it in earlier, or course, but not later.  Please return it to my office (GAR 3.118) or the History Dept. office (GAR 1.104).

Please note that assignments handed in late will be penalized (see paper assignment sheet for details).  I accept medical excuses but only if you notify me of them by the due date of the assignment, with appropriate documentation.  For exams, I expect you to be here except in cases of dire emergency (usually medical).  If you have to miss an exam for any reason (religious holiday, academic trip out of town, scheduled surgery, etc.), you must notify me in advance.  For students with disabilities: Please request appropriate academic accommodation from the Divison of Diversity Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.  Do so early in the semester, so that appropriate measures can be taken before major assignments are due.   

Reading Assignments

Aug. 25 - Introduction to the Course

Aug. 27 - The Indian Milieu
            Read: Asher & Talbot, India Before Europe, pp. 1-9.

            Embree, Sources I, pp. 3-9, 29-30, 274-81.

Skim: Sources I, pp. 17-19, 20-21, 36-38, 281-96.

Recommended: Romila Thapar, “Imagined Religious Communities? Ancient History and the Modern Search for a Hindu Identity,” Modern Asian Studies 23, 2 (1989), pp. 209-31 (e-reserves).

Aug. 30 – Indian Social Structure: Caste in Theory and Practice

Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 9-18.

Embree, Sources I, pp. 203-12, 213-17, 221-23, 234-38, 242-47.

Highly recommended:  MN Srinivas, "Varna and Caste," and GS Ghurye, "Features of the Caste System," from Dipankar Gupta, ed., Social Stratification, pp. 28-48 (e-reserves).

Sept. 1 - The Religion of Islam
            Read: Blair & Bloom, Islam, 27-75.

            Recommended: B & B, Islam, pp. 18-26, 79-102.

Sept. 3 – Muslims Arrive in India

Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 18-24.

Sources I, pp. 381-91, 399-407.

B & B, Islam, pp. 103-130.

Richard Eaton, “Approaches to the Study of Conversion to Islam in India,” in R. Martin, ed. Approaches to Islam, pp. 106-123, (e-res).

Sept. 6 – Labor Day Holiday

Sept. 8 – The Delhi Sultanate I

            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 25-35.

                     B & B, Islam, pp. 130-55.

Rec:  Blair & Bloom, Art & Architecture of Islam, pp. 5-19 (not about India, but good background).

Sept. 10 - Delhi Sultanate II

Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 35-52.

            Michael Meister, "The 'Two and a Half Day' Mosque," Oriental Art (Spring 1972), e-res.
Blair & Bloom, Art & Architecture, pp. 149-56.

Sept. 13 - The Court and the Religious Establishment
            Read: Sources I, pp. 408-25, 430-46.

Rec.: Simon Digby, “The Sufi Shaikh as a Source of Authority,” in R. Eaton, India’s Islamic Traditions, pp. 234-62, e-res.

          B & B, Islam, pp.159-80.

Sept. 15 - Religious and Cultural Assimilation: Bhakti

Read:  Asher & Talbot, pp. 105-114.

            Sources I, pp. 342-78.

Rec: E. Zelliot, “A Medieval Encounter Between Hindu and Muslim,” from R. Eaton, ed., India’s Islamic Traditions, pp. 64-82, e-res.

Sept. 17 – Religious and Cultural Assimilation: Sufism

Read: Sources I, pp. 447-63, 483-89.

          PM Currie, “The Pilgrimage to Ajmer," from TN Madan, ed., Religion in India, pp. 237-47, e-res.

Rec: R. Eaton, “The Political & Religious Authority of the Shrine of Baba Farid,” from Eaton, ed., India’s Islamic Traditions, pp. 263-84, e-res.

Sept. 20 – Shi’ism in India

            Read (or review): B & B, Islam, pp. 49-75.

     AR Saiyid, "Moharram," from TN Madan, Religion in India, pp. 248-59, e-res.

Rec: Vernon Schubel, “The Nature of Shi’ism in its South Asian Context,” from his Religious Performance in Contemporary Islam, pp. 11-33, e-res.

Sept. 22 – Sikhism

            Read: Sources I, pp. 493-509.

            1st Map Assignment Due (see separate sheet)

Sept. 24 - Delhi Sultanate III – Lodhi Mosques & Tombs
            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 115-16.

Sept. 27 - Decline of Delhi and the Rise of Regional Sultanates
            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 84-105.

            Blair & Bloom, Art & Architecture, pp. 156-62.

Sept. 29 - Regional Sultanates in North India: Jaunpur and Gujarat

             1st Paper Due (see separate sheet)

Oct. 1 - Regional Sultanates in South India: The Bahmanids of the Deccan

Read: Asher and Talbot, pp. 53-83 (for the next 2 lectures).

          Richard Eaton, “The Articulaton of Islamic Space in the Medieval Deccan,” from his Essays on Islam & Indian History, pp. 159-75, e-res.

Rec:   Blair & Bloom, Art & Architecture, 36-54 (not India, but useful comparisons).

Oct. 4 - The Empire of Vijayanagar

Read: G. Michell, “Royal Architecture & Imperial Style at Vijayanagar,” from M. Juneja, ed., Architecture in Medieval India, pp. 398-412, e-res.

Oct. 6 - Regional Sultanates in South India: Successors to the Bahmanids in Bijapur and Golconda

Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 163-85.

          C. Talbot, “Inscribing the Other, Inscribing the Self: Hindu-Muslim Identities in Pre-colonial India,” from R. Eaton, India’s Islamic Traditions, pp. 83-117, e-res.

          Blair & Bloom, Art & Arch., pp. 183-98, 275 (pl. 344), 283 (pl. 356).

Oct. 8 - The Last Sultan: The Architecture of Sher Shah

            Read:  Asher & Talbot, pp. 116-123.

Oct. 11 – Review Session

Oct. 13 - Midterm Exam (no makeups; you must be here for this-- there  will be some slides)

Oct. 15 - The Great Mughals I

Read:  Asher & Talbot, 123-131.

            B & B, Islam, pp. 211-219.

Rec:  B & B, Islam, pp. 181-94, 199-208.

Oct. 18 - The Mughal Pattern of Rule
            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 144-51.

                      Sources I, pp. 425-30.

Oct. 20 - Religion at Akbar's Court

Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 129-31.

          Sources I, pp. 463-75.

          GM Graham, "Akbar and Aurangzeb: Syncretism and Separatism in Mughal India," Muslim World (1969), pp. 106-26, e-res.

Oct. 22 - The Architecture of Akbar: Fatehpur Sikri or the City of            Victory
            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 131-44.

                      Blair & Bloom, Art & Arch., pp. 266-78.

Oct. 25 - Early Mughal Painting

            Read: Blair & Bloom, Art & Arch., pp. 164-76, 287-96.
            2nd Map Assignment Due (see separate sheet)

Oct. 27 - Jahangir and the Development of Mughal Architecture and Painting

            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 152-63.

                      Blair & Bloom, Art & Arch., 176-81, 296-302. 

Oct. 29 - The Great Mughals II
            Read: Asher & Talbot, 186-207.

Rec: Satish Chandra, “Jizya and the State in India during the 17th Century,” from Eaton, India’s Islamic Traditions, pp. 133-49, e-res.

Nov. 1 - Shahjahanabad and the Perfection of the Mughal Fort and City

            Read: Blair & Bloom, Art & Arch., pp. 278-86. 

Nov. 3 - Paradise on Earth: The Taj Mahal and Other Mughal Tombs and Gardens

            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 225-231.

            2nd paper due (see separate sheet)

Nov. 5 - Religious Reform and Reaction

            Read: Sources I, pp. 428-30, 475-83.

Rec:  Irfan Habib, "The Political Role of Shaikh Ahmad                                     Sirhindi and Shah Waliullah," Enquiry (1964), pp. 333-55, e-res.

Nov. 8 - Aurangzeb and the Decline of Mughal India

            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 231-244.

         Athar Ali, "The Passing of Empire," Modern Asian Studies (July 1975),

            pp. 385-96, e-res.

Rec: MN Pearson, "Shivaji and the Decline of the Mughal Empire," Jl. of Asian Studies (Feb. 1976), pp. 221-35, e-res.

Nov. 10 – Review Session

Nov. 12 - Slide Quiz (No makeups, obviously)

Nov. 15 – Mughal Literature: Persian and the Emergence of Urdu

Rec:  Ralph Russell, "The Pursuit of the Urdu Ghazal," Jl. of Asian Studies (Nov. 1969), pp. 107-24, e-res.

Nov. 17 & 19 - Eighteenth Century India: Rise of Regional Kingdoms

Read:Asher & Talbot, 244-55.

Rec: B & B, Islam, pp. 221-39.

Nov. 22 - The Beginnings of European Trade and Influence: Portuguese and Dutch

            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 256-91 (for this and the lectures of 11/29 & 12/1)

                      Blair & Bloom, Art & Arch., pp. 303-09.

Nov. 24 - Rajput Fortresses and Palaces
            Read: Asher & Talbot, pp. 207-224.

Nov. 26 – Thanksgiving Holiday

Nov. 29 – The Beginnings of European Trade & Influence: British and French

Dec. 1 - Late 18th Century – The Contest for Control

Dec. 3 - Final Discussion and Review

 NB: Final essay questions will be handed out.  They will be due on Wednesday, December 8, between 2 and 5 PM (which is the date and hour for the exam for this class time), NO LATER.  Please hand them in at the History Dept. office: Garrison 1.104, or my office: Garrison 3.118. 

This course contains a Global Cultures flag.

ANS 361 • Partition Of India In Hist/Lit

30730 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as HIS 350L, ISL 372 )
show description

The Partition of India in History and Literature

 

History 350L/ Asian Studies 361/ ISL 371 – Fall ‘10                        Gail Minault

GAR 2.128                                                                                      GAR 3.118           

MW 3-4:30

 

Textbooks

Required:
Yasmeen Khan, The Great Partition
Gyanendra Pandey, Partition Remembered
Ritu Menon & Kamla Bhasin, Borders & Boundaries
Saadat Hasan Manto, Selected Stories

Choose one of the following:
Ahmad Salim, ed., Lahore 1947
Urvashi Butalia, The Other Side of Silence

Choose one of the following:
Bapsi Sidhwa, Cracking India
S. Cowasjee & KS Duggal, eds., Orphans of the Storm
Khushwant Singh, Train to Pakistan

In addition to the textbooks, there will be readings on the e-reserves.  Password will be given out in class.

            This is an undergraduate seminar that will examine the causes and effects of the partition of British India in 1947 into the nation states of India and Pakistan.   The Partition rivals the Holocaust as one of the most horrific events of twentieth-century history.  Hundreds of thousands lost their lives, millions lost their homes, migrations of unimaginable magnitude took place.  It is important to understand the backgrounds and reason for the partition, but also to consider its effects on the lives of the people involved.  For that, historians need to use sources imaginatively.  The accounts of government documents and even eye-witnesses may not be enough; imaginative literature helps fill in the gaps in understanding the emotional impact of these events on people’s lives.  So we will read historical accounts, but also literature—some autobiographical or biographical accounts, others fictional—that capture the sense of the times.  I will also try to arrange some films, because cinema also helps capture both the horror and the momentousness of these events.

            We will also discuss the phenomenon of partition more generally.  How does the partition of India compare to other partitions (Ireland, Palestine)?  Is partition a solution to major political and cultural problems, and if so which ones?  Does it avoid civil wars?  Does it create more problems and conflicts than it solves?  These are philosophical as well as political questions, and they have not gone away, since the antagonisms that were supposed to be addressed by the partition persist, and since recent events in Bosnia and Iraq once again have presented us with questions about the wisdom, or not, or partitioning countries.   We will doubtless have lots to talk about

            That brings us to the requirements and procedures for the course.  This is a discussion and writing course, not a lecture course.  You are here to participate and to share your ideas on the readings.  I am here to act as a moderator of the discussions and as an editor and commentator on your papers, in order to help you write better.  You will give the occasional oral report, and help lead discussions in the class, and write several papers (details or separate sheet).  However, in order to insure that the class is fruitful for everyone, you must do the readings and turn up.  I will take attendance, and more than three absences over the course of the semester will lead to a reduced grade. Grading is on the plus and minus system.  Grade percentages:  Class participation, discussion, and reports - 30%; two short papers (on the selections listed above) – 20% each; final research paper – 30%.  The Hiostyr Dept’s statement on plagiarism/academic dishonesty is in the e-reserves for the course.  The university has an honor code.  Take it seriously.  Be wise; don’t plagiarize. 

            I enjoy meeting my students personally and urge you to visit my office during office hours at least once during the semester, especially to discuss your research project for the final paper.   My office is GAR 3.118; phone # 475-7214; email: gminault@mail.utexas.edu .  Office hours: MW 1:30-3, or F 1:30-3 by appointment.

Summary of due dates:

            Wednesday, Sept. 22: 1st book report
            Wednesday Oct. 13: Research topic due
            Monday, Oct. 25: 2nd book report

            Monday Nov. 1: Preliminary research bibliographies due.

            Nov. 15, 17, 22, & 29 – Oral class presentations of research projects

Monday, December 6: Research paper due

Please note that assignments handed in late will be penalized (see paper assignment sheet for details).  I accept medical excuses, but only if you notify me of them by the due date of the assignment, with documentation.  For students with disabilities:  Please request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.  Do so early in the semester, so that appropriate measures can be taken before major assignments are due. 

 

Reading assignments

August 25 - Introduction to the Course

Aug. 30 – Partition: Historical Background

Read:  Yasmeen Khan, The Great Partition, pp. 1-39.
Gyanendra Pandey, Remembering Partition, pp. 1-20.

Discussion leader: ______________

Sept. 1 – Partition: Historical Background II

Read:  Khan, Great Partition, pp. 40-62.
Pandey, Remembering Partition, pp. 21-44.
TG Fraser, Partition in Ireland, India, & Palestine, pp. 1-19 (e-res).
Faiz Ahmad Faiz, “Freedom’s Dawn,” tr. by VG Kiernan (handout)

Discussion leader: _______________

Sept. 6 – Labor Day Holiday

Sept. 8 – Partition Considered – The Role of the Leader

Read:  Khan, Great Partition,  pp. 63-103.

Fraser, Partition…, pp. 68-92 (e-res).
Mushirul Hasan, ed., India’s Partition, pp. 44-58, 159-95 (e-res).
Excerpt from Jinnah’s speech of Aug. 11, 1947, Sources of Indian Tradition, vol. 2, pp. 384-87 (e-res).

Discussion leader: ________________

Sept. 13 – Partition Considered II – High Politics and the View from the Street

Read:   Khan, Great Partition, pp. 104-42.

Fraser, Partition…, pp. 92-129 (e-res).
Hasan, India’s Partition, pp. 101-31, 390-95 (e-res).

Discussion Leader: _______________

Sept. 15 – Questions of History - The Portrayal of Violence

Read:  Khan, Gt. Partition,  pp. 143-66.

Pandey, Remembering Partition, pp. 45-66.

Manto, Stories, pp.  

Discusssion leader: ______________

Sept. 20 – Questions of History II – The Evidence of Memory

Read:   Khan, pp. 167-85.

Pandey, pp. 67-91.

Manto, Stories, pp.   

Discusssion leader: _______________

Sept. 22 – lst Paper due (Lahore 1947 or Other Side of Silence)

Read: Manto, Stories, pp.

Continuation of Monday’s discussion.

Sept. 27 – Questions of History III – The Search for Narrative

Read:  Khan, pp. 186-210.

David Gilmartin, “Partition, Pakistan, and South Asian History: In Search of a Narrative,” Jl. of Asian Studies, 57: 4 (Nov. 1998), 1068-95 (e-res).

Discussion leader: _______________

Sept. 29 – Questions of History IV – The Strength of Literature

Read: Ian Talbot, “Literature and the Human Drama of the 1947 Partition,” South Asian Studies, 18 (1995), pp. 37-56 (e-res).
Jason Francisco, “In the Heat of Fratricide…,”Annl. of Urdu Studies, 11 (1996), pp. 227-50 (e-res.).

Discussion leader: _______________

Oct. 4 – Mass Mobilization

Read for this week: Mushirul Hasan, India’s Partition, pp. 132-58 (e-res).
Ian Talbot, Freedom’s Cry, pp. 23-58 (e-res).
Pandey, Remembering Partition, pp. 92-120.
Minault, “Urdu Political Poetry…,” Modern Asian Studies, 8: 4 (1974), pp. 459-71 (e-res).

Discussion leader: ________________

Oct. 6 – Continuation of Monday’s discussion

Discussion leader: ______________

Oct. 11 – Punjab and Delhi

Read for this week: Hasan, India’s Partition, pp. 196-229.
Pandey, pp. 121-51.

            Vazira Zamindar, The Long Partition, pp. 19-44; 45-76 (e-res).

Discussion leader: _________________

Oct. 13 – Continuation of Monday’s discussion

Discussion leader: __________________

Note: Research topics for final papers due.

Oct. 18 – Bengal

Read for this week: Hasan, pp. 254-73, (e-res).
Dipesh Chakrabarty, “Remembered Villages: Representations of Hindu-Bengali Memories in the Aftermath of the Partition,” South Asia, 18 (1995), pp. 109-29 (e-res).

Discussion leader: _________________

Oct. 20 – Continuation of Monday’s discussion

Optional:  Hasan, pp. 274-317 (e-res).
Discussion leader: __________________

Oct. 25 – 2nd Paper due (novels, short stories) – see separate sheet
Film: “Khamosh Pani,” plus discussion

Oct. 27 – Partition and Women I

Read:  Ritu Menon & Kamla Bhasin, Borders and Boundaries, pp. x-64.

Discussion leader: _________________

Nov. 1 – Partition and Women II

Read:  Pandey, pp. 152-74.

Discussion leader: _________________

Note: Preliminary bibliographies due for research papers; think about signing up for your oral presentation.

Nov. 3 – Partition and Women III
Read: Menon & Bhasin, pp. 66-165.
Discussion leader: _________________

Nov. 8 - Partition and Women IV

Read:  Menon & Bhasin, pp. 168-260.

Discussion leader: _________________

Nov. 10 – Community Identity

Read: Pandey, pp. 175-205.

Discussion leader: ________________

Nov. 15, 17, 22, & 29 – Student presentations of research projects

            Sign ups: 11/15___________________________

 

Nov. 24 – No class – Thanksgiving Holiday

Nov. 27, 29, and Dec. 4 – Student presentations of research projects

            Sign ups:  11/17: _______________________________________

                             11/22: ________________________________________
                 11/29: _________________________________________

Dec. 1 – Class dinner party at my house

            Time TBA

NB: Final research papers will be due, Monday, Dec.6, by 5 PM at my office (GAR 3.118) or the History Dept. main office (GAR 1.104).

This course contains a Writing and a Global Cultures Flag.

ANS 340R • European Empires In Asia

30920 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 WAG 214
(also listed as HIS 340R )
show description

History 340R and ANS 340R- European Empires in Asia

Unique #s  HIS 39550, ANS 30920                                                   Gail Minault

MWF 10-11, WAG 214

Textbooks

Required:
Barbara Metcalf & Thomas Metcalf, A Concise History of India
D.R. Sardesai, Southeast Asia: Past & Present (5th or 6th edn.) – pp. for both edns. are listed in the syllabus
Daniel Headrick, Tools of Empire 
Thomas Metcalf, Ideologies of the Raj
Bernard Porter, The Lion’s Share  (4th edn.)
Thomson, Stanley, and Perry, Sentimental Imperialists (on e-reserves)

One of the following:
Rudyard Kipling, Kim
E.M. Forster, A Passage to India
George Orwell, Burmese Days
J.G. Farrell, Siege of Krishnapur

One of the following:
Multatuli (Edward Douwes Dekker), Max Havelaar
Pramoedya Ananta Toer, This Earth of Mankind
Y.B. Magunvijaya, Durga! Umayi
Graham Greene, The Quiet American
Outline Maps of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka) and Southeast Asia (Indonesia) for the map assignments are also available at the Co-op.

History 340R covers the great age of European empires in the 19th and 20th centuries, when European powers established their rule over much of the rest of the world.  We will look at British rule in India and Malaya, Dutch rule in Indonesia, French rule in Indochina, and American involvement in the Philippines and Vietnam.  We will also look at relations between Europeans and local peoples in terms of cultural contact, economic exploitation, and political domination, and the results of such relationships for both the Europeans and the Asians they ruled.  The results, as we shall see, were far-reaching and are still with us today.  We will also look at the 20th-century process of decolonization, as the old reasons for imperial domination lost their force, and as new national identities emerged in Asia.

Requirements for the course include the assigned readings, 2 map assignments, 2 book reports, a mid-term exam, and a final take-home essay.  For specific directions concerning book reports and map assignments, see separate sheets.  Some readings will be on e-reserves (Password: Empireasia).  If you have never used the e-reserves, don’t hesitate to ask for help.  I welcome and appreciate questions in class.  If you prefer, you may ask questions after class that I can address at the beginning of the next class.  I enjoy meeting my students personally and urge you to visit my office at least once during the semester.  My office is Garrison 3.118.  Office hours: M 1:30-3:00, W 2:00-4:00 or by appointment.  Phone: 475-7214, or email: gminault@mail.utexas.edu The TA for the course is Aarti Bhalodia.  Her email is: bhalodia@mail.utexas.edu  – Her office is Burdine 308.  Office hours:  MW 11-12:30. or by appointment.

Grading will be on the basis of the new system of pluses and minuses.   The final grade will be computed on the basis of 25% for each written assignment, i.e.: 50% for the papers and 50% for the exams, with some allowance for improvement.  Map assignments are OK’d, not graded.  They count against you if they are not done. 

Summary of due dates:

Feb. 3 - First Map Assignment
Feb. 15 - Second Map Assignment
March 5 - Hour Exam (No Makeups)
March 26 - First Book Report
April 23 - Second Book Report

Final Exam:  Take-home essay will be handed out on the last day of class, May 7, and it will be due on Monday May 17, 9:00-12:00 Noon, the date and hour of the regularly scheduled exam for this class hour. 

Please note that assignments handed in late will be penalized (see paper assignment sheet for details).  I accept medical excuses, but only if you notify me of them by the due date of the assignment.  For exams, I expect you to be here except in cases of dire emergency (medical usually).  I you have to miss an exam for any reason, you must notify me in advance.  For students with disabilities: Please request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.  Do so early in the semester, so that appropriate measures can be taken before major assignments are due. 

Reading Assignments

 

Jan. 20 - Introduction to the Course

Jan. 22 - Background: The Age of Exploration
Read: Metcalf & Metcalf, Concise History of India [M&M], pp. 1-27.

                       Porter, Lion’s Share, pp. 1-12.

Jan. 25 - Background: The Age of Trade
Read: M&M, pp. 28-49.
          Metcalf, Ideologies, pp. 1-6.

I. 19th Century Empires in South and Southeast Asia: The British, the Dutch and the French

Jan. 27 - Anglo-French Rivalry and Territorial Conquest in India
Read: M&M, pp. 49-67.
          Metcalf, Ideologies, pp. 6-15.

Jan. 29 - Orientalism and Romanticism: The Adventure of Empire
Read: M&M, pp. 67-80.

                      Metcalf, Ideologies, pp. 15-27.

Feb. 1 - Utilitarianism and Evangelicalism: The Justification of Empire
Read: M&M, pp. 80-90.
          Metcalf, Ideologies, pp. 28-43.

Feb. 3 - The Industrial Revolution: The Nuts and Bolts of Empire
Read: Headrick, Tools, pp. 3-42.

            First Map Assignment Due - see separate sheet

Feb. 5 - The Opium Trade as a Pillar of Empire
            Read: Porter, Lion’s Share, pp. 13-38.

                      Headrick, pp. 43-57; [Recommended: pp. 58-79].

                      Thomson, et al, Sentimental Imperialists, pp. 31-43.

Feb. 8-10, 12-15 - European Rivalries in Southeast Asia (4 lectures)

Read: Porter, pp. 67-75.

          Sardesai, Southeast Asia, [5th edn: pp. 58-70, 78-81, 87-109, 125-32, 140-41]; 6th edn.:  pp. 54-65, 73-75, 79-100, 114-20, 122, 129-30.

Second Map Assignment Due Feb. 15 - see separate sheet

Feb. 17 - The Indian Mutiny of 1857

            Read: M&M, pp. 99-122.

                      Headrick, pp. 83-104; [recommended: pp. 105-26].

                      Metcalf, Ideologies, pp. 43-65.

Feb. 19 - The Aftermath of Revolt: British Policy in India in the late 19th century

            Read: M&M, pp. 123-37.

                      Porter, pp. 39-57.

                      Metcalf, Ideologies, pp. 66-92.

Feb. 22 - The Tools of Empire
Read: Porter, pp. 81-100, 116-22.

                      Headrick, pp. 129-91, 204-10, [rec: 192-203].

Feb. 24 - The White Man’s Burden: The Psychology of Empire
Read: Porter, pp. 123-52.
          Sentimental Imp’lists, pp. 4-30.

                      Metcalf, Ideologies, pp. 92-131 (for next 3 lectures).

Feb. 26 - The Civilizing Mission: The Pedagogy of Empire
Read: Sent. Imp’lists, pp. 44-60, 93-105.

Mar. 1 - Victorian Liberalism and Reform: The Conscience of Empire
Read: M&M, pp. 137-64.

                      Porter, pp. 153-65, 182-204, 209-16.

Mar. 3 - Review

Mar. 5 - Hour Exam (No Makeups - you must be here for this)

 

II. 20th Century Empires: Perplexity, Disillusionment, and Dissolution

March 8-10 - Nationalism and the Changing Social Order in India (2 lectures)

      Read: M&M, pp. 165-99.

                Porter, pp. 222-50.

                Metcalf, Ideologies,  pp. 132-71.

March 12 – Film: Gandhi Biography

SPRING BREAK

March 22-24-26 & 29 – Indian Nationalism (cont.):  India Wins Freedom and Partition (4 lectures)

            Read: M&M, pp. 200-226.
          Porter, pp. 251-57, 290-305.
          Metcalf, Ideologies, pp. 171-234.

            Note: March 26 - First Book Report Due - see separate sheet

March 31 & April 5 - Declining Imperial Order in SE Asia (2 lectures)
Read: Sardesai, [5th edn: pp. 145-75]; 6th edn: pp. 131-59.
          Porter, pp. 305-25.

                      Sent. Imp’lists, pp. 106-20.

April 2 - Film: Nehru Dynasty I

April 7-9, & 12 - Early Nationalism in SE Asia (3 lectures)
Read: Sardesai, [5th edn: pp. 187-205]; 6th edn: pp. 170-86.

                      Sent. Implists, pp. 121-33, 148-75.

April 14 & 19 - Aftermath of War and the Winning of Independence in SE Asia (2 lectures)

            Read: Porter, pp. 326-50.

                      Sardesai, [5th edn: pp. 272-97, 298-324]; 6th edn: pp. 255-82; 283-309.

                      Sent. Implists, pp. 190-202.

April 16 - Film: Nehru Dynasty II
Read: M&M, pp. 227-59.

April 21, 26-28 - Dilemmas of the Post-Imperial Age in Independent Asian Nations (3 lectures)

Read: M&M, pp. 260-95.
          Sardesai, [5th edn: pp. 209-36, 330-46]; 6th edn: pp. 187-216, 314-28.

                      Sent. Imp’lists, pp. 217-34, 253-67.

April 23 - Film: “In Our Image: The US and the Philippines”
Second Book Report Due - see separate sheet

April 30, May 3-5 - The New Imperialism?  US Policy in S and SE Asia (3 lectures)
Read: Sardesai, [5th edn: pp. 347-83]; 6th edn: pp. 329-76.

                      Sent. Implists, pp. 268-75, 306-11.

                      Porter, pp. 351-70.

May 7 - Final Discussion and Review

            Take-home exam will be handed out, so be sure to be here.

The exam is due on Monday, May 17, 9:00- Noon, which is the date and time of the regularly scheduled exam for this class time, NO LATER.  You may, of course, hand it in earlier, either to my office or to the History Dept. office, Garrison 1.104.

ANS 390 • Intel Hist Indo-Iran Islam

31100 • Spring 2010
Meets W 400pm-700pm CBA 4.346
show description

Study of various Asian studies-related topics that do not focus on any single geographic region.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 361 • Women In S Asian Societies-W

31115 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 300pm-430pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as HIS 350L, ISL 372, WGS 340 )
show description

Women in South Asian Societies

His 350L/ANS 361/WGS 340/ISL 371
Gail Minault
MW 3:00-4:30
GAR 2. 128

Textbooks

Required:
Geraldine Forbes, Women in Modern India

Kumkum Sangari & Sudesh Vaid, eds., Recasting Women: Essays in Colonial History

Ritu Menon & Kamla Bhasin, Borders and Boundaries

Syeda Hameed, ed., They Hang: 12 Women in My Portrait Gallery

One of the following:
Sara Suleri, Meatless Days
Meena Alexander, Fault Lines (new edn.)

Women in South Asian Societies is an interdisciplinary seminar that will deal with the history, social and political roles, and contemporary problems of women in South Asia. We will study the changes that have occurred in women's lives as a result of historical forces in the 19th and 20th centuries: colonialism, social and religious reform movements, and the roles of women in the movement for independence from colonial rule and partition. We will also attempt to assess the status and roles of women in contemporary South Asian societies, with special emphasis on women's struggles for economic and legal rights, and the problem of violence toward women. Secondary readings will be supplemented occasionally with the testimony of women themselves. Indeed, many of the books for the course combine a variety of sources, and we will have ample discussion concerning the different viewpoints represented.

Requirements for the course include the required readings, which we will discuss in class, and several writing assignments of different lengths (see below). For each class there will be readings from the texts and occasional supplemental readings, either in the form of handouts, or on e-reserve. For each class, a student will be designated discussion leader. The discussions leaders will pose questions, call on people, try to get the quiet ones to speak up, and summarize the points discussed. S/he will then write up a (brilliant and pithy) short report on the readings and the discussion, to be handed in one week later. If you are the designated leader, it goes without saying that you must_ come to class that day. I expect those _not_ designated leaders for the day (a) to have done the readings and (b) to participate in the discussion. Non-discussants will also write up short response papers every week on the readings. See a separate sheet for details on the writing assignments and discussion techniques.

The writing assignments include a book report of approx. 6 pp. on one of the choice of autobiographies listed above, due *Oct. 5*; and a research paper of approx. 15 pp. that will be due on *Dec. 4*. The latter can be on any topic covered in the class that appeals to you or about which you would like to know more. I would like to know your topic by *Oct. 28* so that we can discuss bibliography, and then have your preliminary bibliography by *Nov. 4*. Each student will have to present her research topic in class during the last few weeks of the course. For fuller details on the writing assignments, see a separate sheet. Percentages for the grade: class participation 10%, discussion  leading and report 15%, response papers (collectively) 15 %, book report 20%, research paper, including oral presentation 40%.

*Attendance*: I will take attendance in this class, and any more than *three* absences will be cause for lowering your grade. Seminars thrive on discussion and the only way to have good discussions is for everyone to turn up and participate. On the other hand, if you come down with swine flu, stay home. Get a note from the Student Health Center or your doctor to receive a medical excuse.

I hope that, from our discussions in class, we will get to know one another, but I also enjoy meeting my students personally and urge you to visit my office at least once during the semester. My office is Garrison 3.118, and my office hours are MW 1:30-3, or by appointment on Fridays, 1:30-3. Office phone 475-7214. Please do not call me at home, email instead: gminault@mail.utexas.edu

Course Outline and Reading Assignments

Aug. 26 - Introduction to the Course

Aug. 31 - Indian Women in Myth, Epic, and Religious Thought
Read: Kumkum Roy, "The King's Household: Structure and Space in the Shastric Tradition," from Sangari & Chakravarti, eds. From Myths to Markets. pp. 18-38 (e-reserve).
Tales of Ancient India, excerpts (hand out, also e-reserves).

Sept. 2 & 9 - Indian Women in the Traditional Indian Family (Urban)

*Note*: Sept. 7 - Labor Day Holiday

Read for 9/2: Sangari & Vaid, "Introduction;" to Sangari & Vaid, Recasting, pp. 1-25.
Tanika Sarkar, "A Book of Her Own, A Life of Her Own," from Sangari & Chakravarti, Myths to Markets, pp. 85-124 (e-reserve).

For 9/9: Gail Minault, Secluded Scholars, ch. I, pp. 14-57 (e-reserve).
Sept. 14-16 - Indian Women in the Traditional Indian Family (Rural)

Film on 9/14: "Dadi's Family." Discussion of film

Read for 9/16: Prem Chowdhry, "Customs in a Peasant Economy," in Sangari & Vaid, pp. 302-37 (see next p. for more).
Helen Gideon, "A Baby is Born in the Punjab," Amn. Anthropologist, 64/6 (Dec. 1962): 1220-1234. (e-reserve).
Doranne Jacobson, "Purdah: Life Behind the Veil," Natl. Geographic, 152/2 (Aug. 1977): 270-286 (e-reserve).

Sept. 21-23 - Women in 19th Century India: Colonial Debates over Women's Status and Reform

Read for 9/21: Geraldine Forbes, Women in Modern India, pp. 1-31.

for 9/23: Lata Mani, "Contentious Traditions," in Sangari and Vaid, Recasting, pp. 88-126, and
Ram Mohan Roy, "In Defense of Hindu Women" (e-reserve).

Sept. 28-30 - Women in Colonial India: Debates over Education

Read for 9/28: Forbes, Women, pp. 32-63.
Sumanta Banerjee, "Marginalization of Women's Popular Culture in 19th Century Bengal," Recasting, pp. 127-179.

Read for 9/30: Gail Minault, Secluded Scholars, pp. 58-104 (e-reserve).

Oct. 5-7 - Women and the Press: Writings for and by Women

*1st paper due Oct. 5 *(see separate sheet for details).

Read for 10/5: Vir Talwar, "Feminist Consciousness in Women's Journals in
Hindi,"Recasting, pp. 204-232.

Read for 10/7: Minault, Secluded, pp. 105-157 (e-reserve).

Oct. 12-14 - Early Women's Movements

Read for 10/12: Forbes, Women, pp. 64-120.
Partha Chatterjee, "The Nationalist Resolution of the Women's Question," Recasting, pp. 233-53.

Read for 10/14: Minault, Secluded, pp. 215-266 (e-reserve).

Oct. 19-21 - Women and Nationalism

Read for 10/19: Forbes, Women, pp. 121-56, 189-222.

Read for 10/21: Minault, pp. 267-308 (e-reserve).

Oct. 26-28 - Women, Independence and Partition

*Note:* Research topics due Oct. 28.

Read for 10/26: Forbes, Women, pp. 223-254.

Readfor 10/28: Ritu Menon & Kamla Bhasin, Borders and Boundaries, pp. 3-165.

Nov. 2-4 - Working Women in Colonial and Post-Colonial India

*Note*: Preliminary bibliographies due Nov. 4

Read for 11/2: Forbes, Women, pp. 157-88.
Nirmala Banerjee, "Working Women in Colonial Bengal," in Recasting, pp. 269-301.

Read for 11/4: Vasanta Kanabiran & K. Lalitha, "That Magic Time," in Recasting, pp. 180-203.

Nov. 9-11 - Women and Violence

Read for 11/9: Menon & Bhasin, Borders, pp. 168-260.

Read for 11/11: Hameed, They Hang.

Nov. 16-18, 23, 25, and 30: Students' presentations of research projects; final
discussion and evaluation.

Dec. 2: Class party at my home (12/2); time TBA.

*Research papers due, Dec. 4.

ANS 384 • Socl/Relig Reform Mod India

30635 • Spring 2009
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 1.134
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Study of various aspects and periods of South Asian culture and society.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

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