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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Nancy K. Stalker

Associate Professor Ph.D., 2002, Stanford University

Nancy K. Stalker

Contact

Biography

Research interests

Professor Stalker's scholarship examines the relationship between cultural and religious practice and national identity in modern Japan. Her first book, on new religious movements in the 1920s-30s, is entitled Prophet Motive: Deguchi Onisaburo, Oomoto and the Rise of New Religions in Imperial Japan. Her next monographic project will examine the role of ikebana, the art of flower arrangement, in constructing national and international Japanese identity in the twentieth century, especially focusing on its rapid expansion in postwar Japan from the 1950s-70s.  Other research interests include the conception of traditional Japanese cuisine and gender ideology. 

Courses taught

Introduction to Japan; Modern Japan; History of Japanese Religions; History of Religions of Asia; Religion and Rebellion in Modern East Asia;  War and Defeat in Japanese History and Memory; Imperial Japan; Readings in Modern East Asia;

Awards/Honors

Professor Stalker has won research fellowships from the Fullbright Association; the Japan Foundation, Yale University Council on East Asian Studies, Dartmouth College Humanities Institute, Stanford University Institute of International Studies (Stanford University), A.W. Mellon and Hosei University International scholars. 

Interests

20th-century cultural history, new religious movements, gender

ANS 383 • Japan: Histories Of Culture

32012 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 400pm-700pm CMA 3.108
(also listed as HIS 382N, WGS 393 )
show description

This graduate seminar examines interdisciplinary studies in the history of Japanese culture.  Readings will proceed roughly chronologically, primarily focusing on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and will address such themes as cultural industries, cultural nationalism, gender, mass media representations of culture, and globalization.

ANS F341M • Imperial Japan

81860 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 400pm-530pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS F341M )
show description

Japan from the Meiji transformation through war, defeat, and occupation.   Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

ANS 372 • Gender & Sexuality In Japan

32210 • Spring 2014
Meets T 430pm-730pm BEN 1.102
(also listed as HIS 364G, WGS 340 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 379 • Cuisine And Culture In Asia

31915 • Fall 2013
Meets M 500pm-800pm WCH 4.118
show description

May be repeated for credit when topics vary.  Asian Studies 378 and 379 may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: For Asian studies and Asian cultures and languages majors, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in Asian studies or Asian languages; for others, upper-division standing.

ANS F341M • Imperial Japan

82105 • Summer 2013
Meets MT 400pm-700pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS F341M )
show description

Japan from the Meiji transformation through war, defeat, and occupation.   Prerequisite: upper-division standing.

ANS 341M • Imperial Japan

31670 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 112
(also listed as HIS 341M )
show description

This course covers Japanese history from the mid 19th century to the mid 20th century.  During this period Japan experienced rapid change, a transformation from a feudal, agrarian country into a modern nation-state and economic superpower.  The class format will include lectures, discussions and films.  Lectures and the textbook will provide historical context for the additional reading assignments, which include historical documents, short stories and fiction, oral histories and other forms of nonfiction that address social and cultural experiences.  Films will include both documentaries and narrative accounts of historical events.  

ANS 372 • Gender And Sexuality In Japan

31725 • Spring 2013
Meets T 300pm-600pm JES A218A
(also listed as HIS 364G, WGS 340 )
show description

This course examines gender and sexuality in Japan during the classical (Heian), early modern (Tokugawa or Edo) and modern periods.  We will consider the construction and representation of feminine and masculine gender and sexuality, both normative and otherwise.  In addition to introducing important theoretical issues and intellectual frameworks that underpin the study of gender we will employ a wide variety of sources including Japanese primary sources in English translation such as novellas and films and secondary works in Japanese history, literature and anthropology.  We will adopt a historical approach that considers how forms of gender and sexual expression are represented in Heian and Edo literature, how they are promoted, policed and prohibited by the modern Meiji state (1868-1912) and how cosmopolitanism in the Taisho and early Showa periods influence their construction.  We will continue examining culturally and historically specific categories of gender and sexuality through the postwar and contemporary periods. 

Sample of Proposed Readings:

Barbara Molony and Kathleen Uno, editors, Gendering Modern Japanese History (Harvard 2008)

Sabine Fruhstuck and Anne Walthall, editors, Recreating Japanese Men (University of California 2011)

Janet Goodwin, Selling Songs and Smiles:  The Sex Trade in Heian and Kamakura Japan

(University of Hawaii, 2007)

Jennifer Robertson, Takarazuka: Sexual Politics and Popular Culture in Modern Japan

(University of California Press, 1998)

Course Reader containing short stories, plays, academic articles and book chapters

 

Grading Basis

Course Participation and Attendance: 30%

Weekly Reading Responses: 40%

Final Research Paper: 30%

ANS 302J • Introduction To Japan

31550 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 112
show description

This course is aimed at providing a broad-based introduction to Japanese history, society and culture, beginning with prehistoric times and continuing to present.  We will follow a chronological format, focusing on understanding how Japanese who lived in different historical periods created particular political, social and cultural systems to realize their beliefs and values.  In addition to the main textbook, course materials will include literature, historical documents, art, and film. 

ANS 379 • Cuisine And Culture In Asia

31680 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm BEN 1.118
show description

This interdisciplinary senior seminar explores historical, cultural, economic, and geopolitical aspects of food in Asian culture.  Food is common to all humankind, but different varieties of foods or cuisine also serve to identify nations, religious groups, classes/castes and other communities, marking boundaries between ourselves and “Others.” Topics include: the relationship between food and national identity and between food and imperialism/colonialism.  We will read histories and ethnographies of representative Asian foods; analyze gender and class dimensions of food; examine the health claims of certain Asian cuisines; and read culinary memoirs and accounts of culinary travel. 

ANS 341M • Imperial Japan

30700 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 1.130
(also listed as HIS 341M )
show description

This course covers Japanese history from the mid 19th century to the mid 20th century.  During this period Japan experienced rapid change, a transformation from a feudal, agrarian country into a modern nation-state and economic superpower.  The class format will include lectures, discussions and films.  Lectures and the textbook will provide historical context for the additional reading assignments, which include historical documents, short stories and fiction, oral histories and other forms of nonfiction that  address social and cultural experiences. 

TEXTS:

Peter Duus, Modern Japan
Peter Duus, The Japanese Discovery of America
Tanizaki Junichiro, Some Prefer Nettles
Course packet

GRADING:

Midterm 35%
Book Review 20%
Final 45%


This course contains a Global Cultures flag.

ANS 378 • Senior Seminar In Asian Stds

30795 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WCH 4.118
show description

Today the restaurants and supermarkets of American urban centers include an unprecedented array of exotic dishes and ingredients from the diverse cuisines of East, South and Southeast Asia.  How do history, race, religion, environmental, geographical, and social factors all influence which foods are eaten?  How do food habits mark class and ethnic identity? In this course, students will begin to understand the relationship between history, culture, and cuisine in China, Japan, Korea, India, and, to a lesser extent, countries in Southeast Asia like Thailand and Vietnam.

 
This senior seminar will explore various themes related to food preparation, distribution and consumption in the shaping of modern Asian societies.   Some of these themes include:  gender, family and food; food identity politics and nationalism; the political economy of food; immigration, diaspora and cuisine; globalization of food brands and fast food outlets; food aesthetics; food, tourism and travel; and representations of Asian food in film.  Course materials will come from a wide array of sources--academic and popular monographs and articles about food and cuisine, cookbooks, travel memoirs, novels,and films.

Sample of Proposed Readings:
 Carole Counihan and Penny Van Esterik, Food and Culture: a reader.  (Routledge 2008)
 
Fuschia Dunlop, Shark’s Fin and Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet-Sour Memoir of Eating in China (WW Norton, 2009)
 
Michael Ashkenazi and Jeanne Jacob, The Essence of Japanese Cuisine: An Essay on Food and Culture (University of Pennsylvania, 2000)
 
Sidney Cheung and Chee-beng Tan, Food and foodways in Asia : resource, tradition and cooking (Routledge 2009)

Readings on Blackboard - including articles, primary sources and book chapters
 
Grading Basis
 
Course Participation and Attendance: 30%
Reading Diary and Class Assignments: 30%
Final Research Paper: 40%

ANS 341M • Imperial Japan

81855 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 400pm-530pm GEA 114
(also listed as HIS 341M )
show description

This course covers Japanese history from the mid 19th century to the mid 20th century.  During this period Japan experienced rapid change, a transformation from a feudal, agrarian country into a modern nation-state and economic superpower.  The class format will include lectures, discussions and films.  Lectures and the textbook will provide historical context for the additional reading assignments, which include historical documents, short stories and fiction, oral histories and other forms of nonfiction that  address social and cultural experiences.

ANS 340 • Relign/Rebelln Mod E Asia-W

30905 • Spring 2010
Meets M 500pm-800pm JES A205A
(also listed as R S 352 )
show description

Topics in the religions and mythologies of the peoples of Asia.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 390 • East Asian Religious History

31232 • Fall 2009
Meets TH 400pm-700pm PAR 8A
show description

Study of various Asian studies-related topics that do not focus on any single geographic region.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 390 • Readings In Modern East Asia

31240 • Fall 2009
Meets W 300pm-600pm PAR 8A
show description

1
ANS 390 #31240
Readings in Modern East Asia
Lecture Date & Time: W 3 - 6
Location: PAR 8A
Instructor: Dr. Nancy Stalker
Office WCH 5.128
Office Hours: MF 11-12 or by appointment
E-mail: nancy.stalker@mail.utexas.edu
This graduate seminar is designed to introduce students to graduate level studies of East Asia by providing a broad overview of
scholarship, interpretive frameworks and resources on East Asia (primarily China, Japan and Korea) in different disciplines. The
course consists of four general components: 1) Sessions introducing broad conceptual approaches in scholarship on East Asia
(including areas like Marxism, Nationalism, Imperialism & Colonialism, and Orientalism) and reading materials on East Asia that
incorporate or explicate these approaches 2) Sessions specific to the interests of students in the class 3) Assignments designed to
introduce students to graduate level coursework.
4) Meetings with members of the Asian Studies faculty to discuss the "State of the Disciplines" in
studies of East Asia
Course Requirements
This course will be graded using pluses and minuses. There will be no final examination. Grades will be
determined according to the following:
• Participation and Attendance - 40%
This is a discussion-based course and attendance at class meetings and discussions is mandatory. You are expected to
attend every week and to share your comments and ideas each week on each of the readings. Much of your
participation grade will be determined by in-class presentations. Each week a member of the class will give a 20-
minute introduction to the main readings for that week. These introductions should not just summarize the text, but
discuss the book or article’s most important argument or discovery and provide a concise statement of the author’s
objective, key points, and an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the work. You will prepare and distribute a
discussion guide for your presentation.
• Assignments and Book Reviews (see below) – 60%
In many weeks, there will be an assignment to complete in addition to the readings. Two major assignments you
should begin working on early in the semester are the course syllabus and the thesis or grant proposal.
Course Materials
This syllabus is a work-in-progress and we will be adding readings based on student areas of interest. Look
through the syllabus to determine what you will be reading each week. The books listed below were preordered
and are available at the Co-op.
Warren I. Cohen, East Asia at the Center: Four Thousand Years of Engagement with the World (Columbia, 2000)
Paul A. Cohen, Discovering History in China: American Historical Writing on the Recent Chinese Past. (Columbia,
1984)
Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism (Verso, 1991 extended
second edition)
Edward Said, Orientalism (Vintage, 1994 extended second edition)
Other assigned articles and chapters from books to be read by the entire class will be available online via
Blackboard or other electronic resource. Many readings are from texts that you may wish to purchase online, if
they are related to your field.
2
Course Policies
Academic Integrity
You are expected to adhere to university requirements on academic honesty and integrity. Behaviors such as plagiarism,
unauthorized collaboration, copying of another student’s work, or cheating on examinations in any form will be viewed as an
offense against the academic community and will be dealt with accordingly. If you are uncertain about what constitutes
academic integrity, visit the web site of Student Judicial Services (http://www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/sjs/). In the event that
a student is found engaging in behavior that violates university policies on academic integrity, as stipulated by the office of
Student Judicial Services, the student will receive the grade of F for the course and will be reported to the office of Student
Judicial Services, where further disciplinary action may be taken. There will be no exceptions.
E-Mail & Communications
I will occasionally use e-mail and Blackboard for course-related announcements and communications. E-mail will be sent to
your official email address so make certain this is current in UT Direct. Missed email is not an acceptable excuse for missed
communications. Check Blackboard and e-mail regularly--at least once per week --to make certain you are aware of current
course announcements.
If you have questions or course related issues to discuss with me, I strongly suggest you come to my office hours, rather than
sending an email. If you choose to send email instead, include the course number in the subject line and be advised that I
will not respond immediately and you may have to wait up to 48 hours for a response.
Laptops are not allowed in class. While in class, turn off cell phones and pagers and do not send text messages or read
newspapers or other materials.
Special Needs
Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with
Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (Video Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining
authorized accommodations. If you already have this letter, please visit me during office hours before the first midterm exam
so that we can discuss your needs.
Religious Holy Day Observance
If an exam or assignment falls due on a day when you are observing a religious holy day, I will work with you to find an
acceptable alternative time to complete the assignment.
***NOTE: Subject to Revision!!! I reserve the right to modify this syllabus, course
assignments and course requirements during the semester.
3
Course Assignments
Assignment 1 - Textbook Comparison - Due Sept. 2
Select one of the following events and read the sections on that event in the standard textbooks listed below, or
other standard textbooks you identify. Be prepared to discuss how the treatment of the event differs among
the texts. Also identify at least three important monographs on the events and be prepared to discuss what
each adds to the understanding of that event. Submit a 2 - 3 page paper summarizing your findings.
- Korea: The Korean War
Bruce Cumings, Korea’s Place in the Sun: A Modern History
Michael Robinson, Korea’s Twentieth-century Odyssey
Carter Eckhart, ed, Korea Old and New: A History
- China: The Communist Revolution
Jonathan Spence, The Search for Modern China
Immanuel Hsu, The Rise of Modern China
John Fairbank, China: A New History
- Japan: The Meiji Restoration
E.H. Norman, Origins of the Modern Japanese State
Mikiso Hane, Modern Japan A Historical Survey
Andrew Gordon, The Modern History of Japan: from Tokugawa to Present
Assignment 2 - Journal Exercise Due Sept. 23
Journal Exercise - each student will be asked to choose a journal from the list below and survey the table of
contents from the 1950s (or later in the case of new journals) through the present. Prepare a short paper (2-3
pages) that analyzes the nature of the journal you have chosen and how its content has changed over time.
Class presentations will be scheduled for you to share your results with your classmates.
Journal of Asian Studies Modern China Journal of Japanese Studies
Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies Early China Monumenta Nipponica
Modern Asian Studies China Quarterly Japan Forum
Pacific Affairs CLEAR Journal of Japanese Religion
Positions: East Asia cultural critique Korea Journal
Artibus Asiae Korean Studies
Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars/Critical Asian Studies
Assignment 3 - Book Reviews, Due Sept.2, Oct. 7, Nov.11
This review should be a critical analysis of the text, which means much more than a simple summary of the book's
contents. It should provide an analysis of the work's major points: What is the message of this text? Is the argument
plausible, and is it backed up with credible evidence? Is the argument ultimately convincing? Does this work neglect
other points of view, and, if so, how does this affect the value of the argument? How does this work relate to the other
readings and concepts we've addressed in this course? These are just a few of the questions you should be pondering
when analyzing any piece of historical scholarship. To see examples of first-rate analyses, read some published book
reviews. For example, select journals such as the Journal of Asian Studies, the Journal of Japanese Studies or Monumenta
Nipponica and observe how various reviewers have tackled their assignments.
Assignment 4 - Course Syllabus, Draft Due Oct. 28, Final Due Nov. 11
Prepare a 12-week course syllabus for an advanced undergraduate or graduate course in your main area of
interest. Readings should be assigned for each week and should include a variety of types, i.e. monographs,
book chapters, journal articles, primary sources, fiction etc. You may include films if and when appropriate.
Define and describe assignments for the course. The first draft will be reviewed in-class by your peers.
Assignment 5 - Research Fellowship or Thesis Proposal, Draft Due Nov. 24, Final Due Dec. 5
Prepare a 5 - 7 page proposal for your planned thesis project or for application to an institution that provides
grants for research fellowships. More details will be provided on this assignment later. The first draft will be
reviewed in class by your peers.
4
Course Schedule and Readings
I. WHAT IS EAST ASIA? CREATING THE FIELD OF “EAST ASIAN STUDIES”
1. Introduction and Orientation - Aug. 26
Harry Harootunian, “Tracking the Dinosaur: Area Studies in a Time of Globalism” from History’s Disquiet:
Modernity, Cultural Practice and the Question of Everyday Life (Columbia, 2000) - available electronically from UT
library catalogue
2. Further Readings on Creating the Field - Sept. 2
Paul A. Cohen, Discovering History in China: American Historical Writing on the Recent Chinese Past. New York: Columbia
University Press, 1984
Carol Gluck, “Houses of Mirrors: American History - Writing on Japan,” in Anthony Molho and Gordon Wood, eds.
Imagined Histories: American Historians Interpret the Past - available via Blackboard
John Dower, “E.H. Norman, Japan and the Uses of History” in Origins of the Modern Japanese State: Selected Worlds
of E.H. Norman (Random House, 1975) (available through Blackboard)
***Due: Assignment 1 Textbook Comparison
3. Guest instructor: Professor Robert Oppenheim - Sept. 9 - Readings TBD
4. What is East Asia? A Grand Narrative - Sept. 16
Warren I. Cohen, East Asia at the Center: Four Thousand Years of Engagement with the World (Columbia, 2000) -
entire
***Due - Book Review 1
II. THE NATION-STATE AND MODERNITY
1. Theories of Nationalism - Sept. 23
Reading: Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities (Verso, 1983)
Anthony Smith, Nationalism and Modernism (Routledge, 1998), pp.1-46, 117-142, 145-169, 221-228 (available
electronically through UT catalog)
***Due: Assignment 2 Journal Exercise
2. Marxist Approaches to the Nation-State - Sept. 30
Andrew Barshay, The Social Sciences in Modern Japan: The Marxian and Modernist Traditions, (UC, 2007), Chaps. 1 - 4
(available electronically through UT catalogue)
Arif Dirlik, “Chinese Historians and the Marxist Concept of Capitalism,” Modern China, vol. 8 no. 1 Jan 1982
(available electronically through JSTOR)
-- “Globalization and National Development: The Perspective of the Chinese Revolution”
The New Centennial Review, Volume 3, Number 2, Summer 2003, pp. 241-270 (available electronically
through Project Muse)
5
II. THE NATION-STATE AND MODERNITY (CONT'D)
3. Applied Nationalisms - Oct. 7
Pick a monograph that deals with the making of modernity and the nation-state for your area of interest.
Suggestions will be provided.
***Due: Book Review 2
III. IMPERIALISM AND COLONIALISM
1. Introduction and Colonialism in Taiwan - October 14
Frantz Fanon, "On National Culture" (excerpts from The Wretched of the Earth (Penguin, 1967), available
through Blackboard)
Leo Ching, Becoming Japanese: Colonial Taiwan and the Politics of Identity Formation (University of California, 2001)
TBD Selections from Liao & Wang, eds, Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule (Columbia, 2006)
2. Colonialism in Korea - Oct. 21
Alexis Dudden, Japan’s Colonization of Korea: discourse and power (Hawaii, 2005)
TBD Selections from Shin & Robinson, eds, Colonial Modernity in Korea (Harvard, 1999)
IV. ORIENTALISM
1. Introduction - October 28
Edward Said, Orientalism (Vintage, 1979)
**Due: Draft of Assignment 4, Course Syllabus for in-class Peer Review
2. Applications and Critiques of Said - Nov. 4
Edward Said, "Orientalism Reconsidered" Race & Class, Vol. 27, No. 2, 1-15 (1985) (JSTOR)
Dennis Porter, “Orientalism and its Problems” (Blackboard)
Stefan Tanaka, Japan's Orient: Rendering Pasts into History (California, 1993)
(available electronically through UT Catalog)
Christina Klein, Cold War Orientalism, Chapters?? (Blackboard)
John Kuo Wei Tchen, New York before Chinatown : Orientalism and the shaping of American culture, 1776-1882,
Chapters ?? (Blackboard)
V. GENDER AND EAST ASIA - NOV. 11
Joan Scott, Gender and the Politics of History (available electronically through UT Catalog) (Columbia, 1999), p. 15-50
Chandra Mohanty, "Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses," Feminist Review no. 30
Autumn 1988, pp. 61-88 (available electronically through JSTOR)
Pick a monograph that deals with gender for your area of interest. Suggestions will be provided.
***Due: Book Review 3
6
VI. READINGS IN AREAS OF STUDENT INTEREST
Nov. 17 Readings: TBD
*** Due: Assignment 4 Course Syllabus
Nov. 24 Readings: TBD
*** Due: Draft of Assignment 5 Research Fellowship or Thesis Proposal for
in-class Peer Review
Nov. 31 Readings: TBD
Dec. 5 Readings: TBD
***Due: Final Research Fellowship or Thesis Proposal Due

ANS 390 • Readings In Modern East Asia

30655 • Spring 2009
Meets T 400pm-700pm PAR 8A
show description

Study of various Asian studies-related topics that do not focus on any single geographic region.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

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