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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Patrick Olivelle

Professor Emeritus Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Patrick Olivelle

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-6032
  • Office: WCH 5.120A
  • Office Hours: SPRING 2013: T 12-3:30
  • Campus Mail Code: G9300

Biography

Patrick Olivelle served as the Chair of the Department of Asian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin from 1994 to 2007, where he is Professor of Sanskrit and Indian Religions. Prior to coming to Texas, Olivelle taught in the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, from 1974 to 1991, where he was the Department Chair 1984-90.

Olivelle's current research focuses on the ancient Indian legal tradition of Dharmaśāstra. He has edited and translated the four early Dharmasūtras. He has also prepared a critical edition of the Law Code of Manu (Mānava Dharmaśāstra). A new translation based on the critically edited text was published in Spring 2004 in the Oxford World's Classics series and the critical edition was published in 2005.

In the mid-1990's Olivelle worked on the late Vedic literature, producing an award-winning translation of the early Upaniṣads, as well as a scholar's edition of them. His early work was focused on the ascetic and monastic traditions of India. He published several editions, translations, and studies of ascetic texts and institutions. His award-winning book on the āśrama system was published in 1993.

Olivelle has won several prestigious fellowships, including Guggenheim, NEH, and ACLS. He was elected Vice President of the American Oriental Society in 2004 and President in 2005.

Interests

Sanskrit; Ancient Indian religious history

ANS 384 • Religion/Law/Society In India

31815 • Spring 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 1.134
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Study of various aspects and periods of South Asian culture and society.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

SAN 330 • Sanskrit Poetry Of Asvaghosa

32705 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 305
(also listed as SAN 384S )
show description

Prerequisite: Sanskrit 312L with a grade of at least C.

SAN 384S • Sanskrit Poetry Of Asvaghosa

32720 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 305
(also listed as SAN 330 )
show description

Study of various aspects and periods of Sanskrit language and culture.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and Sanskrit 325L, 330, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.

ANS 340 • Hist Of Hindu Relig Traditions

31705 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 130
(also listed as ANT 324L, HIS 364G, R S 321 )
show description

This course examines the principal themes of traditional Hinduism, the dominant religion of the Indian subcontinent. It gives special attention to the historical development of the tradition and relation to social and cultural life in India. To the extent possible, the course will explore Hinduism through different forms of religious expression created within India itself. These include written texts which have been significant in the Hindu tradition and which reveal the distinctive elements of its religious thought. But they also include rituals that have been central to religious life, patterns of social action that embody Hindu values, and images and architecture that display the form and powers of the Hindu world.

 

Texts

U.R. Anantha Murthy, Samskara.C. Dimmitt and J.A.B. van Buitenen, Classical Hindu Mythology: A Reader in the Sanskrit PuranasGavin Flood, An Introduction to HiduismR.K. Narayan, The MahabharataBarbara Stoler Miller, The Bhagavad-Gita

 

Grading

Microthemes 30% 2 Quizzes 20%, mid-term 20%, and final examination 30%.

SAN 330 • Classical Sanskrit Prose & Lit

32590 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.122
(also listed as SAN 384S )
show description

Prerequisite: Sanskrit 312L with a grade of at least C.

SAN 384S • Classical Sanskrit Prose & Lit

32605 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.122
(also listed as SAN 330 )
show description

Study of various aspects and periods of Sanskrit language and culture.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and Sanskrit 325L, 330, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.

ANS 384 • History Of Sanskrit Literature

32000 • Spring 2011
Meets T 330pm-630pm WCH 4.134A
show description

 

This seminar will examine the development of Sanskrit literature from the earliest times to the medieval period.  The intent of the course is to give a bird’s-eye view of the entire landscape of Sanskrit literature. The literature we will cover include:  Vedic Literature (Saṃhitā, Brāhmaṇas, and Upaniṣads); Grammar; Ritual Literature; Kavya; Drama; Aesthetics; Law; Medicine; Astronomy/Astrology; Philosophy; Epics; Puranas; Bhakti literature.  Students are expected to have completed at least two years of Sanskrit and to have a general familiarity with Indian history and literature. We will read secondary literature, as well as translate samples from each genre of Sanskrit literature.

Requirements and Grading Policy:  60% A research paper on one class of Sanskrit literature. 40% attendance and participation.

 

 

SAN 330 • Sanskrit Drama

32847 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 930am-1100am WCH 4.134A
(also listed as SAN 384S )
show description

This course will study two examples of Sanskrit drama, selections from the Uttararamacarita, “The Last
Acts of Rama” of Bhavabhuti and the Urubhanga “Breaking the Thighs” of Bhasa. The course concentrate
on the translation and grammatical analyses of these works, but it will also place them in the history of
Sanskrit drama and performance and examine the methods of dramatic criticism within the Sanskrit
tradition.


Students enrolled in SAN 384S will be expected to show a higher level of proficiency than those in SAN
330. Both sections require students be able to translate assigned texts and to analyze their grammar and
syntax in class. Both sections require a midterm and a final, but students in the two sections will have
different exams. In addition, SAN 384S will require a written translation, grammatical analysis, and
critical discussion of a selection from a Sanskrit drama that is not read in class. This paper should be 10
-12 pages in length.

GRADING:

SAN 384S - Class recitation 50%, Midterm 15%, Final 20%, Paper 15%
SAN 330 - Class recitation 50%, Midterm 20%, Final 30%

SAN 384S • Sanskrit Drama

32860 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 930am-1100am WCH 4.134A
(also listed as SAN 330 )
show description

This course will study two examples of Sanskrit drama, selections from the Uttararamacarita, “The Last
Acts of Rama” of Bhavabhuti and the Urubhanga “Breaking the Thighs” of Bhasa. The course concentrate
on the translation and grammatical analyses of these works, but it will also place them in the history of
Sanskrit drama and performance and examine the methods of dramatic criticism within the Sanskrit
tradition.


Students enrolled in SAN 384S will be expected to show a higher level of proficiency than those in SAN
330. Both sections require students be able to translate assigned texts and to analyze their grammar and
syntax in class. Both sections require a midterm and a final, but students in the two sections will have
different exams. In addition, SAN 384S will require a written translation, grammatical analysis, and
critical discussion of a selection from a Sanskrit drama that is not read in class. This paper should be 10
-12 pages in length.

GRADING:

SAN 384S - Class recitation 50%, Midterm 15%, Final 20%, Paper 15%
SAN 330 - Class recitation 50%, Midterm 20%, Final 30%

SAN 330 • Readings In Commentarial Prose

31675 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 21
(also listed as SAN 384S )
show description

 

SANSKRIT COMMENTARIAL PROSE
Instructor: Professor Patrick Olivelle
ANS 384S, Unique 31690 T TH 9:30 - 11 AM
FALL 2010 Office Hours: T TH 11 - 12 PM
CAL 21 WCH 4.112
The main purpose of this class is to provide students a firmer foundation in Sanskrit
grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, but especially in the special style of Sanskrit used by
commentators. We will do this by reading the commentary by ¯a¸kara, one of the foremost
theologians and philosophers, on the Bhagavad G„t‡. We will also read and discuss portions
of Garry Tubb's book on ¯‡stric Sanskrit.
Course Requirements:
Attendance is mandatory, and you are expected to have read and translated initially
about half a page of Sanskrit prose. We will increase the number of verses we read in class
as you get familiar with the text.
Religious Holy Days
By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to
the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work
assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to
complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.
Grading Procedures:
Grades will be based on two exams and class participation
Mid-term = 30%
Final = 40%
Participation = 30%
Academic Integrity
University of Texas Honor Code
The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual
opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through
integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.
Plagiarism and Academic Dishonesty
Be careful not to copy the work of peers or to use material without proper attribution.
Nothing can be more disastrous for your grade or for your college record than to be found
to have violated the University rules on academic honesty. Students who violate University
rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of
failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the
individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty
will be strictly enforced. For further information please visit the Student Judicial Services
Web site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.
Documented Disability Statement
Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for
Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone). Please let me
know about your needs as soon as possible.
SYLLABUS
Each day we will read a portion of the commentary, examining the grammar, vocabulary,
and stylistic features with the help of Gary Tubb's book on ˜‡stric Sanskrit
Mid-term Examination will be on October 21.
Final Exam at the date set by the university.

SAN 384S • Readings In Commentarial Prose

31690 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 21
(also listed as SAN 330 )
show description

 

SANSKRIT COMMENTARIAL PROSE
Instructor: Professor Patrick Olivelle
ANS 384S, Unique 31690 T TH 9:30 - 11 AM
FALL 2010 Office Hours: T TH 11 - 12 PM
CAL 21 WCH 4.112
The main purpose of this class is to provide students a firmer foundation in Sanskrit
grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, but especially in the special style of Sanskrit used by
commentators. We will do this by reading the commentary by ¯a¸kara, one of the foremost
theologians and philosophers, on the Bhagavad G„t‡. We will also read and discuss portions
of Garry Tubb's book on ¯‡stric Sanskrit.
Course Requirements:
Attendance is mandatory, and you are expected to have read and translated initially
about half a page of Sanskrit prose. We will increase the number of verses we read in class
as you get familiar with the text.
Religious Holy Days
By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to
the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work
assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to
complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.
Grading Procedures:
Grades will be based on two exams and class participation
Mid-term = 30%
Final = 40%
Participation = 30%
Academic Integrity
University of Texas Honor Code
The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual
opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through
integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.
Plagiarism and Academic Dishonesty
Be careful not to copy the work of peers or to use material without proper attribution.
Nothing can be more disastrous for your grade or for your college record than to be found
to have violated the University rules on academic honesty. Students who violate University
rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of
failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the
individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty
will be strictly enforced. For further information please visit the Student Judicial Services
Web site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.
Documented Disability Statement
Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for
Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone). Please let me
know about your needs as soon as possible.
SYLLABUS
Each day we will read a portion of the commentary, examining the grammar, vocabulary,
and stylistic features with the help of Gary Tubb's book on ˜‡stric Sanskrit
Mid-term Examination will be on October 21.
Final Exam at the date set by the university.

ANS 340 • Hist Of Hindu Relig Traditns

30900 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 3.112
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ANS 340 / HIS 364G / RS 321

Unique 30900/39840/44370 

History of Hindu Religious Traditions

T TH 12:30 – 1:45 PM

UTC 3.112

Professor Patrick Olivelle Office Hours: T TH 10-12 AM

Department of Asian Studies WCH 4.112; Tel. 475-6032

TA: Dan Rudmann, WCH 4.112 Office Hours: M W 1 - 2:30 PM

 

Hinduism is the religious civilization of India, a subcontinent containing dozens of languages and ethnic groups, and a bewildering variety of customs, beliefs, and practices. India, moreover, has a continuous cultural and religious history of over three thousand years. Within the limits of this course, therefore, it is impossible to study in detail the full variety of religious expressions in such a vast area and over such a long period of time. We will focus on some of the major doctrines, practices, and institutions that shaped the historical development of the cluster of religious traditions we today call 'Hinduism' and provide the keys to our understanding of those traditions.

The major concern of this course will be to discover how religions interact with other elements of culture and society, especially the economic and the political, how religions adapt to and often provide the catalyst for social and cultural change, and the role religions play in the formation of 'worlds' which provide frameworks for our understanding of ourselves and our universe. Hinduism, therefore, will be a case study which will help us understand the function of religion in human society and in human history.

 

Evaluation

Class attendance is mandatory.  The readings alone will neither accomplish the goals of this course nor be sufficient to pass the examinations.

1. EXAMS.  There will be a mid-term examination during class on Thursday, March 11.  The final examination will be on Wednesday, May 12, 2 - 5 PM.  Both exams will include brief essays on the central themes covered in lectures and readings.  The essays will test not only your memory but also, and especially, your ability to think critically and to write clearly.

2. QUIZZES.  In addition to the exams, there will be three quizzes.

The final grade will be determined in the following manner: mid? term 35%, final 50%, quizzes 5% each.  The examinations and the quizzes will be based on the material covered in the lectures and the readings during the preceding weeks.  The final exam will be comprehensive; although it will focus on the material covered after the mid-term, it will also include questions that will require a comprehension of the material covered in the whole course.

Required Texts:

Gavin Flood, An Introduction to Hinduism

Diana Eck, Darsan:  Seeing the Divine Image in India.

Other required readings will be posted electronically on Blackboard.

 

 

NOTE: laptop use will not be allowed during class. Please read the following note on plagiarism and collusion:

The General Information Catalog of the University of Texas at Austin defines plagiarism as follows: "the appropriation, buying, receiving as a gift, or obtaining by any means another's work and the submission of it as one's own academic work offered for credit."

 

The current General Information Catalog of the University of Texas at Austin defines collusion as follows: "the unauthorized collaboration with another person in preparing academic assignments offered for credit or collaboration with another person to commit a violation of any section of the rules on scholastic dishonesty."

SYLLABUS

We have established the fact that the fundamental categories of thought, and consequently of science, are of religious origin [and that] nearly all the great social institutions have been born in religion.  If religion has given birth to all that is essential to society, it is because the idea of society is the soul of religion.

êmile Durkheim

1. Introduction to the Study of Religion and Hinduism

Jan 19  Is there something called "Hinduism?" Current meaning of the term. The large variety of religious expressions across time and space within Hinduism. Meaning of the term "religion." Ways of studying religion. Religion and "world building."

ReadingFlood, pp. 5-10; Heinrich von Stietencron, "Hinduism: On the Proper Use of a Deceptive Term."

Jan 21 Bird's eye view of the history of Hinduism, geographically and historically.

ReadingFlood, pp. 10-22.

2. Pre-Vedic India

Jan 26  Pre-Vedic India: the Indus Valley Civilization of the 3-2 millennium B.C.E.  Vedic India: geographical expansion of ‚ryans in northern India 1500-800 B.C.E.

ReadingFlood, pp. 23-35; visit Professor Mark Kenoyer's website to see images from the Indus valley and commentary on them: www.harappa.com/indus/indus0.html

3. The Vedic World:  religion and society

Jan 28  Sources for the study of Hinduism.  Literary and non-literary sources.  Sacred and non-sacred literature.  Anthropological inquiry.  Archeology and Art History. Should we privilege the "sacred" texts in the study of religion? 

Hindu "scriptures":  Veda (˜ruti) and other sacred texts (smÁti).  Sectarian scriptures.

ReadingFlood, pp. 35-40.

Feb 2  Vedic cosmology and Vedic sacrifice

Motifs of creation stories: battle, ritual, procreation. Personified and impersonal explanations of the universe. Social experiences underlying cosmological speculations.

Vedic sacrifice

Reading:  Gavin Flood, pp. 35-50; Laurie Patton: "Veda and Upani?ad."

Feb 4  FIRST QUIZ

Society, social ethic: I

Concept of dharma; social structures and concept of var?a; ritual purity and social status in the Vedic value system. Role of the king.

Reading: Flood, pp. 51-61, 65-74;

Feb 9  Society and social ethic: II

Rites of passage: childhood, initiation, and study; centrality of marriage and family; ritual and procreative obligations.

Reading: Flood, pp. 198-208; Olivelle, "Background and Context", pp. 35-55;

4. The New Hindu World:  religion and individual liberation.

Feb 11  India in the 5-3 centuries B.C.E.: Geography, technology, economy, socio-political conditions. The emergence of the Maurya empire and the reforms of A˜oka. The socio-economic preconditions for the emergence of a new world view. Rise of protestant movements: Buddhism and Jainism.

Society within the value system of the new world.  Ideal of renouncing the world and leaving society.  Ethic of non-action, non-injury, celibacy, ascetic poverty, and vegetarianism.

Reading:  Olivelle, "Background and Context", pp. 55-70; Flood, pp. 75-93;

Feb 16  The concept of sa¸s‡ra, and the new ways of conceiving the geography and history of the universe.  The births and deaths of the universe: time as cyclical.  New definitions of the inhabitants of the Vedic world--gods, demons, ancestors. 

The conception of human life within the framework of sa¸s‡ra.  The concepts of karma and mok?a (or nirv‡?a).  Search for personal salvation.  Knowledge (gnosis) as the key to salvation: gnostic movements and the cultivation of the mind.

Reading:  Hopkin, "Challenges and Change";

Feb 18  The place of the Upanishads in the development of Indian religions.  Major upanishadic doctrines and ideas that influenced the later development of Hindu theological schemes and religious ideas:  Brahman, ‚tman, God, devotional elements, meditation.

Reading:  Olivelle, "‚ra?yakas and Upani?ads"; Olivelle, "An Upani?ad Reader"

Feb 23  Review of what we have learnt so far

FILM:  "Thirty-three Million Gods."

5. Historical Development of the Hindu Tradition

Feb 25  SECOND QUIZ

The creation of the Indian epics: Mah‡bh‡rata and R‡m‡ya?a.

Possible social, religious and political contexts for the writing of the epics.

To get the main outline of the stories of the two epics you may consult the Wikipedia.

Reading:   John Brockington, "The Sanskrit Epics" ; James Fitzgerald, "Dharma and Kingship: Yudhi?Òhira over A˜oka";

Mar 2  The Bhagavad G„t‡: a watershed document in the development of Hindu traditions. G„t‡'s redefinition of karma and renunciation. Ethics and syncretism of the G„t‡: different paths to the same goal. Krishna as supreme god incarnate as a human: God as savior and teacher. Divine love as means of salvation.

ReadingBarbara Stoler Miller, "Introduction"; readings from the G„t‡.

Mar 4  Attempt at a synthesis of the Vedic and the renunciatory value systems:  the doctrine of the four ‡˜ramas.

Caste and var?a: doctrine of karma as theodicy and legitimation of the caste system.

ReadingKaelber, "‚˜rama"; Declan Quigley: "On the Relationship between    Caste and Hinduism."

Mar 9 FILM:  "The Fourth Stage".

Discussion of renunciation in Indian society and religion.

Mar 11  MID-TERM EXAMINATION

 

SPRING BREAK

 

Mar 23  The Gupta Age: development of art, literature, and religion in the first half of the first millennium C.E.  Beginnings of the Pur‡?a literature and the texts on religious law. Vernacular compositions in South India in the second half of the millennium: the Bhakti of the N‡yanars and the AÎvars.

Reading: Flood, pp. 103-127; Eck 3-31.

Mar 25  Devotional theologies:  the system  of R‡m‡nuja and Madhva.

Readings:  Flood, pp. 128-147, 243-246; ; Hiriyanna, "Ved‡nta-Theistic"

Mar 30  Theologies of ¯iva:  ¯aivism of the south and of Kashmir.The Tantric cosmologies and practices.

Reading:   Flood, pp. 148-173; Gavin Flood, "¯aiva"

Apr 1  The Goddess in Hinduism.  The female principle of Indian cosmologies. Position of women in the Hindu tradition:  parallels between divine and human societies.

Reading:  Flood, pp. 174-197; Thomas Coburn "Consort of None, ¯akti of all"; Shrivatsa Goswamin, "R‡dh‡: The Play and Perfection of Rasa";

Apr 6  Pilgrimage and places of pilgrimage.  Indian sacred geography.  Place of rivers in the Hindu religious consciousness.

ReadingEck 63-75; Bhardwaj and Lochtefeld, "T„rtha".

Apr 8  THIRD QUIZ

The history of the Hindu temple.  Religious art and music: divine images and image worship in India.

ReadingFlood, pp. 208-212; Eck 59-63; Vasudha Narayanan, "‚laya"

Apr 13  Theological systems of the early Middle Ages.  The system of Absolute Monism (Advaita Ved‡nta) of ¯aÔkara: concept of M‡y‡ and the world as illusion.

ReadingFlood, pp. 239-243; Eliot Deutsch, "Advaita Ved‡nta", pp. 9-65.

Apr 15  Advaita Ved‡nta: Brahman as sole reality. Mystical knowledge and the discovery of one's identity with Brahman

Apr 29  The system of Yoga and S‡¸khya.

ReadingFlood, pp. 224-236; Hiriyanna, "S‡Ôkhya-Yoga"

Apr 22 Discussion of the philosophies of Advaita and S‡¸khya.

6. Hinduism in Pre-Modern and Modern India

Apr 27  Devotional religion in north India; Hindu encounter with Islam. Establishment of Moslem rule in India. Impact on religious thought and expression in north India: the bhakti saints and the beginning of the Sikh tradition

ReadingHawley, "Songs of the Saints of India."

Apr 29  Hindu encounter with European colonialism and Christian missionary movements. Emergence of neo-Hindu movements in India: Brahmo Samaj, Arya Samaj.

ReadingFlood, pp. 250-261; Dermot Killingley, "Modernity, Reform, and Revival"

May 4  Hinduism in modern and contemporary India

ReadingFlood, pp. 262-265; Lawrence Babb, "Sathya Sai Baba"; C. Ram-Prasad, "Contemporary Political Hinduism"

May 6 Hindusim within a digital and globalized world. Hinduism in the diaspora and and phenomenon of international "gurus".

Reading: Flood, pp. 265-273;

Review of course material since the mid-term examination.

 

FINAL EXAMINATION: Wednesday, May 12, 2 - 5 PM

ANS 378 • Senior Seminar In Asian Stds-W

31050 • Spring 2010
Meets T 330pm-630pm MEZ 1.204
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ANS 378 SENIOR SEMINAR IN ASIAN STUDIES

Social Construction of the Human Body

Unique 31050

Professor Patrick Olivelle

Professor Patrick Olivelle Office Hours: T TH 10-12 AM

Department of Asian Studies WCH 4.112; Tel. 475-6032

 

 

Scholarship on the human body from experts in fields as diverse as English Literature and Anthropology, Film Studies and Sociology, has intensified in recent years.  The Chronicle of Higher Education (June 12, 1991) drew attention to the new and growing interest in this area of inquiry in American universities.  In spite of such interest among numerous scholars, the exploration of the symbolic significance of the human body is still in its infancy.  Bryan Turner (1984) in his important study, The Body and Society, lamented the relative neglect of the human body in sociological thought:  "Contemporary sociology has little to say about the most obvious fact of human existence, namely that human beings have, and to some extent are, bodies" (p. 30).  The same can be said of other fields, including the study of religion.

 

It is widely accepted among scholars--and I take it as a given--that bodily movements and functions, from gestures and dress to sex and food, are culturally and socially defined.  There is a strong correspondence between the two bodies:  the physical and the social.   Mary Douglas's analysis of body symbols will be an importal tool for our study.  On the one hand, bodily symbols are used to express different social experiences, and, on the other, these symbols act back on the society to control it.  Bodily symbols are able to both communicate and to constrain.

 

Although we will pay some attention to the theoretical underpining of the study of the human body, our attention will be principally on the ways in which Asian cultures and societies have constructed the human body to deliver various social and religious messages.

 

 

BOOKS FOR PURCHSE;

 

Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney: Rice as Self

Alf Hiltebeitel: Hair: Its meaning and power in Asian Societies

 

All the other readings will be available electronically.

 

GRADING AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS

1.     For every seminar you should prepare a brief review of the days readings with at least three questions or issues you would like to raise during the seminar.

 

2.    Two students will be appointed as seminar leaders for each sessions. They are expected to introduce the readings, raise issues that should be discussed, and lead the discussions. They should collaborate with each other in preparing for the seminar.

 

3.    Two of you will be paired to write an essay of six pages on a particular reading: the one will be a proponent of the thesis of the reading and the other will be an oponent. The two should collaborate in the research. Each should write three pages. These writings will be read and critiqued by another pair.

 

4.    Research paper on a topic pertinent to our seminar. These papers should be technically perfect both with regard to techniques of presenting a research paper and with regard to English prose composition. The first draft of your papers are due between MARCH 30 and April 9. Revised papers are due MAY 3.

 

5.    GRADES WILL BE DETERMINED ON THE FOLLOWING BASIS:

                Research paper = 60%

                Essay        = 20%

                Participation    = 20%

 

 

Jan 19

Introduction to the study of the body as a social construction.

Course procedures and expectations:

Jan 26

Theoretical considerations of the social construction of the body.

Readings:

Brian S. Turner, "The Body in Western Society: Social Theory and its Perspectives" [blackboard] - 39

Mary Douglas, Natural Symbols, Chapters 4-5 [blackboard] - 27

Mary Douglas, Purity and Danger, Chapters 7-8 [blackboard] - 24

 

OPTIONAL FURTHER READING

Mary Douglas, Purity and Danger, Chapters 8 [blackboard] - 24

 

Feb 2

BODY IN ASIA

Readings:

Thomas Kasulis, "The Body - Japanese Style" in Thomas P. Kasulis, ed., Self as Body in Asian Theory and Practice [blackboard] - 20

Roger Ames, "The Meaning of Body in Classical Chinese Philosophy," ibid. [blackborad] - 17

John Koller, "Human Embodiment: Indian Perspectives", ibid. [blackboard] - 13

Kristofer Schipper, "The Taoist Body" [blackboard] - 27

Puru?asÂkta -- Creation Hymn from the Ëgveda [blackboard]

 

Feb 9

GENDER I

Creation of the Female

Readings:

Alison Black, "Gender and Cosmology in Chinese Correlative Thinking" (30)

Thomas Buckley and Alma Gottlieb, "A Critical Appraisal of Theories of Menstrual Symbolism," in Blood Magic , pp. 3-50.

F. A. Marglin, "Female Sexuality in the Hindu World," in Immaculate & Powerful: The Female in Sacred Image and Social Reality, pp. 39-59.

Julia Leslie, "Menstruation Myths," in Myth and Mythmaking: Continuous Evolution in Indian Tradition, ed. Julia Leslie, pp. 87-104.

 

Optional Reading:

David Mandelbaum, "Family Roles: Girl and Woman"

 

Feb 16

GENDER II

Creation of the Male

Readings:

David Gilmore, "The Manhood Puzzle" (22)

David Mandelbaum, "Family Roles: Boy and Man" (13)

Charles F. Keyes, "Ambiguous Gender: Male Initiation in a Northern Thai Buddhist Society." (32)

Steven Harrell, "Men, Women, and Ghosts in Taiwanese Folk Religion." (20)

 

OPTIONAL READING

A, K. Ramanujan, "The Indian Oedipus" (22)

 

Feb 23

RACE

 

Readings:

Sabine Fruhstuck, "Breeding the Japanese Race"; Ch 5 of Colonizing Sex (*electronic resource at PCL)

Ian Neary, "Burakumin in Contemporary Japan" in Michael Weiner, ed., Japan's Minorities: The Illusion of Homogenieity, Ch. 3. (*electronic resource at PCL)

Millie Creighton, "Soto Others and uchi Others: Imagining Racial Diversity, Imagining Homogeneous Japan," ibid Ch 8.  (*electronic resource at PCL)

 

OPTIONAL READING

Thomas Trautmann, "Race Science versus Sanskrit" and "The Racial Theory of Indian Civilization" from Aryand and British India.

 

March 2

FOOD I

Raymond Firth, "Food Symbolism in a Pre-Industrial Society," in Symbols:  Public and Private , pp. 243-261.

Mary Douglas, "The Abominations of Leviticus," in Purity and Danger: An Analysis of the Concepts of Pollution and Taboo , pp. 41-57.

Patrick Olivelle, "From Feast to Fast:  Food and the Indian Ascetic," in Rules and Remedies in Classical Indian Law , pp. 15-35.

Patrick Olivelle, ⁄Food for Thought: Dietary Regulations and Social Organization in Ancient India.€ 2001 Gonda Lecture. Amsterdam: Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. (25)

 

March 9

FOOD II

Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney, Rice as Self: Japanese Identities through Time.

 

OPTIONAL READING

Caroline Walker Bynum, "Food as control of self" and "Food as control of circumstance," in Holy Feast and Holy Fast:  The Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women , pp. 189-244.

 

 

Week of March 15            SPRING BREAK

 

March 23

HAIR: I

 

Edmund Leach, "Magical Hair," Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 88 (1958), pp. 147-164. 

Christopher R. Hallpike, "Social Hair," Man (N.S.), 4 (1969), pp. 256-264.

P. Hershman, "Hair, Sex and Dirt," Man (N.S.), 9 (1974), pp. 274-298.

Gananath Obeyesekere, Medusa's Hair, pp. 13-51.

 

March 30

HAIR: II

 

Alf Hiltebeitel: Hair: Its meaning and power in Asian Societies

 

April 6

CELIBACY and ASCETICISM

 

Patrick Olivelle ⁄Celibacy in Classical Hinduism.€ In Celibacy and Religious Traditions, ed. Carl Olson, pp. 151-164. New York: Oxford University Press.

Patrick Olivelle, ⁄Deconstruction of the Body in Indian Asceticism,€ in Asceticism, ed. Vincent L. Wimbush and Richard Valantasis, pp. 188-210.  New York:  Oxford University Press.

Steven Colliins, "The body in Theravada Buddhist monasticism" in Sarah Coakley, Religion and the Body

Lyn Teskey Denton, "Varieties of Hindu Female Asceticism" in Roles and Rituals for Hindu Woman, ed. Julia Lestlie, pp. 211-230.

        ** 131

 

OPTIONAL READING

Patrick Olivelle, ⁄Village vs. Wilderness:  Ascetic Ideals and the Hindu World,€ in Austin B. Creel and Vasudha Narayanan, ed., Monasticism in the Christian and Hindu Traditions: A Comparative Study.  Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 125-160.

Patrick Olivelle, ⁄The Renouncer Traditions,€ in The Companion to Hinduism, ed. Gavin Flood. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 271–87.

 

April 13

  PURITY AND IMPURITY

 

Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney, "Japanese germs," in Illness and Culture in Contemporary Japan:  An Anthropological View , pp. 21-50.

Mary Douglas, Purity and Danger, Ch. 1-2.  - 34

            ** 64

 

April 20

BODY MARKINGS AND BODY ORIENTATION

 

Readings:

Robert Hertz, "The Pre-eminence of the Right Hand:  A Study in Religious Polarity," in Rodney Needham, Right & Left:  Essays on Dual Symbolic Classification, pp. 3-31,

Brenda E. F. Beck, "The Right-Left Division of South Indian Society," ibid., pp. 391-430.

Vincent Turner, "Bodily Marks," in The Encyclopedia of Religion, Vol. 2, pp. 269-275.

 

OPTIONAL READING

Marcel Mauss, "Techniques of the Body," tr. Ben Brewster, Economy and Society 2.1 (1973), 70-88.

 

April 27

HOUSE AND BODY

 

Readings:

E. Valentine Daniel, "A House Conceived," pp. 105-162 of Fluid Signs: Being a Person the Tamil Way.

Steven Collins,   "House imagery," pp. 165-176 in Selfless Person: Imagery and Thought in Therav‡da Buddhis.

Brenda E. F. Beck, "The symbolic merger of body, space and cosmos in Hindu Tamil Nadu," in Contributions to Indian Sociology (N.S.), 10.2 (1976), pp. 213-233

 

May 4

DEATH AND FUNERAL

 

David Knipe, "Sapindikarana:  The Hindu Rite of Entry into Heaven," in Religious Encounters with Death, ; 

Gregory Schopen, "Burial 'Ad Sanctos' and the Physical Presence of the Buddha in Early Indian Buddhism," in Religion 17 (1987), pp. 193-225.

William LaFleur, Liquid Life: Abortion and Buddhism in Japan, pp. 3-65.

 

SAN 330 • Sanskrit Poetry

32100 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 1.136
(also listed as SAN 384S )
show description

SANSKRIT POETRY 

Instructor: Professor Patrick Olivelle 

ANS 384S, Unique 32115 T TH 12:30 - 2 PM 

FALL 2009 Office Hours: T TH 2 - 3:30 PM 

UTC 4.114 WCH 4.112 

The main purpose of this class is to provide you a firmer foundation in Sanskrit grammar, 

syntax, and vocabulary. We will do this by reading the epic poem (mah‡k‡vya) Raghuva¸˜a 

by K‡lid‡sa, the preeminent poet and playwright of Sanskrit. As part of this course, you will 

be introduced to the technial vocabulary of the Sanskrit aesthetic tradition (ala¸k‡ra˜‡stra). 

Poets deliberately crafted their work according to the demands of aesthetic perfection. 

Course Requirements: 

Attendance is mandatory, and you are expected to have read and translated initially at 

least 10 verses of the Raghuva¸˜a.  We will increase the number of verses we read in class as 

you get familiar with the text. 

In addition, you should read a book on Sanskrit aesthetics, if you have not done so 

already. Edwin Gerows A Glossary of Indian Figures of Speach, or Indian Poetics. 

Religious Holy Days 

By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to 

the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work 

assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to 

complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence. 

Grading Procedures: 

Grades will be based on two exams: a mid-term and a final. Each will carry 50% of 

the final Grade 

Academic Integrity 

University of Texas Honor Code 

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual 

opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through 

integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. 

Plagiarism and Academic Dishonesty 

Be careful not to copy the work of peers or to use material without proper attribution. 

Nothing can be more disastrous for your grade or for your college record than to be found 

to have violated the University rules on academic honesty.  Students who violate University 

rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of 

failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the 

individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty 

will be strictly enforced. For further information please visit the Student Judicial Services 

Web site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.

Documented Disability Statement 

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for 

Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone). Please let me 

know about your needs as soon as possible. 

SYLLABUS 

I will not give the verses to be read for each class day. That will depend of how fast or slow 

we move through the text. In general expect to read 10-15 verses a day. You will receive a 

photocopy of the first few chapters. 

Mid-term Examination will be on October 14. 

Final Exam at the date set by the university.

SAN 384S • Sanskrit Poetry

32115 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 1.136
(also listed as SAN 330 )
show description

SANSKRIT POETRY 

Instructor: Professor Patrick Olivelle 

ANS 384S, Unique 32115 T TH 12:30 - 2 PM 

FALL 2009 Office Hours: T TH 2 - 3:30 PM 

UTC 4.114 WCH 4.112 

The main purpose of this class is to provide you a firmer foundation in Sanskrit grammar, 

syntax, and vocabulary. We will do this by reading the epic poem (mah‡k‡vya) Raghuva¸˜a 

by K‡lid‡sa, the preeminent poet and playwright of Sanskrit. As part of this course, you will 

be introduced to the technial vocabulary of the Sanskrit aesthetic tradition (ala¸k‡ra˜‡stra). 

Poets deliberately crafted their work according to the demands of aesthetic perfection. 

Course Requirements: 

Attendance is mandatory, and you are expected to have read and translated initially at 

least 10 verses of the Raghuva¸˜a.  We will increase the number of verses we read in class as 

you get familiar with the text. 

In addition, you should read a book on Sanskrit aesthetics, if you have not done so 

already. Edwin Gerows A Glossary of Indian Figures of Speach, or Indian Poetics. 

Religious Holy Days 

By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to 

the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work 

assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to 

complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence. 

Grading Procedures: 

Grades will be based on two exams: a mid-term and a final. Each will carry 50% of 

the final Grade 

Academic Integrity 

University of Texas Honor Code 

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual 

opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through 

integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community. 

Plagiarism and Academic Dishonesty 

Be careful not to copy the work of peers or to use material without proper attribution. 

Nothing can be more disastrous for your grade or for your college record than to be found 

to have violated the University rules on academic honesty.  Students who violate University 

rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of 

failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the 

individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty 

will be strictly enforced. For further information please visit the Student Judicial Services 

Web site: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.

Documented Disability Statement 

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for 

Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone). Please let me 

know about your needs as soon as possible. 

SYLLABUS 

I will not give the verses to be read for each class day. That will depend of how fast or slow 

we move through the text. In general expect to read 10-15 verses a day. You will receive a 

photocopy of the first few chapters. 

Mid-term Examination will be on October 14. 

Final Exam at the date set by the university.

ANS 384 • Sanskrit Culture

30615 • Spring 2009
Meets T 330pm-630pm GAR 2.124
show description

Study of various aspects and periods of South Asian culture and society.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Publications

Article: 2013. "Talking Animals: Explorations in an Indian Literary Genre." Religions of South Asia 7: 14-26. Published simultaneously in Charming Beauties and Frightful Beasts: Non-Human Animals in South Asian Myth, Ritual and Folklore. Ed. Fabrizio M. Ferrari and Thomas Dähnhardt. Sheffield: Equinox Publishing.

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Book: 2013. King, Governance, and Law in Ancient India: Kauṭilya's Arthaśāstra. New York: Oxford University Press. 784 pages.

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Article: 2013. "Hair" in Brill's Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Ed. Knut A. Jacobsen.

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Book: 2012. (with Mark McClish). The Arthaśāstra: Selections from the Classic Indian Work on Statecraft. Cambridge, Mas.: Hackett Publishing Company.

Article: 2012. "Material Culture and Philology: Semantics of Mining in Ancient India." Journal of the American Oriental Society 132: 23-30.

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Article: 2012. "Kaṇṭakaśodhana: Courts of Criminal Justice in Ancient India." In Devadattīyam: Johannes Bronkhorst Felicitation Volume. Ed. François Voegeli et al., pp. 629-641. Bern: Peter Lang.

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Article: 2012. "Kings, Ascetics, and Brahmins: The Socio-Political Context of Ancient Indian Religions." In Dynamiken der Religionsgeschichte zwischen Asien und Europa. Ed. Volkhard Krech and Marion Steinicke, pp. 117-135. Leiden: Brill.

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Article: 2012. "Patañjali and the Beginnings of Dharmaśāstra: An Alternate Social History of Early Dharmasūtra Production." Aux abords de la clairière: Colloque en l'honneur de Ch. Malamoud, pp. 117-133.Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des Hautes Etudes - Sciences religieuses. Paris: Brepolis.

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Edited Volume: 2012. (with Himanshu Prabha Ray and Janice Leoshko) Reimagining Aśoka: Memory and History. Delhi: Oxford University Press. 450 pages.

Article: 2012. "Aśoka's Inscriptions as Text and Ideology." In Reimagining Aśoka: Memory and History, ed. Patrick Olivelle, Himanshu Prabha Ray and Janice Leoshko, pp. 157-183. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

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Article: 2012. “The Implicit Audience of Legal Texts in Ancient India.” Saṃskr̥ta-Sādhutā, Goodness of Sanskrit: Studies in Honour of Professor Ashok N. Aklujkar.” Ed. Ed. Chikafumi Watanabe, Michele Desmarais, and Yoshichika Honda, pp. 422-428. New Delhi: D.K. Printworld.

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Outreach Article. 2012. "What I Do." Alcalde January 2012, pp. 8-10.

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Article: 2011. "War and Peace: Semantics of saṃdhi and vigraha in the Arthaśāstra." In Bertil Tikkanen and Albion M. Butters (eds.), Pūrvāparaprajñābhinandanam: Indological and Other Essays in Honour of Klaus
Karttunen,
pp. 131-139. Studia Orientalia 110. Helsinki: Societas Orientalis Fennica.

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Online publication: 2011. "Mānava-Dharmaśāstra" an annotated bibliography."Alf Hiltebeitel. (ed.), Oxford Bibliography Online: Hinduism. New York: Oxford University Press.

http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195399318/obo-9780195399318-0066.xml?rskey=hUPZ1J&result=55&q=

Article: 2011. "Penance and Punishment: Marking the Body in Criminal Law and Social Ideology of
Ancient India." Journal of Hindu Studies (Oxford University Press) 4: 1-19.

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Encyclopedia article: 2010. "Upaniṣads and Āraṇyakas." In nut A. Jacobsen (ed.), Brill's Encyclopedia of Hinduism,
Vol. 2, pp. 41-55. Leiden: Brill.

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Encyclopedia article: 2010. "Dharmaśāstra." In Knut A. Jacobsen (ed.), Brill's Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Vol. 2, pp. 56-71. Leiden: Brill.

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Encyclopedia article: 2010. "Āśrama and Saṃnyāsa." in Knut A. Jacobsen (ed.), Brill's Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Vol.
2, pp. 684-689. Leiden: Brill.

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Article: 2010. "Dharmaśāstra: A Literary History." In T. Lubin, D. Davis, and J. K. Krishnan (eds.), Hinduism and Law: An Introduction, pp. 28-57. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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Article: 2009. "The Temple in Sanskrit Legal Literature." In H. P. Ray(ed), Archaeology and Text: Temple in South Asia, pp. 191-204. Delhi: Oxford University Press.

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Book: 2009. Viṣṇu's Code of Law: A Critical Edition and Translation of the Vaiṣṇava Dharmaśāstra.
Harvard Oriental Series, No. 73. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. 593 pages.

Edited volume: 2009. Dharma: Studies in Its Semantic, Cultural, and Religious History. Delhi:
Motilal Banarsidass. 492 pages. Expanded new edition of 2004.

Encyclopedia article: 2009. "Hindu Law: The Formative Period, 400 BCE-400 CE." In Stanley N. Katz (ed.), Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History, Vol. 3, pp. 151-155. New York: Oxford University Press.

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Edited volume: 2009. Aśoka In History and Historical Memory. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass. 149
pages.

Article: 2009. "The Living and the Dead: Ideology and Social Dynamics of Ancestral Commemoration in
India." In H. L. Seneviratne (ed.), The Anthropologist and the Native: Essays for Gananath Obeyesekere, pp. 65-74. Florence: Societa Editrice Fiorentina.

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Encyclopedia article: 2009. "Manusmriti." In Stanley N. Katz (ed.), Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History,
Vol. 4, pp. 144-145. New York: Oxford University Press.

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Book. 2008. Life of the Buddha: Buddhacarita by Asvaghosa. Clay Sanskrit Library. New York: New York University Press. 597 pages.

Article: 2008. "Celibacy in Classical Hinduism." In C. Olson (Ed.), Celibacy and Religious Traditions, pp.151-164. New York: Oxford University Press.

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Article. 2008. "Orality, Memory, and Power: Vedic Scriptures and Brahmanical Hegemony in India." In V.L. Wimbush (Ed.), Theorizing Scriptures: New Critical Orientations to a Cultural Phenomenon,(pp.214-219. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.

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Book: 2008. Collected Essays II: Ascetics and Brahmins. Florence: University of Florence Press, 2008.
pp. 328. [new edition of 2006]

Book: 2008. Collected Essays I: Language, Texts, and Society. Florence: University of Florence Press, 2008.
pp. 419. [new edition of 2005]

Article. 2007. "Manu and Gautama: A Study in Sastric Intertextuality." In K. Preisendanz (Ed.) Expanding and Merging Horizons: Contributions to South Asian and Cross-Cultural Studies in Commemoration of Wilhelm Halbfass, pp.681-692. Vienna, Austria: Austrian Academy of Sciences Press.

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Article. 2007. "The Term vikrama in the Vocabulary of Asvaghosa." In B. Kellner (Ed.), Pramanakirtih: Papers Dedicated to Ernst Steinkellner on the Occasion of his 70th Birthday, pp.587-595. Two Volumes. Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetsche und Buddhistische Studien.

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Article. 2007. "On the Road: The Religious Significance of Walking." In Theatrum Mirabiliorum Indiae Orientalis: A Volume to Celebrate the 70th Birthday of Professor Maria Krzysztof Byrski. Rocznik Orientalistyczny 50: 173-187.

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Article. 2007. "The Date and Provenance of the Viṣṇu-Smṛti." Indologica Taurinensia 33: 149-164.

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Book: 2006. Ascetics and Brahmins: Studies in Ideologies and Institutions. Florence: University of Florence Press. 328 pages.

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Article: 2006. "The Ascetic and the Domestic in Brahmanical Religiosity." In O. Freiberger (Ed.), Critics of Asceticism: Historical Accounts and Comparative Perspectives, pp.25-42. New York: Oxford University Press.

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Article: 2006. "Explorations in the Early History of Dharmaśāstra." In Patrick Olivelle (ed.), Between the Empires: Society in India 300 BC to 400 CE, pp. 169-190. Oxford University Press, New York.

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Article: 2006. "The Beast and the Ascetic: The Wild in the Indian Religious Imagination." In Patrick Olivelle, Ascetics and Brahmins: Studies in Ideologies and Institutions. Florence: University of Florence Press, pp. 91-100.

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Article: 2006. "Heart in the Upanisads." Revisti di Studi Sudasiatici 1: 51-67.

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Book: 2005. Language, Texts, and Society: Explorations in Ancient Indian Culture and Religion. Florence: University of Florence Press. 420 pages.

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Book: 2005. Dharmasutra Parallels. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass. 230 pages.

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Book: 2005. Manu's Code of Law: A Critical Edition and Translation of the Manava-Dharmasastra. New York: Oxford University Press.1131 pages.

Article: 2005."Rebirth and Karma in Cross-Cultural Context." Gananath Obeyesekere Volume. In The Midweek Magazine of THE ISLAND. Wednesday 2, February 2005

Article: 2005. "Power of Words: The Ascetic Appropriation and the Semantic Evolution of dharma." In Language, Texts, and Society: Explorations in Ancient Indian Culture and Religion, pp. 120-135.Florence: University of Florence Press, 2005.

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Edited volume: 2004. Dharma: Studies in Its Semantic, Cultural, and Religious History. Special double issue of Journal of Indian Philosophy. Vol. 32, pp. 421–873.

Book: 2004. The Law Code of Manu (based on the critical edition). Oxford World's Classics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 365 pages.

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Article: 2004. "Manu and the Arthaśāstra: A Study in Sastric Intertextuality." Journal of Indian Philosophy 32: 281-291.

Encyclopedia article: 2004. "Hair." In Encyclopedia of Buddhism, ed. Robert E. Buswell, p. 313. Two vols. New York: Macmillan Reference.

Article: 2004. "Rhetoric and Reality: Women's Agency in the Dharmaśāstras." In R. Crusz, M. Fernando & A. Tilakaratne (Eds.), Encounters with the Word: Essays to Honour Aloysium Pieris, pp.489-505. Colombo, Sri Lanka: Ecumenical Institute for Study and Dialogue.

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Article: 2004. "The Semantic History of Dharma The Middle and Late Vedic Periods." In Dharma: Studies in Its Semantic, Cultural, and Religious History, ed. Patrick Olivelle. Special issue of Journal of Indian Philosophy 32: 491–511.

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Article: 2003. "The Renouncer Traditions." In G. Flood (Ed.), The Companion to Hinduism, pp.271-287. Oxford: Blackwell.

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Article: 2002. "Structure and Composition of the Mānava Dharmaśāstra." Journal of Indian Philosophy 30: 535-574.

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Article: 2002. "Abhaksya and abhojya: An Exploration in Dietary Language." Journal of the American Oriental Society 122: 345-354.

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Article: 2002. "Food for Thought: Dietary Regulations and Social Organization in Ancient India." 2001 Gonda Lecture. Amsterdam: Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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Encyclopedia article. 2002. "Karma." Encyclopedia Brittanica.

Encyclopedia article. 2002. "Moksa." Encyclopedia Brittanica.

Encyclopedia article. 2002. "Upaniṣads." Encyclopedia Brittanica.

Article: 2002. "On Meat-Eaters and Grass-Eaters: An Exploration of Human Nature in Kathā and Dharma Literature." In S.J. Rosen (Ed.), Holy War: Violence and the Bhagavad-gita, pp.99-116. Hampton, Virginia: Deepak Publishing.

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Book: 2000. The Dharmasutras of Āpastamba, Gautama, Baudhāyana, and Vasiṣṭha. Sanskrit editions and annotated translations. In Sources of Indian Law, ed. Patrick Olivelle.Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass. 783 pages.

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Book: 1999. Dharmasūtras: The Law Codes of Ancient India (annotated translation of the Dharmasūtras of Āpastamba, Gautama, Baudhāyana, and Vasiṣṭha). Oxford World's Classics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 480 pages.

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Article: 1999. "Sanskrit Commentators and the Transmission of Texts: Haradatta on Āpastamba Dharmasūtra." Journal of Indian Philosophy 27: 551-574.

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Article: 1999. "Young Śvetaketu: A Literary Study of an Upanisadic Story." Journal of the American Oriental Society 119: 46-70.

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Book: 1998. The Early Upaniṣads: Annotated Text and Translation. (edition with variants, translation, and notes) South Asia Research Series. New York: Oxford University Press. 700 pages.

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Article. 1998. "Caste and Purity: A Study in the Language of the Dharma Literature." Contributions to Indian Sociology 32: 190-216.

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Article: 1998. "Unfaithful Transmitters: Philological Criticism and Critical Editions of the Upaniṣads." Journal of Indian Philosophy 26: 173-187.

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Article: 1998. "Hair and Society: Social Significance of Hair in South Asian Traditions." In A. Hiltebeitel & B.D. Miller (Eds.), Hair: Its Power and Meaning in Asian Cultures, pp.11-49. New York: State University of New York Press.

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Book: 1997. Pancatantra: The Book of India's Folk Wisdom. Oxford World's Classics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 247 pages.

Article. 1997. "Amrta: Women and Indian Technologies of Immortality." Journal of Indian Philosophy 25: 427-449.

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Article. 1997. "Orgasmic Rapture and Divine Ecstasy: The Semantic History of ānanda." Journal of Indian Philosophy 25: 153-180.

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Book: 1996. The Upanisads. Oxford World's Classics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 504 pages.

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Article: 1996. "Dharmaskandhāḥ and Brahmasaṃsthaḥ: A Study of Chandogya Upanisad 2.23.1." Journal of the American Oriental Society 116: 205-219.

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Book: 1995. Rules and Regulations of Brahmanical Asceticism: critical edition and translation of
Yādava Prakāśa's Yatidharmasamuccaya.
Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. 443 pages.

Enclopedia article: 1995. "Hindu Ascetcism." In HarperCollins Dictionary of Religion. Ed. Jonathan Z. Smith. San
Francisco: HarperCollins.

Article. 1995. "Deconstruction of the Body in Indian Asceticsm." In V.L. Wimbush & R. Valantasis (Eds.), Asceticism, pp.188-210. New York: Oxford University Press.

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Article. 1995. "Ascetic Withdrawal or Social Engagement: The Inner Conflict in Indian Religions." In D.S. Lopez (Ed.), Sources of Indian Religions, pp.533-546. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

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Article. 1995. "Food in India: A Review Essay." Journal of Indian Philosophy 23: 367-380.

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Book: 1993. The Āśrama System: History and Hermeneutics of a Religious Institution. New York: Oxford University Press. 274 pages.

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Book: 1992. The Saṃnyāsa Upaniṣads: Hindu Scriptures on Asceticism and Renunciation. New York: Oxford University Press. 320 pages.

Article. 1991. "From Feast to Fast: Food and the Indian Ascetic." In J. Leslie (Ed.), Rules and Remedies in Classical Indian Law (Panels of the VIIth World Sanskrit Conference Vol. 9), pp.17-36. Leiden: E.J. Brill.

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Article. 1990. "Village vs. Wilderness: Ascetic Ideals and the Hindu World." In A.B. Creel & V. Narayanan (Eds.), Monasticism in the Christian and Hindu Traditions: A Comparative Study,(pp.125-160. Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press.

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Book: 1987. Renunciation in Hinduism: A Medieval Debate. Volume II: The Viśiṣṭādvaita Argument. Vienna, Austria: University of Vienna - Institute for Indology. 156 pages.

Article. 1987. "King and Ascetic: State Control of Asceticism in the Arthaśāstra. Festschrift Ludo Rocher, Adyar Library Bulletin 50: 39-59.

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Article. 1987.  "Gananath Obeyesekere and the Study of Religion." Contributions to Indian Sociology 21: 29-35.

Book: 1986. Saṃnyāsapaddhati of Rudradeva. Critically edited with introduction and notes. Madras, India: The Adyar Library and Research Center. 226 pages.

Book: 1986. Renunciation in Hinduism: A Medieval Debate. Volume I:The Debate and the Advaita Argument. Vienna, Austria: University of Vienna - Institute for Indology. 193 pages.

Encyclopedia article: 1986. "Saṃnyāsa." In The New Encyclopedia of Religion, ed Mircea Eliade, Vol. 13, pp. 51-53.
New York: Macmillan & Co.

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Encyclopedia article. 1986. "Rites of Passage: The Hindu Rites." in The New Encyclopedia of Religion, ed Mircea Eliade, Vol. 13, pp. 5387-392. New York: Macmillan & Co.

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Article. 1984. "Function of Textual Tradition in Sannyāsin Orders." In P. Gaeffke & D.A. Utz (Eds.), Identity and Division of Cults and Sects in South Asia, pp.45-57. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania - Department of South Asia Regional Studies.

Article: 1984. "Renouncer and Renunciation in the Dharmaśāstras." In R. Lariviere (Ed.), Studies in Dharmasastra, pp.81-152. Calcutta: Firma KLM.

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Article. 1981. "Ānandatīrtha's Saṃnyāsapaddhati: A Handbook for Madhvaite Ascetics." Adyar Library Bulletin 44-45: 293-303.

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Article. 1981. "Contributions to the Semantic History of Saṃnyāsa." Journal of the American Oriental Society 101: 265-274.

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Article. 1981. "Praṇavamīmāṃsā: A Newly Discovered Work of Vidyāraṇya." Annals of the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute 62: 75-101.

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Article. 1980. "Pañcamāśramavidhi: Rite for Becoming a Naked Ascetic." Wiener Zeitschrift für die Kunde Südasiens 24: 129-145.

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Article: 1978. "Ritual Suicide and the Rite of Renunciation." Wiener Zeitschrift fur die Künde Südasiens 22: 19-44.

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Article. 1978. "The Integration of Renunciation by Orthodox Hinduism." Journal of the Oriental Institute (Baroda) 28: 27-36.

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Book: 1977. Vāsudevāśrama Yatidharmaprakāśa. A Treatise on World Renunciation. Part II: Annotated English Translation. Vienna, Austria: University of Vienna - Institute for Indology. 231 pages.

Book: 1976. Vāsudevāśrama Yatidharmaprakāśa. A Treatise on World Renunciation. Part I: Sanskrit Text. Vienna, Austria: University of Vienna - Institute for Indology. 139 pages.

Article: 1976. "Odes of Renunciation." Wiener Zeitschrift für die Kunde Südasiens 20: 91-100.

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Article. 1975. "A Definition of World Renunciation." Wiener Zeitschrift für die Kunde Südasiens 19: 75-83.

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Book: 1974. The Origin and the Early Development of Buddhist Monachism. Colombo, Sri Lanka: M.D. Gunasena. 86 pages.

Article. 1974. "The Notion of Āśrama in the Dharmaśāstras. Wiener Zeitschrift für die Kunde Südasiens 18: 27-35.

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Resume

Resume

Updated January 19, 2009

PERSONAL

  • Spouse: Suman W. Olivelle
  • Nationality: U.S.A.
  • National Origin: Sri Lanka
  • Home: 10300 Morado Cove, Austin, TX 78759. Tel. (512) 328-3956
  • Office: Department of Asian Studies, University of Texas, 1 University Station G 9300, Austin, TX 78712-0587
  • Telephone: Tel. (512) 471-5811 FAX (512) 471-4469
  • E-mail: jpo@uts.cc.utexas.edu
EDUCATION
  • University of Pennsylvania: Ph.D. (History of Indian Religions), 1974.
  • University of Oxford, England: B.A. Honors (Sanskrit and Pāli), First Class, 1972; M.A. 1977
HONORS
  • President, American Oriental Society, 2005-2006.
  • Vice President, American Oriental Society, 2004-2005.
  • Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair in the Humanities, 2006-present.
  • Featured in a 7-page article "Recent Contributions of Patrick Olivelle to Indology." Religious Studies Review 26(2000): 157-163.
  • The 2001 Gonda Lecturer at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.
  • Numata Professor, University of Vienna, Austria. 2001.
  • Guggenheim Fellowship, 1996-97.
  • Alma Cowden Madden Centennial Professor in Liberal Arts, 2000-2006.
  • Christie and Stanley E. Adams, Jr. Centennial Professor in Liberal Arts, 1998-2000.
  • U.S. Delegate, Oxford University Press, 1998-Present.
  • Book Award: Association for Asian Studies, A. K. Ramanujan Translation Award, 1998, for Upaniṣads .
  • Book Award: American Academy of Religion's Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in the Historical Category, 1994, for The Āśrama System.
  • Mircea Eliade Lecturer in Comparative Religion, University of Western Michigan, 1997.
  • University Fellowship, University of Pennsylvania, 1972-73.
LANGUAGES
  • Modern English, French, Italian, German, Sinhalese
  • Classical Sanskrit, Pāli, Latin
EMPLOYMENT
  • Department of Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin: Chair 1994-2007
  • South Asia Institute, Interim Director 2003-04
  • Center for Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin: Director 1994-2000
  • Department of Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin: Professor of Sanskrit and Indian Religions, 1991-present
  • Department of Religious Studies, Indiana University: Chair 1984-90; Professor, 1983-1991; Associate Professor, 1978-83; Assistant Professor, 1974-78.

FELLOWSHIPS

  • Wolfson College, University of Oxford, Visiting Scholar, 2007.
  • American Council of Learned Societies, 2000-2001.
  • University of Texas, Faculty Research Assignment, 2000-2001.
  • Guggenheim Fellowship, 1996-97.
  • University of Texas, Faculty Research Assignment, 1996-97.
  • American Institute of Indian Studies and Smithsonian Institution, Senior Fellowship, 1982.
  • Wolfson College, University of Oxford, Visiting Fellowship, 1981-82.
  • Indiana University, Summer Faculty Fellowship, 1980.
  • Wolfson College, University of Oxford, Visiting Fellowship, 1977-78.
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Fellowship, 1977-78.
  • American Institute of Indian Studies, Post-Doctoral Study Tour Award, 1975.
  • Indiana University, Summer Faculty Fellowship, 1975.

GRANTS (recent)

  • NEH Grant for Critical Edition of Manusmti, 1998–2001 ($128,000).
  • Smithsonian Institution, Grant for Collation and Manuscript Acquisition, 1993 ($35,200).

CURRENT RESEARCH

  • Translation of the Arthaśāstra
  • Dictionary of Ancient Indian Law and Statecraft.
  • Book on ancient Indian social construction of the body, tentatively entitled Images of the Body, Visions of Society : Religion and Body in Ancient India.
  • Critical Edition of the Yājñavalkya Dharmaśāstra.

INVITED LECTURES

  • Select list of institutions: Oxford University, University of Vienna, Harvard, Brown, Columbia, University of Virginia, UC-Santa Barbara, UCLA, Stanford, University of Washington, University of Wisconsin, University of Western Michigan, University of Tennessee, University of North Carolina-Ashville, University of Pennsylvania, University of Chicago, McMaster University, University of Hamburg, University of Gottingen, University of Halle/Wittenburg, University of Warsaw, University of Torino, University of Rome, University of Colombo (Sri Lanka), University of British Columbia, University of Peking, University of Kunmin, University of Chengdu, University of Pune (India), University of Cardiff (U.K.), University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of Sydney, Australian National University, University of Melbourne.

MAJOR ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE

  • University of Texas
    • Department
      • Chair, Department of Asian Studies, 1994-2007
      • South Asia Institute, Interim Director, 2003-04
      • Director, Center for Asian Studies, 1994-2000
    • University
      • Faculty Council, 2006-2007.
      • College of Liberal Arts, Tenure and Promotions Committee, 1991-93.
      • Committee to Reorganize the Department of Oriental and African Studies, 1993.
  • Indiana University
    • Department of Religious Studies
      • Chair, 1984-90.
      • Acting Chair, 1980-81.
    • University
      • College of Arts and Sciences, Committee to Revise the Undergraduate Curriculum, 1989-90.
      • Art Museum Policy Committee, 1985-88.
      • Indiana University Press Faculty Advisory Committee, 1984-85.
      • Indiana University, Bloomington, Tenure Committee, 1983-86.
      • Graduate School Membership Committee, 1978-81.
  • Profession
    • President, American Oriental Society, 2005-2006.
    • Vice President, American Oriental Society, 2004-2005.
    • U.S. Delegate, Oxford University Press. 1998-present.
    • Member, Board of Elector for Boden Professor Sanskrit, Oxford University, 2004.
    • Trustee, American Institute of Indian Studies, 1991-2004.
    • American Academy of Religion, Selection Committee for the Editor of JAAR, 2004.
    • Committee to create the American Institute of Sri Lankan Studies, 1994-95
    • American Academy of Religion, Religion in South Asia Committee, 1993-95
    • Chair of the Association of Chairs of Departments of Religious Studies, 1989-90
    • Nominations Committee, American Oriental Society: Member 1985-86, Chair 1986-87, Chair 2002-03.
    • Member, Scientific Committee, Corpus Juris Sanscriticum. CESMEO, Turin, Italy.
    • Series Editor of book series "South Asia Research" published by Oxford University Press, New York.
    • Series Editor of book series "Sources of Indian Law" published by Motilal Banarsidass, the major Indological publisher in India.
    • Series Editor. "Madden Lectures in South Asian Studies," University of Texas at Austin.

Honors

Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair in the Humanities

2007 - present

Alma Cowden Madden Centennial Professor in Liberal Arts

2000-2006

Book Award: American Academy of Religion's Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in the Historical Category

1994, for The Āśrama System

Book Award: Association for Asian Studies, A. K. Ramanujan Translation Award

1998, for Upaniṣads

Christie and Stanley E. Adams, Jr. Centennial Professor in Liberal Arts

1998-2000

Featured in a 7–page article "Recent Contributions of Patrick Olivelle to Indology."

Religious Studies Review 26(2000): 157-163.

Guggenheim Fellowship

1996-97

Mircea Eliade Lecturer in Comparative Religion, University of Western Michigan

1997

Numata Professor, University of Vienna, Austria

2001

Olivelle Highlight from Life and Letters

President, American Oriental Society

2005-2006

The 2001 Gonda Lecturer at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences

U.S. Delegate, Oxford University Press

1998-present

University Fellowship, University of Pennsylvania

1972-73

Vice President, American Oriental Society

2004-2005

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