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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Paula Newberg

Professor Ph.D., University of Chicago

Paula Newberg

Contact

ANS 390 • Complex Emergencies

31154 • Spring 2015
Meets M 200pm-500pm SRH 3.212
(also listed as GOV 390L )
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Study of various Asian studies-related topics that do not focus on any single geographic region.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 361 • Rights & The State: S Asia

31910 • Fall 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm CBA 4.340
(also listed as GOV 365L )
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RIGHTS AND THE STATE: MODERN SOUTH ASIA

(Global Cultures Flag)

 

Course overview:  Politics in modern south Asia are shaped, often dramatically, by contests about the nature of rights, the ways that citizens claim their rights, and the ways that states respond to those claims.   Every state in the region contends with popular movements to assert rights, whether through war and insurgencies, experiments with constitutions and the rule of law, or efforts to secure the rights of excluded groups, minorities and the economically disadvantaged.  Each state has also tried variously to promote and protect rights – on their own, and with their neighbors and the international community -- and to limit them in order to consolidate power.

 

What do rights have to do with political change?  With contemporary cases as our guide, we will explore basic elements of political change in the region by asking how states and societies are meeting the challenges of creating rights-based political orders, and how and why they succeed or fail.   The range of potential topics is intriguingly varied and broad; after our introduction to the field and the region, we will focus on topics related to rights and conflict.

 

Using political writings, government documents, laws and regulations, social science analysis, local journalism and reporting from local and international organizations we will dissect the meanings of rights in the region, and strive to understand the different ways that these complex issues affect citizens, states, observers and advocates.  In the process, we will examine the tools that are employed to protect rights or limit them, and how reports on rights conditions are developed and used.

 

Neither prior experience with the region nor detailed knowledge of human rights is required for this course (although those who have studied either or both are very welcome).  We will use our readings and discussions to learn about the region through the lenses of rights and governance, and to refine our understanding of rights through the experiences of the people and states that comprise south Asia today.  By the end of the course, each student should have a working understanding of some of the many challenges involving fundamental rights in south Asia, a grasp of analysis and reporting related to rights, and the skills needed to write about rights and politics.

 

Prerequisites:  Six hours of lower-division Government courses. 

 

Requirements:  A seminar succeeds when all of us are fully engaged.  Please use any electronic devices – including computers, tablets, and telephones -- in the classroom only when we are consulting documents that are most easily available online.  If you carry a cell phone with you, please silence it before/during class.

 

All seminar members are required to attend all classes punctually; complete all assignments (both written and oral); participate actively in class and as designated, lead class discussions on assigned readings and written projects.   Your class attendance and participation will be included in determining your final grade.

 

Grading:  Class participation and collegiality will be essential to the success of this seminar. Your oral and written products will be graded on the basis of their clarity, organization,  structure and quality of argument, including your ability to marshal evidence to support your arguments.   Grading will be done on a 100-point scale, translated into plus and minus grades.

 

Participation:  Participation will count toward 40% of the term grade.  As part of class preparation, I will assign, on a rotating basis, 1-2 page memos on specific topics related to readings and class discussion.  Specific assignments for class discussion will be indicated as we progress through the semester.   All class members are expected to participate in every class session.

 

Papers:  Each student will be expected to prepare two concise, 1500-1750 word written assignments and a final paper of approximately 2250-2500 words.  Submission dates will be late in the second, third and fourth months of the term.  Paper #1 will count toward 15% of your grade; paper #2 toward 20% of your grade; and paper #3 for 25% of your grade. 

 

Please provide your papers to me in hard copy (in person) as well as electronically.  Please take the time to revise, proofread, and follow accepted form for footnotes and references. 

 

Penalties for late paper submission will be ½ grade for each late day, unless you provide timely and appropriate documentation from health services or your personal physician. 

 

Course readings:   Two books are available for purchase:

 

Andrew Clapham:  Human Rights:  A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2007). This volume is optional, but recommended.

 

Jack Donnelly:  Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice, 2nd Edition (Cornell University Press, 2003).  This volume is required.

 

For reference and background, you might want to refer to a compendium edited by Micheline Ishay entitled  The Human Rights Reader:  Major Political Essays, 2nd. Edition.

 

Other materials (including videos):  I will post class assignments – including PDFs when URLs are not available -- and other notices on Blackboard on a regular basis.   Class readings are generally available online; in some instances, I will distribute materials in class.  Should you miss a class session, please contact me (and perhaps a classmate) for further information. 

Flags:

Global Cultures

ANS 361 • Rights And The State In S Asia

32153 • Spring 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm GDC 5.304
(also listed as GOV 365L )
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Course overview:  Politics in modern south Asia are shaped, often dramatically, by contests about the nature of rights, the ways that citizens claim their rights, and state responses to those claims.   Every state in the region contends with popular movements to assert rights, whether through war and insurgencies, experiments with constitutions and the rule of law, or efforts to secure the rights of excluded groups, minorities and the economically disadvantaged.  Each state has also tried variously to promote and protect rights, and to limit them in order to consolidate power.

 

Using contemporary cases to illuminate these issues, we will explore basic elements of political change in the region by asking how states and societies are meeting the challenges of creating rights-based political orders, and how and why they succeed or fail.   The range of potential topics is intriguingly varied and broad; after our introduction to the field and the region, we will focus on topics related to rights and conflict.

 

Using political writings, government documents, laws and regulations, social science analysis, local journalism and reporting from local and international organizations we will dissect the meanings of rights in the region, and learn to understand the different ways that these complex issues affect citizens, states, observers and advocates.  In the process, we will examine the tools that are employed to protect rights or limit them, and how reports on rights conditions are developed and used.

 

Neither prior experience with the region nor detailed knowledge of human rights is required for this course.  We will use our readings and discussions to learn about the region through the lenses of rights and governance, and to refine our understanding of rights through the experiences of the people and states that comprise south Asia today.  By the end of the course, each student should have a working understanding of some of the many challenges involving fundamental rights in south Asia, a grasp of analysis and reporting related to rights, and the capacity to write about right and politics.

 

Prerequisites:  Six hours of lower-division Government courses

 

Requirements:  Students are required to attend all classes punctually; complete all assignments (both written and oral); participate actively in class and as designated, lead class discussions on assigned readings and written projects.

 

Each student will be expected to prepare three concise, 1500 word written assignments; submission dates are indicated in the course outline.  Please provide your papers to me in hard copy, and in person.  Please take the time to revise, proofread, and follow accepted form for footnotes and references. 

 

Be sure that your written submissions do not plagiarize the intellectual property of others:  do not copy, without attribution, a sequence of three or more words from a published text, an internet source, grey literature or another person’s work.  Plagiarizing is a form of cheating, and is grounds for a failing grade in this course.  Any incident of plagiarism will be reported to Student Judicial Services.

 

I will post class assignments – including PDFs when URLs are not available -- and other notices; should you miss a class session, please contact me (and perhaps a classmate) for further information. 

 

A seminar succeeds only if all of us are fully engaged.  Please do not use any electronic devices – including computers, tablets, and telephones -- in the classroom.  If you carry a cell phone with you, please silence it before class.

 

I expect all students to see me during office hours and other pre-arranged appointments to discuss classroom and written assignments.  Should office hours be inconvenient, please schedule an appointment with me for another time.

 

Course readings: 

 

We will make use of two books that are available for purchase:

 

Andrew Clapham:  Human Rights:  A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2007)

 

Jack Donnelly:  Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice, 2nd Edition (Cornell University Press, 2003)

 

For reference and background, you may refer to an online compendium edited by Micheline Ishay:  The Human Rights Reader:  Major Political Essays, 2nd. Edition.

 

Class reading assignments, selected primarily from the readings list, will be posted on Blackboard; most are available online, and in some instances, I will distribute materials in class.  The reading list is far longer than will be assigned for specific class sessions, and these pieces vary considerably in length and complexity.  It should help guide you as you seek additional sources, consider paper topics and generally, expand your horizons.

 

Grading:  Class participation is essential to the success of this seminar, and will count for 25% of the term grade. 

 

The first paper will contribute 20% of the course grade; the second paper, 25%, and the third paper, 30% of the overall grade.  Penalties for late paper submission will be ½ grade for each late day, unless you provide timely and appropriate documentation from health services or your personal physician. 

 

Your oral and written products will be graded on the basis of their clarity, organization, structure and quality of argument, including your ability to marshal evidence to support your arguments. 

ANS 390 • Complex Emergencies

31952 • Fall 2013
Meets M 330pm-630pm PAR 305
(also listed as GOV 390L )
show description

Study of various Asian studies-related topics that do not focus on any single geographic region.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 361 • Rights And The State In S Asia

31702 • Spring 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm CLA 0.108
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

Course Description

Contemporary politics in south Asia are shaped by contests about the nature of rights, the many ways that citizens claim their rights, and the manners in which statesrespond to those claims.   Every state in the region contends with movements to assert rights (whether internally or across borders), through war and insurgencies, experiments with constitutions and the rule of law, and efforts to secure the rights of excluded groups, minorities and the economically disadvantaged.  We will explore the development of politics in the region by asking how states and societies meet the challenges of creating rights-respecting political orders, why they succeed or fail, and what current experience means for the future of the region.   

To illuminate a series of case studies, we will analyze political writings, government documents, laws and treaties, scholarly analysis, local journalism and reporting from local and international organizations to dissect the meanings of rights in the region.  Our task will be to clarify the different ways that these complex issues are understood by citizens, states, observers and advocates. 

 

Course Requirements

Students are expected to attend and participate in all class sessions and complete all assignments.  Each student will be expected to help lead class discussions of assigned readings.  Three written assignments of 1500 words will be required, and students will be asked to present on some of their writtenwork orally.

 

Firstwritten assignment                      20%

Second written assignment                 25%

Thirdwritten assignment                     25%

Oral presentation                              15%.

Classparticipation                              15%

 

Texts

Many of the readings will be collected into a course packet.

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