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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Rupert Snell

Professor Ph.D., University of London

Professor and Director of Hindi Urdu Flagship Program
Rupert Snell

Contact

Biography

Courses taught:

Undergraduate courses:

First Year Hindi II; Panorama of Hindi Literature; Flagship Hindi I, III; Flagship Urdu I; Narrative in Pre-Modern India; My Sweet Lord: Devotion in Medieval India; Landscape and Locale in India


Graduate courses:

Panorama of Hindi Literature;

Interests

Poetics and aesthetics in pre-modern Hindi; poetry in Braj Bhasha and Awadhi dialects.

HIN 330 • Hindi And English Translation

32345 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm PAR 302
(also listed as HIN 384 )
show description

The process of translating a text leads us to the deepest possible contemplation of its meanings; and it helps us appreciate the expressive capabilities of both ‘original’ and ‘target’ languages. This course explores the issues involved in translating literary texts from Hindi to English and, to a lesser extent, vice versa. Our selected texts will represent a range of literary genres from modern prose fiction to pre-modern poetry. By comparing existing translations, writing our own versions, assessing different styles and techniques, and seeing (if briefly) what the theorists have to say, we will deepen our understanding of the stylistics of Hindi — what makes the language work, how it expresses sentiment and meaning in a variety of contexts and registers, in what ways the written language differs from colloquial speech, and what factors connect or divide the two worlds of Hindi and English. The class will operate as a seminar, reading translations against their originals in order to analyze the ways in which meaning is lost (or preserved, or enhanced) when a text is ‘taken across’ from one language to another. Students registering for this class must have a good reading knowledge of modern standard Hindi, an appetite for cultural adventure, and a willingness to lead the class by offering lively presentations.

The graduate mode (HIN 384) of this course entails and requires an ability to bring sophisticated critical perspectives to the practical process of translation and to the secondary scholarship analyzing it; the writing requirement for graduates is double that of undergraduates.

See the downloadable syllabus for more details.  The instructor can be contacted by mail: rupertsnell@austin.utexas.edu

HIN 332 • Style And Register In Hindi

32350 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.202
(also listed as HIN 384 )
show description

Practicing skills in reading, listening, writing, and speaking in everyday social situations and some formal situations. Relevant for students working toward the "Advanced" level on the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency scale, and equivalent to level two on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale. 

Hindi 330 (Topic: Style and Register in Hindi) and 332 may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Hindi 312L with a grade of at least C.

HIN 434K • Flagship Hindi Vii

32355 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 21
show description

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HIN 384 • Hindi And English Translation

32370 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm PAR 302
(also listed as HIN 330 )
show description

The process of translating a text leads us to the deepest possible contemplation of its meanings; and it helps us appreciate the expressive capabilities of both ‘original’ and ‘target’ languages. This course explores the issues involved in translating literary texts from Hindi to English and, to a lesser extent, vice versa. Our selected texts will represent a range of literary genres from modern prose fiction to pre-modern poetry. By comparing existing translations, writing our own versions, assessing different styles and techniques, and seeing (if briefly) what the theorists have to say, we will deepen our understanding of the stylistics of Hindi — what makes the language work, how it expresses sentiment and meaning in a variety of contexts and registers, in what ways the written language differs from colloquial speech, and what factors connect or divide the two worlds of Hindi and English. The class will operate as a seminar, reading translations against their originals in order to analyze the ways in which meaning is lost (or preserved, or enhanced) when a text is ‘taken across’ from one language to another. Students registering for this class must have a good reading knowledge of modern standard Hindi, an appetite for cultural adventure, and a willingness to lead the class by offering lively presentations.

The graduate mode (HIN 384) of this course entails and requires an ability to bring sophisticated critical perspectives to the practical process of translation and to the secondary scholarship analyzing it; the writing requirement for graduates is double that of undergraduates.

See the downloadable syllabus for more details.  The instructor can be contacted by mail: rupertsnell@austin.utexas.edu

HIN 384 • Style And Register In Hindi

32375 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 1.202
(also listed as HIN 332 )
show description

Study of various aspects and periods of Hindi language and culture.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and six semester hours of upper-division coursework in Hindi or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

HIN 330 • Love And Lovers In Hindi Lit

32675 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.210
(also listed as HIN 384 )
show description

This Hindi-medium course explores literary depictions of love and lovers, both human and divine, in pre-modern and modern texts. We also sample poetry translated into Hindi or English from Sanskrit, Prakrit, and Tamil, together with modern Hindi poetry, prose fiction, and cinema. Background readings are mostly in English; class discussions will be in a highly authentic mixture of Hindi and English. The prerequisite is HIN 312L with a grade of at least C; or the permission of the instructor. The class supplies everything that is required for a reader of modern Hindi to be able to appreciate pre-modern poetry in the Braj Bhasha and Awadhi dialects. See the syllabus for more details. 

HIN 384 • Love And Lovers In Hindi Lit

32695 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.210
(also listed as HIN 330 )
show description

This Hindi-medium course explores literary depictions of love and lovers, both human and divine, in pre-modern and modern texts. We also sample poetry translated into Hindi or English from Sanskrit, Prakrit, and Tamil, together with modern Hindi poetry, prose fiction, and cinema. Background readings are mostly in English; class discussions will be in a highly authentic mixture of Hindi and English. The prerequisite is HIN 312L with a grade of at least C; or the permission of the instructor. The class supplies everything that is required for a reader of modern Hindi to be able to appreciate pre-modern poetry in the Braj Bhasha and Awadhi dialects. See the syllabus for more details. 

HIN 330 • Autobiography In Hindi

32350 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm MEZ 2.102
(also listed as HIN 384 )
show description

This course is based on readings, in Hindi, of selections of autobiographical writing. Please see the syllabus for a full description.

HIN 384 • Autobiography In Hindi

32375 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm MEZ 2.102
(also listed as HIN 330 )
show description

This course is based on readings, in Hindi, of selections of autobiographical writing. Please see the syllabus for a full description.

ANS 372 • Sweet Lord: Devotn Medvl India

31750 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

This English-medium course looks at the various manifestations of devotional religion

underlying north Indian culture. Our main focus will be on Hindu bhakti traditions,

studied by reading translations of devotional poetry in its historical and cultural context.

Most of our sources will be selected from the pre-modern literatures of languages such

as Hindi, Punjabi and Bengali, but our search for the roots of these literary traditions

will also lead us back to Sanskrit texts such as the Bhāgavata Purāṇa and the Gītagovinda.

We will also examine the three postulates of the course title: “MY” – the personal

connection inherent in devotionalism; “SWEET” – the role of aesthetics and sentiment in

devotional attitudes; and “LORD” – perceptions of dependence and divine majesty.

Students with some knowledge of the religious and cultural “map” of India will be best

positioned to benefit from this course; students who know Hindi will find opportunities

to read some Hindi texts. The essential prerequisite, however, is an energetic interest in

the subject and a desire to study a wide range of remarkable primary literature.

BEN 506 • First-Year Bengali I

31875 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 500pm-600pm BUR 128
show description

Not open to native speakers of Bengali.

BEN 312K • Second-Year Bengali I

31880 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 400pm-500pm WEL 3.402
show description

Not open to native speakers of Bengali.  Prerequisite: Bengali 507 with a grade of at least C.

HIN 330 • Panorama Of Hindi Literature

32149 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm MEZ 2.102
show description

A Panorama of Hindi Literature

HIN 330/384 Fall semester 2012 —  TTh 5:00–6:30,  MEZ 2.102

Rupert Snell  Office hours — TTh 1:00–2:30, WCH 4.130

 

This course offers an introduction to Hindi literature, and investigates how writers develop individual styles to express meaning, mood, and inference. Each piece that we read in Hindi, whether a short story, a poem, or an extract from a novel or autobiography, will be contextualized by wider readings in translation, and/or by analytical studies in English.  Our focus will be on 20th-century writing, but towards the end of the course we will also sample “classical” texts from the 16th and 17th centuries — an essential backdrop to modern writing and still very much a living part of North Indian culture. 

In class each week we will focus on reading a text in the original Hindi. You must prepare the texts in advance, using the glossaries supplied, and must also read the specified English readings and translations; there will be a quiz on this material at the very beginning of the Tuesday class. Keeping up with text preparation and the weekly readings is essential. No make-ups for missed quizzes! 

Although the course schedule does not include formal presentations by students, our classes will be very interactive and will have ample opportunity for discussion. In line with the constitution of India, Hindi and English in parallel will be our official class languages!

Students with four semesters of Hindi study, or equivalent knowledge, are eligible for this class.  

 

ASSESSMENT

Quizzes on weekly readings 20%

Class discussion 20%

Essay in English  (Oct. 18th) 20%

Translation Project  (Nov. 15th) 20%

Take-home final  (TBA) 20%

Essays must be submitted in hard copy on October 18th (HIN 330 students — 1500 words; HIN 384 students — 3000 words).  Drafts may be submitted for feedback by October 9th.

Translation Project: you may choose your own text: this is an opportunity to develop your own interests and preferences. The subject and scope of the project must be approved by November 1st, and the final project must be submitted in hard copy on November 15th. Drafts may be submitted for feedback by November 6th. Each project will consist of a passage to be translated from Hindi to English, together with an analytical commentary, in English, on the translation process. The length of the agreed passage will depend on the type of the individual text; passages for HIN 384 students will be longer and more challenging than those for HIN 330 students. 

You are strongly advised to take up the option of submitting drafts of essays and translation projects!

HIN 330 • Autobiography In Hindi

32022 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.204
(also listed as HIN 384 )
show description


HIN 434K • Flagship Urdu Vii

32040 • Fall 2011
Meets T 400pm-500pm BEN 1.118
(also listed as URD 434K )
show description

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HIN 384 • Autobiography In Hindi

32052 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.204
(also listed as HIN 330 )
show description


URD 434K • Flagship Urdu Vii

32690 • Fall 2011
Meets T 400pm-500pm BEN 1.118
(also listed as HIN 434K )
show description

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HIN 330 • Panorama Of Hindi Literature

32420 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.204
(also listed as HIN 384 )
show description

In this course we will study key Hindi texts, in the original, from half a millennium of literary
development. Our survey will include selections from the devotional verse in the Braj Bhasha and
Awadhi dialects by 16th-century “poet-saints” such as Surdas, Mirabai and Tulsidas; we will also read
poetry composed under the patronage of regional courts in the 17th and 18th centuries, examining its
connectivities to the devotional poets and also to older and broader Indian poetic themes such as love,
the world, and the poets’ own reflections on the art (and craft) of poetry. As we move on to explore texts
from the 19th century we will witness the arrivalof two new guests at the table: “modern standard” Hindi
in the Khari Boli dialect, and English-influenced genres such as prose fiction and free verse. With the
transition into literary modernity we will encounter classics from the 20th-century canon, including short
stories, satire, autobiography and poetry. Our survey will not be strictly chronological but will trace
themes and sensibilities across periods and genres. Textual selections will be studied in their cultural
context with the help of English-medium histories, with glossaries and translations being provided when
necessary. The Braj and Awadhi texts will be accompanied by a full range of supportive material:
students are not expected to have any prior knowledge of these dialects — nor to have any great
difficulty in encountering them for the first time. Students with five semesters of Hindi study, or
equivalent knowledge, will be eligible to take this class.

TEXTS:

Kabir – Bijak / Granthavali
Tulsidas – Ramcaritmanas
Surdas – Sursagar
Mirabai – Padavali
Biharilal – Satsai
Sundardas – Sundar-vilas
Banarasidas – Ardhakathanak
Lallulal – Premsagar
Bharatendu Harishchandra – Bharat ki durdasha
Premcand – Kafan
Sharad Joshi – short satirical pieces
Harivansh Rai Bachchan – Kya bhulun kya yad karun (autobiography)

GRADING:

Five short articles on individual authors/genres (@ 10%) 50%
Term paper (10 pages) 25%
Take-home exam 25%

HIN 434L • Flagship Urdu Viii

32435 • Spring 2011
Meets T 400pm-500pm BUR 128
(also listed as URD 434L )
show description

Flagship Urdu VIII

HIN 384 • Panorama Of Hindi Literature

32450 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.204
(also listed as HIN 330 )
show description

In this course we will study key Hindi texts, in the original, from half a millennium of literary
development. Our survey will include selections from the devotional verse in the Braj Bhasha and
Awadhi dialects by 16th-century “poet-saints” such as Surdas, Mirabai and Tulsidas; we will also read
poetry composed under the patronage of regional courts in the 17th and 18th centuries, examining its
connectivities to the devotional poets and also to older and broader Indian poetic themes such as love,
the world, and the poets’ own reflections on the art (and craft) of poetry. As we move on to explore texts
from the 19th century we will witness the arrivalof two new guests at the table: “modern standard” Hindi
in the Khari Boli dialect, and English-influenced genres such as prose fiction and free verse. With the
transition into literary modernity we will encounter classics from the 20th-century canon, including short
stories, satire, autobiography and poetry. Our survey will not be strictly chronological but will trace
themes and sensibilities across periods and genres. Textual selections will be studied in their cultural
context with the help of English-medium histories, with glossaries and translations being provided when
necessary. The Braj and Awadhi texts will be accompanied by a full range of supportive material:
students are not expected to have any prior knowledge of these dialects — nor to have any great
difficulty in encountering them for the first time. Students with five semesters of Hindi study, or
equivalent knowledge, will be eligible to take this class.

TEXTS:

Kabir – Bijak / Granthavali
Tulsidas – Ramcaritmanas
Surdas – Sursagar
Mirabai – Padavali
Biharilal – Satsai
Sundardas – Sundar-vilas
Banarasidas – Ardhakathanak
Lallulal – Premsagar
Bharatendu Harishchandra – Bharat ki durdasha
Premcand – Kafan
Sharad Joshi – short satirical pieces
Harivansh Rai Bachchan – Kya bhulun kya yad karun (autobiography)

GRADING:

Five short articles on individual authors/genres (@ 10%) 50%
Term paper (10 pages) 25%
Take-home exam 25%

URD 434L • Flagship Urdu Viii

33070 • Spring 2011
Meets T 400pm-500pm BUR 128
(also listed as HIN 434L )
show description

Flagship Urdu VIII

HIN 434K • Flagship Urdu Vii

31267 • Fall 2010
Meets T 400pm-500pm PAR 210
(also listed as URD 434K )
show description

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

URD 434K • Flagship Urdu Vii

31912 • Fall 2010
Meets T 400pm-500pm PAR 210
(also listed as HIN 434K )
show description

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HIN 330 • Genre/Text/Trans Premod Hindi

31525 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.204
(also listed as HIN 384 )
show description

Study of specific subjects related to Hindi culture as reflected in its literary productions and other modes of expression.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Hindi 312L with a grade of at least C.

HIN 384 • Genre/Text/Trans Premod Hindi

31550 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 1.204
(also listed as HIN 330 )
show description

Study of various aspects and periods of Hindi language and culture.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and six semester hours of upper-division coursework in Hindi or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 372 • Sweet Lord: Devotn Medvl India

31165 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 MEZ 1.122
(also listed as R S 341 )
show description

MY SWEET LORD
DEVOTION IN MEDIEVAL INDIA
ANS 372, RS 341
Rupert Snell — rupertsnell@mail.utexas.edu — WCH 5.104a
TTH 9.30–11.00, MEZ 1.120
Fall 2009
This course is about devotional religion – a central element of Indian
culture and a major part of the life experience of contemporary
India. Our main focus will be on North Indian bhakti traditions,
which we will study by reading translations of devotional poetry in
its historical and cultural context. The core of the syllabus will be
the poetry of Tulsidas, Surdas, Mirabai, Kabir, and other medieval
poets whose work continues to inspire and delight modern readers
and audiences. While most of our sources will be selected from the
pre-modern literatures of languages such as Hindi, Punjabi and
Bengali, our search for the roots of these literary traditions will also
lead us back to Sanskrit texts such as the Bhagavata Purana and the
Gitagovinda, and we will also look at seminal Alvar poetry from the
Tamil culture of southern India.
Major themes and issues will include: aesthetics and poetics; literary
genres; poetry & painting; hagiography; textual transmission &
historicity; the translator’s lens; literacy & orality; music,
performance & recital styles; the sectarian milieu; temple and
private worship, and the lives of the saintly. We will also examine
the three postulates of the course title (borrowed from a song by
George Harrison): “MY” – the personal connection inherent in
devotionalism; “SWEET” – the role of aesthetics and sentiment in
devotional attitudes; and “LORD” – perceptions of dependence and
divine majesty.
Students with some knowledge of the religious and cultural “map”
of India will be best positioned to benefit from this course; students
who know Hindi will find opportunities to read some Hindi texts.
The essential prerequisite, however, is an energetic interest in the
subject and a desire to study a wide range of primary literature.

HIN 432K • Flagship Hindi III

31670 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm GAR 1.134
show description

HIN 432K — Flagship III — Syllabus & Schedule
Instructor: Rupert Snell (rupertsnell@mail.utexas.edu).
Office hours (provisional): TTH 11.00-12.30, WCH 5.104a.
Teaching assistant: Sandeep Gupta (sandeepg@mail.utexas.edu).
Office hours — TBA.
Prerequisite: Flagship Hindi II.
Classes: TH 5.00–6.30 in GAR 1.134.
Course booklet: sat åa†mkTa´Å — Selections from Seven Hindi Autobiographies.
Overview of the course. We shall continue to work on the four skills of reading,
writing, speaking and listening that formed the focus of your first-year Flagship
syllabus; but as we encounter different styles and registers of Hindi, we will discover
which kinds of language and vocabulary are best suited for which purpose. We will
frequently use online media as sources for news and current affairs, and will range
widely across numerous different styles of formal and informal language. A theme
running through the semester will be autobiography, whose narratives give a unique
insight into Indian society; the course-book selections from seven widely diverse
autobiographies will form the backbone of our work here. Readings are to be prepared in
advance. Weekly homework assignments are very varied, with no two tasks being alike.
Homework is due 5pm Tuesdays and is to be left in my mailbox, either in HUF or in
DAS (WCH 4th floor); it will normally be returned with comments at the Thursday
class. As the assignments are set in advance, don’t let any one of them take you by
surprise – prepare early! Advice on homework can be sought in office hours, or by
email at any time. Assignments involving writing in Hindi should be 500-600 words in
length unless otherwise specified. Follow the instructions for each assignment closely.
Grading and assessment
Homework 50%
Three exams @ 10% 30% (Wednesdays 9/23, 10/21, 11/18)
Class participation 20%
UT notice regarding disability: Students with disabilities may request appropriate
academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community
Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.
SCHEDULE
WEEK 1, August 27 — Introductions; course procedures, aims and objectives; current
news stories on Hindi-medium websites.
HOMEWORK 1, due Tuesday 1 September — Your account of a current news story as
described in this week’s Hindi media. (Go to samachar.com and click ih~dI). Cite the
URLs you have used, give your article an appropriate title, and include your own
reactions to the item.
WEEK 2, September 3 — (a) Presentation & discussion of two of the news stories used
in homework. (b) Reading and discussion of Javed Akhtar’s introduction to Tarkash.
HOMEWORK 2, due Tuesday 8 September — Summarize the opening pages of Javed
Akhtar’s introduction to Tarkash (use third person throughout).
WEEK 3, September 10 — (a) Tarkash continued. (b) Words and word origins.
HOMEWORK 3, due Tuesday 15 September — A passage from your own
autobiography (publication date 2049) recounting an event from your childhood.
Include the title of your autobiography!
WEEK 4, September 17 — Reading Harishankar Parsai’s autobiography; discussion of
his language, the register he uses, alternative styles of expression.
HOMEWORK 4, due Tuesday 22 September — 4-minute audio or video recording of
discussion with a friend or classmate (anybody whose Hindi is as good as yours) about
a current news event. Recording to be mailed to rupertsnell@mail.utexas.edu.
WEEK 5, September 24 — (a) Dictation. (b) Reading Kaushalya Baisantri’s
autobiography.
HOMEWORK 5, due Tuesday 29 September — Who are the Dalits? An essay researched
through Hindi media by Googling “dilt”. Cite your sources.
WEEK 6, October 1 — More from Kaushalya Baisantri’s autobiography, and
discussion of her style.
HOMEWORK 6, due Tuesday 6 October. Meri Hindi — not an essay, but a bullet-point
discussion of any problems you have in learning Hindi, together with your strategies
for overcoming them.
WEEK 7, October 8 — News stories from the Hindi media, including Karwa Chauth.
HOMEWORK 7, due Tuesday 13 October — What is the significance of the Karwa Chauth
festival? Research it online and write a 250-word article with the heading krva cOT.
Then give one- or two-sentence definitions in Hindi of the following words: ìt, pvR,
¨pvas, †yOhar, poe, cOT, ctuTIR, sUyoRdy.
WEEK 8, October 15 — Amitabh’s accident: reading the autobiography of Harivansh Rai
Bachchan.
HOMEWORK 8, due Tuesday 20 October — The meaning of Madhushala: your
interpretative commentary on four stanzas that you choose from Bachchan’s celebrated
poem (available on Blackboard). May be presented either in writing, or in an
audio/video recording; either way, quote the four stanzas in full.
WEEK 9, October 22 — Reading from the autobiography of Rajendra Prasad, the first
president of the Republic of India.
HOMEWORK 9, due Tuesday 27 October — Translation into Hindi of a passage from
Nirad Chaudhuri’s Autobiography of an Unknown Indian (1951). A longer passage will be
available on Blackboard, s to show the context.
WEEK 10, October 29— (a) More from Rajendra Prasad. (b) Role play: interviewing
India’s first president from the perspective of today, looking particularly at the ways in
which India has changed in recent decades. (Any volunteers for Rajendra Babu’s role
here?)
HOMEWORK 10, due Tuesday 3 November — summary of the class discussion on
Autobiography. As with homework 8, this may be either recorded or written.
WEEK 11, November 5 — Hindi vocabulary: where does it come from, what are its
cultural meanings?
HOMEWORK 11, due Tuesday 10 November — Investigate the individual list of words
given to you, looking into their etymology, their connections with related words, any
synonyms, any idioms in which they appear, and any other points of interest. Your
main sources will be OHED and Platts. You may use a mixture of English and Hindi
in this assignment.
WEEK 12, November 12 — Reading the autobiography of Yashpal, Hindi writer and
“freedom fighter”.
HOMEWORK 12, due Tuesday 17 November — When is a terrorist not a terrorist?
Essay on the use of violence in politics.
WEEK 13, November 19 — What is autobiography? What do autobiographers choose
to reveal about themselves, and why? Prepare three discussion points in advance for
this class discussion.
HOMEWORK 13, due Tuesday 24 November — åa†mkTa : summary of the class
discussion on Autobiography. As with assignments 8 and 10, this can be either written
or recorded.
WEEK 14, November 26 — A final look at the news in the media.
HOMEWORK 14, due Tuesday 1 December — veb kI bolI : make a survey of the Hindi
words and expressions used for media functions such as “download”, “save” etc in a
variety of Hindi-medium websites, and write a report on your findings. How is Hindi
adapting to these new demands?
WEEK 15, December 3 — An encounter with the Ardhakathanak of Banarasidas (1641
A.D.), considered “India’s first autobiography”.
NO HOMEWORK ! CufiI !

HIN 507 • First-Year Hindi II

31030-31035 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm GAR 2.104
show description

Not open to native speakers of Hindi.  Continuation of Hindi 506.  Hindi 604 and 507 may not both be counted; Hindi 507 and Urdu 604 may not both be counted.  Prerequisite: Hindi 506 with a grade of at least C.

HIN 330 • Panorama Of Hindi Literature

31060 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 MEZ 1.120
(also listed as HIN 384 )
show description

Study of specific subjects related to Hindi culture as reflected in its literary productions and other modes of expression.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Hindi 312L with a grade of at least C.

HIN 384 • Panorama Of Hindi Literature

31085 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 MEZ 1.120
(also listed as HIN 330 )
show description

Study of various aspects and periods of Hindi language and culture.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and six semester hours of upper-division coursework in Hindi or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Courses

Courses taught:

First-year, third year, and graduate Hindi; all levels of Flagship Hindi and Urdu; Hindi Literature: Voices and Perspectives; Braj Bhasha and Awadhi Literature; My Sweet Lord – Devotion in Medieval India; Landscape and Locale in India; Medieval Literature of Northern India; Panorama of Hindi Literature; Narrative in Pre-modern India

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