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Dr. Joel Brereton, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Stephen Phillips

Professor Ph.D., Harvard University

Stephen Phillips

Contact

Biography

He is a Sanskritist and specialist in classical Indian thought. He is author of over fifty articles and author or co-author of six books: Aurobindo's Philosophy of Brahman (Brill, 1986), Classical Indian Metaphysics: Refutations of Realism and the Emergence of "New Logic" (Open Court, 1995, Indian edition, Motilal Banarsidass, 1998), Gangesa on the Upadhi, the "Inferential Undercutting Condition," Introduction, Translation, and Explanation (with N. S. Ramanuja Tatacharya, Indian Council of Philosophical Research, 2002) Epistemology of Perception: Gangesa's Tattvacintamani, Vol. I, pratyaksa-khanda, introduction, translation, and commentary (with N. S. Ramanuja Tatacharya, Indian edition, Motilal Banarsidass, 2009), Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth (Columbia, 2009), and The Ksanabhangasiddhi, Ratnakirti on Momentariness (fprthcoming, American Institute of Indian Studies). He is currently working on a four-volume translation of and commentary on the most important work of late classical Indian philosophy, Gangesa's Tattvacintamani (Jewel of Reflection on the Truth of Epistemology), which founded the 'New Logic' school in the fourteenth century. He has been Visiting Professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and Jadavpur University, Kolkata.

Interests

Indian Philosophy; philosophy of religion; theory of value

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philos And Practice

32183 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 356 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 372 • Indian Philosophies

31885-31895 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 200pm-300pm WAG 214
(also listed as PHL 348, R S 341 )
show description

A critical and historical introduction to Indian philosophies and speculative religious thought.  Topics include: the psychology of yoga and Indian mysticism along with the ``enlightenment'' theories and metaphysical positions that are thought to underpin yogic endeavors.  These topics are associated with Indian religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) as well as some of the philosophic schools.  We shall also survey, within a properly philosophic sphere, the development of logic (briefly) and theory of knowledge (at greater length).  Metaphysical arguments for momentariness, ``mind-only,'' and ``no-self'' (on the Buddhist side) and counterarguments for realism and theism (on the side of Nyaya and Vedanta) will occupy us, in particular the debate about self and personal identity.  The Tantric philosophy of the eleventh-century Kashmiri Shaivite Abhinava Gupta along with his contributions to classical aesthetics as well as his suggestions of a new "yoga of art and beauty" will occupy us later in the term.  No previous background in philosophy or in Indian thought is required.

Course requirements: best 3 out of 4 glossary tests (15%); 2 two-page papers (topics to be handed out; 30%); mid-term exam (15%) final exam (35%); attendance (5%).

Reading: J. N. Mohanty, CLASSICAL INDIAN PHILOSOPHY The UPANISADS (tr. Roebuck) The BHAGAVAD GITA (tr. Edgerton) a packet of photocopies

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31520-31531 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 100pm-200pm WEL 1.316
(also listed as PHL 302 )
show description

Discussion of various problems involving language, history, and culture in Asia.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

31780 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 420
(also listed as PHL 356, R S 341G )
show description

This course will begin with an examination of the Yoga-sutra by Patanjali and two or three classical Sanskrit commentaries on it. We shall look at the text both as expressing a metaphysics and as a "how-to book" on yogic practice, focusing on certain bridge psychological concepts and theories. We shall also look at scholarly attempts to reconstruct the origins of yogic practices, particularly as proffered by (1) contemporary philosophers and (2) medical researchers. We shall pay some but less attention to modern psychological interpretations. No Sanskrit or previous background in Indian philosophy is necessary, but students with no previous coursework in philosophy or psychology should contact the instructor.

 

Texts

Mircea Eliade, Yoga: Immortality and FreedomThe Yogustra by Patanjali and Commentary by Vyasa (edition to be determined)(For list of photocopies see the following website:) http://link.lanic.utexas.edu/asnic/phillips/pages/yoga/yogacoursedes.undergrad.html

Grading

A short paper informing a long paper and a class presentation.

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31360-31405 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 100pm-200pm WEL 1.316
(also listed as PHL 302 )
show description

Discussion of various problems involving language, history, and culture in Asia.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.

ANS 372 • Indian Philosophies

31556-31557 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 200pm-300pm WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 348, R S 341 )
show description

A critical and historical introduction to Indian philosophies and speculative religious thought.  Topics include: the psychology of yoga and Indian mysticism along with the ``enlightenment'' theories and metaphysical positions that are thought to underpin yogic endeavors.  These topics are associated with Indian religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) as well as some of the philosophic schools.  We shall also survey, within a properly philosophic sphere, the development of logic (briefly) and theory of knowledge (at greater length).  Metaphysical arguments for momentariness, ``mind-only,'' and ``no-self'' (on the Buddhist side) and counterarguments for realism and theism (on the side of Nyaya and Vedanta) will occupy us, in particular the debate about self and personal identity.  The Tantric philosophy of the eleventh-century Kashmiri Shaivite Abhinava Gupta along with his contributions to classical aesthetics as well as his suggestions of a new "yoga of art and beauty" will occupy us later in the term.  No previous background in philosophy or in Indian thought is required.

Course requirements: best 3 out of 4 glossary tests (15%); 2 two-page papers (topics to be handed out; 30%); mid-term exam (15%) final exam (35%); attendance (5%).

Reading: J. N. Mohanty, CLASSICAL INDIAN PHILOSOPHY The UPANISADS (tr. Roebuck) The BHAGAVAD GITA (tr. Edgerton) a packet of photocopies

ANS 301M • World Philosophy

31755-31765 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 100pm-200pm GAR 0.102
(also listed as PHL 302 )
show description

This course introduces the major traditions of philosophy by way of cross-cultural examination of important questions. What is knowledge, and how is it acquired? Under what conditions is a belief justified? What is the self or person? What is real and what mere appearance? How should we live? And so on. Socrates and Plato within ancient Greek philosophy, Confucius and Lao Tzu within Chinese philosophy, the Buddhist Nagarjuna and the schools of classical Indian philosophy, as well as Ibn Sina (Avicenna) within Islamic philosophy and the Ethiopian philosopher, Zera Yacob, will be discussed along with a few authors of the modern and contemporary periods.

Texts (not yet finally determined):

Confucius, ANALECTS
Plato, MENO
The UPANISHADS (tr. Easwaran)
Bertrand Russell, THE PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY
postings on the web

Grading:

homework: 30% (best three out of four)
midterm exam (part multiple-choice, part essay): 20%
final exam (part multiple-choice, part essay): 40%
attendance and class participation (both section & lecture): 10%

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

31930 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 201
(also listed as PHL 356, R S 341G )
show description

This course surveys the origins of yogic practices in early Indian civilization and traces the development of Yoga philosophies through the Upanishads, BHAGAVAD GITA, YOGA-SUTRA, Buddhist, Jaina, and tantric texts, as well as works of neo-Vedanta. We shall try to identify a set of claims common to all classical advocates of yoga. We shall look at both classical and modern defenses and criticisms, especially of alleged metaphysical and psychological underpinnings of the practices. No previous background in Indian philosophy is necessary, but students with no previous course work in philosophy or in psychology should contact the instructor.

Reading (probable):

(books:)
Tantric Yoga and the Wisdom Goddesses, David Frawley
Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth, S. Phillips
The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, J.H. Woods

a packet of photocopies
on-line publications as designated on the syllabus

Requirements (probable):

Midterm exam (50% on glossary items): 25%
Short paper: 25%
Final exam: 50%.

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

31035-31037 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 200pm-300pm BUR 216
(also listed as PHL 356, R S 341G )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ANS 372 • Yoga And Nyaya-W

31172 • Fall 2009
Meets T 330pm-630pm WAG 210
(also listed as PHL 348, R S 341 )
show description

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PHL 348(W) (RS 241, ANS 372) YOGA AND NYAYA Stephen Phillips

Fall 2009 <phillips@mail.utexas.edu>

WAG 210 office hrs (WAG 301):

Tues 3:30-6:30 Tues 1:30-3:30 & by appt.

1 Sept Introduction. Reading of the sutras of the Yoga Sutra (YS) in whatever translation is

available, privileging the one in Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth (notes also required). We’ll

read the sutras one by one, skipping some, reading aloud in class around the room.

8 Sept Continuation of YS reading. Please read before class through YS chapter two, sutras only

(consulting Vyasa’s and Vacaspati’s commentaries or Phillips’s notes as necessary for

understanding).

15 Sept Continuation of YS reading. Please read before class through the end (sutras only, notes

or commentaries as necessary). Also read from J.N. Mohanty, Classical Indian

Philosophy (CIP), pp. 51-53 & 153-58.

22 Sept The YS commentary by Vyasa. Please bring to class: James H. Woods (tr.), The Yoga

Sutras of Patanjali. Reading (for this class and the next): Vyasa on sutras 1.1-12, 1.23-

32, 2.1-3.8, and 4.29-34. Recommended: Vachaspati’s subcommentary.

29 Sept Further discussion of the YS commentary by Vyasa. Please bring to class: James H.

Woods (tr.), The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. Reading: see above. Details about the first

paper.

6 Oct First paper due (at the beginning of class). Nyaya in overview. E-mail distribution of

‘‘Nyaya’’ by S. Phillips. Begin readings from the Nyaya Sutra (NyS) with Vatsyayana’s

commentary (Bhashya): purchase and bring to class the photocopies available at

Speedway in the Dobie Mall. Also read: Mohanty, CIP, pp. 11-38. First NyS reading: NyS

1.1.1 (including the introduction or avata-ra by Vatsyayana, the author of the

commentary, bha-s.

ya) through 1.1.21.

13 Oct Continue NyS reading, sutras to be announced in the preceding class (6 Oct). Also read:

Mohanty, CIP, pp. 41-50.

20 Oct NyS reading. Vachaspati Mishra. Selected reading to be handed out or distributed by email.

27 Oct NyS reading. Vachaspati Mishra as YS commentator. Passages from Vachaspati,

beginning with the opening section, Vachaspati’s introductory comments, and then the

section on the i-s´vara, YS 1.23ff, James H. Woods (tr.), The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.

Recommended: Vachaspati’s subcommentary on sutras 1.1-12, 2.1-3.8, and 4.29-34.

3 Nov NyS reading with particular attention to Vachaspati. Details about the second paper.

-- --

- 2 -

10 Nov Second paper due (at the beginning of class). Key issues in the combination, or rivalry,

of Yoga and Nyaya. Review J.N. Mohanty, CIP, on both Nyaya and Yoga. Mimamsa,

Vedanta, and other schools. CIP, pp. 125-30. Glossary for the test on 17 Nov identified in

Mohanty, CIP; please bring your copy to class.

17 Nov Scheduling for class presentations. Details concerning final paper. Further discussion of

key issues in the combination, or rivalry, of Yoga and Nyaya. Further reading from

Vachaspati’s YS commentary, passages to be announced. Glossary test.

24 Nov Class presentations. Outline or abstract for the final paper due (may be submitted by

e-mail, no formatting, no MS Word, hard copy preferred).

1 Dec Class presentations.

4 Dec Final paper due (by 5 p.m., Phillips’ mailbox, WAG 316).

Required reading:

J.N. Mohanty, Classical Indian Philosophy (CIP), available at the University Co-op.

James H. Woods (tr.), The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, available at the University Co-op.

S. Phillips, Yoga, Karma, and Rebirth, available at the University Co-op.

E-mail distributions, class handouts, and on-line materials as designated.

Photocopies of the Nya-ya-su-tra with Va-tsya-yana’s commentary available at Speedway in the Dobie Mall.

Grading:

The course fulfills the University’s requirements for a ‘‘substantial writing component’’: there will be two

short papers, a class presentation, and a final paper (preceded by an outline or abstract), plus a test on

glossary items. The total writing required is sixteen pages (double-spaced, reasonable margins, 12-point

font) plus an outline or abstract of the final paper.

Glossary test = 10%

First paper (4 pages) = 20%

Second paper (4 pages) = 20%

Final paper (8 pages) = 40%

Outline/abstract (1 page) and class presentation = 5%

Class participation including comments and criticism of others’ class presentations = 5%.

ANS 384 • Indian Aesthetics

31213 • Fall 2009
Meets W 630pm-930pm WAG 210
(also listed as PHL 385 )
show description

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PHL 385 (ANS 384) CLASSICAL INDIAN AESTHETICS Stephen Phillips

Fall 2009 <phillips@mail.utexas.edu>

WAG 210 office hrs (WAG 301):

Wed 6:30-9:30 Tues 1:30-3:30 & by appt.

26 Aug: Introduction. Overview of Sanskrit literature. The Veda, traditions of arts, and classical schools of philosophy. The major

periods and movements. Rasa aesthetics and Indian art. Karma-yoga and art as offering. Impersonality as an aesthetic as well

as yogic value. Questions of comparative aesthetics.

2 Sept: Sanskrit theatre and court poetry. Na-t.

ya-s´a-stra and classical ‘‘dramatics.’’ Overview of the rasa theory: is it applicable to art

forms other than Sanskrit theatre and poetry? A sneak peak at ‘‘suggestion,’’ dhvani. Why should rasa be an effect, if it is an

effect, of dhvani? Poetic art and styles.

Reading: Daniel Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, pp. 1–31, 35–38, and 44–47

*(1) From the Na-t.

ya-s´a-stra, tr. M. Ghosh, table of contents, translator’s introduction (in part) and from chapters 1 and 7,

pp. 1–5 and 100–149

(2) B.N. Goswami, ‘‘Rasa: Delight of Reason,’’ Essence of Indian Art, pp. 17–30

*(3) J.N. Mohanty, Classical Indian Philosophy, pp. 133–37

9 Sept: Indian poetics: the major movements and theories. Classical Indian philosophy of language. The ritualist background. The

controversy over the meaning of words: particular, universal, shape (a-kr. ti), convenient fiction. The sphot.a or holistic theory

of Bhartr.hari and sentential meaning. Meghadu-ta.

Reading: Ka-lida-sa’s Meghadu-ta, tr. M. R. Kale (other translations are okay)

*(4) J.A.B. van Buitenen, ‘‘A brief history of the literatures of India,’’ and (with E. C. Dimmock), ‘‘The Classical Drama,’’

and A. K. Ramanujan and Edwin Gerow, ‘‘Indian Poetics,’’ The Literatures of India, ed. Dimock, Gerow, Naim,

Ramanujan, Roadarmel, and van Buitenen, pp. 14–19, 81–96, and 115–143

K. Kunjanni Raja, Indian Theories of Meaning, ch. 1

*(5) Bhartr.hari, Ja-ti-samuddes´a, tr. Radhika Herzberger, Bhartr. hari and the Buddhists, pp. 85–105.

16 Sept: The prama-n.

a-s´a-stra’s ‘‘testimony,’’ s´abda, as a source of knowledge. Conditions on knowing the meaning of a sentence.

The powers of words. Mi-ma-m.

sa-’s ‘‘import,’’ ta-tparya. Denotation; sentence meaning.

Reading: Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, pp. 51–66

K. Kunjanni Raja, Indian Theories of Meaning, chs. 2–4

(6) Arindam Chakrabarti, ‘‘Telling as Letting Know,’’ Knowing from Words, ed. Chakrabarti and Matilal

(7) J.N. Mohanty, Classical Indian Philosophy, pp. 67–68

23 Sept: The controversy about sentence meaning. Indication (laks. an. a-, ‘‘non-denotative sentence meaning’’). Theory of metaphor.

Reading: Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, pp. 86–98

K. Kunjanni Raja, Indian Theories of Meaning, chs. 4 and 5

(8) Max Black, ‘‘Metaphor.’’

(9) John Searle, ‘‘Metaphor.’’

30 Sept: Suggestion (dhvani).

Reading: Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, pp. 138–159

K. Kunjanni Raja, Indian Theories of Meaning, ch 7

*(10) Ingalls, Masson, and Patwardhan, The Dhvanya-loka of Anandavardhana with the Locana of Abhinavagupta, HOS 49,

‘‘Introduction’’ and the translation of the opening verse along with Abhinava’s Locana commentary, pp. 1–47

7 Oct:A

i

nanda’s connection of rasa and ‘‘suggestion,’’ dhvani, along with Abhinava’s defense of rasa-dhvani, ‘‘suggestion of rasa,’’

as the ‘‘soul of poetry.’’

Reading: Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, pp. 175–185.

(10) Ingalls, Masson, and Patwardhan, HOS 49, pp. 47–78 (‘‘K’’ & ‘‘A’’ sections only), 78–105 (all portions, i.e., including

the Locana).

14 Oct: Arguments for dhvani and its importance. Opponents ofA i

nanda’s theory. Mahima Bhat.t.a’s arguments.

Reading: Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, pp. 312–318

-- --

(10) HOS 49, pp. 105–123

(11) K. Krishnamoorthy, The Dhvanya-loka and Its Critics, pp. 230–96

(12) Anand Amaladass, Philosophical Implications of Dhvani, pp. 77–122

21 Oct: Rasa according to Abhinava; the applicability of the theory. V.K. Chari’s arguments. Mammat.a’s textbook, the

Ka-vya-praka-s´a, ‘‘Light on Poetry.’’

Reading: Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, pp. 273–280

*(13) V. K. Chari, ‘‘Introduction’’ and ‘‘Rasa: Poetry and the Emotions,’’ Sanskrit Criticism, pp. 1–28

(14) Ganganatha Jha (tr.), Ka-vya-praka-s´a, pp. 52–68

28 Oct: Figures, alam. ka-ra, and classifications of figures. Poetry as ‘‘deviating speech’’ (vakrokti). Comparative (cross-cultural)

rhetoric—is it possible?

Reading: Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, pp. 319–323

*(15) E. Gerow, A Glossary of Indian Figures of Speech, pp. 7–83

4 Nov: Literature week.

Reading: Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, passim

*(16) Canto XIII of Nais. adhacarita ofS ´ ri-hars. a, tr. K. K. Handiqui, pp. 195–204

S ´

akuntala, tr. Barbara Stoler Miller, The Plays of Ka-lida-sa, ed. Barbara Stoler Miller

Ma-lavika- and Agnimitra, tr. E. Gerow, The Plays of Ka-lida-sa, ed. Barbara Stoler Miller

E. Gerow, ‘‘Sanskrit Dramatic Theory and Ka-lida-sa’s Plays,’’ The Plays of Ka-lida-sa, ed. Barbara Stoler Miller

11 Nov: Rasa and religion I. The ninth rasa, s´a-nta-rasa. Shaivism. Abhinava on mantra. Udayana (in the Nya-ya tradition) and a

theistic ‘‘criteriological argument.’’

Reading: Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, pp. 273–280.

(17) P. Muller-Ortega, Abhinava’s ‘‘Song of Praise Intended to Communicate the Direct Experience of the Absolute,’’

translated with introduction, from Tantra in Practice, ed. D. White, pp. 574–586

*(18) J. L. Masson and M. V. Patwardhan, Aesthetic Rapture, vol. I, pp. 23–42, and vol. II, pp. 30–58

(19) From Abhinava Gupta, Abhinavabha-rati- (Abhinava’s commentary on the Na-t.

ya-s´a-stra), S. Phillips, Yoga, Karma, and

Rebirth, pp. 238–40.

(20) E. Gerow, ‘‘Abhinava’s Aesthetics as a Speculative Paradigm’’ (including a new translation of Abhinava’s commentary

on the rasa su-tra in the Na-t.

yas´a-stra), Journal of the American Oriental Society 114.2 (1994), pp. 186–208).

(21) S. Phillips, ‘‘The Classical Indian Criteriological Argument for the Existence of God.’’

18 Nov: Rasa and religion II. Bhakti. Vaishnavism. Neo-Vedanta.

Reading: (22) Bha-gavata Pura-n.

a, tr. D. Goodall, Hindu Scriptures, pp. 373–393

(23) From Vallabha’s Tattva-rthadi-panibandha, from Jaganna-tha Pan.d.

itara-ja’s Rasaganga-dhara, and from Ru-pagosva-mi’s

Bhaktirasa-mr. ta, tr. J. Pereira, Hindu Theology, pp. 315–330 and 339

(24) D. Haberman, Acting as a Way of Salvation, pp. 7–39

(25) Aurobindo, The Life Divine, pp. 218–30

(26) T.M.P. Mahadevan, XX

Recommended: Gi-tagovinda, tr. Barbara Stoler Miller

25 Nov: No class. Happy Thanksgiving.

2 Dec: Special projects and presentations. Summary.

*Books marked with an asterisk are on reserve in the Philosophy Library, WAG 312. Readings other than from the books listed below

are available in a packet of photocopies available at Speedway in the Dobie Mall. The following are required except for the

Gi-tagovinda which is recommended: Daniel Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry; Ka-lida-sa’s Meghadu-ta, tr. M. R. Kale (other translations are

okay); K. Kunjanni Raja, Indian Theories of Meaning; Barbara Stoler Miller (ed.), The Plays of Ka-lida-sa; and Barbara Stoler Miller

(tr.), Gi-tagovinda.

Requirements: (a) presentation of a week’s reading (in whole or part) or of an outline of your term paper; (b) short paper, or outline,

informing (c) a long paper due Tues 8 Dec.

ANS 372 • Yoga As Philosophy & Practice

30575 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm BUR 216
(also listed as PHL 356, R S 341G )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

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