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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Patricia Maclachlan

Associate Professor Ph.D., Columbia University

Patricia Maclachlan

Contact

Biography

Patricia Maclachlan, who arrived at UT in 1997, is now Associate Professor of Government and Asian Studies.  She received her Ph.D in political science and Japan studies in 1996 from Columbia University and spent one year as a research associate in the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations at Harvard University. Her research interests include consumer politics and culture in advanced industrial democracies, with a focus on Japan.

Professor Maclachlan is the author of The People’s Post Office: The History and Politics of the Japanese Postal System: 1871-2010 (Cambridge: Harvard University Asia Center, 2011)andConsumer Politics in Postwar Japan: The Institutional Boundaries of Citizen Advocacy (NY: Columbia University Press, 2002). She is a co-editor of and contributing author to The Ambivalent Consumer: Questioning Consumption in East Asia and the West (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2006), and has written several articles and book chapters on consumer-related issues in Japan and the West, Japanese civil society, and Japanese postal politics.

Courses taught: Politics in Japan; Japanese Foreign Policy; International Relations of East and Southeast Asia; Political Economy of Asia; Civil Society in East Asia (graduate seminar); East Asian Political Economies (graduate seminar).

Interests

Interest group behavior in Japan; Japanese postal politics and reform; consumerism in advanced industrial democracies; comparative political institutions.

ANS 361 • Political Economy Of Asia

31906 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 206
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

Fall 2014

Political Economy of Asia

GOV 365L/ANS 361 (Global Cultures/Writing Flags)

Patricia Maclachlan

TTH: 9:30-11:00

 

Course Description

This intensive reading and writing course explores the dynamic political economies of Japan, China and South Korea.  We will examine the reasons for the region’s “miraculous” GDP growth rates; the notion of the “developmental state” and the role of industrial policy in economic development; the nature of government-business relationships; industrial structure (chaebol, keiretsu, Chinese State-Owned Enterprises); the experiences of East Asian consumers and workers; East Asian approaches to social welfare; and the reactions (both positive and negative) of East Asian political economies to the pressures of globalization.  In addition to analyzing these topics from theoretical, comparative, and historical perspectives, the course introduces students to political-economic themes and concepts that will benefit them in their reading of current events in global economics and finance. 

 

Individual classes will alternate between lectures and seminar-style sessions based on discussions of assigned readings. Some knowledge of East Asia and or comparative politics/political economy is recommended but not required.

 

Grading Policy 

1.  Quizzes:  15%

2.  Two take-home midterm exams (5 pages each):  20%

3.  Research paper (4,000-4,500 words) in 2 drafts:  40%

4.  Final exam:  25%

 

Texts

1.   Barry Naughton, The Chinese Economy: Transition and Growth (2007)

 

Additional readings will be made available at the beginning of the semester.

ANS 361 • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

31920 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 203
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

 

Fall 2014

International Relations of East and Southeast Asia

GOV 365L-3/ANS 361-23 (Global Cultures Flag)

Patricia Maclachlan

TTH 12:30-2:00, PAR 203

Prerequisites

6 semester hours of lower-division Government courses.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

 

Course Description

Toward the end of the 20th century, pundits looked to the spectacular economic growth of East and Southeast Asia and predicted that the 21st century would be the “Pacific Century.”  Although analysts have been far less optimistic about the economic and political future of the region following the 1997 financial crisis, most nevertheless agree that the region has more growth potential than any other part of the world.  It is also home to some of the globe’s most dangerous “hot spots.”

 

This upper division undergraduate course introduces students to some of the major themes and topics in the post-Cold War international relations of East and Southeast Asia: “Great Power” (China, Japan, and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, and the impact of nationalism and historical memory on intra-regional affairs.  Along the way, we will explore the ongoing North Korean nuclear threat, tensions between China and Taiwan, and the United States’ so-called Asia Pivot, as well as basic theoretical approaches to the study of international relations.

 

Grading Policy

         1.    Quizzes on readings: 15%

         2.    First mid-term exam: 20%

         3.    Second mid-term exam or short research paper:  25%

         4.    Final exam: 40%

 

Texts

         1.    Susan L. Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower (2008)

         2.    Victor Cha, The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future (2012)

         3.    Daniel Chirot, Gi-Wook Shin, and Daniel Sneider, eds., Confronting

              Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies (2014)

 

 Additional readings will be made available at the beginning of the semester.   

ANS 361 • Japanese Foreign Policy

31823 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.124
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

Prerequisite

Six semester hours of lower-division Government courses.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

 

Course Description

This course introduces upper level undergraduates to the foreign and domestic determinants of Japanese foreign policy-making and international relations from the beginning of the modern era (1868) to the present.  We will address a wide range of topics, including the causes and consequences of the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars, Japanese colonialism and actions during World War II, the U.S. Occupation of Japan (1945-52), and the history and significance of the U.S.-Japan military alliance. Particular attention will be paid to issues affecting the contemporary balance-of-power in East Asia: the rise of Japanese nationalism, ongoing tensions with China and North Korea, and Japan’s gradual movement toward a more robust military posture.

 

Grading Policy

        Quizzes: 10%

         2 midterms: 40%

         Short research paper or book review (5 pgs): 15%

         Final exam: 35%

 

Texts

Kenneth B. Pyle, Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose (2008).

Additional readings will be made available to students at the beginning of the semester.

ANS 361 • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

31824 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 203
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

 

Prerequisite

6 semester hours of lower-division Government courses.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

 

Course Description

Toward the end of the 20th century, pundits looked to the spectacular economic growth of East and Southeast Asia and predicted that the 21st century would be the “Pacific Century”.  Although analysts have been far less optimistic about the economic and political future of the region following the 1997 financial crisis, most nevertheless agree that the region has the most growth potential compared to any other region in the world.  It is also home to some of the globe’s most dangerous “hot spots”: North Korea’s ongoing nuclear threat, tensions in the Taiwan Straits, and escalating tensions between Japan and China over islands in the East China Sea.       

This upper division undergraduate course introduces students to some of the basic themes of the post-Cold War international relations of East and Southeast Asia.  In addition to tracking current events in the region, we explore basic theoretical approaches to international relations, “Great Power” (China, Japan and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, and the nature of and potential solutions to the North Korean security threat.      

 

Grading Policy

         1.    Quizzes on readings: 15%

         2.    First mid-term exam: 20%

         3.    Second mid-term exam or short research paper:  25%

         4.    Final exam: 40%

 

Texts

         1.    Susan L. Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower (2008)

         2.    Victor Cha, The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future (2012)

 Additional readings will be made available at the beginning of the semester.   

ANS 361 • Political Economy Of Asia

31595 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 2.124
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

Course Description

This intensive reading and writing course explores the political economies of East Asia—by all accounts the world’s most economically dynamic region. With an emphasis on Japan, China and South Korea, we examine a number of themes that have intrigued both scholars and policymakers over the years: the reasons for the region’s “miraculous” GDP growth rates; the notion of the “developmental state” and the role of industrial policy in economic development; the nature of government-business relationships; industrial structure (chaebol, keiretsu, Chinese State-Owned Enterprises); the experiences of East Asian consumers and workers; the business community’s contributions to the development of East Asian welfare states; and the reactions (both positive and negative) of East Asian political economies to the pressures of globalization.  In addition to examining these themes from theoretical, comparative, and historical perspectives, the course introduces students to political-economic themes and concepts that will benefit them in their reading of current events in global economics and finance. 

Individual classes will alternate between lectures and seminar-style sessions based on discussions of assigned readings. Some knowledge of East Asia and or comparative politics/political economy is recommended but not required.

This course has a writing flag.

 

Grading Policy 

1.  Attendance and participation in class discussions:  15%

2.  Two take-home midterm exams (5 pages each):  20%

3.  Research paper (4,000-4,500 words) in 2 drafts:  40%

4.  Final exam:  25%

 

Texts

1.  Chalmers Johnson, MITI and the Japanese Miracle (1982)

2.  Ming Wan, The Political Economy of East Asia: Striving for Wealth and Power (2008)

3.  Barry Naughton, The Chinese Economy: Transition and Growth (2007)

A packet of book chapters, government reports and journal articles will be available for purchase at the beginning of the semester.

ANS 361 • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

31610 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 201
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

Prerequisites

Six hours of Government are recommended but not required. No prior knowledge of the region is required.        

Course Description

Toward the end of the 20th century, pundits looked to the spectacular economic growth of East and Southeast Asia and predicted that the 21st century would be the “Pacific Century”.  Although analysts have been far less optimistic about the economic and political future of the region following the 1997 financial crisis, most nevertheless agree that the region has the most growth potential compared to any other region in the world.  It is also home to some of the globe’s most dangerous “hot spots”: North Korea’s ongoing nuclear threat, tensions in the Taiwan Straits, and escalating tensions between Japan and China.        This upper division undergraduate course introduces students to some of the basic themes of the post-Cold War international relations of East and Southeast Asia.  In addition to tracking current events in the region, we explore basic theoretical approaches to international relations, “Great Power” (China, Japan and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, and the nature of and potential solutions to the North Korean security threat.      

 

Grading Policy

         1.    Quizzes on readings: 15%

         2.    First mid-term exam: 20%

         3.    Second mid-term exam or short research paper:  25%

         4.    Final exam: 40%

 

Texts

         1.    Susan L. Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower (2008)

         2.    David Shambaugh and Michael Yahuda, eds., International Relations of Asia (2008).

         3.    Joseph E. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (2002).    

A selection of book chapters and journal articles will also be made available to students online.

ANS 321M • Politics In Japan

31690 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 201
(also listed as GOV 321M )
show description

This upper-division course surveys themes and topics in the domestic politics of postwar Japan.  We begin the course with an analysis of the Allied Occupation and the development of postwar political institutions, and then explore a range of different subjects, including the evolving government-business relationship, the electoral and political party systems, citizen participation in politics in the environmental and consumer spheres, policy toward women and minorities, the media in politics, and the ongoing political and economic reform process.  All topics will be addressed from a theoretical and comparative perspective.

Assignments

1.    Quizzes: 15%

2.    Midterm Exam #1: 20%

3.    Midterm Exam #2: 25% (Students have the option of writing a 10-page research paper in lieu of an exam

4.    Final Exam: 40%

Texts

1. Andrew Gordon, Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present. Oxford University Press, 2008 (2nd edition).

2. Frances Rosenbluth and Michael Thies, Japan Transformed: Political Change and Economic Structuring (Princeton University Press, 2010)

3. Robin LeBlanc, Bicycle Citizens: The Political World of the Japanese Housewife. University of California Press, 1999.

4. Jacob M. Schlesinger, Shadow Shoguns: The Rise and Fall of Japan’s Postwar Political Machine. Sanford University Press, 1999.

5. Course reading packet.

ANS 361 • Political Economy Of Asia

31471 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JES A203A
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

 This intensive reading and writing course explores the political economies of East Asia—by all accounts the world’s most economically dynamic region. With an emphasis on Japan, China, South Korea and Taiwan, we focus on a number of themes that have intrigued both scholars and policymakers over the years: the reasons for the region’s “miraculous” GDP growth rates; the notion of the “developmental state” and the role of industrial policy in economic development; the nature of government-business relationships; industrial structure (chaebol, keiretsu, Chinese State-Owned Enterprises); the experiences of East Asian consumers and workers; the business community’s contributions to the development of East Asian welfare states; and the reactions (both positive and negative) of East Asian political economies to the pressures of globalization.  In addition to examining these themes from theoretical, comparative, and historical perspectives, the course introduces students to political-economic themes and concepts that will benefit them in their reading of current events in global economics and finance. 

Individual classes will alternate between lectures and seminar-style sessions based on discussions of assigned readings. Some knowledge of East Asia and or comparative politics/political economy is recommended but not required.

This course has a writing flag.

Course Requirements

  1. Attendance and participation in class discussions:       15%
  2. Two take-home midterm exams (5 pages each):          20%
  3. Research paper (approx.  4,500 words) in 2 drafts:       40%
  4. Final exam:                                     25%

Primary course texts:

  1. Chalmers Johnson, MITI and the Japanese Miracle (1982)
  2. Meredith Woo-Cumings, ed., The Developmental State (1999)
  3. Barry Naughton, The Chinese Economy: Transition and Growth (2007)
  4. Stephan Haggard, The Political Economy of the Asian Financial Crisis (2002)
  5. A packet of book chapters, government reports and journal articles will be available for purchase at the beginning of the semester.

 

ANS 361 • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

31490 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 203
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

Course Description:  Toward the end of the 20th century, pundits looked to the spectacular economic growth of East and Southeast Asia and predicted that the 21st century would be the “Pacific Century”.  Although analysts have been far less optimistic about the economic and political future of the region following the 1997 financial crisis, most nevertheless agree that the region has the most growth potential of any other region in the world.  It is also home to some of the globe’s most dangerous “hot spots”: North Korea’s ongoing nuclear threat, tensions in the Taiwan Straits, and, more recently, escalating tensions between Japan and China.This upper division undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to some of the basic themes of the post-Cold War international relations of East and Southeast Asia.  In addition to tracking current events in the region, we will explore basic theoretical approaches to international relations, “Great Power” (China, Japan and the United States) contributions and challenges to the military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of economic globalization and institutional integration in the Asia-Pacific, and the nature of and potential solutions to the North Korean security threat.      Prerequisites:  Six hours of Government are recommended but not required. No prior knowledge of the region is required.        Requirements:1.    Quizzes on readings: 10%2.    First mid-term exam: 20%3.    Second mid-term exam or short research paper:  30%4.    Final exam: 40%Texts:1.    Susan L. Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower (Oxford University Press, 2008)2.    David Shambaugh and Michael Yahuda, eds., International Relations of Asia (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008).3.    Joseph E. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (W.W. Norton & Co., 2002).    A selection of book chapters and journal articles will also be made available to students online.

ANS 301M • Intro To Politics In East Asia

31729 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 201
(also listed as GOV 314 )
show description

 Instructors:           

Professor William Hurst (Government)

Professor Patricia Maclachlan (Government)

Overview: 

As President Obama recently reminded us, America’s future lies with the Pacific as well as the Atlantic. Yet, most students have relatively little exposure to or understanding of East Asian politics. The purpose of this lower-division class is to introduce students to the politics and political systems of key countries in East and Southeast Asia. The course has no prerequisites and does not assume any prior knowledge of either political science or the region.

We will cover China and Japan in the most depth, with shorter units on Korea, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia. We will address the history, political structures, social issues, and economic conditions of each country; many of our topics will be explored from a comparative perspective and with reference to political science theories. By the end of the semester, students will be prepared to take more advanced courses on East and/or Southeast Asian politics.  Even if students choose not to continue with their studies of East and Southeast Asia, this class will provide them with the background knowledge to understand political, economic and social developments in this diverse and critically important part of the world.

Texts:

  1. William Joseph, ed., Politics in China: An Introduction (Oxford 2010)
  2. Bruce Cumings, Korea’s Place in the Sun, updated edition (Norton, 2005)
  3. Frances McCall Rosenbluth and Michael F. Thies, Japan Transformed: Political Change and Economic Restructuring (Princeton, 2010)

 A reading packet will also be available for purchase at the beginning of the semester

Requirements:

  1. Map tests (one each for China/Taiwan, Japan/Korea, SE Asia): 10% total
  2. Quizzes on readings: 15% total
  3. 2 midterm exams: 40% total(A short writing assignment may be substituted for one of the exams)
  4. Final exam: 35%

 

ANS 321M • Politics In Japan

31810 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 201
(also listed as GOV 321M )
show description

Description:

This survey course introduces students to the institutions and processes of postwar Japanese domestic politics from historical and comparative perspectives.  In addition to exploring such topics as the long-term political impact of the Allied Occupation (1945-52), the structure of the political party and policymaking systems, the government-business relationship, and the development of civil society, we will address questions that have long intrigued analysts of Japanese politics: Why was Japan so receptive to the introduction of democratic institutions after World War II?  How can we explain its postwar economic “miracle”?; Why has Japan lost its status as the world’s second largest economy?; and Why is the country having so much trouble implementing political and economic reform?

 

Prerequisites:

            Coursework in political science and/or Japan Studies is recommended but not required.

 

Required Readings: (available for purchase at the University Co-op)

1. Andrew Gordon, Modern History of Japan, 2nd ed. 

            2. Francis McCall Rosenbluth and Michael Thies, Japan Transformed, 2010.          3. Robert Pekkanen, Japan’s Dual Society, 2006.

                        4. Robin LeBlanc, Bicycle Citizens, 1999.

                        5. Jacob M. Schlesinger, Shadow Shoguns, 1999.

 

            Additional readings will be posted on the Blackboard site for this course.

 

Assignments:

  1. Quizzes on readings: 15%
  2. Midterm exam #1: 20%
  3. Midterm exam #2: 25% (Students may instead write a short research paper on a topic of their choice.)
  4. Final exam (Tuesday, May 17, 9:00-12:00): 40%

 

ANS 361 • Japanese Foreign Policy

30740 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 203
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

Description: This course is designed to introduce upper level undergraduates to the foreign and domestic determinants of Japanese foreign policy-making and international relations from the beginning of the modern era (1868) to the present.  We will address a wide range of issues, including the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars, the Pacific War, the Japanese foreign policy-making process, postwar trade and security relations between Japan and the U.S.,  Japan’s role in Asia, and the implications of the ongoing nuclear crisis in North Korea for Japan.Prerequisite:  Six semester hours of lower-division government.  Graduate students may take this course for graduate credit.

Grading/Requirements:
Short policy paper (5 pgs)                 15%
Research paper proposal (2 pgs)  10
Research paper (15 pgs)                    40%

Texts/Readings:
Kenneth B. Pyle, The Japan Question: Power and Purpose in a New Era.
Reading packet (available at beginning of semester)

 

ANS 361 • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

30745 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 203
(also listed as GOV 365L )
show description

Description: This introductory course will explore the postwar international relations of East and Southeast Asia.  Particular attention will be devoted to postwar economic and security issues, the changing political landscape of the post-Cold War period, and to the development and functions of regional institutions.  The course will be instructed around four themes: 1) the impact of "Asian values" on the international relations of the region 2) the definition of "security" in the post-Cold War era 3) the juxtaposition of domestic and international politics in Asia 4) the opportunitiesand constraints confronting regional institution-building and integration.

Grading/Requirements:
Brief writing assignment (max. 8 pages): 30%
Midterm examination: 25%; Final examination: 40%
Attendance: 5%

Textbooks
TBA

 

ANS 391 • East Asian Political Economies

31107 • Spring 2010
Meets TH 930-1230pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as GOV 390L )
show description

Study of various subjects with Asian studies-related content.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Some topics are offered on the letter-grade basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.


ANS 321M • Politics In Japan

31072 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 800-930 PAR 203
show description

 

POLITICS IN JAPAN 

GOV 321M (#39137)/ ANS 321M (#31072) 

TTH: 8:00-9:30 am, PAR 203 

University of Texas at Austin 

Fall 2009 

 

Patricia L. Maclachlan, PhD 

Associate Professor of Government and Asian Studies 

BATS 3.150 

Tel: 232-1724 

E: pmaclachlan@mail.utexas.edu 

Office Hours:  T: 1:00-2:15, TH: 11:15-12:30, or by appointment 

 

 

 

Course Description: 

 

Japan’s modern political history has been punctuated by three “critical junctures” 

that changed—or promised to change—the face of Japan: the Meiji Restoration of 1868, 

which sparked a period of rapid political modernization and industrialization; the period 

of democratization during the Allied Occupation of Japan (1945-52); and the post-1993 

era of near economic stagnation and sluggish political-economic reform. Using the first 

two “critical junctures” as reference points, this course examines the structure and 

resilience of the institutions and power alignments of the postwar era.  What is distinctive 

about those institutions and alignments? Why is Japan having so much trouble reforming 

them today?  How can we explain the changes that have been introduced after the last 

decade or so?   

In addressing these themes, we will explore a wide range of topics including the 

political legacies of the prewar political system, the impact of the Occupation on the 

development of postwar political institutions, the structure and functions of the changing 

electoral and political party systems, interest group politics, citizen protest and the 

development of civil society, the media in politics, the government-business relationship 

and the significance of industrial policy during the postwar rapid economic growth 

period, the policy-making process, the sources and consequences of political corruption, 

and ongoing efforts to reform the contemporary political economy. These topics will be 

discussed from a comparative perspective and with reference to political science concepts 

and theories. 

Since we are fortunate this semester to be studying Japanese politics during the 

immediate aftermath of a major Lower House election (scheduled for August 30), we will 

devote significant time to class discussions on current events.  Students are thus 

encouraged to regularly consult one of Japan’s on-line English language newspapers  

(Japan Times, Asahi Newspaper, The Daily Yomiuri, or the Mainichi Daily News).   

 

 

 

 

Assignments: 

 

1. Quizzes: 15% 

2. Midterm exam #1 (Sept. 29): 20% 

3. Midterm exam #2 (Nov. 10): 25% (Students have the option of writing a 6-8 page 

research paper instead of the exam. Students are also free to do both assignments; 

the grades for the two assignments will be averaged.  See Assignments on 

Blackboard for a list of topic suggestions; topics must be approved by the 

instructor by Nov. 12. Due date for papers: Dec. 1.) 

4. Final exam during scheduled exam period: 40% 

 

 

Required Readings: The following texts are available for purchase at the University Co- 

op on Guadalupe: 

1. Andrew Gordon, Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the 

Present. Oxford University Press, 2008 (2nd edition). 

 2. Gerald Curtis, The Logic of Japanese Politics. Columbia University Press, 

1999. 

 3. Robert Pekkanen, Japan’s Dual Society: Members Without Advocates. Cornell 

University Press, 2006. 

  4. Robin LeBlanc, Bicycle Citizens: The Political World of the Japanese 

Housewife. University of California Press, 1999. 

  5. Jacob M. Schlesinger, Shadow Shoguns: The Rise and Fall of Japan’s Postwar 

Political Machine. Sanford University Press, 1999. 

 

 Additional readings can be accessed directly through UT’s on-line library system 

(usually JSTOR or Academic Search Complete), or under Documents on the Blackboard 

site for this course.  (An explanation for finding articles through JSTOR is noted in Item 

#1 under Documents.) 

 

 

Class Guidelines: 

1.   Students with disabilities are welcome to request appropriate 

accommodations.  Please contact Services for Students with Disabilities (471-6259) and 

the instructor for further information. 

2.   While this course includes no attendance grade, successful completion of the 

snap quizzes requires you to attend all classes and to arrive for each class on time. 

3.   All lectures, readings, and films will be subject to examination. 

 4.   You are responsible for keeping up with e-mail correspondence with the 

instructor, as well as notices and other postings on the Blackboard site for this course. 

5.  All assignments must be completed on schedule.  Only students with officially 

documented illnesses can be exempted from this rule.  Late submissions will be penalized 

5% per day. 

 

 

 

 

6. PowerPoint presentations are designed to provide you with rough outlines 

of basic concepts and themes.  If you wish to do well in this course, you should take 

detailed notes during lectures and class discussions.  Lecture notes and PowerPoint 

presentations will not be posted on the web.   

7. Students guilty of academic dishonesty (ex., cheating on an exam or 

plagiarizing a paper) will receive a “0” for the assignment in question.  No exceptions.  

Students are strongly urged to refer to the following link from the Dean of Students for an 

explanation of what plagiarism is and how it can be avoided: 

http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php. Information about 

plagiarism can also be found on the homepage of the UT library system 

(http://www.lib.utexas.edu). 

 8.  You must take the final exam during the time-slot designated by the university. 

Don’t make travel arrangements during the exam period until the exam schedule has been 

finalized! 

 9.  Please keep in mind that texting and Internet browsing in class are distractions 

to you, to the instructor, and to the students around you.  

 10.  I respectfully ask you to arrive for class on time.  Please let me know well in 

advance of unavoidable absences, late arrivals, and early departures from class. 

 

 

Grading Policy: We will adopt UT’s new “plus & minus” grading system in this course. 

The following is a list of letter grades, their corresponding GPA values, and the 

percentage values that I plan to use for your assignments.  Note that these percentage 

grades will be recorded on Blackboard for our purposes only (i.e.: they will note be noted 

on your transcript). 

 

 

Letter Grade GPA Percentage Score 

A 4.0 94-100% 

A- 3.67 90-93 

B+ 3.33 87-89 

B 3.0 84-86 

B- 2.67 80-83 

C+ 2.33 77-79 

C 2.0 74-76 

C- 1.67 70-73 

D+ 1.33 67-69 

D 1.0 64-66 

D- .67 60-63 

F 0 59 & below 

 

 

 

 

 

Lecture Schedule 

 

Aug. 27: Introduction to the Course 

 No readings 

 

Sept. 1: Overview and Discussion of August 30 Lower House Election 

 Newspaper articles will be posted on Blackboard (under 

 Documents) immediately following the election. Please read in advance of class. 

 

 Tobias Harris and Colum Murphy, “Can the DPJ Bring Democracy to Japan?” 

 Far Eastern Economic Review, July 3, 2009. 

 http://www.feer.com/essays/2009/july/can-the-dpj-bring-democracy-to-japan 

 

 

Sept. 3: Politics in Prewar Japan 

 Gordon, A Modern History of Japan, pp. 61-201. 

 

 

The Postwar Period 

 

Sept. 8, 10 & 15: The Occupation (1945-52)—The Political Legacies of 

Democratization, Demilitarization, and the “Reverse Course” 

 Gordon, A Modern History of Japan, pp. 202-241. 

  

Sept. 17, 22 & 24: “The 1955 System”—Parliamentary and Electoral Institutions, 

Party Competition, and the Secrets of One Party Dominance 

 Curtis, The Logic of Japanese Politics, pp. 25-64. 

 Schlesinger, Shadow Shoguns, Parts One & Two. 

 

Sept. 29: In-Class Midterm Exam 

 

Oct. 1 & 6: Explaining the Postwar “Economic Miracle”—Industrial Policy and the 

Government-Business Relationship 

 Gordon, A Modern History of Japan, pp. 245-88.  

 Chalmers Johnson, MITI and the Japanese Miracle (Stanford University Press, 

1982), pp. 3-34. (Download from Documents on Blackboard.) 

 

Oct. 8: The Media in Politics 

 ? No readings ?  

 

Oct. 13 & 15: Interest Groups and the Problem of Structural Corruption 

 Chalmers Johnson, “Tanaka Kakuei, Structural Corruption, and the Advent of 

Machine Politics in Japan, Journal of Japanese Studies vol. 12, no. 1 (1986): 1-28.  

(Access via JSTOR). 

 

 

 

 

Patricia L. Maclachlan, “Post Office Politics in Modern Japan: The Postmasters, 

Iron Triangles, and the Limits of Reform.” Journal of Japanese Studies, 30:2 (2004): 

281-313.  (Access through JSTOR.) 

 

Oct. 20 & 22: Japan’s Evolving Civil Society 

 Pekkanen, Japan’s Dual Society, Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 5. 

 

Oct. 27 & 29: Women’s Issues in Postwar Japanese Politics 

 LeBlanc, Bicycle Citizens, Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 6. 

 

 

1993 to the Present: Political and Economic Reform 

 

Nov. 3 & 5: The Bubble Economy & Japan’s Current Economic Woes 

 Yukio Noguchi, “the ‘Bubble’ and Economic Policies in the 1980s,” Journal of 

Japanese Studies, 20:2 (Summer 1994): 291-329. (Access through JSTOR) 

 Richard Katz, “The Japan Fallacy,” Foreign Affairs (March/April 2009): 9-14. 

(Access through Academic Search Premier) 

 

Nov. 10: In-Class Midterm Exam  

 

Nov.  12, 17 & 19:  The Fall (and Rise?) of the LDP: Party Politics and Electoral 

Reform 

 Curtis, pp. 65-205. 

 Schlesinger, Shadow Shoguns, Part Four. 

 

Nov. 24 & *Dec. 1: The Koizumi Phenomenon and the Politics of Change 

 Patricia L. Maclachlan, “Storming the Castle: The Battle for Postal Reform in 

Japan,” Social Science Japan Journal (April 2006): 1-18.  (Under Research Tools on 

UT library website, choose “Find a Journal” and enter “Social Science Japan Journal.”) 

Ray Christensen, “An Analysis of the 2005 Japanese General Election: Will 

Koizumi's Political Reforms Endure?” Asian Survey (August 2006): 497-516. (Access 

through JSTOR) 

 

*Research papers due 

 

Dec. 3: Summing Up & Review 

 

 

Useful Japan-related websites:  

http://web-japan.org/links/index.html (provides links to government websites and 

English-language newspapers) 

http://jpcentral.virginia.edu/index.htm (includes a very useful bibliography for 

Japanese politics) 

 http://www.kantei.go.jp/foreign/index-e.html (home page of the prime minister’s 

official residence) 

 

 

 

 http://newslet.iss.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ (Social Science Japan Newsletter, from the 

University of Tokyo) 

 http://hcl.harvard.edu/research/guides/data_japan/index.html (data resources on 

Japan from Harvard University.  Not all resources are available to non-affiliates.) 

 http://www.mansfieldfdn.org/polls/polls_listing.htm (an up-to-date list of public 

opinion polls on Japan from the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation) 

 http://www.mmz.kantei.go.jp/foreign/m-magazine/index.html (subscription 

information for the Japan Prime Minister’s e-mail magazine)  

 http://www.observingjapan.com/ (A cool blog on Japanese politics by Tobias 

Harris) 

 http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/eastasia (the website for UT’s Center for East 

Asian Studies.  Check for list of upcoming events on Japan and useful research resources)  

ANS 361 • Intl Rels Of E/Stheast Asia

31124 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 PAR 203
show description

International Relations of East and Southeast Asia 

GOV 365L (39240)/ ANS 361 (31124) 

Fall 2009 

University of Texas at Austin 

TTH 9:30-11:00, PAR 203 

 

 

Dr. Patricia L. Maclachlan     

Department of Government     

BAT 3.150; Tel, 232-1724      

E: pmaclachlan@mail.utexas.edu    

Office Hours: T: 1:00-2:15 & Th: 11:15-12:30,  

     or by appointment 

 

Course Description 

A decade ago, pundits looked to the spectacular economic growth of East and 

Southeast Asia and predicted that the 21st century would be the “Pacific Century.” 

Although analysts have been far less optimistic about the economic and political future of 

the region following the 1997 financial crisis, most nevertheless agree that East/Southeast 

Asia has the most growth potential of any other region in the world.  It is also home to 

some of the globe’s most dangerous “hot spots”: North Korea’s ongoing nuclear threat, 

conflict in the Taiwan Straits, and, during the early 2000s, escalating tensions between 

Japan and China. 

This upper division undergraduate course is designed to introduce students to 

some of the basic themes of the post-Cold War international relations of East and 

Southeast Asia.  We will explore basic theoretical approaches to international relations, 

“Great Power” (China, Japan, and the United States) contributions and challenges to the 

military and economic security of the region, the objectives and processes of political and 

economic integration in the Asia-Pacific, human rights considerations, and the nature of 

and potential solutions to the ongoing North Korean nuclear crisis.  We will also keep 

track of current events in the region. 

 

Prerequisites 

 Since this is an introductory course, a background in Asian Studies or 

Government is recommended but not required.   

 

Requirements 

1. Quizzes on readings: 15% 

2. First midterm exam (October 13): 20% 

3. Second midterm (November 17): 25% (Instead of the exam, students have the 

option of writing a 5-7 page book review of the Kang, Kang & Cha, or Stiglitz 

volumes.  Due at noon on Nov. 17). 

4. Final exam: 40% 

 2 

 

Class Guidelines 

1.   Students with disabilities are welcome to request appropriate 

accommodations.  Please contact Services for Students with Disabilities (471-6259) and 

the instructor for further information. 

2.   While this course includes no attendance grade, successful completion of the 

quizzes requires you to attend all classes and to arrive for each class on time. 

3.   All lectures, readings, and films will be subject to examination. 

 4.   You are responsible for keeping up with e-mail correspondence with the 

instructor, as well as notices and other postings on the Blackboard site for this course. 

5.  All assignments must be completed on schedule.  Only students with officially 

documented illnesses can be exempted from this rule.  Assignments submitted late will be 

penalized 5% per day. 

6. PowerPoint presentations are designed to provide you with rough outlines 

of basic concepts and themes.  If you wish to do well in this course, you should take 

detailed notes during lectures and class discussions.  Lecture notes and PowerPoint 

presentations will not be posted on the web.   

7. Students guilty of academic dishonesty (ex., cheating on an exam or 

plagiarizing a paper) will receive a “0” for the assignment in question.  No exceptions.  

Students are strongly urged to refer to the following link from the Dean of Students for an 

explanation of what plagiarism is and how it can be avoided: 

http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php.  Information about 

plagiarism can also be found on the homepage of the UT library system 

(http://www.lib.utexas.edu). 

 8.  You must take the final exam during the time-slot designated by the university. 

Don’t make travel arrangements during the exam period until the exam schedule has been 

finalized! 

 9.  Please keep in mind that texting and Internet browsing in class are distractions 

to you, to the instructor, and to the students around you.  

 10.  I respectfully ask you to arrive for class on time.  Please let me know well in 

advance of unavoidable absences, late arrivals, and early departures from class. 

 3 

 

Grading Policy  

We will adopt UT’s new “plus & minus” grading system in this course. The 

following is a list of letter grades, their corresponding GPA values, and the percentage 

values that I plan to use for your assignments.  Note that these percentage grades will be 

recorded on Blackboard for our purposes only (i.e.: they will note be noted on your 

transcript). 

 

 

Letter Grade GPA Percentage Score 

A 4.0 94-100% 

A- 3.67 90-93 

B+ 3.33 87-89 

B 3.0 84-86 

B- 2.67 80-83 

C+ 2.33 77-79 

C 2.0 74-76 

C- 1.67 70-73 

D+ 1.33 67-69 

D 1.0 64-66 

D- .67 60-63 

F 0 59 & below 

 

 

Readings 

 The following texts are required and are available for purchase at the University 

Co-op: 

 

1. G. John Ikenberry and Michael Mastanduno, International Relations Theory 

and the Asia Pacific (Columbia University Press, 2003). 

2. Joseph E. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (W.W. Norton & Co., 

2002). 

3. David Kang, China Rising: Peace, Power and Order in East Asia (Columbia 

University Press, 2007). 

4. David Kang and Victor D. Cha, Nuclear North Korea: A Debate on 

Engagement Strategies (Columbia University Press, 2005). 

5. Michael J. Green and Bates Gill, eds. Asia’s New Multilateralism: 

Cooperation, Competition and the Search for Community (Columbia 

University press, 2009). 

 

All additional readings can be accessed through UT’s on-line library system or 

under Documents in the Blackboard site for this class.  Newspaper articles on current 

events will also be posted on Blackboard as the course progresses.   

 4 

 

 

Lecture Schedule 

 

Part I: Introduction 

 

Aug. 27: Introduction to the Course 

 

 No readings. 

 

Sept. 1: Defining the Region 

 

 Green and Gill, ch. 1 (skim summaries of other book chapters). 

 

Sept. 3 & 8: How Relevant is “The Clash of Civilizations” for the Asia-Pacific? 

 

 Samuel Huntington, “The Clash of Civilizations,” Foreign Affairs 72:2 (Summer 

 1993). (Access via Academic Search Premier.)   

 

 

Part II: IR Theory, Security, and the Role of “Great Powers” in the Region 

 

 

Sept. 10 & 15: Concepts and Theories of International Relations 

 

 Ikenberry and Mastanduno, chapters 1, 3 & 12. 

 

Sept. 17 & 22: Japan—the Reluctant Leader 

 

 Ikenberry and Mastanduno, ch. 5. 

 

 Green and Gill, ch. 5. 

 

Richard J. Samuels, “’New Fighting Power!’: Japan’s Growing Maritime 

Capabilities and East Asian Security,” International Security, vol. 32, no. 3  

(Winter 2007/08): 84-112. 

 

Sept.  24, 29 & Oct. 1: China in the Region – Past and Present 

 

 Kang, all chapters. 

 

 Green and Gill, ch. 3. 

 5 

 

 

Oct. 6 & 8: Assessing the Region’s Conventional and Non-Conventional Security 

Threats 

 

 Green and Gill, chapters 11 & 12.  

 

 

Oct. 13:  In-Class Midterm Exam 

 

 

Part III: Institutional Integration in East & Southeast Asia  

 

 

Oct.  15, 20 & 22: The East Asian Economy and the “Promise” of Globalization 

 

 Stiglitz, all chapters except 5 & 6.  

 

 Edward J. Lincoln, “The Asian Regional Economy,” in David Shambaugh and 

Michael Yahuda, eds., International Relations of Asia (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008), pp. 

277-99. 

 

 

Oct. 27 & 29: Building Regional Institutions – Challenges and Opportunities 

 

 Gill and Green, chapters 2, 3, 5 (review) & 8. 

 

 

Part IV: The Problem of North Korea 

 

 

Nov. 3, 5, 10 & 12: The North Korean Nuclear Crisis  

 

 Kang and Cha, all chapters. 

 

 

Nov. 17: In Class Midterm Exam 

 

 6 

Part V: Human Rights in East Asia 

 

 

Nov. 19, 24, Dec. 1 & 3: The Impact of Norms and Values on Regional Cooperation  

  

Amartya Sen, “Human Rights and Asian Values,” Morgenthau Memorial Lecture 

on Ethics and Foreign Policy, 1997. 

 

Robert D. Kaplan, “Lifting the Bamboo Curtain,” The Atlantic (September 2008): 

85-95. 

 

Green and Gill, ch. 10. 

 

 

 

Some useful current-event websites: 

 

• www.nbr.org/ (National Bureau of Asian Research, or NBR.  A policy-related 

think tank that provides commentary and reports on military and economic issues 

affecting the region.) 

 

• www.nautilus.org/napsnet/dr/index.html (Nautilus Institute: offers daily and 

weekly reports on security issues in the region, including in-depth coverage of 

North Korea.  Sign up for daily e-mail deliveries.) 

 

• www.feer.com/ (Far Eastern Economic Review: the region’s equivalent to The 

Economist.  Provides articles and special reports on domestic and international 

relations in the region.  Access to some materials requires a paid subscription.)  

 

 

ANS 390 • Civil Society In East Asia

30642 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 1230pm-330pm BAT 1.104
(also listed as GOV 390L )
show description

Study of various Asian studies-related topics that do not focus on any single geographic region.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

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