Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
classics masthead classics masthead
Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Course Descriptions

AHC 310 • The Premodern World

32015 • Talbot, Cynthia
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 3.112
(also listed as HIS 301F)
show description

AHC 310 Introductory Surveys in Premodern History:

Introductory survey of premodern history with emphasis on regions outside of the ancient Mediterranean world.

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32020-32035 • Perlman, Paula J
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm WAG 101
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D)
show description

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

AHC 325 • Hist Of Rome: The Republic

32040 • Riggsby, Andrew M
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as CTI 375, HIS 321M)
show description

Covers the period from Rome's foundation through Caesar's murder in 44 B.C.  The emphasis placed on the last two centuries of the Republic when problems accumulated and solutions did not.  All the factors contributing to the Republic's fall will discussed:  political, military, social, economic, religious, etc..

Grading:

2 quizzes (each 25%) requiring essay answers

Final exam (50%) requiring essay answers

Texts:

M. Cary & H.H. Scullar, A History of Rome (3rd ed.)

Plutarch, Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin)

Sallust, Jugarthine War & The Conspiracy of Catiline (Penguin)

Optional:

Appian, Civil Wars (Penguin)

AHC 325 • Hist Grc To End Pelopon War

32045-32050 • Palaima, Thomas G
Meets MW 100pm-200pm CLA 0.126
(also listed as C C 354C, CTI 375, HIS 354C)
show description

Studying Greek history gives us the chance to view in microcosm all the variables that affect the course of history at other times in other places. We can see human beings and human societies at their best and worst, understand how power works in human societies, observe different kinds of political and economic systems, and consider how cultural values are shaped and what influence they have on what human beings do. We shall study the origins of democracy and de-mystify what ancient democracy was. The history of Greece is also a history of warfare and competition.

This course surveys Greek history from the palatial period of the late Bronze Age (1600-1200 B.C.E.) through the 'Dark Ages' and into the 'polis' period down through the end of the Peloponnesian War (404 B.C.E.).

We shall puzzle over how to interpret the often very uneven and very peculiar evidence for the social, political and economic systems that develop in different districts of Greece in 'prehistoric' and historical times.

There will be very little use of visuals. We shall concentrate on sources and how to use them.

The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a one-hour discussion section. Each member of a discussion section will have to lead discussion (with a well-prepared handout) at least once during the semester. Afterwards s/he will write up a retrospective on the discussion to be handed in at the beginning of the final week.

We shall be reading in translation from masterworks of history and literature: Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plutarch, we shall also take into account documentary sources, including translated Linear B texts from the Greek Bronze Age and inscriptions of the historical period.

We shall discuss carefully critical methods for interpreting primary sources.Technically AHC 325 CC 354C HIS 354C is an upper-division course. However, it assumes no background knowledge of the subject and will combine survey of periods with in-depth discussion of particulars. There are no prerequisites. This course counts towards the major in Ancient History and Classical Civilization.

Grading policy:  There will be a fifth-week examination (20% short answer and essay at the start of the 6th week), a tenth-week examination (30% short answer and essay at the start of the 11th week), and a fifteenth-week examination (30% short answer and essay on Wednesday of the 15th week). The final component of the grade will be performance in discussion (20%). You should sign up to be a group leader for one of the available discussion sessions. Discussion grade will be based 1/2 on group leading and handout (10% overall) and 1/2 on general participation (10% overall). There will be no final examination in the examination period. Grading is on the regular "A"-"D," 100-60 system (no curve). Regular class participation will be noted under miscellaneous. Breakdown of elements of the grade: 5th-week exam (20%), 10th-week exam (30%), 15th-week exam (30%), discussion (leading 10% and general participation 10%).

AHC 330 • Epics And Heroes Of India

32055 • Talbot, Cynthia
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CBA 4.326
(also listed as ANS 372, CTI 345, HIS 350L)
show description

FLAGS:   GC  |  Wr  |  II

Description:

This undergraduate seminar focuses on India's classical epics, the Mahabharata and the Ramayana.  Although they originated in ancient times, these two captivating narratives have been retold in different languages and formats over the centuries, including most recently in the form of TV serials and graphic novels.  Among the topics to be explored are the martial ethos of ancient India, the complexities of dharma, the ideology of kingship, traditional gender norms, the recent politicization of the Ramayana, and the use of the epics to counter social and gender hierarchy.  Students will read abbreviated versions of the epics along with excerpts from various translations of the complete narratives; they will also be exposed to other primary sources including paintings, traditional theatrical performances, and modern films and TV shows.

Texts: 

1) Chakravarthi V. Narasimhan, The Mahabharata

2) Gurcharan Das, The Difficulty of Being Good

3) R. K. Narayan, The Ramayana

4) Numerous articles and essays provided on Canvas.

Grading:

reading responses (6 x 5% each) = 30%; analytical essays (2 x 25% each) = 50 %; film review = 5%; attendance & participation = 15%

AHC 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

32060
Meets
show description

Prerequisites:  Upper-division standing and admission to the Classics Honors Program.

Supervised conference course for honors candidates in classics. Three conference hours a week for two semesters.

Majors who plan to seek special honors in Ancient History and Classical Civilization, special honors in Greek, special honors in Latin, or special honors in Classics should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program at least one full academic year before they expect to graduate. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in the coursework required for the major of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the requirements of the major, are (1) AHC 679HA and 679HB-W, Greek 679HA and 679HB-W, Latin 679HA and 679HB-W, or Classical Civilization 679HA and 679HB-W, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of A in each half; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the coursework required for the major and an “A” in each half of the honors tutorial course; and (3) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

Requirements for the Honors Thesis

(1.) The student must discuss the Honors program option with the Faculty Academic Advisor.
(2.) The student must fill out and have signed a Conference Course form for the 679HA and 679HB-W courses.
(3.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HA for directed reading and research under a faculty mentor.
(4.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HB-W writing the Honors Thesis. Students should consult a semester academic calendar and consult with their faculty mentors to determine a schedule for completion of the Thesis. A second faculty reader must also review the Thesis.
(5.) The College of Liberal Arts expects a Thesis to require at least 20 pages of reviewed and revised text. Although there is no other required minimum, the Thesis should consist of more substantial output.
(6.) The final version of the Thesis must be turned in to the Department of Classics Undergraduate Advisor in an electronic (PDF) format or bound copy.

Carries an Independent Inquiry flag.

AHC 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

32065
Meets
show description

Prerequisite: AHC 679HA.

Supervised conference course for honors candidates in classics. Three conference hours a week for two semesters.

Majors who plan to seek special honors in Ancient History and Classical Civilization, special honors in Greek, special honors in Latin, or special honors in Classics should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program at least one full academic year before they expect to graduate. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in the coursework required for the major of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the requirements of the major, are (1) AHC 679HA and 679HB-W, Greek 679HA and 679HB-W, Latin 679HA and 679HB-W, or Classical Civilization 679HA and 679HB-W, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of A in each half; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the coursework required for the major and an “A” in each half of the honors tutorial course; and (3) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

Requirements for the Honors Thesis

(1.) The student must discuss the Honors program option with the Faculty Academic Advisor.
(2.) The student must fill out and have signed a Conference Course form for the 679HA and 679HB-W courses.
(3.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HA for directed reading and research under a faculty mentor.
(4.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HB-W writing the Honors Thesis. Students should consult a semester academic calendar and consult with their faculty mentors to determine a schedule for completion of the Thesis. A second faculty reader must also review the Thesis.
(5.) The College of Liberal Arts expects a Thesis to require at least 20 pages of reviewed and revised text. Although there is no other required minimum, the Thesis should consist of more substantial output.
(6.) The final version of the Thesis must be turned in to the Department of Classics Undergraduate Advisor in an electronic (PDF) format or bound copy.

Carries an Independent Inquiry flag.

bottom border