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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Andrew M Riggsby

Professor Ph.D, UC Berkeley

Professor of Classics and Art History

Contact

Biography

FieldsRoman Cultural History, Latin Prose, Linguistics

Awards: Caesar in Gaul and Rome: War in Words, has received the award for the outstanding book published in Classics and Ancient History in 2006. The award comes from the Association of American Publishers (Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division). 
National Endowment for the Humanities/Roger A. Hornsby Post-Doctoral Rome Prize.  2010-2011.

Recent Publications: Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans.  Cambridge University Press 2010.


Interests

Roman Cultural History, Latin Prose, Cognition

AHC 378 • Roman Law

33125 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 112
(also listed as C C 375 )
show description

This class will have 3 parts.  1) Introduction to the general outlines of Roman law.  2) close study of primary sources on one area of law. 3) discussion of special problems in Roman law, and how they have been approached over time.

Readings

Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans, Andrew M. Riggsby

A Casebook on Roman Property, Herbert Hausmaninger (Author), Richard Gamauf (Author), George A. Sheets (Author)

Requirements

2 exams 15% each

Short paper 20%

Long paper 30%

Participation 20%

C C 375 • Roman Law

33357 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 112
(also listed as AHC 378 )
show description

This class will have 3 parts.  1) Introduction to the general outlines of Roman law.  2) close study of primary sources on one area of law. 3) discussion of special problems in Roman law, and how they have been approached over time.

Readings

Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans, Andrew M. Riggsby

A Casebook on Roman Property, Herbert Hausmaninger (Author), Richard Gamauf (Author), George A. Sheets (Author)

Requirements

2 exams 15% each

Short paper 20%

Long paper 30%

Participation 20%

LAT 385 • Cicero & Genre:theory/Practice

33730 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 214
show description

Cicero and Genre: Theory and Practice

The shared core of the undergraduate and graduate courses will be reading of three texts: Cicero’s oration de Haruspicum Responsis, the dialogue Brutus (parts), and a selection of his letters.  Two days a week will be devoted to translating these works in class, covering much, though not all of the text in a careful fashion.  All students will be tested on this material.

Additionally, students in 385 will do parallel readings of the first Verrine oration, the dialogue de Amicitia, and further selected letters.  This will not be reviewed systematically in class, but it will be tested, and I will make myself available to answer questions as they arise.

Students in 365 will instead do additional study of the various genres Cicero writes in: how are (and aren’t) the works being read typical instances, why does it matter to our reading, and just what is a genre in the first place.  I will give presentations on these topics one day a week for the first several weeks of class.  Students in 365 will have extra assigned secondary reading for these classes.  They will also develop research topics of their own in this area, giving presentations in the later stages of the semester, and writing a final paper.

Texts /Readings:

Cicero, Har. Resp., I Verr., Brutus, Amicit., selected letters (divided between 365 and 385 as above)

Grading Policy:

365: participation 15%, midterm 15%, final 20%; final project 50% (25% final paper, 10% oral presentation, 15% preliminary outlines and drafts)

385: participation 25%, midterm 30%, final 50%

AHC 325 • History Of Rome: The Empire

33025 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 101
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 321 )
show description

 

This class will cover the story of the Roman empire from the death of Caesar to the fall of Rome in A.D. 476.  After working our way through the narrative of this period (about half th semester), we will examine a number of topics that cut across time.  The course will touch on politics, law, war, the economy, social classes, gender, and psychopathic emperors.  Grading: weekly quizzes 10% 2 exams 45% final exam 45% Texts: Ancient Rome: A Military and Political History, Christopher S. Mackay  

LAT 365 • Plautus And Early Latin

33605 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 3.120
(also listed as LAT 385 )
show description

We will study a variety of early Latin texts (laws, epitaphs, poems, oratory, history), building to a reading of one of the first major works of Latin "literature": Plautus' Casina. Attention will be given both to linguistic and literary issues. Among the latter will be the early evolution of genres, the role of Greek models, the role of performance, and the applicability of the notion of "literature" itself.

Requirements and Grading: 365: Final 40%, Midterm 25%, Paper 20%, Participation 15% 385: Final 25%, Midterm 20%, Paper 35%, Participation 20% [students enrolled in 385 will also do additional Latin and secondary readings not covered during class]

 

LAT 385 • Plautus And Early Latin

33630 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 3.120
(also listed as LAT 365 )
show description

We will study a variety of early Latin texts (laws, epitaphs, poems, oratory, history), building to a reading of one of the first major works of Latin "literature": Plautus' Casina. Attention will be given both to linguistic and literary issues. Among the latter will be the early evolution of genres, the role of Greek models, the role of performance, and the applicability of the notion of "literature" itself.

Requirements and Grading: 365: Final 40%, Midterm 25%, Paper 20%, Participation 15% 385: Final 25%, Midterm 20%, Paper 35%, Participation 20% [students enrolled in 385 will also do additional Latin and secondary readings not covered during class]

 

AHC 325 • History Of Rome: The Republic

32910 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 3.102
(also listed as HIS 321M )
show description

Covers the period from Rome's foundation through Caesar's murder in 44 B.C.  The emphasis placed on the last two centuries of the Republic when problems accumulated and solutions did not.  All the factors contributing to the Republic's fall will discussed:  political, military, social, economic, religious, etc..

 Grading:

2 quizzes (each 25%) requiring essay answers

Final exam (50%) requiring essay answers

Texts:

M. Cary & H.H. Scullar, A History of Rome (3rd ed.)

Plutarch, Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin)

Sallust, Jugarthine War & The Conspiracy of Catiline (Penguin)

 Optional:

Appian, Civil Wars (Penguin)

LAT 390 • Latin Epigraphy

33513 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1230pm-200pm WAG 116
show description

Selected topics in Roman studies. Topics given in recent years include Roman comedy, Pliny, and Roman fragmentary historians.

LAT F323 • Caesar

83040 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-500pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as LAT F385 )
show description

We will study selections from Caesar's Gallic War, setting them in various literary, historical, and cultural contexts. The course will cover the new AP syllabus, plus other important passages.

Requirements and Grading: LAT 323: class participation (10%), mid-term (30%), a short paper (2000 words., 25%), and a final (mostly translation, 35%).

LAT 385: class participation (10%), mid-term (25%), a longer paper (3500 words., 35%), and a final (mostly translation, 30%), plus additional readings outside of class.

Texts: Riggsby, Caesar in Gaul and Rome

Caesar (ed. Walser) Bellum Gallicum

LAT F385 • Caesar

83053 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-500pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as LAT F323 )
show description

We will study selections from Caesar's Gallic War, setting them in various literary, historical, and cultural contexts. The course will cover the new AP syllabus, plus other important passages.

Requirements and Grading: LAT 323: class participation (10%), mid-term (30%), a short paper (2000 words., 25%), and a final (mostly translation, 35%).

LAT 385: class participation (10%), mid-term (25%), a longer paper (3500 words., 35%), and a final (mostly translation, 30%), plus additional readings outside of class.

Texts: Riggsby, Caesar in Gaul and Rome

Caesar (ed. Walser) Bellum Gallicum

AHC 325 • History Of Rome: The Empire

32920 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 101
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 321 )
show description

This class will cover the story of the Roman empire from the death of Caesar to the fall of Rome in A.D. 476.  After working our way through the narrative of this period (about half th semester), we will examine a number of topics that cut across time.  The course will touch on politics, law, war, the economy, social classes, gender, and psychopathic emperors. 

Grading:

2 quizzes (each 25%) requiring essay answers

Final exam (50%) requiring essay answers

Texts:

Ancient Rome: A Military and Political History, Christopher S. Mackay

AHC 378 • Roman Law

32945 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 3.120
(also listed as HIS 350L )
show description

This class will have 3 parts.  1) Introduction to the general outlines of Roman law.  2) close study of primary sources on one area of law. 3) discussion of special problems in Roman law, and how they have been approached over time.

Readings

Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans, Andrew M. Riggsby

A Casebook on Roman Property, Herbert Hausmaninger (Author), Richard Gamauf (Author), George A. Sheets (Author)

 Requirements

2 exams 15% each

Short paper 20%

Long paper 30%

Participation 20%

C C 383 • Roman History Survey

33035 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm GAR 2.124
show description

The aim of the is course is to survey Roman History, concentrating on the period from the Gracchi to Nero (133 BC-AD 68), the most important, most discussed and best documented era.  There will be a combination of lectures and seminar discussions.  For the latter, students may from time to time be required to give brief presentations based on the reading assignments.  We will consider a political/military narrative framework, selected issues of social and cultural history, and problems in the historiography of ancient Rome. Students should have a working knowledge of Latin and/or Greek, since the ancient sources will need to be consulted in the original; an acquaintance with German, and/or French, and/or Italian would also be of help, since important work on the period has been undertaken in these languages.  There will be either a term-paper (20-25 typed pages long), on a topic agreed upon the student and instructor; or the student may instead take the Roman History Examination required of Ph.D. students in Classics and Classical Archaeology, for which this course is designed as preparation.

LAT 323 • Cicero And Catullus

33345 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 208
show description

Cicero was the greatest lawyer of the Roman Republic. He aimed to be the embodiment of the social and political establishment. Catullus, his younger contemporary, preferred to play the artistic rebel. He was the first great Roman writer of lyric poetry and epigram. Nearly the only thing they shared was a deeply snarky sense of humor. We will read both to get their different perspectives on Rome's empire. What was it good for? What did it cost? What effect did it have on the subjects? Did their opinions count? The first object of the course will be to improve reading ability, but we will also devote considerable attention to the kinds of questions just raised and the rhetorical and poetic tactics they bring into play. Readings: Cicero, pro Lege Manilia Catullus, Carmina [selections]

C C 348 • Roman Law-W

32555 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 WAG 112
(also listed as EUS 348 )
show description

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

C C 383 • Genre And Politics

32625 • Spring 2010
Meets M 200pm-500pm WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 383 )
show description

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

LAT 383 • Genre And Politics

32980 • Spring 2010
Meets M 200pm-500pm WAG 10
(also listed as C C 383 )
show description

Latin 383 is an intensive prose reading course intended for MA students in Classics and related disciplines who wish to improve their ability to read Latin accurately and at speed.  Students should already have a firm grasp of Latin morphology and syntax as well as significant experience with Latin prose before attempting this course.  You will be expected to prepare a substantial amount of Latin for each class meeting (c. 300 lines/week).  Although the focus of the course will be on acquainting students with the several important Late Republican texts, we will also spend some time with the Imperial Latin Prose of Seneca the Elder.  Class meetings will be devoted to close translation of selected passages from the prepared assignments; detailed review of Latin syntax; and sight reading.  By the end of the semester, students will be able to read quickly and with a strong grasp of Classical Latin syntax.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

32615 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WEL 1.316
show description

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

LAT 323 • Caesar

33085 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 WAG 208
show description

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 304C • Ancient Technology

32001 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 WAG 201
show description

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

C C 383 • Cognitive History Of Anc World

32135 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 200pm-500pm WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 383 )
show description

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

LAT 383 • Cognitive History Of Anc World

32460 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 200pm-500pm WAG 10
(also listed as C C 383 )
show description

Latin 383 is an intensive prose reading course intended for MA students in Classics and related disciplines who wish to improve their ability to read Latin accurately and at speed.  Students should already have a firm grasp of Latin morphology and syntax as well as significant experience with Latin prose before attempting this course.  You will be expected to prepare a substantial amount of Latin for each class meeting (c. 300 lines/week).  Although the focus of the course will be on acquainting students with the several important Late Republican texts, we will also spend some time with the Imperial Latin Prose of Seneca the Elder.  Class meetings will be devoted to close translation of selected passages from the prepared assignments; detailed review of Latin syntax; and sight reading.  By the end of the semester, students will be able to read quickly and with a strong grasp of Classical Latin syntax.

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