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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Adam T Rabinowitz

Associate Professor PhD 2004, University of Michigan

Associate Professor; Assistant Director, Institute of Classical Archaeology
Adam T Rabinowitz

Contact

Interests

Greek colonization, cultural interaction, ancient food and drink, archaeology of daily life, digital approaches to archaeology

C C 307C • Intro To Greek Archaeology

32365 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WAG 201
show description

This course will introduce students to the physical remains of Ancient Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period.  The course will cover all sorts of archaeological evidence, from temples to vases to bones, but it will concentrate on the categories of architecture, sculpture, and painting (especially on ceramics). Through the examination and discussion of this evidence, students will develop a broad knowledge of Ancient Greek material culture, and a sophisticated understanding of the ways we can interpret it.  A focus on stylistic and formal changes and continuities in objects and monuments across time will help us look at long-term issues such as intercultural contact and sociopolitical development.  At the same time, in-depth treatments of particular remains and their contexts will address more specific questions of daily life, art, and ritual.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

C C 380 • Grk Settlement W Med/Black Sea

32510 • Spring 2015
Meets W 200pm-500pm WAG 10
show description

Greeks away from Home: Greek settlement in the Western Mediterranean and the Black Sea

This course will focus on the ancient Greek diaspora that took place between the 8th and the 6th centuries B.C., when Greeks from the Aegean established new communities from the Mediterranean coast of Spain to the Sea of Azov. Although this movement is traditionally referred to as “Greek colonization”, the Greeks themselves referred to these settlements as apoikiai, or “homes away from home.” The term “colonization” has been called into question in recent years, and scholars have been searching for new theoretical models to describe and explain the complex tangle of factors -- social, political, economic, religious -- that led Greeks to settle new areas and that conditioned the subsequent development of those settlements. This course will consider both historical and archaeological sources and their contributions to this discussion.

We will begin by exploring the notion of “colonization” and the theoretical discourse surrounding it, and we will examine alternate explanatory and descriptive models for this phenomenon in the Greek world. We will also address comparative  evidence for other ancient “colonial” movements (e.g. Phoenician, Hellenistic, and Roman), to better understand the idiosyncrasies of the Greek experience. Once we have established a basic theoretical and historical framework, we will spend the rest of the course on a series of archaeological and historical case-studies of individual sites, in which we will investigate both their local context and their development across time. Specific sites will be agreed on by the class, but the regions covered will include the Western Mediterranean (Sicily, South Italy, Spain and France), the Southern Mediterranean (Cyrenaica and Egypt), and the Black Sea.

Each student will be responsible for the investigation of a particular site, which will ideally play a significant role in a final seminar paper. Students will be expected to present articles, a site-based case study, and their research papers. Students will also be required to write a formal review (BMCR style) of a book relevant to the topic of the course. Grades will be based on participation in class discussions, article and case-study presentations, the book review, and the final research paper. Readings will be placed on physical reserve or will be available in digital form through Canvas. Primary texts will be read in English translation, although students with a knowledge of Greek and/or Latin are encouraged to read in the original languages.

Recommended text: J. Boardman, The Greeks Overseas, 4th ed. (1999), ISBN 978-0500281093

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33190 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am FAC 21
(also listed as CTI 310 )
show description

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C S301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

82280 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WAG 201
(also listed as CTI S310 )
show description

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

Grading:

Course requirements include frequent quizzes, an interactive group project, class participation, and three hour-long in-class exams. Grading will be roughly as follows: participation (15%), group project (10%), quizzes (15%), and exams (3 x 20% each = 60%).

Required Texts:

Exploring the World of the Ancient Greeks (J. Camp and E. Fisher, Thames and Hudson, 2010: ISBN 0500288747)

Homer, Odyssey (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics, 1997: ISBN 0140268863)

Thucydides on Justice (P. Woodruff, Hackett, 1993: ISBN 0872201686)

Ten Plays by Euripides (trans. P. Roche, Signet Classics, 1998: ISBN 0451527003)

Four Texts on Socrates (T. West, Cornell University Press, 1998: ISBN 0801485746)

Optional Text:

Herodotus, The Histories (trans. R. Waterfield, Oxford UP, 2008: ISBN 9780199535668) (an online interactive text of Herodotus will be our primary reading, so buy this only if you feel more comfortable with a paper copy)

Other readings will be made available in digital form.

AHC 378 • Herodotus, Ethnograph, & Arch

33515 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 112
(also listed as C C 375 )
show description

This course will focus on the ethnographic component of the Histories of Herodotus: that is, his discussion of the customs and cultures of non-Greek peoples, especially in books 3 and 4. Scholars continue to argue over the extent to which these descriptions accurately depict the neighbors of the Greeks, and the extent to which they reflect Herodotus' literary strategies rather than reality. Initially the accounts of the Egyptians, Persians and Scythians were taken as literal evidence for historical realities; then they were reinterpreted as symbolic narratives of the Other, a mirror for Greek identity; and more recently a middle course between these two poles has been charted. We will explore the primary text, the way it has been analyzed in scholarship across time, and the archaeological remains on the ground that relate to Herodotus' claims. In the process, we will discuss the modern concept of ethnography and the relevance of comparative anthropological evidence for the study of the ancient Mediterranean.

This course is also intended as a trial of new digital approaches to ancient texts. It will serve as a test-bed for a digital interface for Herodotus that provides interactive tools for mapping and network analysis. The Hestia2 project -- an initiative of the Open University UK -- builds on both the existing Hestia project, which maps the places mentioned in Herodotus' work, and the GAPVis project, which seeks to extract spatial and relational information from texts related to the ancient world (http://gap.alexandriaarchive.org/gapvis/index.html#index). These tools are meant to allow students and the general public to extract new meaning from ancient texts, and they will not require any technical expertise beyond the ability to use a web browser. The course will include a brief introduction to digital tools and resources for geography and networks in ancient studies. Students will be expected to make use of these tools and those developed by the Hestia2 project for both in-class discussions and research assignments.

All readings of ancient sources will be in translation, although students with the appropriate language skills will be encouraged to work directly with the original texts in their research.

This course carries the Writing Course and Independent Inquiry flags.

Grades will be based on participation in in-class discussions (25%), two short digital-resource assignments (20%), the presentation of an article or issue (15%), and a significant research paper that students will draft and revise over the course of the semester (40%).

Required texts:

  • The Landmark Herodotus (Anchor Books, 2009)
  • R. Munson, ed., Herodotus: Volume II (Oxford University Press, 2013)

C C 348 • Food And Drink

33670 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 201
show description

Food, Health, and Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean

Food is a major issue in contemporary culture: where it comes from, who has access to it, how it's prepared and consumed, how it affects our health. Furthermore, a number of current theories about nutrition base their approach on claims about the foodways of people in the past. It is therefore worthwhile to examine the actual evidence for the way past cultures produced, consumed, and thought about food. The ancient Mediterranean is a particularly good laboratory for this sort of investigation: it provides us with evidence from numerous and diverse sources, including literature, art, and archaeology, including the study of human remains. We can use this evidence to compare the relation between food and culture in antiquity with contemporary food issues, and to evaluate claims about the health and diet of ancient peoples.

This class will investigate food and drink in the ancient Mediterranean world from France and Italy to Egypt and Mesopotamia and from the late Neolithic to Late Antiquity, with a particular focus on Greek and Roman culture. We will read primary textual sources to understand what people thought about what they ate; we will look at ancient art to see how ancient peoples represented eating and drinking; we will examine archaeological evidence to see what the textual and artistic sources don’t tell us; and we will explore the field of bioarchaeology, which applies scientific analyses to plant, animal, and human remains to illuminate questions of diet, health, and nutrition in the past. By studying the values, social practices, and nutritional choices reflected in ancient foodways, we will come to a better understanding of the relationship between food, health and culture in both the past and the present.

Required texts: J. Wilkins and S. Hill, Food in the Ancient World (Wiley-Blackwell, 2006) (ISBN 978-063123551); J.-L. Flandrin, M. Montanari, A. Sonnenfeld, Food: A Culinary History (Penguin, 2000) (ISBN 978-0140296587); A. Dalby and S. Grainger, The Classical Cookbook: Revised Edition (Getty Museum , 2012) (ISBN 978-1606061107)

Grades will be based on participation in in-class discussions (20%), weekly blog posts (10%), two short (5-6 page) writing assignments (15% each = 30%), a midterm exam (20%) and a final exam (20%).

C C 375 • Herodotus, Ethnograph, & Arch

33730 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 112
(also listed as AHC 378 )
show description

This course will focus on the ethnographic component of the Histories of Herodotus: that is, his discussion of the customs and cultures of non-Greek peoples, especially in books 3 and 4. Scholars continue to argue over the extent to which these descriptions accurately depict the neighbors of the Greeks, and the extent to which they reflect Herodotus' literary strategies rather than reality. Initially the accounts of the Egyptians, Persians and Scythians were taken as literal evidence for historical realities; then they were reinterpreted as symbolic narratives of the Other, a mirror for Greek identity; and more recently a middle course between these two poles has been charted. We will explore the primary text, the way it has been analyzed in scholarship across time, and the archaeological remains on the ground that relate to Herodotus' claims. In the process, we will discuss the modern concept of ethnography and the relevance of comparative anthropological evidence for the study of the ancient Mediterranean.

This course is also intended as a trial of new digital approaches to ancient texts. It will serve as a test-bed for a digital interface for Herodotus that provides interactive tools for mapping and network analysis. The Hestia2 project -- an initiative of the Open University UK -- builds on both the existing Hestia project, which maps the places mentioned in Herodotus' work, and the GAPVis project, which seeks to extract spatial and relational information from texts related to the ancient world (http://gap.alexandriaarchive.org/gapvis/index.html#index). These tools are meant to allow students and the general public to extract new meaning from ancient texts, and they will not require any technical expertise beyond the ability to use a web browser. The course will include a brief introduction to digital tools and resources for geography and networks in ancient studies. Students will be expected to make use of these tools and those developed by the Hestia2 project for both in-class discussions and research assignments.

All readings of ancient sources will be in translation, although students with the appropriate language skills will be encouraged to work directly with the original texts in their research.

This course carries the Writing Course and Independent Inquiry flags.

Grades will be based on participation in in-class discussions (25%), two short digital-resource assignments (20%), the presentation of an article or issue (15%), and a significant research paper that students will draft and revise over the course of the semester (40%).

Required texts:

  • The Landmark Herodotus (Anchor Books, 2009)
  • R. Munson, ed., Herodotus: Volume II (Oxford University Press, 2013)

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33240 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am FAC 21
(also listed as CTI 310 )
show description

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

C C 307C • Intro To Greek Archaeology

33155 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 420
show description

This course will introduce students to the physical remains of Ancient Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period.  The course will cover all sorts of archaeological evidence, from temples to vases to bones, but it will concentrate on the categories of architecture, sculpture, and painting (especially on ceramics). Through the examination and discussion of this evidence, students will develop a broad knowledge of Ancient Greek material culture, and a sophisticated understanding of the ways we can interpret it.  A focus on stylistic and formal changes and continuities in objects and monuments across time will help us look at long-term issues such as intercultural contact and sociopolitical development.  At the same time, in-depth treatments of particular remains and their contexts will address more specific questions of daily life, art, and ritual.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

Grades will be based on in-class quizzes (10%), participation in discussions both in class and online (15%), a group project (15%), two hour exams (15% each) and a comprehensive final exam (30%).  The required text below will be supplemented by frequent readings in electronic form posted on Blackboard.

Texts: J. G. Pedley, Greek Art and Archaeology. 5th edition, 2012.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

33370 • Spring 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1100am WAG 10
show description

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506. We will complete Luschnig’s Introduction to Ancient Greek and then, if time permits, we will read selections from ancient Greek authors, with an emphasis on Attic Greek (Xenophon, Plato, and the orators). There will be daily assignments on grammar, vocabulary, and translation. Regular attendance and active participation are essential. Grades will be based on participation/preparedness (10%); homework (5%); quizzes (15%); two hour exams (22.5% each); and a final hour exam (25%). Prerequisite: Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek). This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

Texts: C. A. E. Luschnig, An Introduction to Ancient Greek. 2nd edition, 2007.

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33000 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am FAC 21
(also listed as CTI 310 )
show description

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

 

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

 

Grading:

Course requirements include frequent quizzes, an interactive group project, contributions to an online discussion board, two midterms, and a final exam. Grading will be roughly as follows: discussion board (5%), group project (10%), quizzes (15%), midterms (2 x 20% = 40%), and final exam (35%).

 

Required Texts:

Exploring the World of the Ancient Greeks (J. Camp and E. Fisher, Thames and Hudson, 2010: ISBN 0500288747)

Homer, Odyssey (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics, 1997: ISBN 0140268863)

The Landmark Herodotus (R. Strassler, Anchor, 2009: ISBN 1400031141)

Aeschylus, Oresteia (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics, 1984: ISBN 0140443339)

Thucydides on Justice (P. Woodruff, Hackett, 1993: ISBN 0872201686)

Ten Plays by Euripides (trans. P. Roche, Signet Classics, 1998: ISBN 0451527003)

Four Texts on Socrates (T. West, Cornell University Press, 1998: ISBN 0801485746)

 

Other readings will be made available in digital form.

C C 380 • Meth & Thry In Clascl Archaeol

33130 • Fall 2012
Meets T 200pm-500pm WAG 10
show description

Classical archaeology, the first branch of archaeology to emerge as a coherent discipline, is both burdened and enriched by its heritage. Long pressed into the service of historical research or confined to a fairly narrow compass of art historical inquiry, it has broadened its scope dramatically over the last half century to include almost every possible aspect of the material remains of past human activity. Methods and perspectives developed in other fields, from social theory to literary criticism to anthropology, are increasingly incorporated into the classical archaeologist’s toolkit. At the same time, classical archaeology is intimately connected with the study of ancient Mediterranean languages and literatures, and those who seek to carry out -- or use the results of -- archaeological research in the Classical world must be aware of the particular set of issues raised by this connection.

 

This thematically-organized seminar provides a forum for the exploration and discussion of the intellectual principles and debates that inform modern archaeologies of the Bronze Age Aegean and the Classical Greek and Roman worlds. It is intended both for students who expect to carry out archaeological research and for students of history or literature who seek a better understanding of the issues surrounding the collection and interpretation of the archaeological evidence they may draw on in their own work. Students will be expected to evaluate a wide variety of arguments, principles, and methods introduced through readings, presentations by guest speakers and the students themselves, electronic media, and visits to various campus or regional resources (the GIS center, SAMA, etc.). Subject matter may include, on the one hand, such theoretical topics as historiography, landscape, gender, colonial and post-colonial studies, agency and habitus, ethnicity and identity, the ancient economy, and mortuary analysis; and, on the other hand, such applied topics as epigraphy and numismatics, the study of ceramics, principles of field survey, remote sensing and geophysical prospection, excavation methodologies, GIS and computer applications, archaeometric analyses, and various other technologies and approaches. 

Texts:

B. Trigger, A History of Archaeological Thought, 2nd ed. (Cambridge 2006: ISBN 978-0521600491)

M. Johnson, Archaeological Theory: An Introduction, 2nd ed. (Wiley-Blackwell 2010: ISBN 978-1405100151)

S. Alcock and R. Osborne, Classical Archaeology, 2nd ed. (Wiley-Blackwell 2012: ISBN 978-1444336917)

C C S301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

82790 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am JGB 2.218
(also listed as CTI S310 )
show description

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

 

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

 

Grading:

 Course requirements include frequent quizzes, an interactive group project, class participation, and three hour-long in-class exams. Grading will be roughly as follows: participation (15%), group project (10%), quizzes (15%), and exams (3 x 20% each = 60%).

Required Texts:

Exploring the World of the Ancient Greeks (J. Camp and E. Fisher, Thames and Hudson, 2010: ISBN 0500288747)

Homer, Odyssey (trans. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics, 1997: ISBN 0140268863)

The Landmark Herodotus (R. Strassler, Anchor, 2009: ISBN 1400031141)

Thucydides on Justice (P. Woodruff, Hackett, 1993: ISBN 0872201686)

Ten Plays by Euripides (trans. P. Roche, Signet Classics, 1998: ISBN 0451527003)

Four Texts on Socrates (T. West, Cornell University Press, 1998: ISBN 0801485746)

 

Other readings will be made available in digital form.

C C 380 • Food/Drink/Body Class Archaeol

33010 • Fall 2011
Meets T 200pm-500pm WAG 10
show description

CC380: Food, Drink, and the Body in Classical Archaeology

This course will explore material and iconographic evidence for the

production, consumption, and social meaning of food and drink, and for

their effects on the human body, in the Greek and Roman worlds.

Although the focus of the course will be primarily archaeological, we

will also bring literary and historical sources to bear on the

relationship between human beings and the things they ingest. In

addition, we may venture beyond the bounds of the Greek and Roman

world to discuss comparative evidence from other places and times, and

there will be extensive consideration of social and anthropological

theory related to eating and drinking. Students will be expected to

present and lead discussion of various articles, and the course will

culminate in a research paper on a topic developed by each student.

Students will also be required to write a formal book review of a book

related to the subject of the course.

 

Grades will be based on article presentations, participation in

discussion, the book review, and the final research paper. Readings

will be placed on physical reserve or will be available in digital

form through Blackboard. Primary texts will be read in translation,

although students with a knowledge of Greek and/or Latin are

encouraged to read in the original languages.

C C 307C • Intro To Greek Archaeology

33310 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 4.102
show description

This course will introduce students to the physical remains of Ancient Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period.  The course will cover all sorts of archaeological evidence, from temples to vases to bones, but it will concentrate on the categories of architecture, sculpture, and painting (especially on ceramics). Through the examination and discussion of this evidence, students will develop a broad knowledge of Ancient Greek material culture, and a sophisticated understanding of the ways we can interpret it.  A focus on stylistic and formal changes and continuities in objects and monuments across time will help us look at long-term issues such as intercultural contact and sociopolitical development.  At the same time, in-depth treatments of particular remains and their contexts will address more specific questions of daily life, art, and ritual.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

Grades will be based on in-class quizzes, on-line discussions and assignments, two hour exams and a comprehensive final exam.  The required text below will be supplemented by frequent readings in electronic form on reserve on BlackBoard.

 

Texts:
J. G. Pedley, Greek Art and Archaeology. 4th edition, 2007.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

32200 • Spring 2009
Meets MTWTHF 900-1000 WAG 10
show description

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

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