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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Todd A. Curtis

Lecturer PhD, Newcastle University, UK

Todd A. Curtis

Contact

Biography

Courses:

CC 306M Intro to Medical and Scientific Terminology

Interests

Ancient medicine and its reception, Rhetoric of ancient science

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33245 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 800am-900am SAC 1.402
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33250 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am SAC 1.402
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33610 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am UTC 2.112A
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

C C 348 • Ancient Greek Medicine

33655 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 1
show description

From the use of the Hippocratic Oath in the Nuremberg trials to William Harvey’s engagement with the “divine Galen” in his monumental study of the circulation of blood, it is quite clear that ancient Greek medicine has had a profound influence on Western medicine and society. To gain a better understanding of this relationship, this course thematically examines the historical reception of the theories and practices of Greco-Roman physicians. By examining ancient Greek medicine in light of the modern fields of pathology, surgery, pharmacology, therapy, obstetrics, psychology, anatomy, medical science, ethics, and education, the student will gain not only a better understanding of the foundations of Western medicine but also an appreciation for how medical terms, theories, and practices take on different meanings with changes in science and society. Course material will be a combination of primary and secondary readings.

Course Expectations:

Please bear in mind that you are responsible for the material covered in class and your readings. Daily assignments will consist of readings from the required text. The chapter readings are available on the syllabus. Students are expected to consult the syllabus and do the assigned reading before coming to class. If over the course of the semester the syllabus needs to be modified or adjusted, an announcement will be sent out via blackboard with an updated assignment schedule.

Grading:

There will be 5 scheduled tests. There will be no final exam.

Scores for each test will be posted on Blackboard under My Grades. I will not be assigning plus-minus final grades. Therefore, my grading scale is as follows:

A=100-90 B=89-80 C=79-70 D=69-60 F=59 and below

Please note that I do not round grades up (i.e. 89.99 is not an A), and there is no curve for this course.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33275 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 800am-900am SAC 1.402
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33280 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am SAC 1.402
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33150 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am UTC 2.112A
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final. Required Texts: Marjorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2nd edition. ISBN: 978-0-7817-9283-7 Strongly Recommended: Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 348 • Ancient Greek Medicine

33215 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 1
show description

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33045 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 800am-900am SAC 1.402
show description

(33045) MWF 8:00-9:00 SAC 1.402; (33050)  MWF 9:00-10:00 SAC 1.402.

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final. Required Texts: Marjorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2nd edition. ISBN: 978-0-7817-9283-7 Strongly Recommended: Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33050 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am SAC 1.402
show description

(33045) MWF 8:00-9:00 SAC 1.402; (33050)  MWF 9:00-10:00 SAC 1.402.

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final. Required Texts: Marjorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2nd edition. ISBN: 978-0-7817-9283-7 Strongly Recommended: Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33050 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 800am-900am UTC 2.112A
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled quizzes, lowest quiz score dropped. No final. Required Text: Marjorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2nd edition. ISBN: 978-0-7817-9283-7; Recommended Text: Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33055 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am UTC 2.112A
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled quizzes, lowest quiz score dropped. No final. Required Text: Marjorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2nd edition. ISBN: 978-0-7817-9283-7; Recommended Text: Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

32910 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 800am-900am SAC 1.402
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled quizzes, lowest quiz score dropped. No final.                   Margorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2nd edition, ISBN: 978-0-7817-9283-7; Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

32915 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am SAC 1.402
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled quizzes, lowest quiz score dropped. No final.                   Margorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2nd edition, ISBN: 978-0-7817-9283-7; Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33300 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 800am-900am UTC 2.112A
show description

33300) MWF 8:00-9:00 UTC 2.112A, (33305) MWF 9:00-10:00 UTC 2.112A.

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled quizzes, lowest quiz score dropped. No final. Required Text: Marjorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2nd edition, ISBN 978-0-7817-9283-7; Recommended Text: Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

33305 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am UTC 2.112A
show description

 

33300) MWF 8:00-9:00 UTC 2.112A, (33305) MWF 9:00-10:00 UTC 2.112A.

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled quizzes, lowest quiz score dropped. No final. Required Text: Marjorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2nd edition, ISBN 978-0-7817-9283-7; Recommended Text: Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 348 • Ancient Greek Medicine

33350 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 101
show description

CC348 Ancient Greek Medicine

(33350) MWF 1:00-2:00 WAG 101

From the use of the Hippocratic Oath in the Nuremberg trials to William Harvey’s engagement with the “divine Galen” in his monumental study of the circulation of blood, it is quite clear that ancient Greek medicine has had a profound influence on Western medicine and society. To gain a better understanding of this relationship, this course thematically examines the historical reception of the theories and practices of Greco-Roman physicians. By examining ancient Greek medicine in light of the modern fields of pathology, surgery, pharmacology, therapy, obstetrics, psychology, anatomy, medical science, ethics and education, the student will gain not only a better understanding of the foundations of Western medicine but also an appreciation for how medical terms, theories and practices take on different meanings with changes in science and society. Course material will be a combination of primary and secondary readings. Assessment: Five tests. No final. Required textbooks: Helen King, Greek and Roman Medicine, ISBN 978-1853995453; G.E.R. Lloyd, Hippocratic Writings, 978-0-14-044451-3; Faith Wallis, Medieval Medicine: A Reader, 978-1-4426-0103-1.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32185 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BUR 106
show description

(32185) MWF 2:00-3:00 BUR 106

This course provides a thematic introduction to Classical mythology.  By studying material and textual sources, you will become familiar with many of the important characters and storylines of ancient Greek and Roman myths. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing the wide variety of social-cultural contexts in which myths function. Thus, we will examine the different ways in which these stories have been interpreted and used from antiquity to the present. Ultimately, through this course you will gain a better appreciation of how myths transcend notions of ‘historicity’ and ‘truth’ providing effectual explanations of the world around us. Grading: 2 midterms (60%) and a final exam (40%).  Required Texts: R. Buxton, The Complete World of Greek Mythology. ISBN 978-0500251218.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

32200 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 800am-900am ART 1.102
show description

(32200) MWF 8:00-9:00 ART 1.102, (32205) MWF 9:00-10:00 WEL 2.224.

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled quizzes, lowest quiz score dropped. No final. Required Text: C. Edward Collins and Ann DePetris, A Short Course in Medical Terminology, 2nd edition, ISBN: 978-0-7817-9883-9; Recommended Text: Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

32205 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WEL 2.224
show description

(32200) MWF 8:00-9:00 ART 1.102, (32205) MWF 9:00-10:00 WEL 2.224.

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Grading: 7 scheduled quizzes, lowest quiz score dropped. No final. Required Text: C. Edward Collins and Ann DePetris, A Short Course in Medical Terminology, 2nd edition, ISBN: 978-0-7817-9883-9; Recommended Text: Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

32495 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 800-900 WEL 3.502
show description

CC 306M: Intro to Medical and Scientific Terminology

 

Spring 2010

Time: MWF 8:00-9:00 (32495)/ Location: WEL 3.502

Time: MWF 9:00-10:00 (32500)/ Location: UTC 2.112A

 

 

Instructor: Todd Curtis

Email: ToddACurtis@yahoo.com

Office: WAG 200A

Office Hours: MWF 10:30-11:30

 

TA: Joseph Ponczoch

Email: ponczoch@mail.utexas.edu

Office: WAG 207

Office Hours: TTh 10:30-11:30

 

Course Description:

 

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, construction and pronunciation. Although this course is primarily for those who are interested in pursuing a career in medicine or the allied health sciences, please bear in mind that it is a classical civilization course. Thus, we will often skip discussions of the technical aspects of modern medicine for the sake of introducing you to relevant elements of Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. Such historical information will not only help you to memorize medical terms but it will also give you a better appreciation of the origins of Western medicine. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required. Since you are learning a new ‘language’, you will need to memorize a large number of words and word components.

 

Goals of this Course:             1) You will acquire a working vocabulary of the Greek and Latin         roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding medical and scientific terminology.

                                                2) You will learn the principles of word analysis, construction, and pronunciation.

                                                3) You will become acquainted with deciphering medico-scientific terminology in context.

 

 

Required Texts:

 

Margorie Canfield Willis, Medical Terminology: A Programmed Learning Approach to the Language of Health Care, 2008, 2nd edition, ISBN: 978-0-7817-9283-7 * There are two different 2nd editions (2006 and 2008).  Although the 2008 2nd edition is preferable, the 2006 2nd will do just fine.  If you have a 2006 2nd ed., please pay attention to the chapter headings, which are essentially the same in both the 2008 and the 2006 2nd editions.

 

Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, 21st edition. ISBN: 978-0803615601. * There is an online version of Taber’s which contains around 30,000 audio files of the pronunciations of medical terms. 

http://www.tabers.com/tabersonline/ub/logout

 

That said, the hardback copy of Taber’s is a must for this course.

 


Recommended Website:

 

http://laits.utexas.edu/sites/medterms/esstential-terms/

 

The above website complements your textbook. It contains information on the various systems of the body, images, complementary exercises, and audio files to help with pronunciation. What makes this website unique is that it links the material covered in your textbook to aspects of Classical literature and culture. * Unless I present it in class, you will not be tested over the material on this website.  

 

 

Grading:   

 

There will be 7 scheduled quizzes which will be administered every other week on Friday. The quizzes are based on the assigned readings and the material I cover in class. Each quiz will include 40 questions, 3 of which will be extra credit. The extra credit questions will be derived from the Greek and Roman historical information presented in class. Scores for each quiz are posted to eGradebook (https://utdirect.utexas.edu/diia/egb/). On eGradebook, scores for each quiz show a total correct out of 40 questions. A score of 37 points (or greater) will be scored as 100% (or greater). In other words, the maximum possible score on each quiz is 40 pts, but 37 points is full credit. Your grade for the course is based on your best six quiz grades. Thus, your lowest quiz grade will be dropped when calculating your final grade. There will be no final exam. The final grades are not curved. I do not offer extra credit work to boost your grade.

 

It is your responsibility to keep track of your quiz grades. If you perceive that there was an error on the quiz or in the marking of your quiz, you should go to the TA’s office to check the hard copy of your quiz. Only the most recent quiz will be available for review during the TA's posted office hours or by appointment (i.e., once Quiz 2 has been administered, Quiz 1 will no longer be available for review).

 

 

Grading Scale: 

 

I will not be assigning plus-minus final grades. Therefore, my grading scale is as follows:     

 

A=100-90        B=89-80          C=79-70          D=69-60          F=59 and below

 

 

  • Your final grade is determined on eGradebook by the total points earned from your six best quizzes.

 

A = 199 pts. or better (i.e. 89.64% or better)
B = 198-177 pts. (89.19% - 79.73%)
C = 176-155 pts. (79.28% - 69.82%)
D = 154-133 pts. (69.37% - 59.91%)
F = 132 pts. or less (59.46% or less)

 

 

Tentative Quiz Dates:

 

Feb. 5, Feb. 19, March 5, March 26, April 9, April 23, May 7                                                          

 

If a quiz has to be moved you will be given at least a week advanced notice. I will never move the quiz up. As long as I schedule the quiz during our regularly scheduled class time, your previous plans don’t count as an excused absence.

 

 

Make-up Policy and Missed Classes:

 

Absences will only be excused for religious holidays, medical reasons (with a letter from Student Health Services or a private physician), or for family emergencies (only when certified by your Dean of Students).  No make-up quizzes will be given, except in cases of emergencies or for religious holidays. If you miss a lecture class, please do not ask me what you missed. It is your responsibility to find someone in the class to take notes for you. I do not post my PowerPoint presentations or lecture notes.

 

 

Religious Holidays:

 

If you need to miss a test for the observance of a religious holiday, you must notify me at least 14 days in advance so we can make alternative arrangements.  

 

 

Homework Policy:

 

Daily assignments will consist mainly of readings from the required text.  Assignments are available on the syllabus. Students are expected to consult the syllabus and do the assigned reading before coming to class. As this course is in many respects a ‘language’ course, you will need to review the presented vocabulary on a daily basis. In addition to the chapter readings, each student is strongly encouraged to make full use of all exercises, reviews, and study aids that the textbook provides. My lectures are not a review of the textbook. Therefore, it is your responsibility to do the exercises and bring your problems to my attention. In each chapter there will be a list of terms generally arranged according to categories such as anatomical, symptomatic, diagnostic, surgical and therapeutic. Unless stated otherwise, you are responsible for memorizing all of the terms in these lists. If over the course of the semester the syllabus needs to be modified or adjusted, an announcement will be sent out via blackboard with an updated assignment schedule.  

 

 

Computer Access:

 

Students are expected to have access to a computer and to the internet.  Class material including the syllabus, weekly assignments, as well as other information and announcements will be posted on Blackboard (courses.utexas.edu).  As was already noted, grades will be posted on eGradebook (https://utdirect.utexas.edu/diia/egb/). To access these sites, students must have an uteid and password. Additionally, it is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the email address which UT has on file is a valid address which is checked regularly. N.B. Certain email providers (yahoo mail for one) automatically mark any bulk email as spam.

 

 

University of Texas Honor Code:

 

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

 

Academic Dishonesty Policy:

 

Any student found cheating will receive a failing grade (F).  Cheating is anything that attempts to circumvent the process of teaching, learning, and assessment.  It may include, but is not limited to, copying off another person's quizzes, exams, or homework; or getting someone else to do your work for you. It also includes the use of unauthorized material/devices while taking a test. If you are unsure about the exact definition you should consult the General information catalogue, Appendix, Section 11-802 (http://www.utexas.edu/student/registrar/catalogs/gi06-07/app/appc11.html#Subchapter11-802).  If you are still unsure, don’t risk it.

 

 

Email Abuse

 

Use of Blackboard's email should be for course-related messages only; please see UT Austin Acceptable Use Policy. Messages such as selling football tickets and posting party invites are not considered course-related. Violations of the UT Austin Acceptable Use Policy will be vigorously pursued. Violators may face disciplinary action including, but not limited to verbal warnings, negative impact on grades, or loss of email privileges. For more information on reporting emails that you believe violate the policy, please visit the UT Austin Acceptable Use Policy website. 

 

 

 

Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL):

 

If you are worried about someone who is acting differently, you may use the Behavior Concerns Advice Line to discuss by phone your concerns about another individual’s behavior. This service is provided through a partnership among the Office of the Dean of Students, the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC), the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and The University of Texas Police Department (UTPD). Call 512-232-5050 or visit http://www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal.

 

 

Students with Disabilities:

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

 

 

Important Dates:

 

Jan. 22: Last day of the official add/drop period. After this date, changes have to be approved by the department chair. 

Feb. 3:  Last day to drop for a possible refund.

Feb. 15: Last day to drop without a possible academic penalty

March 15-20: Spring Break

March 29: Last day to change a registration in a class to or from the pass/fail for credit/no credit

May 7: Last day of class

  • NO FINAL EXAM  

           

Tentative Homework Schedule:

 

By tentative, I mean that this schedule is subject to change. See above. Please do the assigned readings before coming to class.  The following chapters are based on the 2008 2nd ed. of M. Willis, which differs from the 2006 2nd edition of M. Willis. If you have a 2006 2nd ed., please pay attention to the chapter headings, which are essentially the same in both editions.

 

 

 

  1. 1/20        FIRST DAY
  2. 1/22  Ch. 1: Basic Term Components

 

  1. 1/25
  2. 1/27       
  3. 1/29   Ch. 2:  Health Care Records

 

  1. 2/1         
  2. 2/3      
  3. 2/5          QUIZ 1

 

  1. 2/8    Ch. 3: Integumentary System

10.  2/10

11.  2/12  Ch. 4: Musculoskeletal System

 

12.  2/15       

13.  2/17       

14.  2/19        QUIZ 2          

 

15.  2/22 Ch. 5:  Cardiovascular System

16.  2/24

17.  2/26       

 

18.  3/1  Ch. 6:  Blood and Lymphatic System

19.  3/3

20.  3/5          QUIZ 3

 

21.  3/8  Ch. 7: Respiratory System

22.  3/10

23.  3/12  Ch. 8: Nervous System/Psychiatry

 

  • Spring Break – 3/15-20

 

24.  3/22

25.  3/24 

26.  3/26       QUIZ 4

 

27.  3/29  Ch. 9:  Endocrine System

28.  3/31

29.  4/2   Ch. 10:  The Eye

 

30.  4/5  Ch. 11: The Ear

31.  4/7

32.  4/9          QUIZ 5          

 

33.  4/12  Ch. 12: Gastrointestinal System

34.  4/14

35.  4/16

 

36.  4/19  Ch. 13: Urinary System    

37.  4/21

38.  4/23        QUIZ 6

 

39.  4/26  Ch. 14: Male Reproductive System

40.  4/28  

41.  4/30  Ch. 15: Female Reproductive System

 

42.  5/3 

43.  5/5

44.  5/7        QUIZ 7

 

 

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

32500 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 900-1000 UTC 2.112A
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

32645 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 800-900 UTC 2.112A
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

32650 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 UTC 2.112A
show description

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

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