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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Jamie Aprile

Lecturer PhD 2010, University of California at Los Angeles

Contact

Biography

Jamie D. Aprile earned her BA in Anthropology and Classical Civilization from Indiana University in 2001. She attended graduate school at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA 2002-2010 where she earned an MA and PhD in Archaeology.  Her research primarily focuses on political economy in Late Bronze Age Greece, and her dissertation investigated economic and political ties between Nichoria, a hinterland community in southwestern Greece, and its regional center at Pylos.  She also has forthcoming publications on stone tools and archaeological survey in prehistoric Albania.  She is currently a lecturer in Classics at UT where she teaches a variety of courses in archaeology, mythology, and history.

Interests

Bronze Age Aegean Archaeology, Archaeological Theory, Political Economy

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32345 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm FAC 21
show description

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

AHC 310 • The Premodern World

33070 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 3.112
(also listed as HIS 301F )
show description

The premodern world encompasses the span of human existence on Earth from the origins of symbolic behavior around 30,000 years ago to the complex societies that lead up to the early modern era of the 15th century CE.  The boundaries of that range are to some extent arbitrary, as are the divisions between cultures, places, and eras, so in this course we will take a comparative and cross-cultural perspective to explore political, social, and cultural trends in a variety of societies as we traverse time.  While covering the content of the human past, we will also investigate methods of historical study and analysis to discover how history is constructed from both material remains and written sources. 

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

33205 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JGB 2.324
show description

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

C C 340 • Topog & Monuments Anc Rome

33300 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 201
(also listed as URB 353 )
show description

Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome

Rome, as we all know, was not built in one day.  As most cities, it was a constant work in progress, this one spanning some 13 centuries in ancient times alone.   We will survey its architecture and urban development from the beginnings until late antiquity, paying attention to the various factors that shaped its topography: geology, geography, politics, religion, infrastructure constraints, ambitious individuals, and planning efforts, to name only a few. In doing so, we will gain an understanding of the cultural and historical context, Rome’s immense cultural legacy in general and its influence on later architecture in particular.  Freud famously called Rome a palimpsest and, as we look at is present layer and configuration, we’ll also debate the proper place for modern architecture and development in Rome today.  What price preservation - should the city remain a museum?

Books and readings will include:

P. Erdkamp. The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Rome. (2013).

A. Claridge, Rome. An Oxford Archaeological Guide, 2nd ed. (2010).

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

33590 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm FAC 21
show description

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

C C 307C • Intro To Greek Archaeology

33615 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 0.130
show description

This course will introduce students to the physical remains of Ancient Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period.  The course will cover all sorts of archaeological evidence, from temples to vases to bones, but it will concentrate on the categories of architecture, sculpture, and painting (especially on ceramics). Through the examination and discussion of this evidence, students will develop a broad knowledge of Ancient Greek material culture, and a sophisticated understanding of the ways we can interpret it.  A focus on stylistic and formal changes and continuities in objects and monuments across time will help us look at long-term issues such as intercultural contact and sociopolitical development.  At the same time, in-depth treatments of particular remains and their contexts will address more specific questions of daily life, art, and ritual.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

33256 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JGB 2.324
show description

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

C C 307D • Intro To Roman Archaeology

33285 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 214
show description

This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Romans from the beginnings of the city of Rome in the early Iron Age to late antiquity.  It focuses on major developments in Roman material culture, particularly artworks, buildings, and cities.  Material will be presented chronologically and students will see and evaluate artifacts in light of their cultural precedents.  After completing this course, students will be able to understand major Roman sites, monuments, and artworks in their cultural and chronological context and to offer an analysis based on art-historical and archaeological principles.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

33135 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 106
show description

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

33160 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 214
show description

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion. 

Textbooks:

 Alcock, Susan and Robin Osborne, eds. Classical Archaeology. Oxford: Blackwell, 2007.

Renfrew, Colin and Paul Bahn. Archaeology Essentials: Theories, Methods, and Practices. 2nd Edition. London: Thames and Hudson, 2011.

Etienne, Roland and Francoise Etienne. The Search for Ancient Greece. New York, Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1992.

Grades

 2 essays                                              30% (15% each)

In class and online discussions           10%

Midterm exam                                     25%

Final exam                                           35%

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

33015 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WCH 1.120
show description

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

AHC 325 • Archaeology Of Greek Prehist

32915 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 420
(also listed as C C 340, MES 320, PRS 372 )
show description

In this class, we will explore the development of complex societies in Ancient Greece by studying its prehistory through archaeology.  Starting with the Palaeolithic and Neolithic Periods, we will investigate how agriculture, pastoralism, and settled lifestyles changed the character of ancient civilization and led to an increasing degree of social, political, and economic complexity in the Bronze Age, ultimately resulting in the Minoan and Mycenaean cultures and their decline into the “Dark Age.”  Because Greece did not develop in isolation, influences from other cultures around the Mediterranean will also be taken into account.  By taking a long-term point of view on the prehistory of ancient Greece, cycles of progress and decline become evident that display the instability of early social and political patterns and highlight the unique achievement of Classical Greek civilization.  Course readings will include textbooks supplemented by additional readings from academic articles.

 

Textbooks:

Blake, E. and Knapp, A. B. The Archaeology of Mediterranean Prehistory. Blackwell, 2005.

 

Dickinson, O. The Aegean Bronze Age. Cambridge University Press, 1994.

 

Assessment:

1 midterm exam- 25%

1 paper assignment- 25%

1 final exam- 35%

In-class participation- 15%

C C 307C • Intro To Greek Archaeology

33060 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 4.110
show description

This course will introduce students to the physical remains of Ancient Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period.  The course will cover all sorts of archaeological evidence, from temples to vases to bones, but it will concentrate on the categories of architecture, sculpture, and painting (especially on ceramics). Through the examination and discussion of this evidence, students will develop a broad knowledge of Ancient Greek material culture, and a sophisticated understanding of the ways we can interpret it.  A focus on stylistic and formal changes and continuities in objects and monuments across time will help us look at long-term issues such as intercultural contact and sociopolitical development.  At the same time, in-depth treatments of particular remains and their contexts will address more specific questions of daily life, art, and ritual.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

 

Grades will be based on in-class quizzes, on-line discussions and assignments, two hour exams and a comprehensive final exam.  The required text below will be supplemented by frequent readings in electronic form on reserve on BlackBoard.

 

Texts:

Texts:

J. G. Pedley, Greek Art and Archaeology. 4th edition, 2007.

C C 340 • Archaeology Of Greek Prehist

33105 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 420
(also listed as AHC 325, MES 320, PRS 372 )
show description

In this class, we will explore the development of complex societies in Ancient Greece by studying its prehistory through archaeology.  Starting with the Palaeolithic and Neolithic Periods, we will investigate how agriculture, pastoralism, and settled lifestyles changed the character of ancient civilization and led to an increasing degree of social, political, and economic complexity in the Bronze Age, ultimately resulting in the Minoan and Mycenaean cultures and their decline into the “Dark Age.”  Because Greece did not develop in isolation, influences from other cultures around the Mediterranean will also be taken into account.  By taking a long-term point of view on the prehistory of ancient Greece, cycles of progress and decline become evident that display the instability of early social and political patterns and highlight the unique achievement of Classical Greek civilization.  Course readings will include textbooks supplemented by additional readings from academic articles.

 

Textbooks:

Blake, E. and Knapp, A. B. The Archaeology of Mediterranean Prehistory. Blackwell, 2005.

 

Dickinson, O. The Aegean Bronze Age. Cambridge University Press, 1994.

 

Assessment:

1 midterm exam- 25%

1 paper assignment- 25%

1 final exam- 35%

In-class participation- 15%

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

33290 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WEL 1.308
show description

Myths are stories that in many ways serve to define a culture's values and practices, yet are shaped by them as well.  They often deal with both human and divine origins as well as profound life experiences such as birth, death, love, hate, loyalty, betrayal, suffering, and redemption.  The symbiotic relationship between myths and cultures are complex, and the stories of ancient Greece have proved to be particularly compelling in western culture.

 

In this course, we will explore Greek mythology and how it can be understood from multiple points of view.  We will read both primary and secondary sources, and we will analyze the myths using historical and contemporary theories from folklore, psychology, and anthropology.  The readings will be supplemented by material culture that displays how the stories have been used to inspire art for thousands of years.  When the course is complete, students will be able to identify gods, goddesses, and myths, as well as mythic tropes and recurring themes.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

Tentative Textbooks:

Morford, M., R. Lenardon, and M. Sham. Classical Mythology, 9th edition. Oxford University Press, 2011.

Homer, The Odyssey, Translated by S. Lombardo.

Euripides, Bacchae, Translated by D. Franklin.

 

Grading:

Midterm 1: 25%

Midterm 2: 25%

Discussion/Group Activities/Quizzes: 15%

Final Exam: 35%

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

32170 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm ART 1.102
show description

This course surveys the world of the ancient Greeks from the origin of the city-state to the rise of Macedon (roughly 800 - 300 BC). We will focus on some of their distinctive cultural achievements in literature, art, and thought, and also in government, religion, and social organization. Topics we will explore include heroism in war and other contexts, polytheistic religion, democracy and empire, citizenship and slavery, gender and sexuality, and modes of inquiry and knowledge. Readings will include works by Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides, and Plato (in English translation).

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