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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Laura Brooke Rich

Assistant Instructor BA in Classics and Linguistics, University of Florida; MA in Classics, University of Texas at Austin

Contact

Interests

Roman cultural history, Latin literature, women in antiquity, linguistics

LAT F311 • Intermediate Latin I

82820 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CBA 4.338
show description

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

33575 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 2.128
show description

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

33455 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 208
show description

This course serves as the gateway between intermediate and advanced Latin, and its main goal is to increase your speed and accuracy in reading and understanding Latin prose and poetry.  To achieve this goal, the focus will be on consolidating morphology and syntax and on expanding vocabulary and sight reading skills.  Assignments will range from 10-15 lines of Latin at the start of the semester to 35-40 lines at the end of the semester.  The majority of class time will be devoted to translating prepared passages and reviewing syntax and morphology; but we will also take time to discuss the literary and historical context of our readings.  Exercises in close reading of selected passages will introduce basic methodologies for interpreting Latin texts and for speaking and writing critically about them in their literary and historical context.

Grades will be based on attendance, preparation, in-class participation, midterm exams, and a comprehensive final exam.  A grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for continuing to Latin 323.

 

Texts: TBA

C C F302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

82750 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am GSB 2.122
(also listed as CTI F310 )
show description

In this course, students will earn a familiarity with some of the highlights of the Roman civilization from its 8th century BC beginnings to the so-called fall of the Roman Empire in 476 AD, including its history, politics, art, literature, and religion.  Because Rome has been so influential on our own institutions and culture, the Romans offer us invaluable perspectives on the modern world.  At the same time, the Romans were, in many ways, frighteningly different from us.  The study of Rome thus helps us to appreciate how cultural differences can determine how humans think and act.  Our aim in this course is to gain a fuller understanding of Rome—its similarities to, and its differences from, us—in order to understand better who we are, both as humans and as modern descendants of the Romans.  We will reach this goal through reading and discussion of works written by the ancient Romans and secondary works on Roman history and culture.

Texts:

Boatwright et al. 2006.  A Brief History of the Romans.  Oxford University Press.

A translation of Vergil's Aeneid (eg: Stanley Lombardo's)

Access to Blackboard readings

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

33435 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 0.120
show description

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

LAT 311 • Intermediate Latin I

33325 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 0.128
show description

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

 

Textbooks

Kennedy, Caesar: De Bello Civile III, 1st ed. (Bristol, 2002).  ISBN 185399636X

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Traupman, New College Latin and English Dictionary, 3rd ed. (Bantam, 2007)  ISBN 978-0-553-59012-8

LAT S312K • Intermediate Latin II

83015 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WAG 308
show description

Latin 312K introduces intermediate Latin students to one of the most fascinating poems ever written: Vergil's epic tale of the origins of Rome, its lofty ideals, and its imagined destiny. The course will focus first and foremost on solidifying students' grasp of Latin morphology and syntax; but we'll also discuss questions of interpretation and Roman culture. We'll read and discuss selections of the Aeneid in all its original Latin glory. The bulk of the workload will consist of reading and translating assigned selections (a total of about 1000 lines). There will also be exercises on Latin grammar and vocabulary, and students will be expected to read the entire poem in English. Prerequisites: LAT 311 or 312M, or the equivalent by placement test, with a grade of at least C. Note: If it has been more than a month since your last Latin course, you should be sure to review morphology and syntax BEFORE the course begins. Everyone should expect 2-3 hours of homework daily (preparation, exercises, review, reading), and more if your preparation is weak or your Latin is rusty (more than a semester since your last course).

Requirements: Daily attendance, preparation, and participation; homework exercises; weekly tests; comprehensive final exam.

 

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

33655 • Spring 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1200pm-100pm CBA 4.344
show description

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-27 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors.

 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)
Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)
Hillard & Botting, Elementary Latin Translation Book (Bolchazy & Carducci)
Corneau & LeFleur, Workbook to Wheelock's Latin (Harper)
Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

32575 • Fall 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1200pm-100pm WAG 10
show description

This course is the second half of a two-semester introduction to the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin.  Translating passages from ancient writers also introduces students to fundamental features of Roman culture. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to reproduce paradigms of all Latin noun, adjective, adverb, and verb forms; to parse and explain the function of Latin words in context; to demonstrate fluency in basic Latin syntax and a growing vocabulary; to master standard pronunciation of Latin; and to translate accurately from Latin into English. In the latter part of the semester, students read selections from the writings of Julius Caesar in the original Latin.

Class time will be devoted to the introduction of new material, reviewing assigned homework, and practice exercises.  Students should expect daily homework assignments and regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; three midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 507 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 311. 

The completion of Latin 506 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 507. Students who have recently had more than two years of high school Latin, or more than two semesters of college Latin should normally take Latin 311.

Textbooks

Wheelock, Wheelock’s Latin, 7th ed. (Harper Collins, 2011).  ISBN 978-0-06-199722-8

English and Irby, A Little Latin Reader, 1st ed. (Oxford: OUP, 2012).  ISBN 978-0-19-984622-1

Groton, Thirty-Eight Latin Stories, 5th ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1995).  ISBN 978-0-86516-289-1

Comeau and LaFleur, Workbook for Wheelock’s Latin, 3rd ed. Rev. (Harper Collins, 2005).  ISBN

0-006-095642-9

Tatum, A Caesar Reader, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 2012).  ISBN 978-0-86516-696-7

LAT 312M • Second-Year Latin II: Prose

82525 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WAG 208
show description

LAT 312M: Second-Year Latin II

This course is the sequel to Latin 311. This course introduces students to formal Latin prose style, as exemplified in Cicero’s writings. As a powerful statesman, lawyer, orator, and philosopher in the waning days of the Roman Republic, Cicero gives us fascinating insights into a critical and tumultuous period in world history and literature. Readings will include selections from the “Dream of Scipio” and Cicero’s famous speech against the rebel Catilina, the First Catilinarian Oration.

 

Grades will be based on participation, quizzes, written work, midterm tests, and a final exam.

 

Prerequisite:  Latin 311 or equivalent with a grade of C- or better, or consent of the instructor.

 

This course can be counted as partial fulfillment of the foreign language requirement, or to fulfill the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

 

This course is a continuation of Latin 506. This course is a continuation of Latin 507. This course is a continuation of Latin 311.

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

32895 • Spring 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1200-100pm WAG 208
show description

This course is the second half of a two-semester introduction to the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin.  Translating passages from ancient writers also introduces students to fundamental features of Roman culture. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to reproduce paradigms of all Latin noun, adjective, adverb, and verb forms; to parse and explain the function of Latin words in context; to demonstrate fluency in basic Latin syntax and a growing vocabulary; to master standard pronunciation of Latin; and to translate accurately from Latin into English. In the latter part of the semester, students read selections from the writings of Julius Caesar in the original Latin.

Class time will be devoted to the introduction of new material, reviewing assigned homework, and practice exercises.  Students should expect daily homework assignments and regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; three midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 507 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 311. 

The completion of Latin 506 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 507. Students who have recently had more than two years of high school Latin, or more than two semesters of college Latin should normally take Latin 311.

Textbooks

Wheelock, Wheelock’s Latin, 7th ed. (Harper Collins, 2011).  ISBN 978-0-06-199722-8

English and Irby, A Little Latin Reader, 1st ed. (Oxford: OUP, 2012).  ISBN 978-0-19-984622-1

Groton, Thirty-Eight Latin Stories, 5th ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1995).  ISBN 978-0-86516-289-1

Comeau and LaFleur, Workbook for Wheelock’s Latin, 3rd ed. Rev. (Harper Collins, 2005).  ISBN

0-006-095642-9

Tatum, A Caesar Reader, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 2012).  ISBN 978-0-86516-696-7

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

33015 • Fall 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1100-1200 WAG 308
show description

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-27 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors. 

 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

Corneau & LeFleur, Workbook to Wheelock's Latin (Harper) optional

Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

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