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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Lesley A Dean-Jones

Associate Professor Ph.D., Stanford

Associate Professor; Department Chair
Lesley A Dean-Jones
" Language is a horse that carries you into a far country. "

Contact

Biography

Lesley Dean-Jones was born in Liverpool, England, and received her B.A. from University College London in 1974 and her Ph.D. from Stanford in 1987.  She taught first at Barnard College and Columbia University in New York and since 1987 has been teaching at the University of Texas at Austin where she is Associate Professor.  She has held fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, The Institute for the Humanities at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, The Loeb Foundation and the Humboldt Foundation.  She was President of the Society for Ancient Medicine 2000-2006. She has published on Greek literature, history, philosophy and medicine, including, Women's Bodies in Classical Greek Science (Oxford University Press, 1994) and “The Politics of Pleasure:  Female Sexual Appetite in the Hippocratic Corpus,” Helios 19 (1992) 72-91, for which she won the WCC Award for best article written from a feminist perspective for 1994.  Several of her articles have been reprinted in other collections.  In June 2007 she became the first Director of the Classics Research Network.  In 2008 she won an National Science Foundation grant to host the triennial Colloquium Hippocraticum, the first time it had been hosted in the US since its inception in 1972.  She is currently preparing a translation and commentary of pseudo-Aristotle Historia Animalium Book X for Cambridge University Press.  Her other research interests lie in the early professionalization of Greek medicine, especially the effects of literacy. She is also working on a number of shorter papers on medicine in the ancient world, specifically gynecology and dissection, and editing the proceedings of the 2008 Colloquium for publication in the Brill Studies in Ancient Medicine series.

 

Affiliated Research/Academic Unit

 

Interests

Ancient Medicine, Ancient Philosophy, Greek Literature, Women in Antiquity

GK 180K • Rsch Meths In Classical Stds

33510 • Fall 2014
Meets F 200pm-300pm WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 180K )
show description

This course is meant to provide new graduate students with an introduction to materials and methods of classical scholarship.  The instructor and other members of the department will present introductory lectures and bibliographies on the various disciplines involved in contemporary classical studies.  

Students will be required to attend lectures and colloquia, given by visitors and members of our department.

All students should register for this course on a credit/no credit basis.

LAT 180K • Rsch Meths In Classical Stds

33720 • Fall 2014
Meets F 200pm-300pm WAG 10
(also listed as GK 180K )
show description

This course is meant to provide new graduate students with an introduction to materials and methods of classical scholarship.  The instructor and other members of the department will present introductory lectures and bibliographies on the various disciplines involved in contemporary classical studies.  

Students will be required to attend lectures and colloquia, given by visitors and members of our department.

All students should register for this course on a credit/no credit basis.

GK 324 • Daphnis And Chloe: Anc Romance

33497 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 208
show description

In this course we will read the romance Daphnis and Chloe, the only known work of the 2nd/3rd century AD Greek novelist Longus  It is one of five ancient Greek novels that have survived intact from the mid-1st to the 3rd c. CE. It is generally believed to fall chronologically in the middle of the group.  Like all the ancient Greek novels it has a wildly improbable plot involving exposure of noble children at birth, abductions, pirates, help from a god, sex and violence, all of which takes place in a conventional pastoral setting.  Because of its greater concern with depicting character as well as events Daphnis and Chloe is thought to be closer to the modern novel than its contemporaries are.  It is also the only one of the ancient Greek novels to open with a Preface which informs the reader, to some extent, of the author’s purpose beyond mere entertainment.  This is to help the reader understand the universal experience of Love and its significance for the human condition.  Some people take the work as a serious allegory of Love in all its manifestations, others as a tongue in cheek playful romance.  We will read all the text in Greek, commenting on the rhetorical style and imagery of the Greek Imperial period, sometimes called the “Second Sophistic”.  The pace starts off slow (half a page) and increases to 3-4 pages by the end of the semester.  As the pace quickens we will not be able to translate all the text in class, but I will make sure to take questions on the passages you had particular difficulty with.

C C 348 • Women In Classical Antiquity

33245 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 201
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

This class will address the question of the nature and the origin of the western attitude toward women from readings in a wide variety of material from the Greco-Roman period of antiquity.  Specific issues include 1) myths of matriarchy (did women rule in an earlier stage of human history?); 2) the relation between the images of women, marriage, sex and women's role in politics and religion in the literary texts and the actual experience of real women (why is there a disparity between image and reality?); 3) philosophical and medical views on the physical and mental nature of women (how do folklore and ideology affect "scientific" writers?); 4) the extent to which we can glimpse female consciousness in these (mostly) male-authored texts.

The study of this period of human history has constituted the core of a liberal education in the West for several centuries, but this education was, until comparatively recently, concerned almost solely with the lives and thoughts of only half the people alive at that time—the men.  Approaching the texts primarily through the female characters sheds a new perspective on the value of the works and raises the question of their relevance to contemporary society.  We shall see that whatever view we take on the position of women in society, the formulations and solutions of problems in male/female relationships in the Greek and Roman texts are thought-provoking and important.  We will examine the texts in a basically chronological order so that we can trace the development of themes and motifs and consider them in relation to women's changing role in society.

GK 324 • Euripides

33235 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 1.134
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In this course we will read Euripides’ Orestes.  At the Junior level the primary aim of the course is to read and understand the Greek, so a great portion of the classes will be given over to translation.  We will also, however, spend time discussing interpretations of the play.  In addition we will read the 17 other extant plays of Euripides in translation and the Choephoroi of Aeschylus and the Electra of Sophocles.

 On the days scheduled for translation you should have prepared the assigned text before the class period.  You may want to write out a translation for review purposes, but in class when called upon to translate you should read from the Greek. You may annotate your text with vocabulary, asterisks and lines linking adjectives to the nouns they modify, subjects to verbs, etc., but don’t become too reliant on these. Remember they will not be there on the tests.  The first 5 minutes of each translation class will be given over to a vocabulary test where I will give you 5 words in the form they appeared in the assigned text and ask you to translate them.  On 3 occasions during the semester I will substitute a very short unseen for the vocabulary test.  These will not be announced beforehand.  On the days scheduled for discussion of the other plays you should read the play and answer the study questions which I will post on Blackboard by the class period before. 

GK 365 • Plato And Greek Prose

33242 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 112
(also listed as GK 385 )
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This course has two distinct levels and two distinct threads.

The first thread, which will be the same for students in both 365 & 385 (though the grading will differ), is a fairly close reading of Plato’s Symposium.  We will start slowly and work up to 5 pages a week in the first half of the course.  In the second half of the course we will be reading 6-9 pages a week.  To begin with we should be able to cover the whole assignment in class.  Students will be called on to translate, from the TEXT, not a written-out translation.  You may write out a translation if you think it will help you to review, but do not use it in class. You may make annotations in your text, but try to keep them to a minimum; they will not be there on the tests.  Once we get to about 3 pages we will not be able to cover the whole assignment in class, so I depend on you to read carefully and identify any passages that you do not fully understand.  This material will be tested on the Tests and Final by passages for translation and grammatical and stylistic comment.  We will not be doing any philosophical heavy lifting in this course.  I expect these translations to be very accurate for both 365 and 385 students.

The second thread involves more rapid reading of selections from the prose authors on the Reading List for the Greek PhD translation exam.  Again we will start slowly and work up to 20 pages a week.  (This is only a minimum; if you can read more you should do so.) In these class sessions we will spend some time discussing the overall style and context of the selections. We will not be able to cover all of these assignments in class from the beginning of the course, and again you should try to identify passages that you would particularly like to go over in class.  This material will be tested on the Tests and Final by passages for translation.  The passages for students in 365 will be glossed and will be graded as if they were Unseens.  For students in 385 only very unusual words will be glossed, and I will expect a certain accuracy, although not to the same level as in the Symposium translations.

In addition to these requirements students in 365 will prepare 3 polished translations of roughly an OCT page of text from the Reader.  They will also write a term paper of 5-6 pages which will involve an oral presentation and a rewrite. Students in 385 will, in addition to the Symposium passage and the passage from the Reader, translate an unseen passage on each test and the final.

 

 

GK 385 • Plato And Greek Prose

33270 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 112
(also listed as GK 365 )
show description

This course has two distinct levels and two distinct threads.

The first thread, which will be the same for students in both 365 & 385 (though the grading will differ), is a fairly close reading of Plato’s Symposium.  We will start slowly and work up to 5 pages a week in the first half of the course.  In the second half of the course we will be reading 6-9 pages a week.  To begin with we should be able to cover the whole assignment in class.  Students will be called on to translate, from the TEXT, not a written-out translation.  You may write out a translation if you think it will help you to review, but do not use it in class. You may make annotations in your text, but try to keep them to a minimum; they will not be there on the tests.  Once we get to about 3 pages we will not be able to cover the whole assignment in class, so I depend on you to read carefully and identify any passages that you do not fully understand.  This material will be tested on the Tests and Final by passages for translation and grammatical and stylistic comment.  We will not be doing any philosophical heavy lifting in this course.  I expect these translations to be very accurate for both 365 and 385 students.

The second thread involves more rapid reading of selections from the prose authors on the Reading List for the Greek PhD translation exam.  Again we will start slowly and work up to 20 pages a week.  (This is only a minimum; if you can read more you should do so.) In these class sessions we will spend some time discussing the overall style and context of the selections. We will not be able to cover all of these assignments in class from the beginning of the course, and again you should try to identify passages that you would particularly like to go over in class.  This material will be tested on the Tests and Final by passages for translation.  The passages for students in 365 will be glossed and will be graded as if they were Unseens.  For students in 385 only very unusual words will be glossed, and I will expect a certain accuracy, although not to the same level as in the Symposium translations.

In addition to these requirements students in 365 will prepare 3 polished translations of roughly an OCT page of text from the Reader.  They will also write a term paper of 5-6 pages which will involve an oral presentation and a rewrite. Students in 385 will, in addition to the Symposium passage and the passage from the Reader, translate an unseen passage on each test and the final.

 

 

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33010 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WAG 101
(also listed as CTI 310 )
show description

Present day Western civilization has many roots, but the significance of the heritage from ancient Greece cannot be overestimated.  It laid the groundwork for and shaped our literature, art, politics, philosophy, science, education and many of our cultural assumptions.  But it is still in many ways a strange and foreign country.  This course offers an introduction to ancient Greek culture from its beginnings to the end of the Classical period, conventionally placed at the death of Alexander in 323 B.C.  This course is not a history course per se.  We will learn a chronological outline of the most significant events in Greek history, but we will primarily focus on the literary and artistic masterpieces of ancient Greece and the social and cultural context in which they were produced

 

The first class period of each week will be spent amplifying a chapter from a secondary text that will provide the context for the primary works which we will look at on the Wednesday and Friday of each week.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

 

The Cambridge Illustrated History of Greece, ed. Paul Cartledge, Cambridge University Press 2002. ISBN 0-521-52100-9

 

Reader of select primary texts, available from Speedway

GK 324 • Apollonius

33247 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 208
show description

Apollonius' Argonautica is the fullest extant telling of the myth of Jason and the Argonauts and their quest for the Golden Fleece.  Although Apollonius was a contemporary of Callimachus he used Homeric epic hexameter as a model for his verse.  However, his concern for the psychology of his characters, and his interest in romance and adventure foreshadow aspects of the Hellenistic novel.

There are four books to the Argonautica, and of these Book III is by far the most admired.  This book tells how Medea helped Jason fulfill his quest and brilliantly re-presents the two characters that would have been familiar to Apollonius’ audience from Euripides' play.

We will read the entire third book in Greek, paying attention to epic forms and metre but also to Hellenistic trends such as the interest in local customs and the rationalization of divinities.  We will also read the other three books in translation.

 Required texts

 Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica: Book III, ed. R.L. Hunter, Cambridge University Press 1989. ISBN-13: 978-0-521-312363

Jason and the Golden Fleece (The Argonautica), trans. with intro. & explanatory notes by R.L. Hunter, Oxford University Press 2009. ISBN-978-0-19-953872-0

C C 348 • Moral Agency In Greek Tragedy

32953 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 2.112
(also listed as CTI 345 )
show description

Authority: Acceptance, Acquiescence and Assertion: Moral Agency in Greek Tragedy

 

Readings

Aeschylus: The Oresteia

Euripides: Iphigeneia at Aulis

Sophocles: Philoctetes

 

Course Objectives

The primary aim of this course is to introduce you to some of the masterpieces of Greek tragedy, works which have had an incalculable influence on Western civilization.  I will explain the social and cultural background of the texts, identify some of the questions that they pose and suggest some interpretations, but the ultimate aim is for you to feel comfortable enough with these works that you are ready to offer your own interpretations of character and action.  Several class sessions will be given over to sketching analogous situations which you might realistically expect to encounter in your lives and “pre-scripting” possible courses of action using the figures of Orestes, Achilles and Neoptolemus as either models or foils.

 

We will discuss a limited section of the text each class session in light of study questions I will distribute beforehand.  You should read the text with the study questions in mind before class and be prepared to ask and answer questions on the text.  When preparing for the midterm and the final you should use the study questions as a guide to the sort of questions I might ask, and organize material from the readings, my lectures and your own notes accordingly.

 

Pre-scripting of action:

This course is flagged as one that explicitly discusses issues of practical ethics and leadership.  In the plays we will read, three protagonists are placed in situations where they are asked to do something about which they clearly have ethical misgivings.  Orestes is told to kill his mother by Apollo; Achilles is asked by the Greek army, and eventually by Iphigeneia herself, to stand by and let a young girl be sacrificed so that the Greeks can destroy Troy; Neoptolemus is pressured to lie, cheat and steal by Odysseus, again so that Troy might fall.  It is my fervent hope that none of you ever find yourselves in exactly these situations, but it is eminently conceivable that at some point in your lives you will face an ethical dilemma or challenge in which your values will conflict with what you are encouraged to do by an authority you consider infallible, by peer pressure, or by a mentor. We will spend a session after concluding each play brainstorming as many such situations as we can as a class.  Each student will then have a week to produce a “pre-script” of how they would behave in one of the situations we have agreed are a close analogy to the situation in the play.  There will be further instructions for this exercise. 

 

LAT 365 • Lucretius

33359 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 112
(also listed as LAT 385 )
show description

Lucretius’ poem De Reum Natura can be seen as structured around three pairs of books.  Books 1 & 2 explain the nature of atoms and the void and how these produce the qualities of perceivable phenomena in general; Books 3 & 4 focus on the construction of the soul from atomic elements and how this explains its properties; Books 5 & 6 move outward to discuss the construction of the cosmos and cosmic phenomena.  In this course we shall focus on books 3 & 4 and cover material such as Lucretius’ arguments for the corporality of the soul and therefore its ultimate dissolution at death; how it develops the powers of sense perception and how we can be deceived by the information they give us—though they never lie; his anti-teleological argument; and, of course, his diatribe against passion and sex. To cover both books we will need to read about 200 lines a week and, after a brief introduction to Epicurean philosophy, the first couple of weeks of class will be devoted to translating as much as possible in class. Once students are more comfortable with the Latin we shall devote more time to discussing issues of style, metrics, philosophy, earlier Latin poetry and the influence of Lucretius on later poets—particularly Vergil.  At this stage we may not cover all the Latin text in class, but students will always be able to ask to go over any passage they were unable to figure out by themselves. The grade for the course will depend on 2 midterms (20% each), a short translation and commentary (20%) and a longer (9-12 pages) paper (40%).  Each student will make an oral presentation on the topic of their longer paper. The length of the oral presentation will depend on the number of students in the class.  The long paper will be due two weeks before the end of the semester so students will have time to revise their paper. Required texts: Lucretius: De Rerum Natura III, ed. P.M. Brown (Warminster 1997)         Lucretius: De Rerum Natura IV, ed. J. Godwin (Warminster 1987)

LAT 385 • Lucretius

33387 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 112
(also listed as LAT 365 )
show description

Lucretius’ poem De Reum Natura can be seen as structured around three pairs of books.  Books 1 & 2 explain the nature of atoms and the void and how these produce the qualities of perceivable phenomena in general; Books 3 & 4 focus on the construction of the soul from atomic elements and how this explains its properties; Books 5 & 6 move outward to discuss the construction of the cosmos and cosmic phenomena.  In this course we shall focus on books 3 & 4 and cover material such as Lucretius’ arguments for the corporality of the soul and therefore its ultimate dissolution at death; how it develops the powers of sense perception and how we can be deceived by the information they give us—though they never lie; his anti-teleological argument; and, of course, his diatribe against passion and sex. To cover both books we will need to read about 200 lines a week and, after a brief introduction to Epicurean philosophy, the first couple of weeks of class will be devoted to translating as much as possible in class. Once students are more comfortable with the Latin we shall devote more time to discussing issues of style, metrics, philosophy, earlier Latin poetry and the influence of Lucretius on later poets—particularly Vergil.  At this stage we may not cover all the Latin text in class, but students will always be able to ask to go over any passage they were unable to figure out by themselves. The grade for the course will depend on 2 midterms (20% each), a short translation and commentary (20%) and a longer (9-12 pages) paper (40%).  Each student will make an oral presentation on the topic of their longer paper. The length of the oral presentation will depend on the number of students in the class.  The long paper will be due two weeks before the end of the semester so students will have time to revise their paper. Required texts: Lucretius: De Rerum Natura III, ed. P.M. Brown (Warminster 1997)         Lucretius: De Rerum Natura IV, ed. J. Godwin (Warminster 1987)

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33270 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm GSB 2.126
show description

This course offers a survey of ancient Greek culture from its beginnings to the

The aim of this course is to introduce you to some of the masterpieces of Greek literature from the Archaic and Classical eras of Greek civilization, works which have had an incalculable influence on Western civilization.  I will explain the background of the texts, identify some of the questions that they pose and suggest some interpretations, but the ultimate aim is for you to feel comfortable enough with these works that you wish to read further in them yourselves, looking for your own questions and answers.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

Texts:


Texts - All required

The Iliad of Homer, trans. Richmond Lattimore

The Odyssey of Homer, trans. Richmond Lattimore

Sappho: A New Translation, trans. Mary Barnard

Aeschylus I: Oresteia, trans. Richmond Lattimore

The Complete Plays of Sophocles, ed. Moses Hadas

Euripides: Ten Plays, ed. Moses Hadas

Aristophanes: Four Comedies, ed. William Arrowsmith

The Trial and Death of Socrates, trans. G.M.A. Grube

Plato: The Republic, trans. G.M.A. Grube

GK 365 • Female Poets Of Ancient Greece

33508 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 10
(also listed as GK 385 )
show description

Critical study of authors such as Thucydides, Demosthenes, and Aeschylus.

Prerequisites: Greek 324 or 328.

GK 385 • Female Poets Of Ancient Greece

33528 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 10
(also listed as GK 365 )
show description

Topics given in recent years include Plato and Greek prose, Sophocles, and Sophists.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

32375 • Fall 2010
Meets MTWTHF 900am-1000am WAG 10
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GK 506 FIRST-YEAR GREEK I

32375

MTWTHF

900 to  1000a

WAG  10

DEAN-JONES, L

 


32380

MTWTHF

1100 to  1200p

WAG  10

WHITE, S

 

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Greek 506 can be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

 

Texts:

Crosby and Schaeffer, An Introduction to Greek (Dover 2009)

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

82190 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm WAG 101
show description

Myths are stories that encode a culture's values, hopes, and fears. They describe the shape of the universe according to that culture and the processes by which it has assumed this shape.  They express the perceived relationship between humans and the gods, between men and women, between different groups of humans. They explain the reasons for the conventions within a society. They examine the consequences of challenging these conventions. They deal with the most profound of human experiences: birth, love, loyalty, redemption, hate, suffering, sacrifice, death.  They were shaped by, but also helped to shape the societies in which they were produced and have continued to be retold and have a profound effect on all western culture to this day.

In this course we shall examine both the significance of the bare-bones of the myth (to the extent that it can be identified) and how individual authors have shaped plot lines and characters to produce unique versions of a story.  Material culture (archaeological sites, vase painting, etc.) will be used to complement the literary material.  We shall also consider a variety of theories put forward by contemporary scholars on the basic structure and meaning of myth. Ultimately students should be able to recognize not only retellings of ancient myth in our society but also some of the myths we have created ourselves.

Objectives
Students in this course will:
*    Become familiar with the sources for Greek myth
*    Learn the basic categories and details of written Greek myths
*    Learn the ancient artistic and monumental representations of Greek myths
*    Understand the cultural context of Greek myths
*    Know basic mythic chronology and geography
*    Become familiar with modern theories on the significance of myth

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32465 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.112
show description

See attachment

GK 390 • Ancient Medicine

32765 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WAG 10
show description

See attachment

GK 385 • Plato And Greek Prose

32885 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 WAG 112
show description

Topics given in recent years include Plato and Greek prose, Sophocles, and Sophists.

Publications

Book: Women's Bodies in Classical Greek Science  pp.293, (Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 1994).  Reprinted in paperback 1996.  Put on-line by OUP with Questia in 2001.  Conclusion translated into Spanish and used as Introduction to separate fascicle on ancient gynecology in Arenal 7 (2000), 267-300.

Article: "The Child Patient of the Hippocratics: Early Pediatrics?" in The Oxford Handbook of Childhood and Education in the Classical World, edd. Tim Perkins & Judith Evans Grubbs (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2013), 180-99..

Article: "Clinical gynecology and Aristotle's biology," Apeiron 45 (2012), 180-99.

Article: "Too much of a good thing: the health of Olympic athletes in ancient Greece," in East meets West at the Olympic Games, Volume I, ed. Susan E. Brownell (New York: Greekworks 2011), 49-65.

Article: “De medico: a metapaedogogical text,” in Ancient Medical Education: Proceedings of the XIIth Colloque Hippocratique, ed. H.F.J. Horstmannshoff (Leiden: Brill 2010), 1-15.

Article: “Prostitution as a Smoke-screen in a 4th c. B.C.E. Law Case,” Zmanin (Israeli equivalent of History Magazine) 90 (2005), 40-9.

Article: “Written Texts and the Rise of the Charlatan in Ancient Greek Medicine,” Writing into Culture: Written Text and Cultural Practice in Ancient Greece, ed. Harvey Yunis, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2003), 97-121.

Article: “Aristotle’s understanding of Plato’s Receptacle and its significance for Aristotle’s theory of familial resemblance,” Reason and Necessity: Essays on Plato’s Timaeus, ed. M.R. Wright (London: Duckworth 2000), 101-12.

Article: "Philosophy and Science," Cambridge Illustrated History of Ancient Greece, ed. Paul Cartledge (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), 288-319.

Article: "Teaching Medical Terminology as a Classics Course," Classical Journal 93 (1998), pp.290-6.

Article: “Autopsia, Historia and What Women Know:  The Authority of Women in Hippocratic Gynaecology,” Knowledge and the Scholarly Medical Traditions:  A Comparative Study, ed. Don Bates (Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press 1995), 41-58.

Article: “Menexenus—Son of Socrates,” Classical Quarterly  45 (1995), 51-57.

Article: “The ‘Proof’ of Anatomy,” Women in the Classical World:  Image and Text, edd. Elaine Fantham et al. (New York:  Oxford University Press, 1994), 183-205.

Article: “The Politics of Pleasure:  Female Sexual Appetite in the Hippocratic Corpus,” Helios 19 (1992), 72-91. (Reprinted in Discourses of Sexuality:  From Aristotle to Aids, ed. Domna Stanton (Ann Arbor:  University of Michigan Press, 1992), 48-77.)

Article: “The Cultural Construct of the Female Body in Classical Greek Science,” Women's History and Ancient History, ed. Sarah B. Pomeroy (Chapel Hill:  University of North Carolina Press, 1991), 111-137. (Reprinted in Sex and Difference in Ancient Greece and Rome, edd. Mark Golden & Peter Toohey (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003), 183-201.)

Article: “Menstrual Bleeding According to the Hippocratics and Aristotle,” Transactions of the American Philological Association 119 (1989), 179-194.

Article: “The Role of Ephialtes in the Development of Athenian Democracy,” Classical Antiquity 6 (1987), 53-76.

Encyclopedia article: “Hair and Hairiness,” in 100,000 Years of Beauty, vol.2, Ancient Civilizations, ed.Claude Calamé (Paris: Les Éditions Babylone 2009), 88-91.

Encyclopedia article: "Hippocratic Corpus, Gynecological Works," Encyclopedia of Ancient Natural Scientists: The Greek Tradition and its Many Heirs, edd. Paul T. Keyser & Georgia L. Irby-Massie (New York: Routledge 2008), 401-3.

Encyclopedia article: Translations with commentary of Pseudo-Aristotelian Problems 4.26& Caelius Aurelianus’ On Chronic Disorders 4.9 for Sourcebook for Homosexuality in the Ancient World, ed. T.K. Hubbard (Berkeley: University of California Press 2003), 262-4 & 463-5.

Review: Hippocrates' Woman: Reading the Female Body in Ancient Greece by Helen King (London: Routledge, 1998) for Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 74 (2000), 812-3.

Review: Hippocrates: Places in Man, trans., ed. & comm. by Elizabeth M. Craik (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998) for Classical World 94 (2000), 100-1.

Review: Hippocrates by Jacques Jouanna, trans. M.B. DeBevoise (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999) for Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 56 (2001), 81-3.

Review: Abortion in the Ancient World, Konstantinos Kapparis (London: Duckworth, 2002) for American Journal of Philology 124 (2003), 613-6.

Review: The Staff of Oedipus: Transforming Disability in Ancient Greece, Martha L. Rose (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press 2003) for The American Historical Review, 110 (2005), 531-2.

Review: Galen on the Brain, Julius Rocca (Leiden: Brill 2004) for Apeiron, 39 (2006), 221-4.

Review: In the Grip of Disease, G.E.R. Lloyd (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2003) for Ancient Philosophy 27 (2007), 205-8.

Review: Compendium of Greek Thought, edd. Jacques Brunschwig et al. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000) for The Washington Times (2/17/01).

Work in Progress

Historia Animalium.  Consisting of Pseudo-Aristotle: De Non Generando & Aristotle: Dialectic on De Non Generando.  Translation with Introduction and Commentary.  (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming)

"On Problemata IV.26: Why sodomy is pleasurable for some men and not others," forthcoming in Aristotle's Problemata, ed. Robert Mayhew (Brill).

"Gynaecology," forthcoming in The Cambridge Companion to Hippocrates, edd. Steven Spiegl & Peter Pormann (Cambridge University Press).

What is natural about the Aristotelian oikos?

Polybus' Heartless Man.

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