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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Jessica Miner

Lecturer Ph.D., UT Austin

Contact

  • Phone: 475-9446
  • Office: FAC 22 and WAG 211
  • Office Hours: T/TH 2-3pm in FAC 22; F 4-5pm in WAG 211
  • Campus Mail Code: G5600

Interests

Greek Oratory and Comedy

GK 311 • Intermediate Greek I

33475 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WAG 112
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Continuation of Greek 601C or 507. Introductory readings from classical authors such as Lysias, Plato, and Xenophon. Includes grammar review.

Prerequisites: Greek 601C or 507 with a grade of at least C, or Greek 804 and 412 with a grade of at least C in each.

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

34045 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 112
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Latin 322 is the gateway course through which students who show a greater mastery of the skills of translation (Latin vocabulary and matching English vocabulary, idioms, Latin word arrangement, grammar) will pass ahead to more demanding courses like Latin 323, 324, and 365.

GK 311 • Intermediate Greek I

33495 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 112
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Continuation of Greek 601C or 507. Introductory readings from classical authors such as Lysias, Plato, and Xenophon. Includes grammar review.

Prerequisites: Greek 601C or 507 with a grade of at least C, or Greek 804 and 412 with a grade of at least C in each.

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

33590 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 112
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The primary goal of this course is to get you reading Latin prose and poetry at a brisk pace, which we will achieve through extensive practice with translating prepared and sight passages. Over the course of the semester, we will work through selections from Livy, an earnest literary historian, and Ovid, an irreverent love poet—contemporary writers of the Augustan period who aim to instruct their readers on matters of morality but in vastly different ways. In particular we will explore each author’s use of mythological exempla through close readings of the most famous passages from the first book of Livy’s Ab Urbe Condita and selections from Ovid’s Ars Amatoria. Together, these works offer us a fascinating look at the relevance of Rome’s mythic foundations to life in the early Empire, including the ways in which Romans navigated the social pressures of appearance, courtship, etiquette, and sex. As we translate, we will pay careful attention to literary and historical context, style, tone, and—in the case of Ovid—meter. 

Required Texts   Block, E. Ars Amatoria I. Bryn Mawr Commentaries, 1984.

Gould and Whiteley. Livy: Book I. Bristol Classical Press, 1993.

LAT 323 • Cicero: Orator/Philos/Politcn

33460 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm MEZ B0.302
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****TItle, Instructor, and Time change- should be Dr. Miner, MWF 12-1 MEZ B0.302****

 

LAT 323: Cicero: Orator, Philosopher, Politician

Dr. Miner

 

This course will offer an in-depth examination of Ciceronian oratory, both theory and practice, amid the political upheaval in Rome during the 50’s B.C. We will focus on two major works: Pro Caelio and De Oratore. Pro Caelio, Cicero’s famous speech on behalf of Marcus Caelius Rufus delivered in 56 B.C., presents a scathing and dramatic attack on his enemy Publius Clodius Pulcher via Clodius’ sister, Clodia (also known as Lesbia from Catullus’s poetry). It was also during this political unrest that Cicero turned to writing his philosophical treatise on the ideal orator. De Oratore, composed in 55 B.C., examines the rhetorical skills and techniques of persuasive speech, but also addresses the orator’s need for a broad philosophical education and connects this training to the orator’s role as politician. We will read the whole of De Oratore in translation as well as selections in Latin from book 3. Weekly activities will include translations from Latin, class discussion, and readings from secondary sources. In addition to a midterm and final exam, there will be a short research project related to the themes of the course.

Texts:

Required texts:

Cicero: Pro Caelio, 2001, eds. E. Keitel and J. Crawford, Focus Classical Commentary.

Cicero: De Oratore, 2011, ed. D. Mankin

Cicero: On the Ideal Orator, 2001, trans. J. May and J. Wisse, Oxford University Press.

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

33450 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 112
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The primary goal of this course is to get you reading Latin prose and poetry at a brisk pace. Over the course of the semester, we will work through selections from Ovid and Suetonius, both of whom aim to instruct their readers on matters of morality and physiognomy (ancients, no less than moderns, used outer appearance to judge character). In the Ars Amatoria, Ovid employs an irreverent and ironic tone that defies easy interpretation, while Suetonius' penchant for intriguing (sometimes shocking!) details in his Lives of the Caesars complicates our understanding of historical biography as a genre. Together, these works offer us a window into the fascinating world of Roman private life, from 'call-girls' to Emperors, and the ways in which Romans navigated the social pressures of appearance, courtship, etiquette, and sex. Apart from reading the authors in the original Latin, we will discuss their contemporary context and their reception in the modern world.

 

Texts: TBD. 

GK 311 • Intermediate Greek I

33115 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm ENS 116
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Texts: TBA 

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

33720 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 208
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Latin 322 is the gateway course through which students who show a greater mastery of the skills of translation (Latin vocabulary and matching English vocabulary, idioms, Latin word arrangement, grammar) will pass ahead to more demanding courses like Latin 323, 324, and 365.

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

32605 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm JES A209A
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This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

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