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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Robert J Hankinson

Professor PhD, Cambridge

Professor of Philosophy and Classics

Contact

Biography

FieldAncient Philosophy and Medicine, Philosophy of Science

A classical philosophy scholar, he has a special interest in ancient medicine and philosophy of science. He is author of The Sceptics (1995) in the Routledge 'Arguments of the Philosophers' Series, and Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (Oxford, 1998). He has edited Method, Medicine, and Metaphysics (1988). His editions and translations, with philosophical commentary, include Galen's On the Therapeutic Method (Oxford, 1991), Galen on Antecedent Causes (Cambridge, 1998), Aristotle's de Caelo (Oxford, forthcoming in two volumes), and Simplicius' Commentary on de Caelo. (Volume I, Simplicius: On Aristotle On the Heavens 1.1-4 (Duckworth/Cornell, 2002) has appeared; two more volumes are forthcoming.) He is the editor of Apeiron.

Interests

Ancient Philosophy and Medicine, Philosophy of Science

C C 304C • Ancient Philosophy

33230-33235 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 1000am-1100am PAR 203
(also listed as PHL 301K )
show description

An introduction to the philosophical achievements of the ancient world, concentrating on Plato and Aristotle.

LAT 390 • Attitudes: Love In Repub/Augus

33775 • Fall 2013
Meets T 200pm-500pm WAG 10
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Attitudes to Love in late Republican and Augustan poetry

GK 390 • Hellenistic Philosophy

33290 • Fall 2012
Meets W 630pm-930pm WAG 312
(also listed as PHL 381 )
show description

Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

 

Course Description

 Hellenistic philosophy, that is of the period between the death of Aristotle and (traditionally at least) 31 BC, was for centuries unjustly neglected. Over the past thirty years or so much has been done to remedy that neglect, and the distinctive schools of the period (Epicurean, Stoic, Academic, Pyrrhonian) are now recognized as continuing much of enduring and intrinsic interest. Study of the period is hampered by the fact that, with rare exceptions, their works are known only through later citations and attestations, which complicates the process of interpretation. But it is still a project well worthwhile. This course will examine key ideas and arguments from all of these schools, and the contributions they made (and debates they engaged in) concerning epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, logic and mind (among other things).

 

Grading

1 term paper (90%)

participation and/or presentation (10%)

 

Texts

A.A. Long, D.N. Sedley The Hellenistic Philosophers Vol. 1 (1987)

Cambridge University Press ISBN: 0521275563

 

This course satisfied the History requirement.

GK 390 • Aristotle's Metaphysics

33288 • Spring 2012
Meets W 200pm-500pm WAG 312
(also listed as PHL 381 )
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Prerequisites

Graduate Standing and Consent of Graduate Advisor or instructor required.

 

Course Description

The metaphysical and epistemological views of Descartes, Hobbes, and Locke. Topics include the proper foundation for a philosophical system, the nature of knowledge, emotions, (free) will, personal identity (and religious toleration). 

 

Grading

Class participation: 20% (A class presentation will constitute part of this grade.)

Major Essay:                           80% (3,500-6,000 words; due on the last day of lectures.)

Texts

Descartes’s Meditations on First Philosophy, with Objections and Replies,

Descartes, Principles of Philosophy, Part I

Locke, Essay Concerning Human Understanding (selections, mostly from Book II)

Locke, A Letter on Toleration

Hobbes, The Elements of Law Natural and Politic (selections from the part on natural philosophy and epistemology.

 

C C 348 • History Of Ancient Philosophy

32960-32970 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as PHL 329K )
show description

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

C C 348 • History Of Ancient Philosophy

32240 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 329K )
show description

C C 348 4-HIST OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

32240

TTH
M

800 to   930a
800 to   900a

WAG  302
WAG  307

HANKINSON, R

open


32245

TTH
M

800 to   930a
900 to  1000a

WAG  302
WAG  307

HANKINSON, R

open


32250

TTH
M

800 to   930a
1000 to  1100a

WAG  302
WAG  307

HANKINSON, R

closed

 

 

After brief introductory forays into selected contexts of early Greek philosophy (esp. Parmenides, Empedocles, and the Sophist Gorgias), we shall concentrate on the three great figures of classical ancient Greek philosophy (fifth and fourth century B.C.E.), Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.  In our readings of selected dialogues of Plato, our concerns will be fourfold:  (a) to identify and survey themes of the fifth-century "Sophistic movement," against which Socrates and Plato significantly react; (b) to articulate a conception of the philosophy of Socrates (who wrote nothing himself); (c) to grasp the origins of Plato's philosophy; (d) to study Plato's mature metaphysics (account of reality) and epistemology (theory of knowledge).  Our discussion of Aristotle will emphasize metaphysics, cosmology, natural philosophy, and theory of the soul.
The course is required of philosophy majors.  It has no special prerequisites; and given its concern with ideas that are central in the Western tradition, it can thus also serve as an upper-division introduction to philosophy.

REQUIRED WORK AND COURSE PRECEPTS
(FULLER STATEMENT WILL BE DISTRIBUTED DURING FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES.)

Written examinations:  Two or three mid-term examinations.

Papers: Two papers of about 1,600 words each.  Instructions and suggested questions will be furnished.

Contribution to discussion:  Bonus points will be awarded to those students who will have made the most effective use of opportunities for discussion in the weekly discussion sections (up to +4 points on a 100-point grading scale).

Attendance: Required at the weekly discussion sections.  (Maximum of two absences will be excused.)

C C 348 • History Of Ancient Philosophy

32245 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 329K )
show description

C C 348 4-HIST OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

32240

TTH
M

800 to   930a
800 to   900a

WAG  302
WAG  307

HANKINSON, R

open


32245

TTH
M

800 to   930a
900 to  1000a

WAG  302
WAG  307

HANKINSON, R

open


32250

TTH
M

800 to   930a
1000 to  1100a

WAG  302
WAG  307

HANKINSON, R

closed

 

 

After brief introductory forays into selected contexts of early Greek philosophy (esp. Parmenides, Empedocles, and the Sophist Gorgias), we shall concentrate on the three great figures of classical ancient Greek philosophy (fifth and fourth century B.C.E.), Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.  In our readings of selected dialogues of Plato, our concerns will be fourfold:  (a) to identify and survey themes of the fifth-century "Sophistic movement," against which Socrates and Plato significantly react; (b) to articulate a conception of the philosophy of Socrates (who wrote nothing himself); (c) to grasp the origins of Plato's philosophy; (d) to study Plato's mature metaphysics (account of reality) and epistemology (theory of knowledge).  Our discussion of Aristotle will emphasize metaphysics, cosmology, natural philosophy, and theory of the soul.
The course is required of philosophy majors.  It has no special prerequisites; and given its concern with ideas that are central in the Western tradition, it can thus also serve as an upper-division introduction to philosophy.

REQUIRED WORK AND COURSE PRECEPTS
(FULLER STATEMENT WILL BE DISTRIBUTED DURING FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES.)

Written examinations:  Two or three mid-term examinations.

Papers: Two papers of about 1,600 words each.  Instructions and suggested questions will be furnished.

Contribution to discussion:  Bonus points will be awarded to those students who will have made the most effective use of opportunities for discussion in the weekly discussion sections (up to +4 points on a 100-point grading scale).

Attendance: Required at the weekly discussion sections.  (Maximum of two absences will be excused.)

C C 348 • History Of Ancient Philosophy

32250 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 329K )
show description

C C 348 4-HIST OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

32240

TTH
M

800 to   930a
800 to   900a

WAG  302
WAG  307

HANKINSON, R

open


32245

TTH
M

800 to   930a
900 to  1000a

WAG  302
WAG  307

HANKINSON, R

open


32250

TTH
M

800 to   930a
1000 to  1100a

WAG  302
WAG  307

HANKINSON, R

closed

 

 

After brief introductory forays into selected contexts of early Greek philosophy (esp. Parmenides, Empedocles, and the Sophist Gorgias), we shall concentrate on the three great figures of classical ancient Greek philosophy (fifth and fourth century B.C.E.), Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.  In our readings of selected dialogues of Plato, our concerns will be fourfold:  (a) to identify and survey themes of the fifth-century "Sophistic movement," against which Socrates and Plato significantly react; (b) to articulate a conception of the philosophy of Socrates (who wrote nothing himself); (c) to grasp the origins of Plato's philosophy; (d) to study Plato's mature metaphysics (account of reality) and epistemology (theory of knowledge).  Our discussion of Aristotle will emphasize metaphysics, cosmology, natural philosophy, and theory of the soul.
The course is required of philosophy majors.  It has no special prerequisites; and given its concern with ideas that are central in the Western tradition, it can thus also serve as an upper-division introduction to philosophy.

REQUIRED WORK AND COURSE PRECEPTS
(FULLER STATEMENT WILL BE DISTRIBUTED DURING FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES.)

Written examinations:  Two or three mid-term examinations.

Papers: Two papers of about 1,600 words each.  Instructions and suggested questions will be furnished.

Contribution to discussion:  Bonus points will be awarded to those students who will have made the most effective use of opportunities for discussion in the weekly discussion sections (up to +4 points on a 100-point grading scale).

Attendance: Required at the weekly discussion sections.  (Maximum of two absences will be excused.)

GK 390 • Aristotle's Philosophy Of Mind

32766 • Spring 2010
Meets W 300pm-600pm WAG 312
(also listed as PHL 381 )
show description

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

C C 348 • Hist Of Ancient Philosophy

32680-32690 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WAG 302
show description

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

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