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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Rabun M Taylor

Associate Professor PhD 1997, University of Minnesota

Associate Professor and Faculty Undergraduate Advisor
Rabun M Taylor

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-0677
  • Office: WAG 14B
  • Office Hours: By appointment (on leave fall 2014)
  • Campus Mail Code: C3400

Biography

InterestsGreek and Roman art, architecture, archaeology, urbanism, social history, and material culture— particularly as understood through the lens of social sciences such as anthropology and religious studies.

FieldsRoman Archaeology, Urbanism, Roman Material Culture, Greek and Roman Art.

Courses Taught:

Fall 2010:  CC 307D:  Introduction to Roman Archaeology; CC 340:  Pompeii.

Spring 2011:  CC 317:  Classical Archaeology:  Methods and Approaches; CC 383:  Greeks and Romans on the Bay of Naples.

Fall 2011:  CC 307D:  Introduction to Roman Archaeology; UGS 303:  Technology in the Greek and Roman World.

Spring 2012:  CC 317:  Classical Archaeology:  Methods and Approaches; CC 380:  Ostia.

Fall 2012:  CC 307D:  Introduction to Roman Archaeology; UGS 303:  Technology in the Greek and Roman World.

Spring 2013:  CC 340:  Pompeii; CC 380:  Roman Architecture.

 

Fieldwork: Morea, Cosa, Naples, Rome

 

 

 

 


Interests

Greek and Roman art, architecture, archaeology, urbanism, social history, and material culture

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

32370 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 112
show description

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 340 • Pompeii

32415 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 112
show description

Buried in an eruption in 79 AD and rediscovered only in the mid-eighteenth century, the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum offer modern visitors a panoramic view of Roman life.  The forum, temples, baths, houses, shops, theaters, and streets weave a tattered tapestry still saturated with meaning today.  Our task is to recover some of that meaning through the refractory lens of our modern minds.  Using ancient literary texts and various analytical approaches, we will sample the rich visual and material legacy of Mt. Vesuvius, seeking through artifacts — some magnificent and others merely interesting — to recollect a way of life.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

33620 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 308
show description

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 340 • Pompeii

33205 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.120
show description

The towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried in an eruption of 79 AD, offer modern visitors a panoramic surface view of Roman life. This course will delve deeper by examining the ancient remains in context. The forum, temples, baths, houses, shops, theaters, and streets weave a tattered tapestry still saturated with meaning today. Our task it to recover some of that meaning through the refractory lens of our modern minds. Using ancient literary texts and various analytical approaches, we will sample the rich visual and material legacy of these towns, seeking through artifacts--some magnificent and others merely interesting--to recollect a way of life.

Students will be evaluated according to performance in class, on a midterm and final exam, on several writing assignments, and on other tasks assigned by the instructor.

C C 380 • Roman Architecture

33295 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 200pm-500pm WAG 10
show description

This course will encompass Roman architecture in its many dimensions:  as a process, and a product; as an expression of cultural continuity and a medium of innovation; as a product of high artifice, and an organic component of urban and rural landscape; as the product of complex systems of planning, administration, and organization; and as a vehicle of signification through time.  Special attention will be given, on the one hand, to Vitruvius and the fraught relationship of his architectural treatise to the emergence of a distinctly Roman classicism, and to monumental architecture of the Roman Imperial period from Nero to Maxentius.

C C 307D • Intro To Roman Archaeology

33055 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 420
show description

This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Romans from the beginnings of the city of Rome in the early Iron Age to late antiquity.  It focuses on major developments in Roman material culture, particularly artworks, buildings, and cities.  Material will be presented chronologically and students will see and evaluate artifacts in light of their cultural precedents.  After completing this course, students will be able to understand major Roman sites, monuments, and artworks in their cultural and chronological context and to offer an analysis based on art-historical and archaeological principles.

Three quizzes: 5 percent each (15 total) Midterm: 30 percent Special Assignments: 20 percent Final exam: 35 percent.

 The textbook is Fred Kleiner, A History of Roman Art (2007).  It’s at the Co-op.

Other readings are listed in the week-by-week entries of the course calendar below.  Apart from Kleiner, all readings will be available electronically—either on e-reserves, or as an e-book.  You can access both resources through UT Libraries.  In general, you should try to have the weekly readings done by the Thursday class session.

E-reserves page:  http://reserves.lib.utexas.edu/eres/default.aspx

E-reserves password for this course:  servius

 

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

33065 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 201
show description

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion. 

 

 

This course fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.  As a prerequisite, students must have taken one of the following:  AHC 319 (Topic 1:  The Ancient Mediterranean World); ANT 304; ARH 302; ARY 301; C C 301, 302, 307C, 307D, 319D; HIS 319D.  

C C 380 • Ostia

33170 • Spring 2012
Meets T 200pm-500pm WAG 10
(also listed as R S 387M )
show description

Decades on from the large-scale Italian excavations of the ancient Roman port city of Ostia and Russell Meiggs’ epochal synthesis published in 1973, a new wave of archaeological discoveries and historical interpretations has shed much light on the city and its companion community of Portus—not just in their physical and local aspects, but also in the ways that they interacted with Rome and the Mediterranean at large.  Focusing on recent work in archaeology, history, and religious studies, this seminar takes a multidisciplinary approach to Ostia, scrutinizing its complex and often unique physical and social structures, its many religious and commercial institutions, its art and architecture, and its broader significance in Roman life and culture.

 

Texts

Please note these are provisional:Aurea Roma:  dalla città pagana alla città cristiana.  2000.Bakker, J.T.  1994.  Living and Working with the Gods:  Studies of Evidence for Private Religion and Its Material Environment in the City of Ostia (100-500 AD).Boin, D.  2010.  “Temples and Traditions in Late Antique Ostia, 250-600 C.E.”  Ph.D. thesis, University of Texas – Austin.Bruun, C. and A.G. Zevi, eds.  2002.  Ostia e Portus nelle loro relazioni con Roma.Descoeudres, J.-P., ed.  2001.  Ostie – port et porte de la Rome antique.Egelhaaf-Gaiser U.  2002.  “Religionsästhetik und Raumordnung am Beispiel der Vereinsgebäude von Ostia.”  In Religiöse Vereine in der Römischen Antike. Untersuchungen zu Organisation, Ritual und Raumordnung,123-72.Falzone, S.  2007.  Ornata aedificia.  Pitture parietali delle case ostiensi.Gering A. 2004.  “Plätze und Strassensperren an Promenaden. Zum Funktionswandel Ostias in der Spätantike.” RM 111, 299-382.Hainzelmann, M.  2000.  Die Nekropolen von Ostia.Hermansen, G.  1981.  Ostia:  Aspects of Roman City Life.Keay, S. et al., eds.  2005.  Portus:  An Archaeological Survey of the Port of Imperial Rome.Martin A. et al. 2002.  “The Urbanistic Project on the Previously Unexcavated Areas of Ostia (DAI-AAR 1996-2001).” MAAR 47, 259-304.Meiggs, R.G.  1973.  Roman Ostia.Muntasser, N.  2003.  “The Late Antique Domus in Ostia.”  Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas – Austin.Olsson, B. et al., eds.  2001.  The Synagogue of Ostia and the Jews of Rome:  Interdisciplinary Studies.Pavolini C. 2002.  “La trasformazione del ruolo di Ostia nel III sec. d.C.”  MEFRA 114, 325-352.Pavolini, C.  2006.  Ostia.  Guida archeologica Laterza.  2nd ed.Priester S. 2002.  Ad summas tegulas. Untersuchungen zu vielgeschossigen Gebäudeblöcken mit Wohneinheiten und Insulae im kaiserzeitlichen Rom.Rickman, G.  1982.  The Corn Supply of Ancient Rome.Rieger, A.-K.  2004.  Heiligtümer in Ostia.Steuernagel, D.  2004.  Kult und Alltag in römischen Hafenstädten. White, L.M.  1997.  "Synagogue and Society in Imperial Ostia: Archaeological and Epigraphic Evidence," Harvard Theological Review 90:1, 23-58.White, L.M.  1999.  “Reading the Ostia Synagogue: A Reply to A. Runesson,” Harvard Theological Review 92:4, 435-464.Zevi, A.G. and A. Claridge, eds.  1996.  “Roman Ostia” Revisited:  Archaeological and Historical Papers in Memory of Russell G. Meiggs.Zevi, A.G. and J. Humphrey, eds.  2004.  Ostia, Cicero, Gamala, Feasts and the Economy.Zevi, A.G. and R. Turchetti, eds.  2004.  Le strutture dei porti e degli approdi antichi.

Grading

Grades will be assigned according to individual performance in class discussions, presentations, and a research paper.

C C 307D • Intro To Roman Archaeology

32920 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 201
show description

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Romans from the beginnings of the city of Rome in the early Iron Age to late antiquity. It focuses on major developments in Roman material culture, particularly artworks, buildings, and cities. Material will be presented chronologically and students will see and evaluate artifacts in light of their cultural precedents. After completing this course, students will be able to understand major Roman sites, monuments, and artworks in their cultural and chronological context and to offer an analysis based on art-historical and archaeological principles.

 

Three quizzes (Tuesdays, in class): Midterm (Tuesday, Oct. 5, in class): Two critical essays on outside lectures: Final exam (Monday, Dec. 13, 2-5 p.m.):5 percent each (15 total) 30 percent 20 percent 35 percent.

C C 317 • Clascl Archaeol: Meths/Approch

33315 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WAG 201
show description

The archaeology of the Classical world is an enormously wide-ranging field, encompassing archaeological fieldwork of all kinds over thousands of miles.  This course will be your introduction to this diverse and fascinating discipline, both in terms of its scope and its methods.  Not only will we study the “core” of the Classical world in Greece and Italy through an examination of major sites and artifacts, we will also focus on the methods that have stimulated important new discoveries and ideas in recent decades.  We will consider how Classical archaeology has developed since its origins in the 18th and 19th centuries and focus on key debates and innovations in the field.  In addition, we will discuss important methodological principles such as numismatics, field survey, excavation techniques, and artifact analysis.  Several units of the course will be anchored in particular archaeological sites that exemplify the topics under discussion. 

 

This course fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.  As a prerequisite, students must have taken one of the following:  AHC 319 (Topic 1:  The Ancient Mediterranean World); ANT 304; ARH 302; ARY 301; C C 301, 302, 307C, 307D, 319D; HIS 319D. 

C C 383 • Greeks/Romans On Bay Of Naples

33430 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 200pm-500pm WAG 10
show description

Mythic haunt of the great heroes Odysseus, Aeneas and Hercules; historic birthplace of Greek colonization; haven of Hellenism in the west; playground and pleasance of the Roman aristocracy; cultural and commercial powerhouse:  the Bay of Naples played a role second only to Rome in the cultural geography of ancient Italy.  Emphasizing the population centers of the western Bay—particularly Neapolis, Puteoli, Baiae, Misenum, and Cumae, and their Phlegraean coast and hinterland—this seminar seeks to redress a colossal imbalance in Anglo-American scholarship on the region, which has focused almost exclusively on Pompeii, Herculaneum, and a handful of Vesuvian villas.  We will investigate this region across several disciplines, including archaeology, social and political history, architectural history, geology, numismatics, epigraphy, and religious studies.  Reading knowledge of Italian is highly desirable but not required.

C C 307D • Intro To Roman Archaeology

32210 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 201
show description

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Romans from the beginnings of the city of Rome in the early Iron Age to late antiquity. It focuses on major developments in Roman material culture, particularly artworks, buildings, and cities. Material will be presented chronologically and students will see and evaluate artifacts in light of their cultural precedents. After completing this course, students will be able to understand major Roman sites, monuments, and artworks in their cultural and chronological context and to offer an analysis based on art-historical and archaeological principles.

 

Three quizzes (Tuesdays, in class): Midterm (Tuesday, Oct. 5, in class): Two critical essays on outside lectures: Final exam (Monday, Dec. 13, 2-5 p.m.):5 percent each (15 total) 30 percent 20 percent 35 percent.

C C 340 • Pompeii

32235 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.128
show description

Buried in an eruption in 79 AD and rediscovered only in the mid-eighteenth century, the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum offer modern visitors a panoramic view of Roman life.  The forum, temples, baths, houses, shops, theaters, and streets weave a tattered tapestry still saturated with meaning today.  Our task is to recover some of that meaning through the refractory lens of our modern minds.  Using ancient literary texts and various analytical approaches, we will sample the rich visual and material legacy of Mt. Vesuvius, seeking through artefacts — some magnificent, all interesting — to recollect a way of life. 

C C 340 • Topog & Monuments Of Anc Rome

32535 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 WAG 308
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

This course is a general survey of the architecture and urban development of Rome from its beginnings until late antiquity.  By studying the city’s monumental center, students will gain an understanding of Rome’s immense cultural legacy in general, and in specific a familiarity with the spatial and topographical vocabulary inherited by the modern urban West.  Additionally, by examining the remains of ancient Rome’s infrastructure, they will confront the city as an organic and historical entity.

GRADING:

Class participation and attendance:  10 percent

Map quizzes:  10 percent

2 Midterms:  30 percent

Presentation:  20 percent

5- to 8-page research paper (for grad students, 15-20 pages):  30 percent

 

TEXTBOOKS:

Claridge, A.  Rome:  An Oxford Archaeological Guide.  Oxford.

Favro, D.  The Urban Image of Augustan Rome.  Cambridge.  (Currently on order at Coop, due in mid-September)

Packer, J.  The Forum of Trajan in Rome:  A Study of the Monuments in Brief.  Berkeley.

Stambaugh, J.  The Ancient Roman City.  Baltimore and London.

Course packet.

Optional purchase:

Holloway, R.  The Archaeology of Early Rome and Latium.

C C 307D • Intro To Roman Archaeology

32655 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.134
show description

This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Romans from the beginnings of the city of Rome in the early Iron Age to late antiquity.  It focuses on major developments in Roman material culture, particularly artworks, buildings, and cities.  Material will be presented chronologically and students will see and evaluate artifacts in light of their cultural precedents.  After completing this course, students will be able to understand major Roman sites, monuments, and artworks in their cultural and chronological context and to offer an analysis based on art-historical and archaeological principles.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

C C 380 • Meth & Thry In Clascl Archaeol

32740 • Fall 2009
Meets T 330pm-630pm WAG 10
show description

C C 380 Seminar in Classical Archaeology:

Topics given in recent years include methods and theory, Greek and Roman Naples, landscape archaeology, and Hellenistic and Roman Egypt.

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