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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Steven J Lundy

Lecturer Ph.D. 2013, University of Texas at Austin

Contact

C C 302 • Intro To Ancient Rome-Wb

33196 • Fall 2014
Meets
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This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

AHC 325 • History Of Rome: The Empire

33475 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 101
(also listed as CTI 375, EUS 346, HIS 321 )
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This class will cover the story of the Roman empire from the death of Caesar to the fall of Rome in A.D. 476.  After working our way through the narrative of this period (about half th semester), we will examine a number of topics that cut across time.  The course will touch on politics, law, war, the economy, social classes, gender, and psychopathic emperors.

Grading:

2 quizzes (each 25%) requiring essay answersFinal exam (50%) requiring essay answers

Texts:

Ancient Rome: A Military and Political History, Christopher S. Mackay

LAT 311 • Intermediate Latin I

34020 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WAG 112
show description

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

 

Textbooks

Kennedy, Caesar: De Bello Civile III, 1st ed. (Bristol, 2002).  ISBN 185399636X

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Traupman, New College Latin and English Dictionary, 3rd ed. (Bantam, 2007)  ISBN 978-0-553-59012-8

AHC 325 • Hist Of Rome: The Republic

33145 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 3.102
(also listed as CTI 375, HIS 321M )
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Covers the period from Rome's foundation through Caesar's murder in 44 B.C.  The emphasis placed on the last two centuries of the Republic when problems accumulated and solutions did not.  All the factors contributing to the Republic's fall will discussed:  political, military, social, economic, religious, etc.

Grading:2 quizzes (each 25%) requiring essay answersFinal exam (50%) requiring essay answers

 

Texts:

M. Cary & H.H. Scullar, A History of Rome (3rd ed.)Plutarch, Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin)Sallust, Jugarthine War & The Conspiracy of Catiline (Penguin)Optional:Appian, Civil Wars (Penguin)

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

33705 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 112
show description

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

LAT F311 • Intermediate Latin I

83035 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WEL 3.266
show description

Second Year Latin as a whole shifts the focus of Latin language learning from acquiring the fundamentals of morphology, grammar and syntax, to applying and developing those skills in translation and comprehension of original Latin texts.  In this class, we will read Vergil’s Aeneid, the seminal text of the Augustan period and one of the most remarkable and enduring works of Western literature. The aim of the class is to guide the student through a careful reading and translation of selections of the first half of Vergil’s text (books 1-6), with an emphasis on consolidating language skills in preparation for further work in Latin texts in subsequent semesters.  Most of this translation work will be conducted in class, supplemented by the student’s independent preparation of assigned sections.  These translations, together with developing vocabulary, morphology, grammar and syntax skills, will be tested in regular quizzes, occasional pop quizzes and drills, three midterms, and a final.  In-class translation work will be further supplemented by homework assignments, combining translation skills with grammatical and stylistic commentary.  As the semester develops, students will also be introduced to literary and historical analysis of classical texts, and will be expected to comment articulately on material covered, both in and out of class, in formal and informal assignments.

 

Prerequisites: LAT 507 or equivalent (i.e. first-year beginning Latin) with a grade of C or higher. Latin 311 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, and as an elective or towards a minor in some programs

 

Text: Pharr, C. Vergil’s Aeneid, Books I-VI (Bolchazy-Carducci) [ISBN-10: 0865164215 | ISBN-13: 978-0865164215]

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

33440 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 1.134
show description

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

C C F302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

82577 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WAG 201
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The history of Ancient Rome constitutes one of the critical and focal periods of European and World History. From a tiny and seemingly insignificant community in the Italian peninsula to the administrative center of a massive and unprecedented Mediterranean Empire for more than half a millennium, Rome has left an indelible impression on European society, politics and culture. Understanding the history of Rome is fundamental to any student not only hoping to gain a greater knowledge of the ancient world, but human history even to the present day.

This course overviews the narrative, themes and study of Roman history and society, covering the period from the foundation of the city to late antiquity. Through examination of contemporary texts and material, combined with readings of modern scholarship, the aim of the class is to provide the student with a thorough introduction of its political and cultural history, with a look to further study of the ancient world, as well as a greater comprehension of Rome’s unique place in world history. In two midterms and a final, students will also be expected to consolidate information learned in class lectures to present a general knowledge of Roman history, an ability to identify important products of Rome’s literary and material output, and articulate issues central to the study of the field.

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

33705 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 308
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Continuation of Latin 311. Selected readings from classical authors.
Only one of the following may be counted: Latin 511K, 312K, 312M, 316

Prerequisites:  
Latin 311 with a grade of at least C, or the consent of  the instructor.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

82185 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WAG 201
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The ancient Romans are both fascinating in their own right and uniquely useful for contemporary Americans.  Because Rome has been so influential on our own institutions and culture, the Romans offer us invaluable perspectives on the modern world.  At the same time, the Romans were in many ways frighteningly different from us.  The study of Rome thus helps us to appreciate how cultural differences can determine how humans think and act.  Our aim in this course is to gain a fuller understanding of Rome-its similarities to, and its differences from, us-in order to understand better who we are, both as humans and as modern descendants of the Romans.  We will reach this goal through reading and discussion of works written by the ancient Romans and secondary works on Roman history and culture.

LAT 311 • Sec-Yr Lat I: Sel Rom Writers

32915 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 1.134
show description

Second Year Latin I: Selected Roman Writers (LAT311) Syllabus

 

Instructor: Steven Lundy Office hours: MWF 12-1

Place: GAR 1.134 Office: WAG 13

Time: MWF 1-2 Email: steven.lundy@mail.utexas.edu

Unique: 32915 Telephone: 512-471-7890

 

Required Text: Pharr, C. Vergil’s Aeneid, Books I-VI (Bolchazy-Carducci)

Optional: Latin reference grammar (e.g. Morwood [intermediate], Allen & Greenough [advanced]); a Latin dictionary (e.g. Cassell’s); translation of the Aeneid (West, Lombardo, etc.)

 

Course Description

 

Second Year Latin, as a whole, shifts the focus of Latin language learning from developing morphology, grammar and syntax – the student’s knowledge of which now largely taken for granted – to applying those skills to translation of original Latin material.  In this first class, we will focus on Vergil’s Aeneid, the seminal text of the Augustan period and, unquestionably, one of the most remarkable and enduring products of Western literature.  Although the move from developing language skills to reading poetry may seem daunting, Vergil’s language exhibits classical Latin in an exemplary form, and there are few better challenges for the intermediate student wishing to consolidate and enhance her Latin language skills from the previous two semesters.  Further, to the student new to Roman society, culture, and history, the Aeneid – particularly in the original Latin – offers an account, paradoxically both complete and tantalizingly provocative, of the world, as its poet, Vergil, saw it.

 

The aim of the class is to guide the student through a careful reading and translation of selections of the first half of Vergil’s text (books 1-6), with an emphasis on consolidating language skills in preparation for further work in Latin texts in subsequent semesters.  Most of this translation work will be conducted in class, supplemented by the student’s independent preparation of assigned sections.  These translations, together with developing vocabulary, morphology, grammar and syntax skills, will be tested in regular quizzes, occasional pop quizzes and drills, three midterms, and a final.  In-class translation work will be further supplemented by three substantial homework assignments, combining translation skills with grammatical and stylistic commentary.  Finally, as the semester develops, students will be introduced to literary analysis of classical texts, and will be expected to comment intelligently on material covered, both in and out of class, in formal and informal assignments.

 

By the end of the semester, students who successfully complete Latin 311 with a Grade C or higher will have acquired sufficient capability to advance to Latin 312 (Selected Roman Writers) or equivalent at other institutions.

 

Course Structure and Grading

 

Final Grade Weighting

 

Quizzes (6, worst dropped): 10%

Class participation (inc. pop quizzes): 15%

Midterm Exams: 50%

Final Exam: 25%

 

Included in the class participation score are the student’s attentiveness and engagement with the class, pop quizzes and drills, and homework assignments.  Extra credit may occasionally be offered and only at the instructor’s discretion.

 

 

A

A-

B+

B

B-

C+

C

C-

D

F

Score

100-93.5

93.4-89.5

89.4-86.5

86.4-83.5

83.4-79.5

79.4-76.5

76.4-73.5

73.4-69.5

69.4-59.5

< 59.5

 

The pass/fail score is 75; the credit/no credit score is 65.

Provisional Exam Dates

 

Midterm 1 Friday February 19th

Midterm 2 Wednesday March 24th

Midterm 3 Monday April 19th

Final May 12th-15th, 17th-18th TBD

 

Attendance

 

As in previous Latin classes, progress cannot be expected without dedication and commitment, and this kind of dedication will be expected in the form of daily attendance and active participation in class. Attendance will be taken on a class-by-class basis at the beginning of class; failure to attend attendance without good cause more than three times will correspond to a 2% drop in the final grade for each unexcused absence. Excessive tardiness and absence will be judged at the discretion of the instructor. Unexcused absence will not be accommodated for in the event of a missed quiz or exam.

 

Note that an absence may be excused for the following reasons ONLY: a religious holiday, medical reasons as documented by a visit to a doctor's office or Student Health Services, team competitions that require a student to be out of town (for which students should have the proper paperwork), or for family emergencies certified by the Dean of Students. In other instances students should plan for and take advantage of their three “free” absences. Generally, both student and instructor are expected to understand and comply with university regulations on these matters. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

 

In the event of a missed quiz or test, or if a student has special requirements for taking a quiz or test outside of class hours, he or she is expected to alert the instructor at the earliest possible opportunity.  In the event of an assignment missed or postponed for a legitimate reason, the student typically has a full week to make up the assignment before receiving a zero for that assignment.  In general, students are always expected to take responsibility for their own work, and should always inform the instructor if any material will be missed as soon as possible.

 

Other Resources

 

The syllabus and handouts will be made available on Blackboard. Grades will be posted on eGradebook, and students are encouraged to take responsibility for their own grades on a regular basis to ensure their accuracy.

 

University policies

 

I abide by all UT policies.

 

Scholastic dishonesty includes any kind of cheating on any graded assignment. It will result in an F for this course, which you then may not drop. For questions about scholastic dishonesty, see the General Information catalogue, Appendix C, Section 11-802 (http://www.utexas.edu/student/registrar/catalogs/gi03-04/app/appc11.html#11-802).

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with academic disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259 or 471-4641 or online at http://www.utexas.edu/depts/dos/ssd/index.html.

 

If class must be missed due to the observance of a religious holiday, please provide proper notification at least fourteen days prior to the intended day(s) of absence. For more details, see http://www.utexas.edu/admin/evpp/policy/holy.html.

LAT 311 • Sec-Yr Lat I: Sel Rom Writers

33065 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm JES A209A
show description

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

 

Textbooks

Kennedy, Caesar: De Bello Civile III, 1st ed. (Bristol, 2002).  ISBN 185399636X

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Traupman, New College Latin and English Dictionary, 3rd ed. (Bantam, 2007)  ISBN 978-0-553-59012-8

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

82335 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 830-1000 WAG 208
show description

This course is the second half of a two-semester introduction to the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin.  Translating passages from ancient writers also introduces students to fundamental features of Roman culture. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to reproduce paradigms of all Latin noun, adjective, adverb, and verb forms; to parse and explain the function of Latin words in context; to demonstrate fluency in basic Latin syntax and a growing vocabulary; to master standard pronunciation of Latin; and to translate accurately from Latin into English. In the latter part of the semester, students read selections from the writings of Julius Caesar in the original Latin.

Class time will be devoted to the introduction of new material, reviewing assigned homework, and practice exercises.  Students should expect daily homework assignments and regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; three midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 507 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 311. 

The completion of Latin 506 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 507. Students who have recently had more than two years of high school Latin, or more than two semesters of college Latin should normally take Latin 311.

Textbooks

Wheelock, Wheelock’s Latin, 7th ed. (Harper Collins, 2011).  ISBN 978-0-06-199722-8

English and Irby, A Little Latin Reader, 1st ed. (Oxford: OUP, 2012).  ISBN 978-0-19-984622-1

Groton, Thirty-Eight Latin Stories, 5th ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1995).  ISBN 978-0-86516-289-1

Comeau and LaFleur, Workbook for Wheelock’s Latin, 3rd ed. Rev. (Harper Collins, 2005).  ISBN

0-006-095642-9

Tatum, A Caesar Reader, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 2012).  ISBN 978-0-86516-696-7

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

32375 • Spring 2009
Meets MTWTHF 900-1000 WAG 208
show description

This course is the second half of a two-semester introduction to the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin.  Translating passages from ancient writers also introduces students to fundamental features of Roman culture. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to reproduce paradigms of all Latin noun, adjective, adverb, and verb forms; to parse and explain the function of Latin words in context; to demonstrate fluency in basic Latin syntax and a growing vocabulary; to master standard pronunciation of Latin; and to translate accurately from Latin into English. In the latter part of the semester, students read selections from the writings of Julius Caesar in the original Latin.

Class time will be devoted to the introduction of new material, reviewing assigned homework, and practice exercises.  Students should expect daily homework assignments and regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; three midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 507 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 311. 

The completion of Latin 506 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 507. Students who have recently had more than two years of high school Latin, or more than two semesters of college Latin should normally take Latin 311.

Textbooks

Wheelock, Wheelock’s Latin, 7th ed. (Harper Collins, 2011).  ISBN 978-0-06-199722-8

English and Irby, A Little Latin Reader, 1st ed. (Oxford: OUP, 2012).  ISBN 978-0-19-984622-1

Groton, Thirty-Eight Latin Stories, 5th ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1995).  ISBN 978-0-86516-289-1

Comeau and LaFleur, Workbook for Wheelock’s Latin, 3rd ed. Rev. (Harper Collins, 2005).  ISBN

0-006-095642-9

Tatum, A Caesar Reader, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 2012).  ISBN 978-0-86516-696-7

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