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Jason Abrevaya, Chair 2225 Speedway, Stop C3100, Austin, TX 78712 • Admin: 512-471-3211 & Advising: 512-471-2973

Daniel S. Hamermesh

Professor Ph.D., Yale University

Daniel S. Hamermesh

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-8526
  • Office: BRB 2.162
  • Office Hours: None. Please email me.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3100

Biography

Daniel S. Hamermesh is Professor in Economics, Royal Holloway University of London and Sue Killam Professor Emeritus in the Foundation of Economics at the University of Texas at Austin. His A.B. is from the University of Chicago (1965), his Ph.D. from Yale (1969). He taught from 1969-73 at Princeton, from 1973-93 at Michigan State, and at Texas since then. He has held visiting professorships at universities in North America, Europe, Australia and Asia, and lectured at nearly 250 universities in 48 states and 33 foreign countries. His research, published in nearly 100 refereed papers in scholarly journals, has concentrated on time use, labor demand, discrimination, academic labor markets and unusual applications of labor economics (to beauty, sleep and suicide).


Check out the Economic Thought of the Day 


daniel hamermesh

Hamermesh is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and the Society of Labor Economists, a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), and Past President of the Society of Labor Economists and of the Midwest Economics Association. In 2013 he received the biennial Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to Labor Economics of the Society of Labor Economists; the annual IZA Prize in Labor of the Institute for the Study of Labor; and the biennial John R. Commons Award of the international economics honor society OΔE. His magnum opus, Labor Demand, was published by Princeton University Press in 1993. The same press published his Beauty Pays in 2011. In 2014 Worth Publishers published the fifth edition of his Economics Is Everywhere, a series of 400 vignettes designed to illustrate the ubiquity of economics in everyday life and how the simple tools in a microeconomics principles class can be used.His undergraduate teaching, particularly of large classes in introductory economics, has gained him several University-wide teaching awards.

Hamermesh has been married for 48 years to Frances W. Hamermesh, an attorney, and they have two sons. His hobbies include long-distance running, at which his skills are rapidly deteriorating; foreign travel, in which increasing practice has heightened his enjoyment, and spending time with his six grandchildren, ages 18 to 8, whom he does not see often enough.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

34415 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 106
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 304K • Intro To Microeconomics-Honors

34100 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 106
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

34110 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 106
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 376M • Economics Of Life

34320 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 3.112
show description

Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C-.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Economics 376M is a course in personnel economics. We will use economic theory to analyze how profit-maximizing firms make decisions involving human resources. Among the topics to be covered are the following: Neoclassical labor demand theory Recruiting, hiring, and job design Training and investment in workers' human capital Compensation, promotion, and provision of incentives Nonwage job attributes and fringe benefits The first unit of the course, covering neoclassical labor demand theory, will use tools familiar from ECO 420K to analyze how firms determine the number and mix of workers to use in production. In this unit of the course, we will assume that labor markets are perfectly competitive and all agents have perfect information. In much of the rest of the course, we will relax these assumptions. For example, to understand firms' recruiting behavior, we will consider models in which workers have private information about their ability or in which it takes time for firms to locate workers who are good matches with the firm. To understand the consequences of firm-provided training, we will consider models in which a worker's productivity at the current firm grows with job seniority. And to understand how compensation methods and promotion ladders can provide work incentives, we will consider models in which firms cannot observe workers' choices of effort. This course is a writing component course and therefore a large proportion of your course grade will be determined by your performance on various writing assignments.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

34020 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 106
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33315 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 106
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 341K • Introduction To Econometrics

33480 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 220
show description

INTRODUCES THE STUDENT TO STANDARD REGRESSION PROCEDURES OF PARAMETER ESTIMATION AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 329 WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Econometrics is an application of statistical methods to the estimation of economic relationships. Students are expected to have an understanding of both statistics and economic theory. This course reveals how relationships among economic variables are discerned from data. The primary focus of this course is on estimation methodology. If more information is needed contact instructor.

ECO 304K-H • Intro To Microeconomics-Honors

33620 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm BUR 106
show description

Fall 2009     

                 
D. Hamermesh              

ECO 304K:  INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (HONORS)   


Unique No. 33620
                                                                                 
                                                  
                                                                        
                                                   
                                                                                 
                                                                           
                                                    Course Outline and Required
Reading
 
OFFICE HOURS:          D. Hamermesh, 2.162 BRB (just north of Gregory Gym)
Monday, 11-1, Wednesday 1:15-3:15, or by appointment
WEBSITE:                    www.eco.utexas.edu/faculty/Hamermesh/class.html
 
            Teaching Assistants: 
            Liangfei Qiu                   3-5, MW                              
    BRB 2.120
            Jake Zhao                      2-3:30 M; 2-3:30 Tu                  
BRB 3.124
            Luis Silva                      9-10:30 Tu; 11-12:30 W             
BRB 4.128
BOOKS, etc.:
1.  G. Stone, Core Microeconomics, with Course Tutor. Worth, 2009, 1st edition
(paper) STONE.   ISBN 1-4292-4433-X
2.  D. Hamermesh, Economics Is Everywhere. Worth, 2010 (paper) EIE  ISBN 
1-4292-4433-X
3.  i-clicker, in case you do not already have one.
4.  Course Packet of materials for ECO 304K with D. Hamermesh, to be downloaded
by you from the website listed above.
 
EXAMS:
There will be two 75-minute-long exams in class, Thursday, Sept. 24 and
Thursday, Oct. 29.  The first will be all short essay; the second will be part
short essay, part multiple-choice.  There will be multiple-choice quizzes (8 in
total) in class except Thursdays, Aug. 27, Sept. 24, Oct. 1, Oct. 29, Nov. 5,
Nov. 26 and Dec. 3. The final exam will be MONDAY, Dec. 14, 2-4:30PM.  Please do
not plan to leave campus before that date.  EXCEPT FOR CONFLICTS WITH OTHER
FINAL EXAMS or a compelling personal reason, you must take the final exam at
this time.  The final will be entirely multiple-choice.  All tests will include
questions based on the lectures. There will be a Q&A session shortly before each
midterm and the final.
 
Copies of past tests are in the course packet along with suggested answers to
them.  Quiz answers will be posted on the website the afternoon of the quiz. The
website will also contain an occasional "Economic Thought of the Day"-consult it
regularly!  Most of these can also be read, along with interesting thoughts by
other economists, at http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/ .  Also, I will send
occasional announcements/reminders through email.
 
 
GRADING (Regular Section)  Possible Grades are A, A-, B+, B, B-, etc.
Standard: The quizzes count 15 percent in total, with the lowest two scores
being discarded (including up to two missed quizzes).  Each midterm counts 20
percent; the final exam counts 40 percent.    (There are no make-up quizzes or
midterms.)  The remaining 5 percent of the grade is based on an original "Story"
that you turn in between November 12 and November 21. If you miss a midterm,
your course grade will continue to be based 15 percent on the quizzes, 20
percent on the other midterm, 5 percent on the "Story," but 60 percent of the
grade will  be based on the final. Scores on quizzes and exams will be available
on eGradeBook.
 
The "Hammer Homer":  If your final exam score is in the top 5 percent of this
Section, you receive an automatic A for the course IF you have turned in a
passing "Story" AND you have taken BOTH midterms.
 
The first paragraph of the "Story" must state something that you have observed
in the real world, in your family life, in a song (list the relevant lyrics) or
in a movie (describe the scene).  The second paragraph must then provide a brief
analysis demonstrating how the item described in the first paragraph illustrates
a particular economic concept covered in class.  The "Story" cannot duplicate
any in Economics Is Everywhere or any story, song or movie discussed in class. 
Also, it cannot be one of those discussed in Dirk Mateer, Economics in the
Movies (Thomson, 2005), a little workbook that you may find interesting.  The
story must be printed out-no email attachments accepted.
 
GRADING (Honors Section)
All of the above plus:
  One additional "Story" to be handed in during Section meeting on Thursday,
  October 8; 5 percent
  4 graded homework assignments, due in Section meetings on selected dates; 10
  percent
  Attendance/participation in experiments in Section; 5 percent.
With these three and the "Standard" there is a total of 120 percent.  Your total
will thus be multiplied by 5/6 to place it on a 100-point scale. The "Hammer
Homer" does not apply to this Section.


SCHEDULE:
Chapters or                 
Week Ending               Topic                                        Pages in
STONE                       Chapters in EIE
 
August 28                      Scarcity 1,                                 incl. Appendix; start 2.  
 
September 4                  Supply and demand                    Finish 2,
                                                                                    except pp. 41-47; 3.                  2
 
September 11                 Supply and demand                    4, except pp. 88-98 and 102-103; 3,4                                                                                Start 5.
 
September 18                 Elasticity;                                  Finish 5, except pp. 128-131;      5
                                     nature of demand                      Start 6.                      
                                     Policy Lecture:  Health
 
September 25                 Nature of demand                       Finish 6,
                                     except Appendix;                     6.  pp. 282-286.


FIRST MIDTERM, September 24
 
October 2                      Production; short-                      7.    7, 8 run costs                                  
 
 
October 9                      Short-run output                        8.   9, 10, 11
                                      decisions; the long run
 
October 16                    Monopoly.                                 217-230  12, 13
                                   
 
October 23                    Monopolistic competition;           10, except pp. 258-261                                                                                   14  game theory
 
October 30                    Oligopoly                                  230-249   

                                 
 
SECOND MIDTERM, October 29
 
November 6                   Discounting; input markets.         pp. 287-292 and 296-307.                                      15, 16 Policy Lecture:  Sports                                                    
 
November 13                 Income distribution;                    12, except pp. 327-333; 14;                                                          17 discrimination                         "automation reading." 
                                   Policy Lecture: Social Security
 
November 20                 Externalities and                         pp. 88-98; 13.                                                18  pollution                                  
 
November 27                 Taxation                                    pp. 102-103, 127-131                                     19
                                   
December 4                   International trade                       pp. 41-47; 15.                                20 "sweatshop reading."
                                                                                
              
 
 

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33630 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm BUR 106
show description

Fall 2009                      

ECO 304K:  INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS   

Unique No. 33630

D. Hamermesh        

                                             
                                                  
                                                                        
                                              
                                                                                 
                                                                           
                                                    Course Outline and Required Reading
 
OFFICE HOURS:          D. Hamermesh, 2.162 BRB (just north of Gregory Gym)
Monday, 11-1, Wednesday 1:15-3:15, or by appointment
WEBSITE:                    www.eco.utexas.edu/faculty/Hamermesh/class.html
 
            Teaching Assistants: 
            Liangfei Qiu                   3-5, MW                              
    BRB 2.120
            Jake Zhao                      2-3:30 M; 2-3:30 Tu                  
BRB 3.124
            Luis Silva                      9-10:30 Tu; 11-12:30 W             
BRB 4.128
BOOKS, etc.:
1.  G. Stone, Core Microeconomics, with Course Tutor. Worth, 2009, 1st edition
(paper) STONE.   ISBN 1-4292-4433-X
2.  D. Hamermesh, Economics Is Everywhere. Worth, 2010 (paper) EIE  ISBN 
1-4292-4433-X
3.  i-clicker, in case you do not already have one.
4.  Course Packet of materials for ECO 304K with D. Hamermesh, to be downloaded
by you from the website listed above.
 
EXAMS:
There will be two 75-minute-long exams in class, Thursday, Sept. 24 and
Thursday, Oct. 29.  The first will be all short essay; the second will be part
short essay, part multiple-choice.  There will be multiple-choice quizzes (8 in
total) in class except Thursdays, Aug. 27, Sept. 24, Oct. 1, Oct. 29, Nov. 5,
Nov. 26 and Dec. 3. The final exam will be MONDAY, Dec. 14, 2-4:30PM.  Please do
not plan to leave campus before that date.  EXCEPT FOR CONFLICTS WITH OTHER
FINAL EXAMS or a compelling personal reason, you must take the final exam at
this time.  The final will be entirely multiple-choice.  All tests will include
questions based on the lectures. There will be a Q&A session shortly before each
midterm and the final.
 
Copies of past tests are in the course packet along with suggested answers to
them.  Quiz answers will be posted on the website the afternoon of the quiz. The
website will also contain an occasional "Economic Thought of the Day"-consult it
regularly!  Most of these can also be read, along with interesting thoughts by
other economists, at http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/ .  Also, I will send
occasional announcements/reminders through email.
 
 
GRADING (Regular Section)  Possible Grades are A, A-, B+, B, B-, etc.
Standard: The quizzes count 15 percent in total, with the lowest two scores
being discarded (including up to two missed quizzes).  Each midterm counts 20
percent; the final exam counts 40 percent.    (There are no make-up quizzes or
midterms.)  The remaining 5 percent of the grade is based on an original "Story"
that you turn in between November 12 and November 21. If you miss a midterm,
your course grade will continue to be based 15 percent on the quizzes, 20
percent on the other midterm, 5 percent on the "Story," but 60 percent of the
grade will  be based on the final. Scores on quizzes and exams will be available
on eGradeBook.
 
The "Hammer Homer":  If your final exam score is in the top 5 percent of this
Section, you receive an automatic A for the course IF you have turned in a
passing "Story" AND you have taken BOTH midterms.
 
The first paragraph of the "Story" must state something that you have observed
in the real world, in your family life, in a song (list the relevant lyrics) or
in a movie (describe the scene).  The second paragraph must then provide a brief
analysis demonstrating how the item described in the first paragraph illustrates
a particular economic concept covered in class.  The "Story" cannot duplicate
any in Economics Is Everywhere or any story, song or movie discussed in class. 
Also, it cannot be one of those discussed in Dirk Mateer, Economics in the
Movies (Thomson, 2005), a little workbook that you may find interesting.  The
story must be printed out-no email attachments accepted.
 
GRADING (Honors Section)
All of the above plus:
  One additional "Story" to be handed in during Section meeting on Thursday,
  October 8; 5 percent
  4 graded homework assignments, due in Section meetings on selected dates; 10
  percent
  Attendance/participation in experiments in Section; 5 percent.
With these three and the "Standard" there is a total of 120 percent.  Your total
will thus be multiplied by 5/6 to place it on a 100-point scale. The "Hammer
Homer" does not apply to this Section.


SCHEDULE:
Chapters or                 
Week Ending               Topic                                        Pages in
STONE                       Chapters in EIE
 
August 28                      Scarcity 1,                                 incl. Appendix; start 2.  
 
September 4                  Supply and demand                    Finish 2,
                                                                                    except pp. 41-47; 3.                  2
 
September 11                 Supply and demand                    4, except pp. 88-98 and 102-103; 3,4                                                                                Start 5.
 
September 18                 Elasticity;                                  Finish 5, except pp. 128-131;      5
                                     nature of demand                      Start 6.                      
                                     Policy Lecture:  Health
 
September 25                 Nature of demand                       Finish 6,
                                     except Appendix;                     6.  pp. 282-286.


FIRST MIDTERM, September 24
 
October 2                      Production; short-                      7.    7, 8 run costs                                  
 
 
October 9                      Short-run output                        8.   9, 10, 11
                                      decisions; the long run
 
October 16                    Monopoly.                                 217-230  12, 13
                                   
 
October 23                    Monopolistic competition;           10, except pp. 258-261                                                                                   14  game theory
 
October 30                    Oligopoly                                  230-249   

                                 
 
SECOND MIDTERM, October 29
 
November 6                   Discounting; input markets.         pp. 287-292 and 296-307.                                      15, 16 Policy Lecture:  Sports                                                    
 
November 13                 Income distribution;                    12, except pp. 327-333; 14;                                                          17 discrimination                         "automation reading." 
                                   Policy Lecture: Social Security
 
November 20                 Externalities and                         pp. 88-98; 13.                                                18  pollution                                  
 
November 27                 Taxation                                    pp. 102-103, 127-131                                     19
                                   
December 4                   International trade                       pp. 41-47; 15.                                20 "sweatshop reading."
                                                                           

ECO 376M • Economics Of Life-W

33915 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BRB 2.136
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C-.

Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Economics 376M is a course in personnel economics. We will use economic theory to analyze how profit-maximizing firms make decisions involving human resources. Among the topics to be covered are the following: Neoclassical labor demand theory Recruiting, hiring, and job design Training and investment in workers' human capital Compensation, promotion, and provision of incentives Nonwage job attributes and fringe benefits The first unit of the course, covering neoclassical labor demand theory, will use tools familiar from ECO 420K to analyze how firms determine the number and mix of workers to use in production. In this unit of the course, we will assume that labor markets are perfectly competitive and all agents have perfect information. In much of the rest of the course, we will relax these assumptions. For example, to understand firms' recruiting behavior, we will consider models in which workers have private information about their ability or in which it takes time for firms to locate workers who are good matches with the firm. To understand the consequences of firm-provided training, we will consider models in which a worker's productivity at the current firm grows with job seniority. And to understand how compensation methods and promotion ladders can provide work incentives, we will consider models in which firms cannot observe workers' choices of effort. This course is a writing component course and therefore a large proportion of your course grade will be determined by your performance on various writing assignments.

Research & Books



Beauty Pays

BEAUTY PAYS. Princeton University Press, 2011, Cover

BEAUTY PAYS. Princeton University Press, 2011, Table of Contents

TIME MAGAZINE Feature

PEOPLE MAGAZINE story

New York Times op-ed

New Yorker story

Times of London story

La Stampa story

Revista Dinero story

Le Figaro story

Folha de Sao Paulo story

Der Spiegel story

Link to Daily Show Nov. 14, 2011, segment

Link to Fox and Friends, Aug. 31, 2011, segment

Beauty Pays Research Papers

General: "Beauty and the Labor Market," American Economic Review, 1994 PDF Version

Lawyers: "Beauty, Productivity and Discrimination; Lawyers' Looks and Lucre," Journal of Labor Economics, 1998 PDF Version

Ad. execs: "Business Success and Businesses' Beauty Capital," Economics Letters, 2000 Word Version

China: "Dress for Success: Does Primping Pay?" Labour Economics, 2002 PDF Version

College Teaching: "Beauty in the Classroom: Instructors' Pulchritude and Putative Pedagogical Productivity," Economics of Education Review, 2005 PDF Version

Economists: "Changing Looks and Changing 'Discrimination': The Beauty of Economists," Economics Letters, 2006 PDF Version

Happiness: "'Beauty Is the Promise of Happiness'"? European Economic Review, 2013 PDF Version

Chinese Advertisement


Economics Is Everywhere

Cover for Economics is Everywhere

Table of Contents, Description and Chapter 1


Time Use Papers

"Long Workweeks and Strange Hours" PDF File

"Not Enough Time?" American Economist, Sept. 2014 PDF File

"A Gift of Time" Labour Economics, 2013 (with D. Kawaguchi and J. Lee) PDF File

"Cyclical Variation in Labor Hours and Productivity Using the ATUS," American Economic Association, Papers and Proceedings, 2013 (with M. Burda and J. Stewart) PDF File    ATUS-Based Productivity Series

"How Do Immigrants Spend Their Time? The Process of Assimilation" Journal of Population Economics, 2013 (with S. Trejo) PDF File

"Total Work and Gender: Facts and Possible Explanations," Journal of Population Economics, 2013 (with M. Burda and P. Weil) PDF File

"Aggregate Impacts of a Gift of Time," American Economic Association, Papers and Proceedings, 2012 (with J. Lee and D. Kawaguchi) PDF File

"The Timing of Labor Demand," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, 2012 (with A. Cardoso and J.Varejao) PDF File

"Unemployment, Market Work and Household Production" Economics Letters, May 2010 (with M. Burda) PDF File

"Incentives, Time Use and BMI: The Roles of Eating, Grazing and Goods," Economics and Human Biology, March 2010 PDF File

“A Structural Model of the Fixed Time Costs of Market Work,” Economics Letters, September 2009 (with S. Donald) PDF File

“The Demand for Variety: A Household Production Perspective,” Review of Economics and Statistics, August 2008 (with R. Gronau) PDF File

“Cues for Timing and Coordination: Latitude, Letterman and Longitude,” Journal of Labor Economics, April 2008 (with C. Myers and M. Pocock) PDF File

"Direct Estimates of Household Production," Economics Letters, January 2008 PDF File

"The Economics of Workaholism," Berkekley Electronic Journal in Economic Analysis and Policy: Contributions, 2008 (with Joel Slemrod). PDF File

"The Distribution of Total Work in the EU and US," (with M. Burda and P. Weil), in Boeri et al, Oxford University Press, 2008 PDF File

“Time to Eat: Household Production Under Increasing Income Inequality,” American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Nov. 2007, PDF File

“Stressed Out on Four Continents: Time Crunch or Yuppie Kvetch,” Review of Economics and Statistics, May 2007, (with J. Lee) PDF File

“Time vs. Goods: The Value of Measuring Household Production Technologies,” Review of Income and Wealth, March 2006 (with R. Gronau) PDF File

"Routine,” European Economic Review, January 2005 PDF File

"Timing, Togetherness and Time Windfalls," Journal of Population Economics, November 2002 PDF File

"Changing Inequality in Markets for Workplace Amenities," Quarterly Journal of Economics, November 1999 PDF File

"Crime and the Timing of Work," Journal of Urban Economics, March 1999 PDF File

“The Timing of Work over Time,” Economic Journal, January 1999 PDF File

“When We Work,” American Economic Association, Papers and Proceedings, May 1998 PDF File

"Sleep and the Allocation of Time," Journal of Political Economy, October 1990 (with J. Biddle) PDF File

"Shirking or Productive Schmoozing: Wages and the Allocation of Time at Work," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, January, 1990 PDF File


Unpublished Papers

The Psychic Cost of Children

Age, Cohort and Co-Authorship

Long Workweeks and Strange Hours

Does Labor Legislation Benefit Workers?

Not Enough Time

Endophilia or Exophobia: Beyond Discrimination


Gossip Files

 

Salary Information

University Salaries-UT and Other Major Institutions, 1980 -

Citations to Labor Economists, 1991-

UT Graduates' Salaries--Report of a Survey

Salaries of Full Professors of Economics in Major Public Universities, 1998-99 -- 2012-13

Published Papers

"Scholarship, Citations and Salaries: Economic Rewards in Economics," Southern Economic Journal, 1982.

"Facts and Myths About Refereeing," Journal of Economic Perspectives, 1994.

"Age and Productivity Among Economists," Review of Economics and Statistics, 1998.

"Tools or Toys? The Impact of High Technology on Scholarly Productivity," Economic Inquiry, 2002.

"The Determinants of Econometric Society Fellows Elections," Econometrica, 2003.

"What Is Discrimination? Gender in the American Economic Association," American Economic Review, 2006.

"Reputation and Earnings: The Roles of Quality and Quantity in Academe," Economic Inquiry, 2012.

"Six Decades of Top Economics Publishing: Who and How?" Journal of Economic Literature, 2013.

Miscellaneous

Recent Journal Acceptance Rates

Age of Authors of Articles in Major Journals


Advice for Economists

Viewpoint: Replication in Economics (Can. Journ. Econs., August 2007)

Top 10 Tips for Jump-Starting Your Career (CSWEP Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2006)

An Old Male Economist's Advice to Young Female Economists (CSWEP Newsletter, Winter 2005)

A Media Guide for Economists (Journ. of Econ. Ed., 2004)

Microeconomic Principles Teaching Tricks (AEA Papers & Proceedings, May 2002)

Professional Etiquette for the Mature Economist (AEA Papers & Proceedings, May1993)

A Young Economist's Guide to Professional Etiquette (Journ. Econ Persps., Winter 1992)

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