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Jason Abrevaya, Chair 2225 Speedway, Stop C3100, Austin, TX 78712 • Admin: 512-471-3211 & Advising: 512-471-2973

Helen Schneider

Lecturer Ph.D., Cornell

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-1734
  • Office: BRB 3.116
  • Office Hours: Wed 10:00am - 12:00noon; or by appt.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3100

ECO 321 • Public Economics

33527 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 1
show description

In this course you will learn to apply microeconomic analysis to study the role of the public sector in the economy. Topics that we will cover include public goods and externalities, education, income redistribution, the workings of social security, welfare, political economy, cost-benefit analysis, and taxation. Although this field is sometimes called “public finance,” it is worth noting that this has nothing to do with stocks, bonds, or any other “finance” topic. It is also worth noting that this is a microeconomics course. We will not study the short-run macroeconomic effects of taxation and government spending as you may have done in 304L.

 

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

ECO 321 • Public Economics

33529 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 1
show description

In this course you will learn to apply microeconomic analysis to study the role of the public sector in the economy. Topics that we will cover include public goods and externalities, education, income redistribution, the workings of social security, welfare, political economy, cost-benefit analysis, and taxation. Although this field is sometimes called “public finance,” it is worth noting that this has nothing to do with stocks, bonds, or any other “finance” topic. It is also worth noting that this is a microeconomics course. We will not study the short-run macroeconomic effects of taxation and government spending as you may have done in 304L.

 

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

ECO 330T • Economics Of Health

33575 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.102
show description

OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.

This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation. In this course, only 304K is required (not 420K, so a solid foundation in math, statistics, and microeconomic theory is not necessary but recommended) and there is no writing component. Finally, this course will examine the role and justification for government involvement in the medical care system.

Prerequisites: ECO 304K with a C- or better

 

 

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics

34365 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAI 3.02
show description

This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 321 • Public Economics

34480 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 0.102
show description

STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 

ECO 330T • Health Economics

34523 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm CLA 1.104
show description

OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.

This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation. In this course, only 304K is required (not 420K, so a solid foundation in math, statistics, and microeconomic theory is not necessary but recommended) and there is no writing component. Finally, this course will examine the role and justification for government involvement in the medical care system.

Prerequisites: ECO 304K with a C- or better

 

 

ECO S350K • Health Economics

83045 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm BRB 1.120
show description

The course is designed for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of how to apply basic microeconomic tools to the study of health and medical care issues.  This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation.  Finally, this course will examine ideas for health care reform.  Empirical results, current issues, and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course.  

Prerequisites: ECO 420K with at least a C- or better.

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics

34660 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WCH 1.120
show description

This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 330T • Health Economics

34789 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 1
show description

This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation. In this course, only 304K is required (not 420K, so a solid foundation in math, statistics, and microeconomic theory is not necessary but recommended) and there is no writing component. Finally, this course will examine the role and justification for government involvement in the medical care system.

Prerequisites: ECO 304K with a C- or better

ECO 350K • Health Economics

34840 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm PAR 1
show description

The course is designed for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of how to apply basic microeconomic tools to the study of health and medical care issues.  This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation.  Finally, this course will examine ideas for health care reform.  Empirical results, current issues, and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course. 

Prerequisites: ECO 420K with at least a C- or better.

ECO 301 • Introduction To Economics

34400 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 0.126
show description

This course will be a mixture of both Micro and Macro Economics.  Students who wish to be an Economics major MAY NOT use this course toward the major and should take ECO 304K and ECO 304L.

  • Students will learn how economists describe and measure the economy, in the aggregate, as well as specific markets such as the labor market, the housing market, financial markets, and international trade.  Concepts for measurement and data will be covered.
  • Students will learn how economists organize their analysis of economic choices by thinking about how individuals (i) respond to incentives, (ii) seek out exchange in markets, and (iii) form, and participate in, various economic institutions.
  • Students will learn how to think about strategic behavior (for example, markets with a small number of firms, or negotiating trade agreements among a small number of countries).
  • Students will learn about “externalities” and “public goods,” which, by conferring costs or benefits that are not appropriated by individuals or that are “non-rival” in nature (for example, once discovered, a technology can be used by many at the same time), provide reasons for government regulation, taxation, and government-provided goods and services.

ECO 321 • Public Economics

34515 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm CLA 1.104
show description

STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 

ECO S350K • Health Economics

83385 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm BRB 1.120
show description

The course is designed for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of how to apply basic microeconomic tools to the study of health and medical care issues.  This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation.  Finally, this course will examine ideas for health care reform.  Empirical results, current issues, and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course.  

Prerequisites: ECO 420K with at least a C- or better.

ECO 321 • Public Economics

34210 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BRB 2.136
show description

STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Public economics is the study of government taxation and spending. My course differs from a traditional public economics course in three ways. First, it focuses primarily on taxation, with relatively little coverage of government spending. Second, the course focuses less on theory than a typical public economics course. It covers basic theoretical concepts in public economics, but only briefly, and spends much more time on the application of those concepts to analyze issues in real-world tax policy.

ECO S350K • Health Economics

83510 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm BRB 1.120
show description

The course is designed for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of how to apply basic microeconomic tools to the study of health and medical care issues.  This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation.  Finally, this course will examine ideas for health care reform.  Empirical results, current issues, and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course.  

Prerequisites: ECO 420K with at least a C- or better.

ECO 321 • Public Economics

34245 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm UTC 3.132
show description

STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Public economics is the study of government taxation and spending. My course differs from a traditional public economics course in three ways. First, it focuses primarily on taxation, with relatively little coverage of government spending. Second, the course focuses less on theory than a typical public economics course. It covers basic theoretical concepts in public economics, but only briefly, and spends much more time on the application of those concepts to analyze issues in real-world tax policy.

ECO 321 • Public Economics

34140 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm UTC 3.132
show description

STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

 

ECO S304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

83410 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm UTC 1.118
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

ECO 321 • Public Economics

34426 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm UTC 3.132
show description

STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Public economics is the study of government taxation and spending. My course differs from a traditional public economics course in three ways. First, it focuses primarily on taxation, with relatively little coverage of government spending. Second, the course focuses less on theory than a typical public economics course. It covers basic theoretical concepts in public economics, but only briefly, and spends much more time on the application of those concepts to analyze issues in real-world tax policy.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

ECO 350K • Health Economics

34485 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 3.132
show description

The course is designed for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of how to apply basic microeconomic tools to the study of health and medical care issues.  This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation.  Finally, this course will examine ideas for health care reform.  Empirical results, current issues, and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course.  

Prerequisites: ECO 420K with at least a C- or better.

ECO 321 • Public Economics

33415 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 3.132
show description

STUDY OF APPROPRIATE ALLOCATIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY BETWEEN GOVERNMENT (FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL) AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR. THE WORKINGS OF SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, EDUCATION, POLLUTION CONTROL, DEREGULATION, TAXATION; AND PROPOSALS FOR REFORM.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

Public economics is the study of government taxation and spending. My course differs from a traditional public economics course in three ways. First, it focuses primarily on taxation, with relatively little coverage of government spending. Second, the course focuses less on theory than a typical public economics course. It covers basic theoretical concepts in public economics, but only briefly, and spends much more time on the application of those concepts to analyze issues in real-world tax policy.

ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

82915 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm WEL 2.304
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33505 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 UTC 3.124
show description

Download Attachment

ECO 321 • Public Economics-W

33610 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm UTC 3.132
show description

Download attachment to view syllabus

ECO 321 • Public Economics

33775 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 3.132
show description

 

Public Economics:  Eco 321

Fall 2009

Unique Number: 33775

 

Instructor: Dr. Helen Schneider

Class Time: MWF 1:00-2:00 pm

Office: 3.116  BRB 

Class Location: UTC 3.132

Office Phone: 471-1734  

Office Hours: Tuesdays,  10-11:30 am     

E-mail: h.schneider@eco.utexas.edu

or by appointment  


INTRODUCTION

Course Synopsis: In this course you will learn to apply microeconomic analysis to study the role of the public sector in the economy.  Topics that we will cover include public goods and externalities, education, income redistribution, the workings of social security, welfare, political economy, cost-benefit analysis, and taxation.   

Although this field is sometimes called "public finance," it is worth noting that this has nothing to do with stocks, bonds, or any other "finance" topic.  It is also worth noting that this is a microeconomics course.  We will not study the short-run macroeconomic effects of taxation and government spending as you may have done in 304L. 

Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics (420K) is an essential prerequisite for this course.  If it's been a while since you took intermediate microeconomics, the textbook provides a review in the appendix. 

COURSE MATERIALS

Required Text: Harvey S. Rosen and Ted Gayer. Public Finance, 2008, 8th Edition.

Additional Reading:  Additional required and optional readings from sources other than the textbook will be posted on the course website (see below). 

Website: Course material will be on the university's Blackboard system.  In particular, homework assignments will not be handed out in class; they will be posted on Blackboard for students to download.  This class will also use the Grade Center feature on Blackboard so that students can keep track of their scores on assignments and exams. 

POLICY ON STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon receipt appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students-Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Tests.  There will be two midterm exams and a comprehensive final exam.    If you have an emergency that prevents you from taking an exam, I need to be notified by e-mail or phone no later than the day of the exam.  There will be no make-up exams for the midterms.  Should dire circumstances (e.g. illness) prevent you from taking a test, its weight will be added to your final exam.

Problem Sets.  Five problem sets will count towards your final grade.  All assignments may be obtained at the class web page.  Collaboration among students in working out problem sets is encouraged, but you must write up your own homework.  Questions very similar to the problem sets will appear on the exams.  It behooves you to make sure that you understand and can present the solutions to problems on your own in spite of working on the material with one another.  Turning in identical problem sets will result in a zero for both parties.  Problem Sets are due at the beginning of class on their due date.  Problem sets WILL NOT be accepted late. This is an absolute policy. Please do not ask for extensions.  Answer keys will be posted after the due date.

Policy Paper.  The paper should be no longer than 5 pages, and will be due on November 23.  You may access the rubric for this assignment on the class web page.  You must choose a proposed or legislated policy to write about.  The paper must describe the policy and provide an economic analysis of it.  This could include a description of how the policy may affect equity or economic behavior, for instance labor supply, savings, educational attainment, or employment.  You may also discuss the aspects to be considered when conducting cost-benefit analysis.

Grading:  Total Problem Sets = 15%; Exam 1 = 20%; Exam 2 = 20%; Paper = 15%; Final = 30%.   Class participation may affect grades on the margin.    

READINGS AND COURSE OUTLINE

Introduction to the Public Sector and Fundamentals of Welfare Economics

Wednesday, August 26

Introductions and Syllabus

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 1

Optional: PJ O'Rourke, All Guns, No Butter

Friday, August 28

Tools of Positive Analysis

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 2

Monday, August 31

Tools of Normative Analysis

Rosen and Gayer, Chapters 3

Wednesday, September 2

Tools of Normative Analysis: Examples of Positive and Normative Analysis

Optional: Miron and Zweibel, "The Economic Case Against Drug Prohibition," Journal of Economic Perspectives 9(4): 175-192.

Friday, September 4

Public Goods

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 4

Analysis of Public Expenditure

Monday, September 7

Labor Day Holiday

Wednesday, September 9

Public Goods

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 4

Problem Set I Posted

Friday, September 11

 

Externalities and the Environment

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 5

Monday, September 14

Pigouvian Taxes

Gruber, "The Economics of Tobacco Regulation," Health Affairs 2002, 21(2): 146-162.

Wednesday, September 16

Problem Set I Due

Externalities and the Environment

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 5

Problem Set II Posted

Friday, September 18

Political Economy,

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 6

Monday, September 21

Political Economy and Public Goods

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 6

Wednesday, September 23 Problem Set II Due

Review

Friday, September 25

Exam 1

Monday, September 28

Education

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 7

Wednesday, September 30

Education

Hanushek, "Assessing the Effects of School Resources on Student

Performance: An Update," Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 19(2): 141-164. 

Problem Set III posted

Friday, October 2

Social Security

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 11

Monday, October 5

 

Social Security

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 11

Wednesday, October 7

Problem Set III Due

Income Redistribution

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 12

Friday, October 9

Expenditure Programs for the Poor

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 13

Monday, October 12

 

Welfare Reform

Blank "Evaluating Welfare Reform in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature 2002, 1105-1166

Wednesday, October 14

 

Health Care

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 9

Friday, October 16

Health Care

Pauly "The Economics of Moral Hazard: Comment."  The American Economic Review 1968, 531-537. 

 Monday, October 19

 

Government and the Market for Health Care

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 10

 Wednesday, October 21

Private and Public Cost-Benefit Analysis

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 8, pp. 150-160

Problem Set IV Posted

Friday, October 23

Valuing Intangibles

Kenkel "Using Estimates of the Value of a Statistical Life in Evaluating Regulatory Effects," http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/mp1570d.pdf  

Monday, October 26

Applications of Cost-Benefit Analysis

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 8, pp. 160-175

Wednesday, October 28 Problem Set IV Due

Review

Friday, October 30

Exam 2

A Framework for Tax Analysis

Monday, November 2

Introduction to Taxation. Personal Income Tax

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 14, pp. 305-308; Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 17

Wednesday, November 4

Taxation and Income Distribution

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 14, pp. 309-321

Friday, November 6

Taxation and Income Distribution

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 14, pp. 309-321

Monday, November 9

 

General Equilibrium Tax Incidence

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 14, pp. 321-329

Wednesday, November 11

Taxation and Efficiency

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 15

Friday, November 13

Efficient and Equitable Taxation

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 16

Monday, November 16

Taxes on Labor Supply

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 18, pp. 415-424

Wednesday, November 18

Taxes on Savings,

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 18, pp. 424-436

Friday, November 20

The Corporation Tax

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 19

Monday, November 23 Policy Paper Due

Taxes on Consumption and Wealth

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 21

Wednesday, November 25

Taxes on Consumption and Wealth

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 21

Problem Set V Posted

Friday, November 27

Thanksgiving Holiday

Monday, November 30

Multigovernment Public Finance

Rosen and Gayer, Chapter 22

Wednesday, December 2 Problem Set V Due

Catch-up and Review

Friday, December 4

Review

ECO 330T • Health Economics

33830 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 UTC 3.132
show description

 

Health Economics:  ECO 330T

Unique Number: 33830

 

Instructor: Dr. Helen Schneider

Class Time: MWF 11:00-12:00

Office: 3.116  BRB 

Class Location: UTC 3.132

Office Phone: 471-1734  

Office Hours: Tuesdays, 12-1:30 p.m.     

E-mail: h.schneider@eco.utexas.edu

or by appointment  


INTRODUCTION

 

Health care is an exciting and evolving field in which government policies play a vital role.  The course is designed for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of how to apply basic microeconomic tools to the study of health and medical care issues.  This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation.  Finally, this course will examine ideas for health care reform.  Empirical results, current issues, and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course.  

Prerequisites: Introduction to Microeconomics (304K) is an essential prerequisite for this course.  If it's been a while since you took intermediate microeconomics, the textbook provides a review in the Appendix.    

COURSE MATERRIALS

 

Required Reading: Health Economics, Charles E. Phelps, 4th Edition (Addison-Wesley, 2010)

 

Additional Reading:  Additional required and optional readings from sources other than the textbook will be posted on the course website (see below).  

 

The course outline gives the chapters and articles that correspond to the lectures.  For better understanding of the course material the assigned reading must be finished before the class period.  

 

Website: Course material will be on the university's Blackboard system.  In particular, homework assignments will not be handed out in class; they will be posted on Blackboard for students to download.  This class will also use the Grade Center feature on Blackboard so that students can keep track of their scores on assignments and exams. 

 

POLICY ON STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon receipt appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students-Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 


EVALUATION AND GRADING

 

Tests.  There will be two exams and a comprehensive final exam.  If you have an emergency that prevents you from taking an exam, I need to be notified by e-mail or phone no later than the day of the exam.  There will be no make-up exams for the midterms.  Should dire circumstances (e.g. illness) prevent you from taking a test, its weight will be added to your final exam.

Problem Sets.  Five problem sets will count towards your final grade.  All assignments may be obtained at the class web page.  Collaboration among students in working out problem sets is encouraged, but you must write up your own homework.  Questions very similar to the problem sets will appear on the exams.  It behooves you to make sure that you understand and can present the solutions to problems on your own in spite of working on the material with one another.  Turning in identical problem sets will result in a zero for both parties.  Problem Sets are due at the beginning of class on their due date.  Problem sets WILL NOT be accepted late. This is an absolute policy. Please do not ask for extensions.  Answer keys will be posted after the due date.

Policy Paper.  You will be required to complete a policy paper that applies economic methodology to investigate the economics of a health care issue.  Theoretical, empirical, or critical review papers are acceptable.  Pure literature reviews (i.e., a type of book report) are unacceptable; you must display some original thinking.  The paper should be no longer than 5 pages, and will be due on November 30.   More details will be forthcoming.

Grading Policy:   

Requirement

Percentage of Final Grade

Problem Sets

15

Exam 1

20

Exam 2

20

Policy Paper

15

Final Exam

30

 

100

 

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST

 

This is only a suggested outline and is subject to change, unlike the exam dates, which are fixed.  Any readings that are not from the textbook will be posted on Blackboard.

 

Date

Topic

Reading Assignment

Wednesday, August 26

Introduction

 

Friday, August 28

Why Health Economics?

  • Chapter 1

Monday, August 31

Utility and Health

  • Chapter 2

Wednesday, September 2

The Transformation of Medical Care to Health

  • Chapter 3

Friday, September 4

Government Policy Towards Health Behavior

  • Chapter 3

Monday, September 7

Labor Day Holiday

 

Wednesday, September 9

 

Special Topic:

Economics of Obesity

 

 

Problem Set I Posted

  • Cutler, David M, Edward L. Glaeser, and Jesse M. Shapiro. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?" Journal of Economic Perspectives 17(3), 2004, 93-118.

Friday, September 11

 

Demand for Medical Care

  • Chapter 4, pp. 91-105

Monday, September 14

Demand for Medical Care and Health Insurance

  • Chapter 4, pp. 105-123

Wednesday, September 16

Problem Set I Due

Demand for Health Insurance

Problem Set II Posted

  • Chapter 10, pp. 300-308

Friday, September 18

The Economics of Moral Hazard

  • Chapter 10, pp. 308-118
  • Pauly, Mark. "The Economics of Moral Hazard," American Economics Review 58:3, March 1968, 531-537.

Monday, September 21

Empirical Studies of Medical Care Demand

  • Chapter 5

Wednesday, September 23

Problem Set II Due

Review

 

Friday, September 25

Exam 1

 

Monday, September 28

Self-Selection and Health Insurance

 

  • Chapter 10, pp. 118-326

Wednesday, September 30

Income Tax and Health Insurance

  • Chapter 10, pp. 326-338

Friday, October 2

Special Topic:

The Uninsured

  • Hadley, et al. Covering the Uninsured In 2008." Health Affairs, 27(5), 2008, pp. w399-w415.
  • Kuttner, Robert. "The American Health Care System-Health Insurance Coverage" NEJM, 344(14), April 5 2001.

Monday, October 5

Health Insurance Supply and Managed Care

  • Chapter 11

Wednesday, October 7 Problem Set III Posted

Supply of Medical Care: Hospitals

  • Chapter 8

Friday, October 9

Hospitals in the Marketplace

 

  • Chapter 9
  • Reinhardt, Uwe. "The Economics of For-Profit and Not-For-Profit Hospitals." Health Affairs, 19:6, 178-185.

Monday, October 12

 

Supply of Medical Care: Physicians

  • Chapter 7, 197-224

Wednesday, October 14

Problem Set III Due

Supplier-Induced Demand

  • Chapter 7, 225-236

Friday, October 16

The Physician and the Physician Firm

  • Chapter 6

Monday, October 19

Review

 

Wednesday, October 21

Exam 2

 

Friday, October 23

Special Topic:

Technology in Medicine

  • Cutler, David M and Mark McClellan. "Is Technological Change in Medicine Worth It?" Health Affairs, 20(5), 2001, 11-29.

Monday, October 26

The Pharmaceutical Industry: The New Wave of Medical Care

  • Chapter 15, pp. 507-527

Wednesday, October 28

Problem Set IV Posted

Special Topic: Direct to Consumer Advertising

  • Donohue et al. "A Decade of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Prescription Drugs." NEJM 357(7), 2007, 673-681

Friday, October 30

The Pharmaceutical Industry and Health Reform

  • Hutton et al. The Pharmaceutical Industry and Health Reform: Lessons from Europe." Health Affairs, 13(3), 1994, pp. 98-111.

Monday, November 2

Regulation

  • Chapter 15, pp. 484-507

Wednesday, November 4

Problem Set IV Due

Medical Malpractice

  • Chapter 13

Friday, November 6

Medical Malpractice

  • Chapter 13

Monday, November 9

Externalities in Health

  • Chapter 14

Wednesday, November 11

Externalities in Health

  • Chapter 14

Friday, November 13

Special Topic: Antitrust

 

Monday, November 16

Government Provision of Health Insurance

  • Chapter 12

Wednesday, November 18

Problem Set V Posted

Medicaid and Medicare

  • Chapter 12

Friday, November 20

Universal Insurance

  • Chapter 16

Monday, November 23

Special Topic:

National Health Insurance: An Approach to the Redistribution of Medical Care

  • Chapter 16
  • Lu, Jui-Fen Rachel and William C. Hsiao. "Does Universal Health Insurance Make Health Care Unaffordable? Lessons From Taiwan." Health Affairs, 22(3), 2003, pp. 77-88.

Wednesday, November 25 Problem Set V Due

Catch-up and Review

 

Friday, November 27

Thanksgiving Holiday

 

Monday, November 30 Policy Paper Due

Special Topics

To be announced

Wednesday, December 2

Special Topics

To be announced

Friday, December 4

 

Review

 

 

 ***Final Exam***

 

ECO 350K • Health Economics-W

33853 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 JES A307A
show description

 

Health Economics-W:  ECO 350K

Unique Number: 33853

 

Instructor: Dr. Helen Schneider

Class Time: MWF 10:00-11:00

Office: 3.116  BRB 

Class Location: JES A307A

Office Phone: 471-1734  

Office Hours: Tuesdays, 12-1:30 p.m.     

E-mail: h.schneider@eco.utexas.edu

or by appointment  


INTRODUCTION

 

Health care is an exciting and evolving field in which government policies play a vital role.  The course is designed for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of how to apply basic microeconomic tools to the study of health and medical care issues.  This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation.  Finally, this course will examine ideas for health care reform.  Empirical results, current issues, and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course.  

Prerequisites:  Intermediate Microeconomics (420K) is an essential prerequisite for this course.  If it's been a while since you took intermediate microeconomics, the textbook provides a review in Chapter 2.   Chapter 3 reviews statistical tools for health economics. 

 COURSE MATERRIALS

 

Required Reading: The Economics of Health and Health Care, Folland, Goodman and Stano, 6th Edition (Prentice Hall, 2010)

 

Additional Reading:  Additional required and optional readings from sources other than the textbook will be posted on the course website (see below). 

 

The course outline gives the chapters and articles that correspond to the lectures.  For better understanding of the course material the assigned reading must be finished before the class period.  

 

Website: Course material will be on the university's Blackboard system.  In particular, homework assignments will not be handed out in class; they will be posted on Blackboard for students to download.  This class will also use the Grade Center feature on Blackboard so that students can keep track of their scores on assignments and exams. 

 

POLICY ON STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

 

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon receipt appropriate academic adjustments for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students-Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY POLICY

 

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.

EVALUATION AND GRADING

I. Writing Assignments.  Note that the total for all writing assignments is 50% of your grade.  The course outline provides the relevant dates for all writing assignments.  Each is due at the beginning of class on the due date.  Lateness at any stage results in a loss of at least one letter grade on that assignments. 

Research Paper.   This course is a substantial writing component for undergraduates.  Thus, a significant paper is due at the end of the semester.  For us to discuss how to do that research, you will have to submit a proposal, first draft, and final paper.  You must choose a proposed or legislated health care policy to write about.  The paper must describe the policy and provide an economic analysis that draws upon economic models discussed in class.  

I would like you to start thinking early of a research topic and to write a proposal.  Feel free to talk to me about your topic, your sources and approaches you can take in doing your research.  Due dates along the way will help guarantee progress:

Assignment

Due Date

Approx. Length

% of Grade

Proposal

November 2

2-3 pages

5

First Draft

November 14

5-6 pages

10

Final Paper

December 7

8-10 pages

15

There are several sources you could use to find a topic.  One is simply to follow the policy debates in the newspapers and magazines.  Second is to look at the policies discussed in the class.  A third way is to browse through recent issues of economic policy journals, or the web pages of research and policy institutions.

The proposal should state the question you want to address, discuss the importance of your study (i.e. why it is an important public policy issue) and it should include some literature review.  The first draft should include everything, with theoretical and empirical models, conclusions and policy implications.  Illustrate your analysis with a graphical presentation if appropriate.  If your graphs are not incorporated into the text of your paper, please provide a clear connection between graphs and text.   

Short Papers.  Two assignments will count for 20% of your final grade.  Short papers will be strictly limited to 3 typed double-spaced pages in order to encourage succinct and incisive reasoning. 

II. Tests.  There will be one midterm and a comprehensive final exam.  If you have an emergency that prevents you from taking an exam, I need to be notified by e-mail or phone no later than the day of the exam.  There will be no make-up exam for the midterm.  Should dire circumstances (e.g. illness) prevent you from taking midterm exam, its weight will be added to your final exam.

III. Problem Sets.  Four problem sets will count towards your final grade.  All assignments may be obtained at the class web page.  Collaboration among students in working out problem sets is encouraged, but you must write up your own homework.  Questions very similar to the problem sets will appear on the exams.  It behooves you to make sure that you understand and can present the solutions to problems on your own in spite of working on the material with one another.  Turning in identical problem sets will result in a zero for both parties.  Problem Sets are due at the beginning of class on their due date. Problem sets WILL NOT be accepted late. This is an absolute policy. Please do not ask for extensions.  Answer keys will be posted after the due date.

Grading Policy:  A letter grade will be assigned based on your weighted course average score and your performance relative to the rest of the class.  Letter grades include A, A-, B+, ..., D, D-, F." 

Requirement

Percentage of Final Grade

Problem sets

5%

Midterm exam

20%

Two short papers

20% (10% each)

Research paper

30%

Final exam

25%

 

100%

 

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST

 

This is only a suggested outline and is subject to change, unlike the exam dates, which are fixed.  Any readings that are not from the textbook will be posted on Blackboard.

FGS=Folland, Goodman and Stano, 6th edition

 

Date

Topic

Reading Assignment

Wednesday, August 26

Introduction

 

Friday, August 28

The Relevance of Health Economics

  • FGS, Chapter 1
  • Newhouse, Joseph P. "Medical Care Costs: How Much Welfare Loss?" Journal of Economic Perspectives, 6(3), 1992, 3-21.

Monday, August 31

The Production of Health

  • FGS, Chapter 5

Wednesday, September 2

The Production of Health

  • Corman, Hope, Joyce, Theodore J., and Grossman, Michael. "Birth Outcome Production Function in the United States." Journal of Human Resources 22, 1987, 339-360.

Friday, September 4

Government Policy Towards Health Behavior

  • FGS, Chapter 24

Monday, September 7

Labor Day Holiday

 

Wednesday, September 9

 

Special Topic:

Economics of Obesity

 

 

Problem Set I Posted

  • Cutler, David M, Edward L. Glaeser, and Jesse M. Shapiro. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?" Journal of Economic Perspectives 17(3), 2004, 93-118.

Friday, September 11

 

Demand for Health: Labor-Leisure Trade-Offs

  • FGS, Chapter 7, pp. 128-135

Monday, September 14

Demand for Health: Marginal Efficiency of Investment (MEI)

  • FGS, Chapter 7, pp. 135-141

Wednesday, September 16

Problem Set I Due

Risk and Insurance

  • FGS, Chapter 8, pp. 143-154

Friday, September 18

The Economics of Moral Hazard

  • FGS, Chapter 8, pp. 154-165
  • Pauly, Mark. "The Economics of Moral Hazard," American Economics Review 58:3, March 1968, 531-537.

Monday, September 21

Measuring Health Care Demand Elasticity

  • FGS, Chapter 9
  • Manning et al. "Health Insurance and the Demand for Medical Care: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment." American Economic Review 77:3, June 1987, 251-277.

Wednesday, September 23

Short Paper 1 Due

Asymmetric Information and Health Insurance

Problem Set II Posted

  • FGS, Chapter 10

Friday, September 25

Employer Provision of Health Insurance and Its Implications

  • FGS, Chapter 11, pp. 215-229

Monday, September 28

The Uninsured

  • FGS, Chapter 11, pp. 229-238
  • Kuttner, Robert. "The American Health Care System-Health Insurance Coverage" NEJM, 344(14), April 5 2001.

Wednesday, September 30 Problem Set II Due

Managed Care

  • FGS, Chapter 12

Friday, October 2

Review

 

Monday, October 5

Midterm Exam

 

Wednesday, October 7

Supply of Medical Care: Hospitals

  • FGS, Chapter 13

Friday, October 9

 

Supply of Medical Care: Hospitals

 

  • Reinhardt, Uwe. "The Economics of For-Profit and Not-For-Profit Hospitals." Health Affairs, 19:6, 178-185.

Monday, October 12

 

Supply of Medical Care: Physicians

  • FSG, Chapter 15

Wednesday, October 14

Short Paper 2 due

Supplier-Induced Demand: Empirical Evidence Problem Set III Posted

  • FSG, Chapter 15

Friday, October 16

Health Care Labor Markets and Professional Training

  • FSG, Chapter 16

Monday, October 19

Health Care Labor Markets and Professional Training

  • FSG, Chapter 16

Wednesday, October 21 Problem Set III Due

Catch-up and Review

Research paper discussion

 

Friday, October 23

Special Topic:

Technology in Medicine

Cutler, David M and Mark McClellan.  "Is Technological Change in Medicine Worth It?"  Health Affairs, 20(5), 2001, 11-29.

Monday, October 26

The Pharmaceutical Industry: Drug Pricing and Profits

  • FSG, Chapter 17, pp. 358-372

Wednesday, October 28

 

Special Topic: Direct to Consumer Advertising

  • Rosenthal et al. "Promotion of prescription drugs to consumers." NEJM 346, 2002, 498-505

Friday, October 30

The Pharmaceutical Industry: R&D

  • FSG, Chapter 17, pp. 372-380

Monday, November 2

Proposal Due

Equity, Efficiency, and Need

  • FSG, Chapter 18

Wednesday, November 4

 

Equity, Efficiency, and Need

  • FSG, Chapter 18

Friday, November 6

Government Intervention in Health Care Markets

  • FSG, Chapter 19, pp. 407-419

Monday, November 9

Government Failure

  • FSG, Chapter 19, pp. 420-428

Wednesday, November 11

 Principal Regulatory Mechanisms

  • FSG, Chapter 20

Friday, November 13

Special Topic: Antitrust

  • FSG, Chapter 20, pp. 451-457

Monday, November 16

 

Social Insurance: Medicaid and Medicare

  • FSG, Chapter 21

Wednesday, November 18

 First Draft Due

 Social Insurance: Medicaid and Medicare

Problem Set IV Posted

  • FSG, Chapter 21

Friday, November 20

Comparative Health Care Systems

  • FGS, Chapter 22

Monday, November 23

Special Topic:

National Health Insurance: An Approach to the Redistribution of Medical Care

  • FGS, Chapter 22, pp. 518-520
  • Lu, Jui-Fen Rachel and William C. Hsiao. "Does Universal Health Insurance Make Health Care Unaffordable? Lessons From Taiwan." Health Affairs, 22(3), 2003, pp. 77-88.

Wednesday, November 25 

Catch-up and Review

 

Friday, November 27

Thanksgiving Holiday

 

Monday, November 30 Problem Set IV Due

Special Topics

To be announced

Wednesday, December 2

Special Topics

To be announced

Friday, December 4

Final Paper Due

Review

 

 See Registrar's website

 ***Final Exam***

 

ECO 329 • Economic Statistics

82755 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm UTC 3.102
show description

METHODS OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF QUANTITATIVE DATA IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS. REQUIRED OF ECONOMICS MAJORS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

Economics 329 is an introduction to Economic Statistics. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with methods of summarizing collections of measurements (data sets) of economic, political and business phenomena. Of particular concern will be an introduction to elementary probability theory and its use in the interpretation of summary statistics (inference) obtained from statistical data sets. A number of economic, political and business applications will be used to illustrate the methods. If more information is needed contact instructor.

ECO 330T • Health Economics

33155 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 400pm-530pm UTC 4.110
show description

OPEN TO NONMAJORS. TOPICS MAY INCLUDE ECONOMIC THEORY, APPLICATIONS, AND POLICY. ECONOMICS 330T AND 350K MAY NOT BOTH BE COUNTED UNLESS THE TOPICS VARY.

This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation. In this course, only 304K is required (not 420K, so a solid foundation in math, statistics, and microeconomic theory is not necessary but recommended) and there is no writing component. Finally, this course will examine the role and justification for government involvement in the medical care system.

Prerequisites: ECO 304K with a C- or better

 

 

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