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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • Admin: 512-471-4991 & Advising: 512-471-5736

Course Descriptions

CRW 325 • Writing Border Narratives

33620 • Casares, Oscar H.
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 308
(also listed as MAS 374)
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CRW 325  l  1-Writing Border Narratives

Instructor:  Casares, O

Unique #:  33620

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  MAS 374

FLAGS:   CD  |  Wr

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: CRW 325 (Topic: Writing Border Narratives), 325 (Topic 1), E 325 (Topic: Writing Border Narratives), MAS 374 (Topic: Writing Border Narratives), 374 (Topic 34).

Prerequisites: One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The U.S.-Mexico border extends nearly 2,000 miles, from San Diego, California to Brownsville, Texas and from Tijuana, Baja California to Matamoros, Tamaulipas. Since the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe in 1848, the international boundary has meant different things to different people, as it continues to do so today. This course uses the personal essay as a way of examining our relationships with U.S.-Mexico border.

We will spend the first part of the course reading and learning about the personal essay in its various forms. For the remainder of the course students will write their own personal essays having to do with their experiences or reflections on the border. These narratives can be drawn directly from experiences of life on or near the border, or they can be drawn indirectly via the experiences of a family member or friend so long as the student/writer is also included in the essay. This course is designed for students who already have some experience with the border region.

Texts: Various posted texts on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Requirements & Grading: We will read many essays in an effort to learn the form, as well as how to look more critically at your own work. Expect pop quizzes on the reading material. Students write two personal essays (each 5-7 pages) and revise one of these at the end of the semester.

Attendance is required.

Classroom participation/Quizzes: 15%; Two Personal Essays/Final Revision: 85%.

CRW 325F • Fiction Writing

33625 • Unferth, Deb Olin
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 200
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CRW 325F  l  Fiction Writing [CERTIFICATE]

Instructor:  Unferth, D

Unique:  33625

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Each week for the first half of the semester, we will focus on a different element of craft—everything from intriguing first sentences to breathless endings. We will spend time on description, setting, dialogue, conflict, and more. I will assign in-class exercises and short take-home assignments, some of which we will discuss in class. We will read stories by 20th and 21st century writers and focus on how these writers make use of plot, form, voice, and style. In the second half of the semester, students will each write a complete short story, which we will workshop. On the last day of class students will hand in short reading responses to individually selected books, identifying an element of craft that particularly interests them.

Through story workshops, generative exercises, discussion of published work, and individual suggested reading, students write new work and read the work of others always with an eye toward inciting fresh ways of thinking about fiction. Students should emerge from the class with a solid grounding in narrative and with a collection of work in various stages of completion.

Texts: reading packet.

Requirements and Grading: Short writing assignments: 40%; Longer Short Story: 30%; Attendance and participation: 20%; Short responses: 10%.

CRW 325F • Fiction Writing

33630 • LaSalle, Peter N
Meets MW 330pm-500pm PAR 210
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CRW 325F  l  Fiction Writing [Certificate]

Instructor:  La Salle, P

Unique #:  33630

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: CRW 325F, E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction), 325F.

Prerequisites: One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The beginning of the course will stress the development of skills in the various aspects of narration, including writing description, probing character, and plotting. The latter part of the course will involve the writing and rewriting of a complete short story.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Cassill, ed.

Requirements & Grading: Four writing assignments: 90%; Attendance and participation: 10%.

CRW 325M • Creative Writing

33645-33670 • Casares, Oscar H.
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CAL 100
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CRW 325M  l  Creative Writing

Instructor:  Casares, O & __________

Unique #:  33645-33670

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: CRW 325M, E 315F, 315P.

Prerequisites: One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: This course is an introduction to the three major genres of creative writing: fiction, poetry, and the personal essay. Students will be evaluated on work in all three genres. Short, frequent writing assignments (blog posts, sketches, and single poems) will allow students to practice their craft throughout the semester, and will culminate in longer pieces in each genre.

Prof. Casares will teach an introduction to reading and writing literary fiction. During the semester we will study a variety of stories from the textbooks, looking at the different techniques the writer used, and then eventually discussing your own short stories in this same manner. The goal is to make you a more critical reader while you gain a greater appreciation for what goes into developing an effective story, all of which is designed to improve your writing skills. Note: We will be discussing only literary fiction and not genre fiction (science fiction, vampire stories, romance, suspense, etc.). Prof. Casares will spend time at the beginning of the semester explaining the differences between the two forms, but if you hoped to write genre fiction this may not be the right course for you. There are no exceptions to this rule.

Prof. __________ will teach poetry writing, focusing on the building blocks of poetic craft (line, sound, and stanza) as well as broader issues of voice, tone, diction, and subject matter. We will read and analyze a variety of classic and contemporary poems, seeking to become better readers in order to become better writers.

Profs. Casares and __________ will collaborate to teach the art of the personal essay. Different from the persuasive or analytic essay you write for other classes, the personal essay is a literary genre related to memoir and autobiography. We will read outstanding examples of the form and practice casting our own experiences as literature in essays of our own.

This course will also introduce students to the basic practice of the creative writing class, the workshop. Every student will have the opportunity to have at least one assignment workshopped, either by the T.A. and members of your section, or by the professor and your T.A. in front of the whole class. Students will be able to choose between these options.

Texts: Janet Burroway, Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft, Pearson/Longman (4th edition); Jeffery Wainwright, Poetry, the basics, Routledge (2nd Edition).

Requirements & Grading: Short story: 20% of final grade; Suite of 3-5 poems: 20% of final grade; Personal essay: 20% of final grade; Character sketch: 5% of final grade; Plot sketch: 5% of final grade; Poem #1: 5% of final grade; Poem #2: 5% of final grade; Personal Essay proposal: 5% of final grade; Weekly blog posts: 10% of final grade; Participation and attendance: 5% of final grade.

CRW 325P • Poetry Writing

33675 • YOUNG, LAURA
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CAL 21
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CRW 325P  l  Poetry Writing [Certificate]

Instructor:  Young, L

Unique #:  33675

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: CRW 325P, E 325 (Topic 2: Creative Writing: Poetry), 325P.

Prerequisites: One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, (316K,) 316L, 316M, 316N, 316P, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The practice of writing poetry involves writing, yes, but it is also the practice of attention, a process of making choices, and the ability to exist in uncertainty. In this introductory course, we will examine both matters of craft (such as line, imagery, and structure) and matters of mind (for example, mystery, discovery and disruption). Class meetings will include: the workshop of student poems; the analysis of poems from a range of time periods; and close reading and discussion of essays on various poetic themes. Our ultimate goal is to better understand the work of contemporary and traditional poets, and to engage with fullest intention in our own writing practices, both as writers and as readers.

Required texts: Actual Air, by David Berman (Open City Books, 1999); When My Brother Was an Aztec, by Natalie Diaz (Copper Canyon Press, 2012); Render: An Apocalypse, by Rebecca Gayle Howell (Cleveland University Press, 2013); The Ocean Inside Kenji Takezo, by Rick Noguchi (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996); A Poetry Handbook, by Mary Oliver (Harcourt, 1994).

Additional readings, distributed in class, will include student work and handouts (poems and essays about poetry).

Requirements & Grading: Grades will be based on a final portfolio of original poems and revisions (30%); weekly creative and/or critical exercises (30%); a short presentation (15%); and participation (25%).

Attendance is mandatory. More than three absences may negatively impact the final grade.

CRW 355F • Advanced Fiction Workshop

33685 • Harvey, Jonathan Edward C
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 310
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CRW 355F  l  Advanced Fiction Workshop [Certificate]

Instructor:  Harvey, J (Carey, E)

Unique #:  33685

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: CRW 355F, 660, E 355K.

Prerequisites: CRW 340F (or E 341).

Description: We will discuss, criticize, and write short fiction. Students will read each other’s work with rigor and generosity. Students will write three original stories for class.

Class Policies: Stories will be submitted via e-mail to your fellow students the morning your story is due. Make sure your work is double-spaced and page-numbered.

Stories should be at least 8 pages and no longer than 25. No novel excerpts, please. All work must be original—both your own work, and written for this class. Please do not recycle work written for other courses.

Please do not write stories with characters invented by other authors. And, of course, do not submit work written by other people, even substantially rewritten. For the purposes of this class, I also ask that you do not allow other people to edit your work. For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php.

A workshop class is a community, if you do not show up to discuss your colleagues work, there’s no reason for them to read yours with any attention. Much of what you will learn about fiction will be from each other—you will see how actual readers interpret and respond to your work. If you miss the day of your own workshop you may receive an F for the assignment.

You may miss two classes without it affecting the final grade in your class. You will fail the class after four absences. Perfect attendance will improve your grade. Please let me know ahead of time if you know you will miss a class for any reason.

Please be on time to class. More than four late arrivals will affect your final grade.

Laptops are not allowed to be open and on during class. Please bring in hard copies of all notes you may need to consult.

All work must be original—that is both your own work, and written for this class. Please do not recycle work written for other courses. Do not submit work written by other people, even substantially rewritten. That includes characters and scenarios: please, no fan fiction or alternate versions of other people’s published work. If you have any questions, please talk to me. For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php.

FOR WORKSHOP: you are required to read the other students’ work and to type at least two paragraphs of respectful critical response. Please bring in two copies of your critiques, one for the author, and one for me in hard copy. If I don’t have a hard copy of your student critiques, they will be marked as missing. You are responsible for critiques even if you are absent for the workshop.

GRADING: Your final grade will be based on both your written work in the class, and also your participation. You will receive letter grades on written assignments.

EXTRA CREDIT: You may earn extra credit by attending readings by authors on campus or at local bookstores and writing a one-page response. If you are unsure of whether a writer qualifies or not, please ask me.

The breakdown of grading follows: FIRST STORY, 20%; SECOND STORY: 20%; THIRD STORY: 20%; REVISION: 10%; WRITTEN COMMENTS ON OTHER STUDENTS’ WORK: 15%; CLASS PARTICIPATION: 15%.

CRW 355F • Advanced Fiction Workshop

33690 • LaSalle, Peter N
Meets MW 500pm-630pm PAR 310
show description

CRW 355F  l  Advanced Fiction Workshop [Certificate]

Instructor:  La Salle, P

Unique #:  33690

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: CRW 355F, 660, E 355K.

Prerequisites: CRW 340F (or E 341).

Description: This is a course for advanced students in fiction writing; the student will write a total of 30-40 pages of original fiction during the semester.

There will be three dates on which work is due, and on each the student will turn in either a complete short story or an installment from a longer work; if the student is working on a longer project (a novella, for instance), approval must be given by the instructor ahead of time.

Student work will be examined in class with workshop discussion, and the student will meet with the instructor in individual conferences to discuss projects and progress.

There will also be reading from two texts.

Texts: • The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Seventh Edition, Cassill and Bausch, editors • Dreamtigers, Jorge Luis Borges (fiction and poetry, for discussion of how the two genres influence each other).

Requirements & Grading: 90 percent on writing; 10 per cent on in-class participation and quizzes.

The grade will be a matter, essentially, of the quality of the written work. Two absences are allowed, and more than that will affect the grade.

Schedule:  See above.

Policies:

Documented Disability Statement: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone), or visit http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd.

CRW 355P • Advanced Poetry Workshop

33695 • Young, Dean H
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 22
show description

CRW 355P  l  Advanced Poetry Workshop [Certificate]

Instructor:  Young, D

Unique #:  33695

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

CRW 355P and E 355K may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: CRW 340P (or E 341L).

Description: This is a class for practicing poets with workshop experience. While emphasis will be upon work written by students in the class, we will also foster a vital connection to the work of contemporary and past poets. Students will be expected to work not only on their own poems but also their ability to articulate a sophisticated and informed relationship to poetry in general.

Requirements & Grading:

About a poem a week to be submitted for workshop although all these poems will not be addressed in class.

Ongoing written responses to the work of classmates as well as occasional assignments made at the discretion of the professor.

Attendance. Active and vocal engagement demonstrated in class consistently.

A final portfolio of about five poems, the majority of them substantially revised in response to workshop feedback.

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