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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Fall 2008

E 392M • NEW DIRECTION SHAKESPEARE STDS

Unique Days Time Location Instructor
35735 TH
6:00 PM-9:00 PM
BEN 1.118
Mallin

Course Description

Course Description: "Introduction to Graduate Shakespeare Studies: New Directions for Research and Interpretation" Professor Eric S. Mallin This course will introduce the study of Shakespeare at the graduate level; and it will provide an overview of the latest and most fruitful directions for scholarship and interpretation in this field. We will explore the plays of Shakespeare in a thorough, exacting way, and then we will see how contemporary readers, armed with particular ideologies, facts, desires, and histories, understand those works. Thus I imagine our business as obtaining a view of the profession through the dense, refracting Shakespeare lens. With some exceptions, interpretive history about Shakespeare mirrors (and often anticipates) literary criticism in general. This course will serve, then, as a supplement to or expansion of a literary criticism course. We will operate non-chronologically, but we will use as our springboards the great revisionist methodologies of the '80sfeminism and new historicism. That will lead into the current rule of religious studies and textual scholarship. Queer theory may be seen as a multilevel bridge between all of these land masses. Finally, I would like to consider some less-practiced but increasingly popular ways of reading: ecocriticism, popular culture, and presentism.. Weekly meditations, a longer seminar paper, and perhaps a creative assignment will constitute the writing portion of the course. Your attention, attendance, and cheerful conversation will constitute the rest. Plays for the Fall semester will probably include: Comedy of Errors, Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Othello, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter's Tale, and perhaps Thomas Middleton's The Changeling.

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