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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Michael B Winship

Professor D.Phil, 1990, Oxford University

Michael B Winship

Contact

Biography

Michael Winship is a bibliographer and historian of the book – with special expertise in publishing and book trade history in the United States before 1940 – who has published extensively on American literary publishing.  He edited and completed the final three volumes of Bibliography of American Literature, for which he received the bibliography prize of the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers, and served as an editor of and contributor to the recently completed 5-volume A History of the Book in America.  His research interests are book production, publishing, and distribution in the industrial era; copyright; and the international trade in books.

Interests

History of the book, bibliography, and textual criticism

E 379R • Producing American Lit

35020 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am HRC 2.214
show description

E 379R  l  4-Producing American Literature

Instructor:  Winship, M

Unique #:  35020

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Independent inquiry; Writing

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: What do we mean when we speak of American literature? What makes a text American or literary? Who gets to say? What is at stake in how we answer these questions? No writer creates and no reader interprets in a vacuum. Between writer and reader a number of agents – printers, publishers, booksellers, reviewers, and teachers – take actions and make decisions that affect and establish a text's meaning, its literary value, and its place in the canon of American literature.

This course, drawing on new work in the field of the history of the book, will examine the forces – cultural, economic, and historical – that have played a role in the creation, production, distribution, and reception of American literary texts from 1776 to 1940. It will consist of a number of case studies that focus on major literary texts, exploring how an understanding of the ways that the texts were produced and received alters and deepens our present reading and interpretation. A variety of issues relating to this theme will be addressed: copyright and author's royalties; the creation of a "national" American literature; popular and high culture; the impact of technology and the introduction of cheap books; the growth of a national market for books and of a mass reading public; censorship and the importance of reviewers and other moral gatekeepers; the availability of reliable reading texts for modern scholars and students.

Requirements & Grading: In addition to regular readings, students will be assigned a series of exercises that are designed to help them locate and analyze primary materials, both printed and manuscript, using related reference sources. These exercises will lead to the preparation of three short (2 page) response papers, which will be peer-reviewed by fellow students. As a final project, students will explore the production of an American literary text, drawing on original documents, where available, as well as multiple editions in the collections of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and other libraries. This research will be the basis of a class presentation and a term paper (8 pages). Attendance in class is required, and students are expected to come to class having completed both readings and exercises and prepared to participate in class discussion. Grades will be based on class participation (20%), the response papers to the exercises (30%), and the final paper (50%).

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodation for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

E 338 • Amer Lit: From 1865 To Present

35950 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BEN 1.102
show description

Instructor:  Winship, M

Unique #:  35950

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In addition to close readings of assigned texts by American authors published from the Civil War to the present, the course will explore the contested development over this period of a distinctively American literary culture. Our readings will include a variety of genres: prose fiction and essays, poetry, and drama. Attention will also be paid to the institutions (publishing houses, periodicals, and theaters) and people (literary agents, editors, and reviewers) that played a role in creating this culture and influencing our appreciation or interpretations of it.

Texts: The second (3-volume package) of the Norton Anthology of American Literature, 8th edition (ed. Baym et al) plus supplementary materials.

Grading & Requirements: Class attendance and participation: 20%; Two 3-4-page writing exercises: 20% each; Final 5-6-page paper: 40%.

As a substantial writing course, particular attention will be paid to students’ ability to write analytical essays.  In assigning grades to the writing exercises and final paper, strength of argument and analysis will be emphasized, though clarity, spelling, and grammatical correctness will also be taken into account.

During the semester, the class will visit the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center to examine original manuscripts and editions of the works of American authors that have been assigned. These trips are not optional.

Class attendance is required of all students: students missing three or more classes without proper advance excuse may have their grade lowered.

Unannounced quizzes may be given in class.

E 349S • Walt Whitman

36045 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 210
show description

Instructor:  Winship, M

Unique #:  36045

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Only one of the following may be counted:  E 349S (Topic 7: Walt Whitman), E 379N (Topic: Walt Whitman and his World) and as 379S (embedded topic: Walt Whitman).

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: Walt Whitman (1819-1892) witnessed and wrote about life and culture in the 19th-century United States, claiming that “The United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem.” In this course, we will focus on Whitman’s own writing, both poetry and prose, but also read selectively from his contemporaries, to explore the literary culture of his time.

Texts: Walt Whitman, Poetry and Prose (New York: Library of America, 1996).

Requirements & Grading: Class attendance and participation, 20%; Two writing exercises, 25% each; Final paper, 30%.

As a class that carries the writing flag, particular attention will be paid to students’ ability to write analytical essays. In assigning grades to the writing exercises and final paper, the strength of the analysis will be emphasized, though clarity, spelling, and grammatical correctness will also be taken into account.

At the end of the semester, the class will meet for a few sessions in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center to examine and work with original manuscripts and editions by Walt Whitman.

Class attendance is required of all students: students missing three or more classes without proper advance excuse may have their final grade lowered.

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY..

E 337 • Amer Lit: From Begin To 1865

35760 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Winship, M            Areas:  II / E

Unique #:  35760            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: “In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?” With this question, first posed in 1820, the Englishman Rev. Sydney Smith pricked the pride of the first generation of writers in the United States. In 1852, the answer to his question was self-evident; many people in Britain and Europe where busy reading Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin. By the end of the Civil War, few educated readers would have denied that a full-blown literary culture and literary tradition had developed in the United States—though later readers, scholars, and teachers have defined and established that culture and tradition in different ways.

In this course we will read a range of important American texts written before 1865, exploring the different ways that our literary culture and tradition has been defined. What makes a text American? What kinds of tradition are we creating when we recognize certain texts as literary or important? What role do politics, religion, and other cultural and social forces play in American literature?

During the semester, the class will meet occasionally in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center to examine original or early editions of many of the assigned texts.

Texts: Reading will include the standard canonical early American works from the Discovery (Columbus, etc.) through Puritan New England (Bradford, Bradstreet, Williams, etc.) to the American Renaissance (Emerson, Fuller, Hawthorne, Whitman, etc.). As far as possible, students will read digitized copies of original or early editions of the reading assignments, but these may be supplemented by modern editions (to be determined) as necessary.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance is required of all students, as is participation in class discussion. If you miss more than four classes without proper excuse, your grade will be lowered. Students are encouraged to visit during office hours.

There will be two writing exercises (ca. 1000 words each) during the semester, and a final paper (ca. 1500-2000 words). The first writing exercises will be a close reading of a single poem; the second an investigation and reflection on the publication of works in American literary monthlies of the 1850s. The final paper will explore the nature and meaning of our American literary tradition by discussing a peculiarly American theme in three of the works that we have read during semester. Only in exceptional circumstances will a late assignment be accepted. Unannounced quizzes may also be given in class.

Quizzes and class attendance, 20%; Writing exercises, 20% each; Final paper, 40%.

E 379R • Producing American Literature

35745 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am HRC 2.214
show description

Instructor:  Winship, M            Areas:  VI

Unique #:  35745            Flags:  Independent inquiry; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 379R (Topic: Producing American Literature) and 379S (embedded topic: Producing American Literature) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: What do we mean when we speak of American literature? What makes a text American or literary? Who gets to say? What is at stake in how we answer these questions? No writer creates and no reader interprets in a vacuum. Between writer and reader a number of agents – printers, publishers, booksellers, reviewers, and teachers – take actions and make decisions that affect and establish a text's meaning, its literary value, and its place in the canon of American literature.

This course, drawing on new work in the field of the history of the book, will examine the forces – cultural, economic, and historical – that have played a role in the creation, production, distribution, and reception of American literary texts from 1776 to 1940. It will consist of a number of case studies that focus on major literary texts, exploring how an understanding of the ways that the texts were produced and received alters and deepens our present reading and interpretation. A variety of issues relating to this theme will be addressed: copyright and author's royalties; the creation of a "national" American literature; popular and high culture; the impact of technology and the introduction of cheap books; the growth of a national market for books and of a mass reading public; censorship and the importance of reviewers and other moral gatekeepers; the availability of reliable reading texts for modern scholars and students.

Requirements & Grading: In addition to regular readings, students will be assigned a series of exercises that are designed to help them locate and analyze primary materials, both printed and manuscript, using related reference sources. These exercises will lead to the preparation of three short (2 page) response papers, which will be peer-reviewed by fellow students. As a final project, students will explore the production of an American literary text, drawing on original documents, where available, as well as multiple editions in the collections of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and other libraries. This research will be the basis of a class presentation and a term paper (8 pages). Attendance in class is required, and students are expected to come to class having completed both readings and exercises and prepared to participate in class discussion. Grades will be based on class participation (20%), the response papers to the exercises (30%), and the final paper (50%).

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodation for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

E 337 • Amer Lit: From Begin To 1865

35385 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 0.120
show description

Instructor:  Winship, M            Areas:  II / E

Unique #:  35385            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: “In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?” With this question, first posed in 1820, the Englishman Rev. Sydney Smith pricked the pride of the first generation of writers in the United States. In 1852, the answer to his question was self-evident; many people in Britain and Europe where busy reading Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin. By the end of the Civil War, few educated readers would have denied that a full-blown literary culture and literary tradition had developed in the United States—though later readers, scholars, and teachers have defined and established that culture and tradition in different ways.

In this course we will read a range of important American texts written before 1865, exploring the different ways that our literary culture and tradition has been defined. What makes a text American? What kinds of tradition are we creating when we recognize certain texts as literary or important? What role do politics, religion, and other cultural and social forces play in American literature?

During the semester, the class will meet occasionally in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center to examine original or early editions of many of the assigned texts.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, ed. Nina Bayme et al., 8th ed. (2012), Vols. A & B.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance is required of all students, as is participation in class discussion. If you miss more than four classes without proper excuse, your grade will be lowered. Students are encouraged to visit during office hours.

There will be two writing exercises (ca. 1000 words each) during the semester, and a final paper (ca. 1500-2000 words). The first writing exercises will be a close reading of a single poem; the second an investigation and reflection on the publication of works in American literary monthlies of the 1850s. The final paper will explore the nature and meaning of our American literary tradition by discussing a peculiarly American theme in three of the works that we have read during semester. Unannounced quizzes may also be given in class. Only in exceptional circumstances will a late assignment be accepted.

Quizzes and class attendance, 20%; Writing exercises, 25% each; Final paper, 30%.

E 384K • History Of The Book

35780 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm HRC 2.214
show description

Over the past half century, the History of the Book has emerged as an active, interdisciplinary field, attracting an international group of scholars from many different disciplines.  This course, offered in conjunction with the TILTS “The Fate of the Book” theme, is designed to introduce students to the work of book historians, from the early work of Henri-Jean Martin, Elizabeth Eisenstein, and Robert Darnton to recent, trendsetting work by William St Clair, Adrian Johns, and Leah Price.  The course will be based in the HRC, and a major goal will be to familiarize students with the remarkable resources available there.   Another major goal will be to explore with students the ways that book history can be relevant to their own work as they prepare to research and write their dissertations.

E 379R • Producing American Literature

35565 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am HRC 2.212
show description

Instructor:  Winship, M            Areas:  VI

Unique #:  35565            Flags:  Writing; Independent Inquiry

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 379R (Topic: Producing American Literature) and 379S (embedded topic: Producing American Literature) may not both be counted. 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: What do we mean when we speak of American literature?  What makes a text American or literary?  Who gets to say?  What is at stake in how we answer these questions?  No writer creates and no reader interprets in a vacuum. Between writer and reader a number of agents – printers, publishers, booksellers, reviewers, and teachers – take actions and make decisions that affect and establish a text's meaning, its literary value, and its place in the canon of American literature.

This course, drawing on new work in the field of the history of the book, will examine the forces – cultural, economic, and historical – that have played a role in the creation, production, distribution, and reception of American literary texts from 1776 to 1940. It will consist of a number of case studies that focus on major literary texts, exploring how an understanding of the ways that the texts were produced and received alters and deepens our present reading and interpretation. A variety of issues relating to this theme will be addressed: copyright and author's royalties; the creation of a "national" American literature; popular and high culture; the impact of technology and the introduction of cheap books; the growth of a national market for books and of a mass reading public; censorship and the importance of reviewers and other moral gatekeepers; the availability of reliable reading texts for modern scholars and students.

Requirements & Grading: In addition to regular readings, students will be assigned a series of exercises that are designed to help them locate and analyze primary materials, both printed and manuscript, using related reference sources. These exercises will lead to the preparation of four short (2 page) response papers, which will be peer-reviewed by fellow students. As a final project, students will explore the production of an American literary text, drawing on original documents, where available, as well as multiple editions in the collections of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and other libraries. This research will be the basis of a class presentation and a term paper (8 pages). Attendance in class is required, and students are expected to come to class having completed both readings and exercises and prepared to participate in class discussion. Grades will be based on class participation (20%), the response papers to the exercises (30%) and the final paper (50%).

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodation for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

E 395M • Producing American Literature

35705 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm HRC 2.214
show description

Producing American Literature

What do we mean when we speak of American literature?  What makes a text American or literary?  Who gets to say?  What is at stake in how we answer these questions?  No writer creates and no reader interprets in a vacuum. Between writer and reader a number of agents – printers, publishers, booksellers, reviewers, and teachers – take actions and make decisions that affect and establish a text's meaning, its literary value, and its place in the canon of American literature.

This course, drawing on new work in the field of the history of the book, will examine the forces – cultural, economic, and historical – that have played a role in the creation, production, distribution, and reception of literary texts from 1776 to 1940.  It will consist of a number of case studies that focus on major literary texts, exploring how an understanding of the ways that the texts were produced alters and deepens our present reading and interpretation.  A variety of issues relating to this theme will be addressed: copyright and author's royalties; the creation of a "national" American literature; popular and high culture; the impact of technology and the introduction of cheap books; the growth of a national market for books and of a mass reading public; censorship and the importance of reviewers and other moral gatekeepers; the availability of reliable reading texts for modern scholars and students.

Requirements: In addition to the readings, there will be a series of exercises that are designed to help students locate and analyze primary materials, both printed and manuscript, and related reference sources.  Attendance in class is required, and students are expected to come to class having completed both readings and exercises and prepared to participate in class discussion.  As a final project, students will prepare a paper that explores the production of an American literary text, drawing on original documents, where available, as well as multiple editions in the collections of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and other libraries. This research will be the basis of a class presentation, and a term paper.  Grades will be based on class participation and exercises (30%) and the final paper (70%).

E 350R • Amer Authors And Publishers

35350 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am HRC 2.212
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Whatever it is that authors do, they do not write books. Books are the result of a collaborative effort that involves papermakers, printers, binders, publishers, booksellers, and reviewers. In making books, the publisher rather than the author is the central figure, for it is the publisher who takes entrepreneurial responsibility for not only their production, but also their dissemination and reception. This course explores these facts by focusing on the relationships between American authors and their publishers from the founding of the United States into the early twentieth century.

Texts: The readings for the course will be varied, including not only important American literary and cultural works (e.g. Paine’s Common Sense, Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter, Twain’s Huck Finn, Dreiser’s Sister Carrie) but also published correspondence and memoirs of authors and publishers and recent interdisciplinary secondary work by historians of the book (e.g. William Charvat, Leon Jackson, Susan Williams). Where appropriate, the readings will be supplemented by primary materials in the rich collections of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC).

Tentative Reading List: Tom Paine, Common Sense; Parson Weems, Life of Washington; Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; H. B. Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass; Fanny Fern, Ruth Hall; Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Theodore Dreiser, Sister Carrie; and relevant secondary works.

Requirements & Grading: As a honors course, a major goal will be to introduce honors students to primary source materials and to prepare them for using those materials in their own work. Thus, students will not only be exposed to the rich collections of the HRC, but be required to use them hands-on for their assignments in a way that is impossible in a regular undergraduate course.

Students will write a series of three short papers (ca. 2 pages each) based on their investigations of the HRC collections (30% of grade). They will also be encouraged to use these collections in their preparation of a final research paper (ca. 8-10 pages) that explores the role of both author and publisher in the creation of a literary work of their choosing (50% of grade). Attendance and participation in class discussion (20% of grade) will also be mandatory.

E 379R • Producing American Literature

35860 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am HRC 2.212
show description

E 379R (Topic: Producing American Literature) and 379S (embedded topic: Producing American Literature) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: How do we get the literary texts that we read? Who chooses them and who determines the ways that they are presented? No writer creates and no reader interprets in a vacuum. Between writer and reader a number of agents – printers, publishers, booksellers, reviewers, and teachers – take actions and make decisions that affect and establish a text's meaning as well as its literary value.

This course, drawing on new work in the field of the history of the book, will examine the forces – cultural, economic, and historical – that have played a role in the creation, production, distribution, and reception of literary texts from 1776 to 1940. It will consist of a number of case studies that focus on major literary texts, exploring how an understanding of the ways that the texts were produced alters and deepens our present reading and interpretation. A variety of issues relating to this theme will be addressed: copyright and author's royalties; the creation of a "national" American literature; popular and high culture; the impact of technology and the introduction of cheap books; the growth of a national market for books and of a mass reading public; censorship and the importance of reviewers and other moral gatekeepers; the availability of reliable reading texts for modern scholars and students.

Requirements & Grading: In addition to regular readings, students will be assigned a series of exercises that are designed to help them locate and analyze primary materials, both printed and manuscript, using related reference sources. These exercises will lead to the preparation of four short (2 page) response papers, which will be peer-reviewed by fellow students. As a final project, students will explore the production of an American literary text, drawing on original documents, where available, as well as multiple editions in the collections of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and other libraries. This research will be the basis of a class presentation and a term paper (8 pages). Attendance in class is required, and students are expected to come to class having completed both readings and exercises and prepared to participate in class discussion. Grades will be based on class participation (20%), the response papers to the exercises (30%) and the final paper (50%).

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodation for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

E 384K • Intro To Bibliog & Textual Std

35905 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm HRC 2.214
show description

As a discipline, bibliography investigates the technical and social processes of textual creation, production, transmission, and reception.  Bibliographers explore textual versions and their material forms, the technical and political facts of textual dissemination and control, and the variety of textual meanings and social effects.  Bibliography is concerned with texts in all their variety – not just written or printed texts, but also filmed, taped, or digitized texts.  Finally, bibliography examines and analyzes the connections within texts between form and meaning and how textual form and meaning are established by and interact with social, political, and cultural institutions.

This course introduces students to the practice and theory of textual research, emphasizing bibliographical approaches.  The primary focus will be on printed texts – especially literary texts – produced and distributed as books in Great Britain and the United States, but we will also consider other texts, including electronic and non-print texts, as well as texts produced in non-Western societies.  Because books and manuscripts remain the primary tools of literary and humanistic study and research, one goal of the course will be to teach students to use these tools with skill and sophistication.  The course meets regularly in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center and will introduce students to the printed and manuscript resources of the HRHRC collections.

The primary textbooks for the class will be R. B. McKerrow's classic An Introduction to Bibliography for Literary Students and Philip Gaskell's A New Introduction to Bibliography.  These will be supplemented by articles by Fredson Bowers, Roger Chartier, Robert Darnton, W. W. Greg, Jerome J. McGann, D. F. McKenzie, William St Clair, G. Thomas Tanselle, and others.  The readings are supplemented by dvds and videos that show various process of book production.  As part of the course students will have the option of participating in a printing laboratory where they will set type and print a broadside. 

Requirements: A series of three exercises designed to show how to find, describe, analyze, and interpret printed and manuscript texts as material records, and a short essay (about 8-10 pages) that examines or investigates a textual problem or issue related to the student's interests or research from a bibliographical perspective.  Students will also give a formal presentation of their essay as if it were a conference paper for class discussion.  Grades will be based on the exercises and class participation (40%) and the term paper (60%).

E 349S • Walt Whitman

34685 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 304
show description

Only one of the following may be counted:  E 349S (Topic: Walt Whitman), E 379N (Topic: Walt Whitman and his World) and as 379S (embedded topic: Walt Whitman).

Course Description: Walt Whitman (1819-1892) witnessed and wrote about life and culture in the 19th-century United States, claiming that “The United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem.” In this course, we will focus on Whitman’s own writing, both poetry and prose, but also read selectively from his contemporaries, to explore the literary culture of his time.

Texts: Walt Whitman, Poetry and Prose (New York: Library of America, 1996).  Optional: Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass and Other Writings, rev. ed. (New York: Norton, 2002).

Grading: Class attendance and participation, 20%; Two writing exercises, 25% each; Final paper, 30%. As a substantial writing class, particular attention will be paid to students’ ability to write analytical essays. In assigning grades to the writing exercises and final paper, the strength of the analysis will be emphasized, though clarity, spelling, and grammatical correctness will also be taken into account. At the end of the semester, the class will meet for a few sessions in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center to examine and work with original manuscripts and editions by Walt Whitman. Class attendance is required of all students: students missing three or more classes without proper advance excuse may have their final lowered. The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

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