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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Betsy A Berry

Senior Lecturer Ph.D., 1994, University of Texas at Austin

Betsy A Berry

Contact

Biography

Betsy Berry’s chief research and writing interests are in Creative Writing, British Modernism, and American Literature.  Her poems have appeared in U.S., Australian, and Canadian periodicals.  Two of her short stories—“Family and Flood” and “Human Sexuality”­––have appeared in major anthologies (Lone Star Literature and Literary Austin).  She has also published critical essays on Jean Rhys (Studies in the Novel), Blue Velvet (Literature/Film Quarterly), and John Graves and Beverly Lowry (in John Graves, Writer).   In 2008 she received two teaching awards:  the W.O.S. Sutherland Award for Teaching Excellence in Sophomore Literature and a Texas Blazers Faculty Excellence Award.   

Interests

Poetry; the short story; the British novel.

E 316P • Masterworks Of Literature

35605-35650 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 1.402
show description

 

Instructor:  Berry, B

Unique #:  35605-35655

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags: n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Literature in History--

Because this course covers the broad range of American literature, nearly four centuries of writing, it will necessarily involve a rich variety of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. We will begin by examining the origins of American literature from its colonial beginnings in New England in the 17th century through the Enlightenment of the 18th century and the particular brand of Romanticism that marked the early 19th century. Then we will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will be particularly interested in women and minority writers, and certain longer texts—by Crane, Plath, O’Brien, and McCarthy—will provide special opportunities to study the relationship between a particular work and the history and culture in which it is grounded. Throughout we will seek to define and elucidate a genuine national literature that is powerful, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America’s past and present are immense.

Texts: McMichael, ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 6th ed.; Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar; Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Cormac McCarthy, The Road.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes & Disc. Section Participation, 15%; First Exam, 25%; Second Exam, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance for all class meetings  [See Course Policy Statement]

Discussion Sessions with your respective TAs are mandatory. TA sessions may frequently include 10-20 question quizzes.

E 316P • Masterworks Of Literature

35655 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 302
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B

Unique #:  35655

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags: n/a

Restrictions:  Discovery Scholars, Longhorn Scholars

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course will examine American literature from the Enlightenment era of 18th-century America through the end of the 20th century. We will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will seek to define, if possible, a genuine national literature that is strong, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America past and present are immense.

Texts: Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Street, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Van Jordan, M-a-c-n-o-l-i-a; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Packet of short stories and poems

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes, 25%; Mid-Term Exam, 20%; Essay, 20%; Final Exam, 25%; Class Participation, 10%

E 344L • Australian Literature & Film

35775 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B

Unique #:  35775

Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: In this course we will study the history, geography, and culture of Australia as reflected in literature and film. We will begin with background lectures on the founding of Australia, its origins as a penal colony, and the question of whether British-colonized Australia was a “gulag,” as Robert Hughes maintains in The Fatal Shore, or an early instance of imperial globalism. Turning from the First Fleet (Jan. 26, 1788), we will read a modern text, Robyn Davidson’s travel narrative, Tracks (1980), to get a feel for the unique geography of the Outback and the engagement of White Australia with the original inhabitants of this nation, the Aboriginals. Davidson’s feminist perspective on Australia offers irresistible reading.  Then we will view the film Walkabout, which provides an excellent visual introduction to landscape, Europeanism, and Aboriginal culture. Then, back to the past, to the 1890s and the creation of an Australian archetype: the Drover’s Wife. We will begin by reading Henry Lawson’s seminal story, “The Drover’s Wife,” and read an amazing sequence of Drover’s Wife stories to the end of the twentieth century, including “The Drover’s De facto,” “The Driver’s Wife,” and “The Wife’s Drover.” Once again, we return to the historical record. Australia’s development of a national identity, the transition from colony to nation, will be grounded in the film Gallipoli (Peter Weir, 1982). From this point we turn to the last seminal moment to be studied in the course, the election of a Labor government in 1972 and the development of a new sense of history, culture, and creativity. In this vein we will read the urban fiction of two of Australia’s most important short story writers, Michael Wilding and Frank Moorhouse; we will also try to sort out the complicated fictional and metafictional exchange taking place between their stories written about each other and the culture of modern Australia. Finally, we will read Kate Jennings’ Snake, a recent novel of great power and intensity that takes us back to the “dead heart”—the arid interior—in the form of a compressed and highly innovative family saga about feminism, masculinity, and Australia. When you’re finished with this course, the inevitable thing to do, I hope, is to book passage to Oz.

Texts: Robyn Davidson, Tracks; Australian Literature & Film (Co-op Packet); Michael Wilding:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Frank Moorehouse:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Kate Jennings, Snake.

Requirements & Grading: Midterm, 40%; Final, 40%; One short paper, 10%; Attendance & class participation, 10%.

E S316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

83355 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm WAG 101
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B

Unique #:  83355

Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2014, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History--

Because this course covers the broad range of American literature, nearly four centuries of writing, it will necessarily involve a rich variety of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. We will begin by examining the origins of American literature from its colonial beginnings in New England in the 17th century through the Enlightenment of the 18th century and the particular brand of Romanticism that marked the early 19th century. Then we will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will be particularly interested in women and minority writers, and certain longer texts—by Crane, Plath, O’Brien, and McCarthy—will provide special opportunities to study the relationship between a particular work and the history and culture in which it is grounded. Throughout we will seek to define and elucidate a genuine national literature that is powerful, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America’s past and present are immense.

Texts: McMichael, ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 6th ed.; Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar; Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Cormac McCarthy, The Road.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes & Disc. Section Participation, 15%; First Exam, 25%; Second Exam, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance for all class meetings  [See Course Policy Statement]

Discussion Sessions with your respective TAs are mandatory. TA sessions may frequently include 10-20 question quizzes.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

35445 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CAL 419
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B

Unique #:  35445

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course will examine American literature from the Enlightenment era of 18th-century America through the end of the 20th century. We will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will seek to define, if possible, a genuine national literature that is strong, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America past and present are immense.

Texts: Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Street, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Van Jordan, M-a-c-n-o-l-i-a; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Packet of short stories and poems

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes, 25%; Mid-Term Exam, 20%; Essay, 20%; Final Exam, 25%; Class Participation, 10%

E 324 • Troubled Literary Marriages

35885 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 206
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B

Unique #:  35885

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Tom and Viv & Anne and Kayo & Sylvia and Ted and Assia --

The personal lives of authors nearly always find their ways into their works and none more so than in the case of these three pairs of star-crossed marriages: the great twentieth century poet T. S. Eliot and his wife Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot, the victim of a gross medical misdiagnosis; the confessional poet Anne Sexton and her long suffering husband, Albert “Kayo” Sexton; and, of course, the infamous entanglement and tragedy of poets Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, and Hughes’s lover Assia Wevill. Out of the ashes of these tortured unions and private agonies rose literary and enduring masterpieces. We will use the tools of biography, memoir, letters, and above all, the words of the principals, both in their creative and private lives, to decipher and explicate some of the canonical texts and tropes of the twentieth century. For the Eliots we will focus on that most personal of “impersonal” poems, The Waste Land. We will also view the feature film Tom and Viv. We’ll study the collected poems of Anne Sexton and excerpts from Diane Middlebrook’s biography of Sexton. In the case of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes we will read selected Plath poetry, selections from her journals, and the novel published just before her death, The Bell Jar. We will read Hughes’s last collection of poetry, Birthday Letters, a deeply personal response to the tragic end of their marriage and of Plath’s life. We will see the recent film Sylvia, with Gwyneth Paltrow and Daniel Craig (as Hughes). And, finally, we will read a fascinating biography, Lover of Unreason, the story of Assia Wevill, the largely forgotten “other woman” in the lives of Hughes and Plath. Both the literature and behind-the-scenes material are amazingly haunting and unforgettable documents that testify to the professional and private angst in the bid to join the literary pantheon.

Texts: (tentative list) T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems; Anne Sexton, The Collected Poems; Sylvia Plath, The Collected Poems and The Bell Jar; Ted Hughes, Birthday Letters; Yehuda Koren and Eilat Negev, Lover of Unreason.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes and Class Participation, 20%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay, 25%; Final Exam, 30%.

E 362L • British Novel In 20th Century

36125 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 208
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B

Unique #:  36125

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will begin our study of the modern British novel with D. H. Lawrence. In Sons and Lovers Lawrence uses the form of the bildungsroman to chart the psychological and sexual parameters of British working class culture. Our second novel, To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf, introduces stunning narrative innovations, tracing the complex interrelationships of a family affected by the tyranny and blessings of love amidst a sea of change. From there we turn to Jean Rhys’ Voyage in the Dark, a naturalistic study of a young woman from the Caribbean who struggles to make her way in a predatory male culture in Great Britain based on gender, class, and economic power. From the post World War II era we will read John Fowles’ The Collector, a dark, gripping story of class, obsession, and the unfulfilled life. After that we return in our reading to the earlier part of the century with Pat Barker’s Regeneration, a profound study of the physical and psychological trauma of the Great War. We will end with a psychological thriller, Patrick McGrath’s Asylum, employing a classic unreliable narrator who relates a 1950s tale of sexual obsession, familial loss, and the descent into madness.

Texts: D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark; John Fowles, The Collector; Pat Barker, Regeneration; Patrick McGrath, Asylum.

Requirements & Grading: Class Participation, 15%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay Assignment, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance of all class meetings (to be explained further in course policy handout).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

35175-35220 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm FAC 21
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35175-35220            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History--

Because this course covers the broad range of American literature, nearly four centuries of writing, it will necessarily involve a rich variety of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. We will begin by examining the origins of American literature from its colonial beginnings in New England in the 17th century through the Enlightenment of the 18th century and the particular brand of Romanticism that marked the early 19th century. Then we will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will be particularly interested in women and minority writers, and certain longer texts—by Crane, Plath, O’Brien, and McCarthy—will provide special opportunities to study the relationship between a particular work and the history and culture in which it is grounded. Throughout we will seek to define and elucidate a genuine national literature that is powerful, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America’s past and present are immense.

Texts: McMichael, ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 6th ed.; Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar; Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Cormac McCarthy, The Road.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes & Disc. Section Participation, 15%; First Exam, 25%; Second Exam, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance for all class meetings  [See Course Policy Statement]

Discussion Sessions with your respective TAs are mandatory. TA sessions may frequently include 10-20 question quizzes.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

35325 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35325            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  Longhorn Scholars

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course will examine American literature from the Enlightenment era of 18th-century America through the end of the 20th century. We will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will seek to define, if possible, a genuine national literature that is strong, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America past and present are immense.

Texts: Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Street, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Van Jordan, M-a-c-n-o-l-i-a; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Packet of short stories and poems

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes, 25%; Mid-Term Exam, 20%; Essay, 20%; Final Exam, 25%; Class Participation, 10%

E 344L • Australian Literature & Film

35800 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35800            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: In this course we will study the history, geography, and culture of Australia as reflected in literature and film. We will begin with background lectures on the founding of Australia, its origins as a penal colony, and the question of whether British-colonized Australia was a “gulag,” as Robert Hughes maintains in The Fatal Shore, or an early instance of imperial globalism. Turning from the First Fleet (Jan. 26, 1788), we will read a modern text, Robyn Davidson’s travel narrative, Tracks (1980), to get a feel for the unique geography of the Outback and the engagement of White Australia with the original inhabitants of this nation, the Aboriginals. Davidson’s feminist perspective on Australia offers irresistible reading.  Then we will view the film Walkabout, which provides an excellent visual introduction to landscape, Europeanism, and Aboriginal culture. Then, back to the past, to the 1890s and the creation of an Australian archetype: the Drover’s Wife. We will begin by reading Henry Lawson’s seminal story, “The Drover’s Wife,” and read an amazing sequence of Drover’s Wife stories to the end of the twentieth century, including “The Drover’s De facto,” “The Driver’s Wife,” and “The Wife’s Drover.” Once again, we return to the historical record. Australia’s development of a national identity, the transition from colony to nation, will be grounded in the film Gallipoli (Peter Weir, 1982). From this point we turn to the last seminal moment to be studied in the course, the election of a Labor government in 1972 and the development of a new sense of history, culture, and creativity. In this vein we will read the urban fiction of two of Australia’s most important short story writers, Michael Wilding and Frank Moorhouse; we will also try to sort out the complicated fictional and metafictional exchange taking place between their stories written about each other and the culture of modern Australia. Finally, we will read Kate Jennings’ Snake, a recent novel of great power and intensity that takes us back to the “dead heart”—the arid interior—in the form of a compressed and highly innovative family saga about feminism, masculinity, and Australia. When you’re finished with this course, the inevitable thing to do, I hope, is to book passage to Oz.

Texts: Robyn Davidson, Tracks; Australian Literature & Film (Co-op Packet); Michael Wilding:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Frank Moorehouse:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Kate Jennings, Snake.

Requirements & Grading: Midterm, 40%; Final, 40%; One short paper, 10%; Attendance & class participation, 10%.

E F316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

83470 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm WAG 101
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  83470            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in history --

Because this course covers the broad range of American literature, nearly four centuries of writing, it will necessarily involve a rich variety of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. We will begin by examining the origins of American literature from its colonial beginnings in New England in the 17th century through the Enlightenment of the 18th century and the particular brand of Romanticism that marked the early 19th century. Then we will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will be particularly interested cultural context, psychological underpinnings, and gender representations. Our longer texts, by Crane, Kesey, O’Brien, and McCarthy, will provide special opportunities to study the dense relationship between a particular work and the history and culture in which it is grounded. Throughout we will seek to define and elucidate a genuine national literature that is powerful, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America’s past and present are immense.

Texts: McMichael, ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 7th ed.; Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings; Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest; Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Cormac McCarthy, The Road.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes & Discussion Section Participation, 15%; Midterm Exam, 40%; Final Exam, 45%.

Punctual attendance to all class meetings [See Course Policy Statement].

E S316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

83700 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm WAG 101
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  -- / B

Unique #:  83700            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in history --

Because this course covers the broad range of American literature, nearly four centuries of writing, it will necessarily involve a rich variety of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. We will begin by examining the origins of American literature from its colonial beginnings in New England in the 17th century through the Enlightenment of the 18th century and the particular brand of Romanticism that marked the early 19th century. Then we will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will be particularly interested cultural context, psychological underpinnings, and gender representations. Our longer texts, by Crane, Kesey, O’Brien, and McCarthy, will provide special opportunities to study the dense relationship between a particular work and the history and culture in which it is grounded. Throughout we will seek to define and elucidate a genuine national literature that is powerful, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America’s past and present are immense.

Texts: McMichael, ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 7th ed.; Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings; Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest; Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Cormac McCarthy, The Road.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes & Discussion Section Participation, 15%; Midterm Exam, 40%; Final Exam, 45%.

Punctual attendance to all class meetings [See Course Policy Statement].

E 324 • Literary Marriages From Hell

35340 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm PAR 203
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  Elective / U

Unique #:  35340            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Tom and Viv & Anne and Kayo & Sylvia and Ted and Assia --

The personal lives of authors nearly always find their ways into their works and none more so than in the case of these three pairs of star-crossed marriages: the great twentieth century poet T. S. Eliot and his wife Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot, the victim of a gross medical misdiagnosis; the confessional poet Anne Sexton and her long suffering husband, Albert “Kayo” Sexton; and, of course, the infamous entanglement and tragedy of poets Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, and Hughes’s lover Assia Wevill. Out of the ashes of these tortured unions and private agonies rose literary and enduring masterpieces. We will use the tools of biography, memoir, letters, and above all, the words of the principals, both in their creative and private lives, to decipher and explicate some of the canonical texts and tropes of the twentieth century. For the Eliots we will focus on that most personal of “impersonal” poems, The Waste Land. We will also view the feature film Tom and Viv. We’ll study the collected poems of Anne Sexton and excerpts from Diane Middlebrook’s biography of Sexton. In the case of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes we will read selected Plath poetry, selections from her journals, and the novel published just before her death, The Bell Jar. We will read Hughes’s last collection of poetry, Birthday Letters, a deeply personal response to the tragic end of their marriage and of Plath’s life. We will see the recent film Sylvia, with Gwyneth Paltrow and Daniel Craig (as Hughes). And, finally, we will read a fascinating biography, Lover of Unreason, the story of Assia Wevill, the largely forgotten “other woman” in the lives of Hughes and Plath. Both the literature and behind-the-scenes material are amazingly haunting and unforgettable documents that testify to the professional and private angst in the bid to join the literary pantheon.

Texts: (tentative list) T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems; Anne Sexton, The Collected Poems; Sylvia Plath, The Collected Poems and The Bell Jar; Ted Hughes, Birthday Letters; Yehuda Koren and Eilat Negev, Lover of Unreason.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes and Class Participation, 20%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay, 25%; Final Exam, 30%.

E 362L • British Novel In 20th Century

35585 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 208
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35585 & 35590            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will begin our study of the modern British novel with D. H. Lawrence. In Sons and Lovers Lawrence uses the form of the bildungsroman to chart the psychological and sexual parameters of British working class culture. Our second novel, To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf, introduces stunning narrative innovations, tracing the complex interrelationships of a family affected by the tyranny and blessings of love amidst a sea of change. From there we turn to Jean Rhys’ Voyage in the Dark, a naturalistic study of a young woman from the Caribbean who struggles to make her way in a predatory male culture in Great Britain based on gender, class, and economic power. From the post World War II era we will read John Fowles’ The Collector, a dark, gripping story of class, obsession, and the unfulfilled life. After that we return in our reading to the earlier part of the century with Pat Barker’s Regeneration, a profound study of the physical and psychological trauma of the Great War. We will end with a psychological thriller, Patrick McGrath’s Asylum, employing a classic unreliable narrator who relates a 1950s tale of sexual obsession, familial loss, and the descent into madness.

Texts: D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark; John Fowles, The Collector; Pat Barker, Regeneration; Patrick McGrath, Asylum.

Requirements & Grading: Class Participation, 15%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay Assignment, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance of all class meetings (to be explained further in course policy handout).

E 362L • British Novel In 20th Century

35590 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35585 & 35590            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will begin our study of the modern British novel with D. H. Lawrence. In Sons and Lovers Lawrence uses the form of the bildungsroman to chart the psychological and sexual parameters of British working class culture. Our second novel, To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf, introduces stunning narrative innovations, tracing the complex interrelationships of a family affected by the tyranny and blessings of love amidst a sea of change. From there we turn to Jean Rhys’ Voyage in the Dark, a naturalistic study of a young woman from the Caribbean who struggles to make her way in a predatory male culture in Great Britain based on gender, class, and economic power. From the post World War II era we will read John Fowles’ The Collector, a dark, gripping story of class, obsession, and the unfulfilled life. After that we return in our reading to the earlier part of the century with Pat Barker’s Regeneration, a profound study of the physical and psychological trauma of the Great War. We will end with a psychological thriller, Patrick McGrath’s Asylum, employing a classic unreliable narrator who relates a 1950s tale of sexual obsession, familial loss, and the descent into madness.

Texts: D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark; John Fowles, The Collector; Pat Barker, Regeneration; Patrick McGrath, Asylum.

Requirements & Grading: Class Participation, 15%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay Assignment, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance of all class meetings (to be explained further in course policy handout).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34945-34990 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JES A121A
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  34945-34990            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History--

Because this course covers the broad range of American literature, nearly four centuries of writing, it will necessarily involve a rich variety of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. We will begin by examining the origins of American literature from its colonial beginnings in New England in the 17th century through the Enlightenment of the 18th century and the particular brand of Romanticism that marked the early 19th century. Then we will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will be particularly interested in women and minority writers, and certain longer texts—by Crane, Plath, O’Brien, and McCarthy—will provide special opportunities to study the relationship between a particular work and the history and culture in which it is grounded. Throughout we will seek to define and elucidate a genuine national literature that is powerful, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America’s past and present are immense.

Texts: McMichael, ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 6th ed.; Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar; Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Cormac McCarthy, The Road.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes & Disc. Section Participation, 15%; First Exam, 25%; Second Exam, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance for all class meetings  [See Course Policy Statement]

Discussion Sessions with your respective TAs are mandatory. TA sessions may frequently include 10-20 question quizzes.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

35095 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 203
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35095            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  Longhorn Scholars

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course will examine American literature from the Enlightenment era of 18th-century America through the end of the 20th century. We will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will seek to define, if possible, a genuine national literature that is strong, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America past and present are immense.

Texts: Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Street, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Van Jordan, M-a-c-n-o-l-i-a; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Packet of short stories and poems

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes, 25%; Mid-Term Exam, 20%; Essay, 20%; Final Exam, 25%; Class Participation, 10%

E 344L • Australian Literature & Film

35440 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 306
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35440            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: In this course we will study the history, geography, and culture of Australia as reflected in literature and film. We will begin with background lectures on the founding of Australia, its origins as a penal colony, and the question of whether British-colonized Australia was a “gulag,” as Robert Hughes maintains in The Fatal Shore, or an early instance of imperial globalism. Turning from the First Fleet (Jan. 26, 1788), we will read a modern text, Robyn Davidson’s travel narrative, Tracks (1980), to get a feel for the unique geography of the Outback and the engagement of White Australia with the original inhabitants of this nation, the Aboriginals. Davidson’s feminist perspective on Australia offers irresistible reading.  Then we will view the film Walkabout, which provides an excellent visual introduction to landscape, Europeanism, and Aboriginal culture. Then, back to the past, to the 1890s and the creation of an Australian archetype: the Drover’s Wife. We will begin by reading Henry Lawson’s seminal story, “The Drover’s Wife,” and read an amazing sequence of Drover’s Wife stories to the end of the twentieth century, including “The Drover’s De facto,” “The Driver’s Wife,” and “The Wife’s Drover.” Once again, we return to the historical record. Australia’s development of a national identity, the transition from colony to nation, will be grounded in the film Gallipoli (Peter Weir, 1982). From this point we turn to the last seminal moment to be studied in the course, the election of a Labor government in 1972 and the development of a new sense of history, culture, and creativity. In this vein we will read the urban fiction of two of Australia’s most important short story writers, Michael Wilding and Frank Moorhouse; we will also try to sort out the complicated fictional and metafictional exchange taking place between their stories written about each other and the culture of modern Australia. Finally, we will read Kate Jennings’ Snake, a recent novel of great power and intensity that takes us back to the “dead heart”—the arid interior—in the form of a compressed and highly innovative family saga about feminism, masculinity, and Australia. When you’re finished with this course, the inevitable thing to do, I hope, is to book passage to Oz.

Texts: Robyn Davidson, Tracks; Australian Literature & Film (Co-op Packet); Michael Wilding:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Frank Moorehouse:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Kate Jennings, Snake.

Requirements & Grading: Midterm, 40%; Final, 40%; One short paper, 10%; Attendance & class participation, 10%.

E F316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

83595 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAI 3.02
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  83595            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in history --

Because this course covers the broad range of American literature, nearly four centuries of writing, it will necessarily involve a rich variety of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. We will begin by examining the origins of American literature from its colonial beginnings in New England in the 17th century through the Enlightenment of the 18th century and the particular brand of Romanticism that marked the early 19th century. Then we will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will be particularly interested cultural context, psychological underpinnings, and gender representations. Our longer texts, by Crane, Kesey, O’Brien, and McCarthy, will provide special opportunities to study the dense relationship between a particular work and the history and culture in which it is grounded. Throughout we will seek to define and elucidate a genuine national literature that is powerful, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America’s past and present are immense.

Texts: McMichael, ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 7th ed.; Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings; Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest; Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Cormac McCarthy, The Road.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes & Discussion Section Participation, 15%; Midterm Exam, 40%; Final Exam, 45%.

Punctual attendance to all class meetings [See Course Policy Statement].

E S316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

83827 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm PAR 210
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  83827            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course will examine American literature from the Enlightenment era of 18th-century America through the end of the 20th century. We will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will seek to define, if possible, a genuine national literature that is strong, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America past and present are immense.

Texts: Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Street, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Van Jordan, M-a-c-n-o-l-i-a; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Packet of short stories and poems.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes, 25%; Mid-Term Exam, 20%; Essay, 20%; Final Exam, 25%; Class Participation, 10%

E 324 • Literary Marriages From Hell

35210 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm PAR 203
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35210            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Restricted to non-English majors.

E 322 and 324 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Only one of the following may be counted unless the topics vary: E 320M, 324, 376L, 379M, 379N.

May not be counted toward a major in English.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Tom and Viv & Anne and Kayo & Sylvia and Ted and Assia -- The personal lives of authors nearly always find their ways into their works and none more so than in the case of these three pairs of star-crossed marriages: the great twentieth century poet T. S. Eliot and his wife Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot, the victim of a gross medical misdiagnosis; the confessional poet Anne Sexton and her long suffering husband, Albert “Kayo” Sexton; and, of course, the infamous entanglement and tragedy of poets Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, and Hughes’s lover Assia Wevill. Out of the ashes of these tortured unions and private agonies rose literary and enduring masterpieces. We will use the tools of biography, memoir, letters, and above all, the words of the principals, both in their creative and private lives, to decipher and explicate some of the canonical texts and tropes of the twentieth century. For the Eliots we will focus on that most personal of “impersonal” poems, The Waste Land. We will also view the feature film Tom and Viv. We’ll study the collected poems of Anne Sexton and excerpts from Diane Middlebrook’s biography of Sexton. In the case of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes we will read selected Plath poetry, selections from her journals, and the novel published just before her death, The Bell Jar. We will read Hughes’s last collection of poetry, Birthday Letters, a deeply personal response to the tragic end of their marriage and of Plath’s life. We will see the recent film Sylvia, with Gwyneth Paltrow and Daniel Craig (as Hughes). And, finally, we will read a fascinating biography, Lover of Unreason, the story of Assia Wevill, the largely forgotten “other woman” in the lives of Hughes and Plath. Both the literature and behind-the-scenes material are amazingly haunting and unforgettable documents that testify to the professional and private angst in the bid to join the literary pantheon.

Texts: (tentative list) T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems; Anne Sexton, The Collected Poems; Sylvia Plath, The Collected Poems and The Bell Jar; Ted Hughes, Birthday Letters; Yehuda Koren and Eilat Negev, Lover of Unreason.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes and Class Participation, 20%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay, 25%; Final Exam, 30%.

E 362L • British Novel In 20th Century

35385 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 208
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35385           Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will begin our study of the modern British novel with D. H. Lawrence. In Sons and Lovers Lawrence uses the form of the bildungsroman to chart the psychological and sexual parameters of British working class culture. Our second novel, To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf, introduces stunning narrative innovations, tracing the complex interrelationships of a family affected by the tyranny and blessings of love amidst a sea of change. From there we turn to Jean Rhys’ Voyage in the Dark, a naturalistic study of a young woman from the Caribbean who struggles to make her way in a predatory male culture in Great Britain based on gender, class, and economic power. From the post World War II era we will read John Fowles’ The Collector, a dark, gripping story of class, obsession, and the unfulfilled life. After that we return in our reading to the earlier part of the century with Pat Barker’s Regeneration, a profound study of the physical and psychological trauma of the Great War. We will end with a psychological thriller, Patrick McGrath’s Asylum, employing a classic unreliable narrator who relates a 1950s tale of sexual obsession, familial loss, and the descent into madness.

Texts: D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark; John Fowles, The Collector; Pat Barker, Regeneration; Patrick McGrath, Asylum.

Requirements & Grading: Class Participation, 15%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay Assignment, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance of all class meetings (to be explained further in course policy handout).

E 362L • British Novel In 20th Century

35390 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Berry, B            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35390            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will begin our study of the modern British novel with D. H. Lawrence. In Sons and Lovers Lawrence uses the form of the bildungsroman to chart the psychological and sexual parameters of British working class culture. Our second novel, To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf, introduces stunning narrative innovations, tracing the complex interrelationships of a family affected by the tyranny and blessings of love amidst a sea of change. From there we turn to Jean Rhys’ Voyage in the Dark, a naturalistic study of a young woman from the Caribbean who struggles to make her way in a predatory male culture in Great Britain based on gender, class, and economic power. From the post World War II era we will read John Fowles’ The Collector, a dark, gripping story of class, obsession, and the unfulfilled life. After that we return in our reading to the earlier part of the century with Pat Barker’s Regeneration, a profound study of the physical and psychological trauma of the Great War. We will end with a psychological thriller, Patrick McGrath’s Asylum, employing a classic unreliable narrator who relates a 1950s tale of sexual obsession, familial loss, and the descent into madness.

Texts: D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark; John Fowles, The Collector; Pat Barker, Regeneration; Patrick McGrath, Asylum.

Requirements & Grading: Class Participation, 15%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay Assignment, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance of all class meetings (to be explained further in course policy handout).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34690-34730 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm JES A121A
show description

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: Literature in History--

Because this course covers the broad range of American literature, nearly four centuries of writing, it will necessarily involve a rich variety of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. We will begin by examining the origins of American literature from its colonial beginnings in New England in the 17th century through the Enlightenment of the 18th century and the particular brand of Romanticism that marked the early 19th century. Then we will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will be particularly interested in women and minority writers, and certain longer texts—by Crane, Plath, O’Brien, and McCarthy—will provide special opportunities to study the relationship between a particular work and the history and culture in which it is grounded. Throughout we will seek to define and elucidate a genuine national literature that is powerful, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America’s past and present are immense. 

Texts: McMichael, ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 6th ed.; Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar; Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Cormac McCarthy, The Road.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes & Disc. Section Participation, 15%; First Exam, 25%; Second Exam, 30%; Final Exam, 30%.

Punctual attendance for all class meetings  [See Course Policy Statement]

Discussion Sessions with your respective TAs are mandatory. TA sessions may frequently include 10-20 question quizzes.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34885 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 310
show description

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This course will examine American literature from the Enlightenment era of 18th-century America through the end of the 20th century. We will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will seek to define, if possible, a genuine national literature that is strong, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America past and present are immense. 

Texts: Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Street, and Other New York Writings; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Van Jordan, M-a-c-n-o-l-i-a; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Packet of short stories and poems

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes, 25%; Mid-Term Exam, 20%; Essay, 20%; Final Exam, 25%; Class Participation, 10%

E 344L • Australian Literature & Film

35305 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CPE 2.206
show description

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

 Description: In this course we will study the history, geography, and culture of Australia as reflected in literature and film. We will begin with background lectures on the founding of Australia, its origins as a penal colony, and the question of whether British-colonized Australia was a “gulag,” as Robert Hughes maintains in The Fatal Shore, or an early instance of imperial globalism. Turning from the First Fleet (Jan. 26, 1788), we will read a modern text, Robyn Davidson’s travel narrative, Tracks (1980), to get a feel for the unique geography of the Outback and the engagement of White Australia with the original inhabitants of this nation, the Aboriginals. Davidson’s feminist perspective on Australia offers irresistible reading.  Then we will view the film Walkabout, which provides an excellent visual introduction to landscape, Europeanism, and Aboriginal culture. Then, back to the past, to the 1890s and the creation of an Australian archetype: the Drover’s Wife. We will begin by reading Henry Lawson’s seminal story, “The Drover’s Wife,” and read an amazing sequence of Drover’s Wife stories to the end of the twentieth century, including “The Drover’s De facto,” “The Driver’s Wife,” and “The Wife’s Drover.” Once again, we return to the historical record. Australia’s development of a national identity, the transition from colony to nation, will be grounded in the film Gallipoli (Peter Weir, 1982). From this point we turn to the last seminal moment to be studied in the course, the election of a Labor government in 1972 and the development of a new sense of history, culture, and creativity. In this vein we will read the urban fiction of two of Australia’s most important short story writers, Michael Wilding and Frank Moorhouse; we will also try to sort out the complicated fictional and metafictional exchange taking place between their stories written about each other and the culture of modern Australia. Finally, we will read Kate Jennings’ Snake, a recent novel of great power and intensity that takes us back to the “dead heart”—the arid interior—in the form of a compressed and highly innovative family saga about feminism, masculinity, and Australia. When you’re finished with this course, the inevitable thing to do, I hope, is to book passage to Oz. 

Texts: Robyn Davidson, Tracks; Australian Literature & Film (Co-op Packet); Michael Wilding:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Frank Moorehouse:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Kate Jennings, Snake.

Requirements & Grading: Midterm, 40%; Final, 40%; One short paper, 10%; Attendance & class participation, 10%.

E F316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

83530 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm PAI 3.02
show description

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

 

Description: Literature in history --

Because this course covers the broad range of American literature, nearly four centuries of writing, it will necessarily involve a rich variety of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. We will begin by examining the origins of American literature from its colonial beginnings in New England in the 17th century through the Enlightenment of the 18th century and the particular brand of Romanticism that marked the early 19th century. Then we will focus on a myriad of American voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, noting, as we proceed, both continuities and innovations. We will be particularly interested cultural context, psychological underpinnings, and gender representations. Our longer texts, by Crane, Kesey, O’Brien, and McCarthy, will provide special opportunities to study the dense relationship between a particular work and the history and culture in which it is grounded. Throughout we will seek to define and elucidate a genuine national literature that is powerful, multicultural, and inclusive. There is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, but the rewards in seeking to understand America’s past and present are immense.

 

Texts: McMichael, ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 7th ed.; Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings; Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest; Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods; Cormac McCarthy, The Road.

 

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes & Discussion Section Participation, 15%; Midterm Exam, 40%; Final Exam, 45%.

 

Punctual attendance to all class meetings [See Course Policy Statement].

E 324 • Literary Marriages From Hell

35425 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 201
show description

This course is not applicable towards English Major requirements.

 

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Tom and Viv & Anne and Kayo & Sylvia and Ted and Assia -- The personal lives of authors nearly always find their ways into their works and none more so than in the case of these three pairs of star-crossed marriages: the great twentieth century poet T. S. Eliot and his wife Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot, the victim of a gross medical misdiagnosis; the confessional poet Anne Sexton and her long suffering husband, Albert “Kayo” Sexton; and, of course, the infamous entanglement and tragedy of poets Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, and Hughes’s lover Assia Wevill. Out of the ashes of these tortured unions and private agonies rose literary and enduring masterpieces. We will use the tools of biography, memoir, letters, and above all, the words of the principals, both in their creative and private lives, to decipher and explicate some of the canonical texts and tropes of the twentieth century. For the Eliots we will focus on that most personal of “impersonal” poems, The Waste Land. We will also view the feature film Tom and Viv. We’ll study the collected poems of Anne Sexton and excerpts from Diane Middlebrook’s biography of Sexton. In the case of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes we will read selected Plath poetry, selections from her journals, and the novel published just before her death, The Bell Jar. We will read Hughes’s last collection of poetry, Birthday Letters, a deeply personal response to the tragic end of their marriage and of Plath’s life. We will see the recent film Sylvia, with Gwyneth Paltrow and Daniel Craig (as Hughes). And, finally, we will read a fascinating biography, Lover of Unreason, the story of Assia Wevill, the largely forgotten “other woman” in the lives of Hughes and Plath. Both the literature and behind-the-scenes material are amazingly haunting and unforgettable documents that testify to the professional and private angst in the bid to join the literary pantheon. 

Texts: (tentative list) T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems; Anne Sexton, The Collected Poems; Sylvia Plath, The Collected Poems and The Bell Jar; Ted Hughes, Birthday Letters; Yehuda Koren and Eilat Negev, Lover of Unreason.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes and Class Participation, 20%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay, 25%; Final Exam, 30%.

E 344L • Australian Literature & Film

34650 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm PAR 301
show description

Course Description: In this course we will study the history, geography, and culture of Australia as reflected in literature and film. We will begin with background lectures on the founding of Australia, its origins as a penal colony, and the question of whether British-colonized Australia was a “gulag,” as Robert Hughes maintains in The Fatal Shore, or an early instance of imperial globalism. Turning from the First Fleet (Jan. 26, 1788), we will read a modern text, Robyn Davidson’s travel narrative, Tracks (1980), to get a feel for the unique geography of the Outback and the engagement of White Australia with the original inhabitants of this nation, the Aboriginals. Davidson’s feminist perspective on Australia offers irresistible reading.  Then we will view the film Walkabout, which provides an excellent visual introduction to landscape, Europeanism, and Aboriginal culture. Then, back to the past, to the 1890s and the creation of an Australian archetype: the Drover’s Wife. We will begin by reading Henry Lawson’s seminal story, “The Drover’s Wife,” and read an amazing sequence of Drover’s Wife stories to the end of the twentieth century, including “The Drover’s De facto,” “The Driver’s Wife,” and “The Wife’s Drover.” Once again, we return to the historical record. Australia’s development of a national identity, the transition from colony to nation, will be grounded in the film Gallipoli (Peter Weir, 1982). From this point we turn to the last seminal moment to be studied in the course, the election of a Labor government in 1972 and the development of a new sense of history, culture, and creativity. In this vein we will read the urban fiction of two of Australia’s most important short story writers, Michael Wilding and Frank Moorhouse; we will also try to sort out the complicated fictional and metafictional exchange taking place between their stories written about each other and the culture of modern Australia. Finally, we will read Kate Jennings’ Snake, a recent novel of great power and intensity that takes us back to the “dead heart”—the arid interior—in the form of a compressed and highly innovative family saga about feminism, masculinity, and Australia. When you’re finished with this course, the inevitable thing to do, I hope, is to book passage to Oz.

Texts: Robyn Davidson, Tracks; Australian Literature & Film (Co-op Packet); Michael Wilding:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Frank Moorehouse:  Selected Stories (Co-op Packet); Kate Jennings, Snake.

Grading: Midterm, 40%; Final, 40%; One short paper, 10%; Attendance & class participation, 10%.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

E 362L • British Novel In 20th Century

34770 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 201
show description

Course Description: We will begin our study of the modern British novel with D. H. Lawrence. In Sons and Lovers Lawrence uses the form of the bildungsroman to chart the psychological and sexual parameters of British working class culture. Our second novel, To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf, introduces stunning narrative innovations, tracing the complex interrelationships of a family affected by the tyranny and blessings of love amidst a sea of change. From there we turn to Jean Rhys’ Voyage in the Dark, a naturalistic study of a young woman from the Caribbean who struggles to make her way in a predatory male culture in Great Britain based on gender, class, and economic power. From the post World War II era we will read John Fowles’ The Collector, a dark, gripping story of class, obsession, and the unfulfilled life. After that we return in our reading to the earlier part of the century with Pat Barker’s Regeneration, a profound study of the physical and psychological trauma of the Great War. We will end with a psychological thriller, Patrick McGrath’s Asylum, employing a classic unreliable narrator who relates a 1950s tale of sexual obsession, familial loss, and the descent into madness.

Texts: D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark; John Fowles, The Collector; Pat Barker, Regeneration; Patrick McGrath, Asylum.

Grading: Class Participation, 15%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay Assignment, 30%; Final Exam, 30%. Punctual attendance of all class meetings (to be explained further in course policy handout).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 362L • British Novel In 20th Century

34775 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 301
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Course Description: We will begin our study of the modern British novel with D. H. Lawrence. In Sons and Lovers Lawrence uses the form of the bildungsroman to chart the psychological and sexual parameters of British working class culture. Our second novel, To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf, introduces stunning narrative innovations, tracing the complex interrelationships of a family affected by the tyranny and blessings of love amidst a sea of change. From there we turn to Jean Rhys’ Voyage in the Dark, a naturalistic study of a young woman from the Caribbean who struggles to make her way in a predatory male culture in Great Britain based on gender, class, and economic power. From the post World War II era we will read John Fowles’ The Collector, a dark, gripping story of class, obsession, and the unfulfilled life. After that we return in our reading to the earlier part of the century with Pat Barker’s Regeneration, a profound study of the physical and psychological trauma of the Great War. We will end with a psychological thriller, Patrick McGrath’s Asylum, employing a classic unreliable narrator who relates a 1950s tale of sexual obsession, familial loss, and the descent into madness.

Texts: D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark; John Fowles, The Collector; Pat Barker, Regeneration; Patrick McGrath, Asylum.

Grading: Class Participation, 15%; Mid-Term Exam, 25%; Essay Assignment, 30%; Final Exam, 30%. Punctual attendance of all class meetings (to be explained further in course policy handout).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34105 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm PAR 310
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English 316K Longhorn Scholars - 34105   Dr. Berry
Masterworks of American Literature   Calhoun 303
Spring 2010, MWF 12-12:50 pm   Off. Hrs.: MWF 1-2 pm
Parlin 310   bbarama@mail.utexas.edu

REQUIRED TEXTS and REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS:

PURCHASE ALL AT BEGINNING OF THE SEMESTER!

  • E 316K LHS Course Packet, Berry (University Co-op)
  • Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings (NY: Modern Library, 1893; rpt. 2001)
  • Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman: Certain Private Conversations in Two Acts and a Requiem (Penguin, 1949; rpt. 1977)
  • Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1962; Penguin rpt. 1976)
  • Cormac McCarthy, The Road (Vintage Books, 2006)

We will see a film of a Death of a Salesman production in its entirety.  All film footage shown in class will be subject to examinations the same as written texts (as will class discussions, handouts, and any other materials presented during the course).

Course Prerequisites:

Completion of at least 27 semester hours of coursework, including Rhetoric and Composition 306 or the equivalent, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test (or an appropriate assessment test).

Course Objectives: 

This course is designed to provide an overview of selected American literary voices in poems, short stories, two novels, and a play.  We will examine author biographies and a close reading of the texts, including the contextual, historical, cultural and ideological background information that gave rise to such works.

Course Materials Required:

All course textbooks and course packet listed above, a notebook reserved solely for notetaking for this course (any kind you prefer), a pen (tests must be taken in pen), 6 medium-sized bluebooks (blank exam books; 2 needed per test), and notepaper (for occasional use with quizzes which does not have a perforated edge).

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. 

Grade Percentages: 

25%            EXAM 1 [March 8th & 10th]
25%            EXAM 2 [April 21st & 23rd]
30%            EXAM 3/FINAL EXAM  [Saturday, May 15th, 2-5 pm]
20%            Attendance, attendance, attendance! Participation, focus, enthusiasm!
Quiz average. (I’ll explain about quizzes in detail in class).

All Exams must be taken to receive a passing final grade in the course.

No final plus-or-minus grades will be given in this course.

* Have your reading assignments completed by their corresponding date on the syllabus!  The importance of completing these readings by their lecture date cannot be overemphasized. Otherwise you will get significantly less context and comprehension from the lectures, a key and stone-cold fact to consider if your goal is to score high on the course exams.  Check several classes ahead to prepare for longer readings.  Readings not specified on syllabus as * separate text * or * handout * are in your Co-op Course Packet. *

* IT IS MANDATORY THAT EACH STUDENT BRING WITH HIM/HER THE TEXT(S) WE ARE WORKING ON AND A PEN AND NOTE TAKING MATERIAL TO EVERY CLASS. *

Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: American

34265-34310 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JES A121A
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Unique #s:

34265
34270
34275
34280
34285
34290
34295
34300
34305

34310

English 316K, 34265-34310   Dr. B. Berry    
Masterworks of American Literature   Calhoun 303    
Spring 2010, T Th 12:30-1:45 pm   Office Hrs.: MWF 1-2 p.m.    
JES A121A   bbarama@mail.utexas.edu    
         

Required Course Texts

 
o George McMichael, general ed., Concise Anthology of American Literature, 7th Edition  
(Prentice Hall, 2006)        
o Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets, and Other New York Writings, (1893;  
Random House Modern Library rpt. 2001)  
o Ken Kasey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1962; Penguin rpt. 1976)  
o Tim O’Brien, In the Lake of the Woods (1994; Houghton Mifflin rpt. 2008)  
o Cormac McCarthy, The Road (Vintage International/Random House, 2006)  
         
* Have your reading assignments completed by their corresponding date on the syllabus.  The importance of completing these readings by their lecture date cannot be overemphasized. Otherwise you will get significantly less context and comprehension from the lectures, a key and stone-cold fact to consider if your goal is to score high on the course exams.  Check several classes ahead to prepare for longer readings.  BRING THE APPROPRIATE TEXT OR TEXTS TO BOTH LECTURE & DISC. SECTION. *
         
All films or film footage will be subject to examinations the same as written texts.  Prepare to see all films in class, as pertinent discussions and lecture notes will accompany their viewing.  All handouts are considered texts as well and therefore subject to exam questions.
         

Course Prerequisites:

Completion of at least 27 semester hours of coursework, including Rhetoric and Composition 306 or the equivalent, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test (or an appropriate assessment test).

       

Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. 

         

Grading Percentages

       
25% — Exam 1  [Tuesday, 2/16] Rearrange any plans you might have for all 3 fixed exam dates.
25% — Exam 2  [Thursday, 3/25]
35% — Final Exam/Exam 3 [Wed., 5/12; location TBA]
15% — Discussion Section Performance:  pop quiz average (2-3 grades will be dropped, must be 
present in Section to take quizzes; no make-ups), attendance, and general participation.

No final course grades of plus or minus grades will be given in this course.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 324 • Literary Marriages From Hell

34705 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 206
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Literary Marriages From Hell:  Tom & Viv and Scott & Zelda and Sylvia & Ted & Assia


English 324, 34705

Dr. Berry

Literary Marriages from Hell

Calhoun 303

Spring 2010, T Th 3:30-4:45 pm

Office Hours: MWF 1-2 pm, or 

PAR 206

        email Felipe for an appt.

TA: Felipe Cruz, ffcruz85@gmail.com

bbarama@mail.utexas.edu

Required Texts: 

o T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems (Modern Library, 1922; rpt. 2002)
o F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tender is the Night (Scribner, 1933; rpt. 2003)
o Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar (Perennial Classics, 1963/1971; rpt. 1999)
o Sylvia Plath, Ariel (Perennial Classics, 1961; rpt. 1999)
o Ted Hughes, Birthday Letters (Farrar Straus Giroux, 1998)
* I will provide numerous class handouts and short texts & visuals for view on doc cam.

*  PLEASE BRING THE APPROPRIATE TEXT OR TEXTS TO CLASS EACH DAY. *

Grade Percentages:

Exam 1:   20%
Exam 2:   20%
Exam 3:   30%
Paper:     20%
Class Participation/Involvement/Focus & Enthusiasm: 10%

No final plus-or-minus grades will be given in this courseAll 3 exams must be completed.

Course Description:

LITERARY MARRIAGES FROM HELL: 

Tom & Viv (Eliot) and Scott & Zelda (Fitzgerald) and Sylvia (Plath) & Ted (Hughes) & Assia (Wevill)

The personal lives of authors nearly always find their ways into their works and none more so than in the case of these three pairs of star-crossed marriages:  the Eliots, the Fitzgeralds, and Plath, Hughes & Wevill triangle.  Out of the ashes of their tortured marriages and private agonies rose some literary masterpieces and many enduring works.  We will use the tools of biography, memoir, letters, and above all, the words of the principals, both in their creative and private lives, to decipher and explicate some of the major texts of the twentieth century.  With the Eliots we will focus on that most personal of “impersonal” poems, The Waste Land.  We will also view the film Tom and Viv

For F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, we will read Scott’s Tender is the Night and a few stories and essays by Zelda.  We will also see an A&E “Tortured Artists Series” documentary about Scott and Zelda: F. Scott Fitzgerald:  The Great American Dreamer.

In the case of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes we will read Plath’s poetry and selections from her journals and her novel, The Bell Jar.  We will read Hughes’s last collection of poetry, Birthday Letters, a belated response to the tragic end of their marriage and of Plath’s life.  We will see the recent film Sylvia, with Gwyneth Paltrow and Daniel Craig portraying Plath and Hughes.  And we will read excerpts from a recent book on the Plath/Hughes/Wevill triangle: Lover of Unreason: Assia Wevill, Sylvia Plath’s Rival and Ted Hughes’s Doomed Love  (2006).

In this course the literature, art, and behind-the-scenes material are amazingly haunting and unforgettable documents that testify to the professional and private angst in the participants’ bid to join the literary pantheon.  

Films: 

Feature film Tom and Viv
documentary FSF
Great American Dreamer
feature film Sylvia
(rare) documentary Sylvia Plath: Voices & Visions (featuring Plath herself)

All films or film footage will be subject to examinations the same as written texts.  Prepare to see all films in class, as pertinent discussions and lecture notes will accompany their viewing.  All handouts are considered texts as well and therefore subject to exam questions.

Course Prerequisites:

Completion of at least 30 semester hours of coursework, including Comp Lit 315, E 603B, E 316K or TC603B.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. 

 For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 344L • Australian Literature & Film

35110 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 201
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E 344L: Australian Literature and Film (35110)

Dr. B. Berry
Fall 2009, T Th 2-3:30

Course Description:

344L Australian Literature and Film: A representative selection of Australian writing and films from the founding, 1788, to the present. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of course work in English or rhetoric or writing. The subject of each class meeting may be determined from the assigned reading for the day (see following). The instructor retains the right to vary this
syllabus.

Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For further information, please download the full syllabus.

E 362L • British Novel In 20th Century

35153 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm PAR 301
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E 362L: The British Novel in the Twentieth Century (35153, 35154)

Dr. B. Berry
Fall 2009, MWF 12 noon-12:50 p.m. (35153); MWF 2-2:50 p.m. (35154)

 

Course Description:

E 362L The British Novel in the Twentieth Century: We will begin our study of the modern British novel with Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence, who uses the form of the bildungsroman to chart the psychological and sexual parameters of British working class culture. “High Modernist” Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse traces the complex interrelationships of a family affected by the tyranny and blessings of love with the background of great historical flux. Jean Rhys’s Voyage in the Dark is a naturalistic study of a young woman from the Caribbean who struggles to survive in the predatory man’s world of England in the 1930s. John Fowles’ The Collector explores issues of class and psychological deviancy in the 1950s, and Patrick McGrath’s Asylum is a chilling tale of “morbid sexual obsession.” Finally, Sebastian Faults’ Birdsong is a profoundly moving modern recreation of the most significant historical event in twentieth century British history, the Great War (1914-1918). Through these selected voices we will learn much about both the trajectory of the novel art form as well as aspects of British class and culture. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of course work in English or rhetoric or writing. The subject of each class meeting may be determined from the assigned reading for the day (see following). The instructor retains the right to vary this syllabus.

Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For further information, please download the full syllabus.

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