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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Jerome F Bump

Professor Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley

Jerome F Bump

Contact

Biography

Jerome and Sue Bump live near Lago Vista, a mile from Lake Travis, on a little ''ranch'' named ''Pied Beauty,'' the title of a poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins. Jerome has been a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, and the recipient of the Jeanne Holloway Award for undergraduate teaching. He is the author of Gerard Manley Hopkins and sixty chapters and articles.

Interests

Gerard Manley Hopkins; Alice books; Victorian literature; literature of nature; animal humanities; digital humanities.

E 350R • Animal Humanities

35845 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 104
show description

Instructor:  Bump, J

Unique #:  35845

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Ethics and Leadership; Writing; Global Cultures (pending approval)

Computer Instruction:  Yes

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will explore the representation of animals in literature, focusing especially on the analogy between racism and cruelty to animals and between the Holocaust and factory farming, an argument made by Coetzee, Derrida, I. B. Singer, and by Monson in his documentary Earthlings. In addition to these moral issues, we will focus on the practical ethics of eating animals, animal research on this campus, etc. While most of our texts will be British or American, we will include some examples from other countries. For example, we will discuss the apparent moral superiority of the Jain, Hindu, and Buddhist attitudes toward animals. In addition to the books listed below, our course anthology will include selections from the Bible, and authors such as Montaigne, Bentham, Hopkins, Kipling, Rilke, Black Elk, Kafka, Alice Walker, Ted Hughes, and J. Frank Dobie.

Required books include Sewell’s Black Beauty and the course anthology,  a collection of xeroxed materials from Jenn's, 2000 Guadalupe (basement of the Church of Scientology at 22nd and Guadalupe, 473-8669). It will cost about $60. Jenn’s takes major credit cards, of course. If you don’t get there within the first few days you might want to call ahead to make sure they have a copy reserved for you.

Requirements & Grading: About 50% of the final grade will be determined by multimedia web projects (200 points for each project and 50 points (X2) for critiquing the projects of others); 36% by informal writing (Blogs, 360 points); and up to 24% by class participation (240 points). 1000 points (out of 1,200 or more) are required for an A-; 900 for a B-; 800 for a C-; 700 for a D-. Because more than 1200 points will be available, students can emphasize formal over informal writing or vice versa. However, at the end of the course, students will receive exactly the grade recorded in the online gradebook, even if it is one point short of the next higher grade.

E 324 • Animals In Children Literature

35700 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 104
show description

Instructor:  Bump, J            Areas:  Elective / U

Unique #:  35700            Flags:  Ethics & Leadership; Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  Yes

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, OR T C 603B.

Description: The course will be centered on the topics of ethics and leadership in literature for and about children and adolescents. We will focus on the representation of animals in children’s literature, as in, for example, Lewis Carroll’s parody of the use of animals to teach benevolence in 18th c. literature. In addition to Carroll, possible authors include Blake, Sewell, Kipling, Black Elk, Anaya, and Morpurgo.

Requirements & Grading: About 50% of the final grade will be determined by two multimedia projects (250 points each); 40% by quizzes and informal writing (400 points); and at least 10% by class discussion (100 points). 1200 points (out of 1,300 or more) are required for an A+ (unofficial grade); 1100 for an A; 1000 for an A-; 965 for a B+; 945 for a B; 900 for a B-; 865 for a C+; 845 for a C; 800 for a C-; 765 for a D+; 735 for a D; and 700 for a D-.

E 603A • Comp And Reading In World Lit

34570 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 104
show description

This version of 603 is devoted to experiential learning. In the second semester it will be a leadership/ethics “flag” course, focusing on those subjects, and a service learning course, requiring students to go out into the community and write a story to facilitate the adoption of a dog or cat who was or is on death row at the animal shelter.

In both semesters this version of E603 is for students who have already read many of the older masterworks of Western civilization and are ready to move on to masterpieces of world literature aligned with four of the six experiences required in the new core curriculum: writing, global cultures, American cultural diversity, and ethics and leadership. At U.T. and in this class especially we focus on leadership for the benefit of society, not for individual wealth. If the latter is your goal, you might want another section of this course.

Our ultimate ethics goal will be to “widen the circle of compassion,” as Einstein put it, to include not only all kinds of people but all other species as well. We will begin with analogies between factory farming, slavery, and Nazi concentration camps made by various writers and philosophers, and especially by the shocking documentary Earthlings, which will challenge us to become more mindful of ethical decisions we make daily about food, clothing, entertainment, etc. Our training in practical ethics will include evaluation of student behavior in the course.

Finally, to prepare you for your college and later careers we will cultivate digital, information, and print literacy and practice college-level writing, speaking, listening, discussing, and analyzing ideas. Grades will be based in part on meeting the two expectations employers have of college graduates: time management, and the ability to read, analyze, and follow complex, detailed directions. *

Texts/Readings:

In the first semester Lewis Carroll’s Alice on Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass will prompt discussions of leadership, discovery learning, diversity, animal ethics, and the college experience. Two novels by the Nobel Prize Winner, and U. T. alum, J. M. Coetzee, will initiate debates about the representation and treatment of animals, a topic explored also in Dobie's Longhorns and Mustangs, and many other works. Our exploration of ethics will be supported by Stephen Covey’s  7 Habits of Highly Successful People and Ram Dass’s How Can I Help? Our awareness of global cultures will be increased by Coetzee’s novel, set in Africa, along with our journey to India via Hesse's German masterpiece Siddhartha. In response to the tragedy of 9/11 we will trace the history of compassion for all creatures in world religions, especially Indian mythology, religion, and ethics. Finally, the analogies between speciesism and racism will frame our discussion of masterpieces by Native-, African-, Asian-, and Hispanic Americans, such as Black Elk Speaks, and The Bluest Eye, by Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison. To explore gender issues we will read student essays and the graphic novel, Fun Home, by Alison Bechtel. This novel also exemplifies our theme of family dynamics, explored most explicitly in the movie, Dead Poets’ Society, starring Robyn Williams.

Assignments:

Your formal writing will be four multimedia autobiographical essays about your identity, your passion, your ethics (saving an animal’s life), and your leadership vision. Your goals will be to discover your self and your beliefs and to learn how to articulate them in writing and class discussion. Informal writing will be blogs about the readings in preparation for class discussion. For more information see the detailed course description at: http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~bump/603A12/course.html

About the Professor:

Jerome Bump has been awarded a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, a N. D. E. A. Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, the Jeanne Holloway Award for undergraduate teaching, the Dad's Association Centennial Teaching Fellowship for instructing freshmen, and the Rhodes Centennial Teaching Fellowship for directing the Computer Writing and Research Laboratory (devoted primarily to lower division instruction).

E 350R • Animal Humanities

35495 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 104
show description

Instructor:  Bump, J            Areas:  V / F

Unique #:  35495            Flags:  Ethics and Leadership, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  Yes

E 350R (Topic: Animal Humanities) and 379N (Topic: Animal Humanities) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will explore the representation of animals in literature, focusing especially on the analogy between racism and cruelty to animals and between the Holocaust and factory farming, an argument made by Coetzee, Derrida, I. B. Singer, and by Monson in his documentary Earthlings. In addition to these moral issues, we will focus on the practical ethics of eating animals, vivisection research on this campus, etc. While most of our texts will be British or American, we will include some examples from other countries. For example, we will discuss the apparent moral superiority of the Jain, Hindu, and Buddhist attitudes toward animals. In addition to the books listed below, our course anthology will include selections from the Bible, and authors such as Montaigne, Bentham, Hopkins, Kipling, Rilke, Black Elk, Kafka, Alice Walker, Ted Hughes, and J. Frank Dobie.

Digital Literacy. Because the "Five Characteristics of a Successful Student at U.T." include "Good computer skills" as well as "Strong writing skills," basic website skills will be required. Students will be expected to check their email frequently (maintaining the correct email address in the U.T. Direct system) along with the course Discussion Boards and Online Gradebook in Blackboard, all especially the day before class. Students will use multimedia to fulfill all the writing requirements and ultimately collect everything on one portfolio web site.

Print Literacy. Required books include the course anthology*; Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty; the Annotated Alice (Norton, 0-393-04847-0) -- BUY ONLY THIS EDITION; J. M. Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello (Penguin 2003 01420.0481); and Lester Faigley’s The Little Penguin Handbook (Pearson Longman 2007 032124401X). *FOR THE FIRST ASSIGNMENT, students will need the course anthology, which is a collection of xeroxed materials from Jenn's, 2000 Guadalupe (basement of the Church of Scientology at 22nd and Guadalupe, 473-8669). It will cost about $50. Jenn’s takes major credit cards, of course. If you don’t get there within the first few days you might want to call ahead to make sure they have a copy reserved for you.

Requirements & Grading: About 50% of the final grade will be determined by multimedia web projects (200 points for each project and 50 points (X2) for critiquing the projects of others), 14% by the portfolio (140 points); 36% by informal writing (Blogs, 360 points); and up to 24% by class participation (240 points). 1000 points (out of 1,200 or more) are required for an A-; 900 for a B-; 800 for a C-; 700 for a D-. Because more than 1200 points will be available, students can emphasize formal over informal writing or vice versa, class discussion more than the portfolio, etc. However, at the end of the course, students will receive exactly the grade recorded in the online gradebook, even if it is one point short of the next higher grade.

E 349S • Carroll And Hopkins

35330 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 104
show description

Instructor:  Bump, J            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35330            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  Yes

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will explore the works of Lewis Carroll and Gerard Manley Hopkins. For their projects students can write about any aspect of either author.

Texts: the complete works of each author and a course anthology.

Requirements & Grading: About 50% of the final grade will be determined by multimedia web projects (15% for each first draft—150 points each, 10% for each revision—100 points each), 14% by the portfolio (140 points); 36% by informal writing (360 points); and up to 24% by class participation (240 points). 1000 points (out of 1,200 or more) are required for an A-; 900 for a B-; 800 for a C-; 700 for a D-. Because more than 1200 points will be available, students can emphasize formal over informal writing or vice versa, class discussion more than the portfolio, etc. However, at the end of the course, students will receive exactly the grade recorded in the online gradebook, even if it is one point short of the next higher grade.

E 350R • Animal Humanities

35630 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 104
show description

E 350R (Topic: Animal Humanities) and 379N (Topic: Animal Humanities) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will explore the representation of animals in literature, focusing especially on the analogy between racism and cruelty to animals and between the Holocaust and factory farming, an argument made by Coetzee, Derrida, I. B. Singer, and by Monson in his documentary Earthlings. In addition to these moral issues, we will focus on the practical ethics of eating animals, vivisection research on this campus, etc. While most of our texts will be British or American, we will include some examples from other countries. For example, J. M. Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello discusses Africa and Australia, and we will discuss the apparent moral superiority of the Jain, Hindu, and Buddhist attitudes toward animals. In addition to the books listed below, our course anthology will include selections from the Bible, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and authors such as Homer, Montaigne, Bentham, Hopkins, Kipling, Rilke, Black Elk, Kafka, Alice Walker, Ted Hughes, and J. Frank Dobie.

Digital Literacy. In order to “publish” student writing, basic website skills will be taught. Because the "Five Characteristics of a Successful Student at U.T." include "Good computer skills" as well as "Strong writing skills," students will be expected to check their email frequently (maintaining the correct email address in the U.T. Direct system) along with the course Discussion Boards and Online Gradebook in Blackboard, all especially the day before class. Students will download pictures from our class web sites and use multimedia to fulfill all the writing requirements and ultimately collect everything on one portfolio web site. The portfolio will include some of the materials you uploaded to Facebook, where we will have a closed group "to help students develop a small community within the larger whole"(Carnegie's Reinventing Undergraduate Education: A Blueprint for America’s Research Universities).

Texts: Print Literacy. Required books consist of the course anthology*; Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty; the Annotated Alice (Norton, 0-393-04847-0) -- BUY ONLY THIS EDITION; J. M. Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello (Penguin 2003 01420.0481); and Lester Faigley’s The Little Penguin Handbook (Pearson Longman 2007 032124401X). *FOR THE FIRST ASSIGNMENT, students will need the course anthology, which is a collection of xeroxed materials from Jenn's, 2000 Guadalupe (basement of the Church of Scientology at 22nd and Guadalupe, 473-8669). It will cost about $50. Jenn’s takes major credit cards, of course. If you don’t get there within the first few days you might want to call ahead to make sure they have a copy reserved for you.

Requirements & Grading: About 50% of the final grade will be determined by multimedia web projects (15% for each first draft—150 points each, 10% for each revision—100 points each), 14% by the portfolio (140 points); 36% by informal writing (360 points); and up to 24% by class participation (240 points). 1000 points (out of 1,200 or more) are required for an A-; 900 for a B-; 800 for a C-; 700 for a D-. Because more than 1200 points will be available, students can emphasize formal over informal writing or vice versa, class discussion more than the portfolio, etc. However, at the end of the course, students will receive exactly the grade recorded in the online gradebook, even if it is one point short of the next higher grade.

E 379N • Animal Humanities-W

35080 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 104
show description

http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~bump/379/course.html

 

E379N Animal Humanities 35080

SWC Tues Thurs 2-3:30  Parlin 104, Jerome Bump 
see the website: http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~bump/379/

We will explore the representation of animals in literature, focusing especially on the analogies between racism and cruelty to animals and between the Holocaust and commercial animal slaughter, an argument made by Coetzee, Derrida, I. B. Singer, and by Monson in the documentary Earthlings (screenplay + movie). In addition to these moral issues, we will focus on the practical ethics of eating animals, vivisection research on this campus, etc. While most of our texts will be British or American, we will include the Jain, Hindu, and Buddhist attitudes toward animals. In addition to the books listed below, our course anthology will include selections from the Bible, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and authors such as Homer, Montaigne, Bentham, Hopkins, Kipling, Black Elk, Kafka, Alice Walker, Ted Hughes, and J. Frank Dobie.

Grades. About 50% of the final grade will be determined by multimedia web projects (15% for each first draft—150 points each, 10% for each revision—100 points each), 14% by the portfolio (140 points); 36% by informal writing (360 points); and up to 24% by class participation (240 points). 1000 points (out of 1,200 or more) are required for an A-; 900 for a B-; 800 for a C-; 700 for a D-. Because more than 1200 points will be available, students can emphasize formal over informal writing or vice versa, class discussion more than the portfolio, etc. However, at the end of the course, students will receive exactly the grade recorded in the online gradebook, even if it is one point short of the next higher grade

Print Literacy. Required books consist of the course anthology*; Sewell’s Black Beauty; and Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello. *FOR THE FIRST ASSIGNMENT, students will need the course anthology, which is a collection of xeroxed materials from Jenn's, 2000 Guadalupe (basement of the Church of Scientology at 22nd and Guadalupe, 473-8669). It will cost about $50. Jenn’s takes major credit cards, of course. If you don’t get there within the first few days you might want to call ahead to make sure they have a copy reserved for you.

Digital Literacy.  In order to “publish” student writing, basic website skills will be taught. Because the "Five Characteristics of a Successful Student at U.T." include "Good computer skills" as well as "Strong writing skills," students will be expected to check their email frequently (maintaining the correct email address in the U.T. Direct system) along with the course Discussion Boards and Online Gradebook in Blackboard, especially the day before class. Students will download pictures from our class web sites and use multimedia to fulfill all the writing requirements and ultimately collect everything on one portfolio web site. The portfolio will include some of the materials you uploaded to Facebook, where we will have a closed group "to help students develop a small community within the larger whole"(Carnegie's Reinventing Undergraduate Education: A Blueprint for America’s Research Universities ).


We will take seriously the ethics of the Honor Code and Scholastic Dishonesty


Disabilities: The University of Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471- 6259, 471-6441 TTY.


About the Professor: Jerome Bump has been awarded a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, a N. D. E. A. Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, the Jeanne Holloway Award for undergraduate teaching, the Dad's Association Centennial Teaching Fellowship for instructing freshmen, the Rhodes Centennial Teaching Fellowship for directing the Computer Writing and Research Laboratory (devoted primarily to lower division instruction), and chosen as a Mortar Board Preferred Professor. He was an editor of Texas Studies in Language and Literature and has written Gerard Manley Hopkins and over fifty articles. For more information about him, his teaching philosophy, or his courses see http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~bump/  and facebook.com/jbump

OVERVIEW of regularly scheduled classes

_______________________________________________________________________________

schedule subject to change

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FORMAL WRITING DUE DATES

UT leadership image 2-16 P1 DUE ON BLACKBOARD

UT leadership image 3-3   P1 HARD COPY DUE 

UT leadership image 3-31  P2 DUE ON BLACKBOARD

UT leadership image 4-14   P2 HARD COPY DUE

UT leadership image 4-23  Website CD due

UT leadership image 5-13  Electronic Portfolio due

________________________________________________________________________________

SCHEDULE

UT leadership image 1-20 Introduction and Overview, Earthlings

UT leadership image 1-22  :Introduction and Overview, Earthlings  + Graves, “Blue and Other Dogs"

UT leadership image 1-27 ROAD MAPS

UT leadership image 1-29 ROAD MAPS 

UT leadership image 2-3  Who Are You? An Animal. Derrida; Definitions; Bentham; Snyder; Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

UT leadership image 2-5  Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? + Walker, "Am I Blue?"

UT leadership image 2-10 Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? + Emotional Intelligence

UT leadership image 2-12 MEET AT Natural Science Museum,

(with DB still available on Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? overviews: Animal Humanities; Vegetarianism vs. Graves' "Meat.")

2-16  last date to drop a course

UT leadership image 2-16 P1 DUE ON BLACKBOARD

Meet at Bob Bullock State History Museum BRING P1 Blackboard Copy 

UT leadership image 2-19  Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello and Disgrace

UT leadership image 2-24    Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello and Disgrace

UT leadership image 2-26 Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello and Disgrace             

UT leadership image 3-3   P1 DUE 


Historical Overview: England      

UT leadership image 3-5  Fear: Blake and Texas Writers: Harrigan + Barney

UT leadership image 3-7   Mad Hatter's Tea Party: extra credit

UT leadership image 3-10  Love: Blake and Hopkins; Ritvo on SPCA

UT leadership image 3-12  Sewell’s Black Beauty

UT leadership image 3-14   Holi Festival at Barsana Dham: extra credit

3-16 to 3-21 Spring break

UT leadership image 3-24   Sewell’s Black Beauty;

UT leadership image 3-26  Sewell’s Black Beauty


  • March 30 Monday Last day an undergraduate student may, with the dean’s approval, withdraw from the University or drop a class except for urgent and substantiated, nonacademic reasons. Last day a student may change registration in a class to or from the pass/fail or credit/no credit basis.


UT leadership image 3-31  P2 due on Blackboard  MEET AT THE H. R. C.

Historical Overview: India

UT leadership image 4-2   Jainism, Ahimsa; Jain Animal Shelters vs. Lockwood Kipling

UT leadership image 4-5   Ram Navi Festival at Barsana Dham: extra credit 11:00 am to 12:30 pm

UT leadership image 4-7 REVIEWS DUE. Hinduism, Buddhism, Edwin Arnold, Confucianism

UT leadership image4-9  Imperialism + Hunting; + Jeffers, Orwell

UT leadership image 4-14 P2 hard copy due  MEET AT THE CLAY PIT RESTAURANT 

UT leadership image 4-16 Kipling’s The Jungle Books;

4-18  RANCH PARTY extra credit

UT leadership image4-21Kipling’s The Jungle Books;

UT leadership image 4-23 Website CD due  MEET AT THE TURTLE POND

UT leadership image 4-25   Barsana Dham Mela, a Traditional Indian Fair: extra credit noon to 9 pm

UT leadership image 4-28   Kipling’s The Jungle Books;

UT leadership image 4-30   TEXAS TOTEM ANIMALS

UT leadership image 5-5   TEXAS TOTEM ANIMALS

UT leadership image 5-7   Dobie walk

UT leadership image May 13   10-12  Electronic Portfolio due


Experiential learning activities for the semester

(there were many other extra credict activities than are on this list)

    • 2-12   Natural Science Museum
    • 2-16   Bob Bullock State History Museum
    • 3-3      Blanton Art Museum
    • 3-7      Mad Hatter's Tea Party: extra credit
    • 3-14   Holi Festival at Barsana Dham: extra credit
    • 3-22   Holi Festival on campus: extra credit
    • 3-31   The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
    • 4-5     Ram Navi Festival at Barsana Dham: extra credit
    • 4-14   The Clay Pit Restaurant
    • 4-18   Ranch Party extra credit
    • 4-23  The Turtle Pond
    • 4-25   Barsana Dham Mela: extra credit
    • 5-7      Dobie walk

E 603A • Comp And Reading In World Lit

34190 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm PAR 104
show description

E 603A: Composition and Reading in World Literature (34190)

Fall 09; TTh 11-12:30 PAR 104
Jerome Bump  /  Office: Parlin 132  /  Phone: 471-8747 
Office Hours: Tues., Thurs. 9:45-10:45, 1:15-1:45 and by appointment
email: bump@mail.utexas.edu  /  facebook.com/jbump  /  http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~bump/603A09/

_______________________________________________________________________

Rationale: In 2004 the Commission of 125 recommended a new undergraduate core curriculum: so that students would be better prepared for a changing world: ”Our students live in a world that has undergone a technological revolution. They live in closer proximity to other nations and cultures. They live in a state and country that are more culturally diverse. And they study in an intellectual world where long-established boundaries between scholarly areas are less distinct. The core curriculum should . . . ensure that all of our students, whatever their areas of specialization, graduate with the flexible skills they need to be leaders in our communities.” The new curriculum includes required freshman courses  to “expose each entering UT student to the broad goals and possibilities of a university education, while promoting a greater sense of intellectual community among undergraduates. They will make students aware of the high standards necessary for college-level academic work and help students cultivate skills to meet those standards." Also required are courses marked by “flags” in six categories: 1. Writing—3 courses; 2. Quantitative reasoning ; 3. Global cultures; 4. Multicultural perspectives and diversity 5. Ethics and leadership; 6. Independent inquiry. 
_______________________________________________________________________

Description:

This version of E603 is for students who have already read many of the older masterworks of Western civilization and are ready to move on to masterpieces of world literature aligned with four of the six experiences required in the new core curriculum: writing, global cultures, American cultural diversity, and ethics and leadership.  Our primary focus will be on ethics and feelings, primarily compassion, especially as it relates to Pre-Med and related concentrations.

In addition to meeting the basic Plan II freshman requirement, this course earns you two of these required flag credits: writing and leadership/ethics, thus meeting three requirements for you.

To meet the requirements for the Ethics and Leadership flag, at least one-third of the course grade must be based on work in practical ethics, i.e., the study of what is involved in making real-life ethical choices.” Hence our initial questions are [1] What would I have done about the Holocaust if I had been in Germany and known what was going on at the time? [2] What would I have done about slavery if I had been in east Texas and known what was going on at the time? To experience something like these predicaments, the documentary Earthlings and related readings will raise our consciousness of the cruelty to animals going on around us right now and the related moral decisions we make every day concerning our use of animals for food, clothing, pets, entertainment, etc. Students will then write a formal essay about making real-life ethical choices such as these, though the essay need not be about cruelty to animals.

In other words, we will use active, experiential learning as much as possible. In your formal writing especially we will use discovery learning, in this case you will be discovering who you are are, what your passions are, what your ethics are, and what your leadership vision might be. For these assignments especially, students should be prepared to think for themselves. Discovery learning means that there will be fewer instructions for projects than what students may be used to from other courses. This can be frustrating for some, especially those who want a detailed formula that will guarantee them a good grade. Instead students will be encouraged to be creative and write about what is most important to them. Finally, we will also use place-based education whenever we can, taking excursions during class and outside of class to develop a sense of this state, this town, and especially this university, as your place, your Alma Mater (nurturing mother).

Finally, to prepare you for your college and later careers we will cultivate digital, information, and print literacy and practice college-level writing, speaking, listening, discussing, and analyzing ideas. Grades will be based in part on meeting the two expectations employers have of college graduates: time management, and the ability to read, analyze, and follow directions.

_______________________________________________________________________

Writing

Your formal writing assignments will be two essays each semester. Each will be a minimum of four pages and be revised in response to peer critiques before being submitted to the instructor for his grading and critique. In the first semester essay #1 will be on our identity (there may be other options as well) and essay #2 will be about your passion. In the second semester essay #3 will be about your ethics and then, inspired by the Leadershape program of the Colleges of Business and Engineering, essay #4 will be a leadership vision to motivate you during your college years and beyond. Informal writing will be blogs about the readings. At the end of each semester you will be required to post an electronic portfolio of all your work.

This writing will require digital literacy (multimedia and web skills) as well as print literacy. Because the "Five Characteristics of a Successful Student at U.T." include "Good computer skills" as well as "Strong writing skills," students will be expected to check their email frequently (maintaining the correct email address in the U.T. Direct system) along with the course Discussion Boards and Online Gradebook in Blackboard, all especially the day before class. Students will download pictures from our class web sites and use multimedia to fulfill all the writing requirements and ultimately collect everything on one portfolio web site. The portfolio will include some of the materials you uploaded to Facebook, where we will have a closed group "to help students develop a small community within the larger whole" (Carnegie's Reinventing Undergraduate Education: A Blueprint for America’s Research Universities ).

Students should be familiar with keyboarding, operating systems, word processing, electronic mail, web-browsing, downloading and uploading files, Facebook, and Power Point. In addition, you will need to know (or learn how to), create simple, personal websites, blogs, and electronic portfolios, all with images. You will use Facebook for discussions of the readings and U.T.’s Blackboard system for keeping track of your grades and as a peer editing site to critique the papers of other students.

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Reading

Covey's 7 Habits of Highly Effective People will teach us about ethics, leadership, and time management. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep will ask us to define what it means to be human, to be humane, and how those terms relate to compassion for all creatures.The analogies between speciesism and racism in Spiegel’s The Dreaded Comparison will  frame our discussion in the second semester of American cultural diversity and masterpieces by Native-, African-, Asian-, and Hispanic Americans, including Kingston’s Woman Warrior and The Bluest Eye (by the Nobel Prize Winner, Toni Morrison). Carroll’s Alice books will prompt discussions of leadership, discovery learning, the college experience, diversity, and the representation of animals, a topic explored also in our discussions of Dobie's Longhorns and Mustangs, and Coetzee’s novel. Coetzee’s novel, set in Africa and Australia, will give us a sense of global cultures, as will our journey in the second semester to India via Hesse's German masterpiece Siddhartha. In response to the tragedy of 9/11 we will trace the history of compassion for all creatures in world religions in the second semester, especially Indian mythology, religion, and ethics.

Required Texts For The First Semester:

[1] the course anthology*;
[2] The Annotated Alice (Norton, 0-393-04847-0 BUY ONLY THIS EDITION);
[3] Stephen Covey's The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (Simon and Schuster 2004 0-7432-6951-9);
[4] J. S. Coetzee, Elizabeth Costello (Penguin 0-14-200481-2);
[5] Marjorie Spiegel, The Dreaded Comparison, 2nd ed. (New York: I.D.E.A. Mirror Books, 1996: 0-9624493-3-4);
[6] Philip K. Dick,  Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (New York: Ballantine Del Rey, 1968);
[7] Lester Faigley’s The Little Penguin Handbook (Pearson Longman: any edition); and [8] the 2009-2010 Daily Planner,University Co-op.

*FOR THE FIRST ASSIGNMENT, students will need the course anthology, which is a collection of xeroxed materials. It will be available from Jenn's, 2000 Guadalupe (basement of the Church of Scientology at 22nd and Guadalupe, 473-8669). It will cost about $50. Jenn’s takes major credit cards, of course. If you don’t get there within the first few days you might want to call ahead to make sure they have a copy reserved for you.

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Grades

About 50% of the final grade will be determined by multimedia web projects (15% for each first draft—150 points each, 10% for each revision—100 points each), 14% by the portfolio (140 points); 36% by informal writing (360 points); and at least 10% by class discussion (100 points). 1200 points (out of 1,300 or more) are required for an A+ (unofficial grade); 1100 for an A; 1000 for an A-; 965 for a B+; 945 for a B; 900 for a B-; 865 for a C+; 845 for a C; 800 for a C-;765 for a D+; 735 for a D; and 700 for a D-. Because more than 1200 points will be available, students can emphasize formal over informal writing or vice versa, class discussion more than the portfolio, etc. However, at the end of the course, students will receive exactly the grade recorded in the online gradebook, even if it is one point short of the next higher grade.

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For the dates of exams and assignments, and the subjects of each discussion, see The Schedule. For policy on cell phones etc. in class see the Class Participation and Class Discussion documents. See also pp. 488-489 of the course anthology: “Paraphrasing vs. Plagiarism. “ Plagiarism in my class will be punished severely.

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Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.
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About the Professor:

Jerome Bump has been awarded a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, a N. D. E. A. Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, the Jeanne Holloway Award for undergraduate teaching, the Dad's Association Centennial Teaching Fellowship for instructing freshmen, the Rhodes Centennial Teaching Fellowship for directing the Computer Writing and Research Laboratory (devoted primarily to lower division instruction), and chosen as a Mortar Board Preferred Professor. He was an editor of Texas Studies in Language and Literature and has written Gerard Manley Hopkins and over fifty articles. For more information about him, his teaching philosophy, or his courses see http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu/~bum

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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