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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Mia Carter

Assistant Instructor Ph.D., English and Modern Studies, 1992, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Associate Professor, University Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor

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Biography

Mia Carter is an Associate Professor and University Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor in the English Department. Recent publications include: ''History’s Child: Virginia Woolf, Heritage, and Historical Consciousness”  in ALIF: Journal of Comparative Poetics: Childhood: Creativity and Representation;  ''Acknowledged Absences: Claire Denis’ Cinema of Longing'' in Studies in European Cinema, and  Archives of Empire: From Company to Canal, Vol. 1, which she co-edited with Barbara Harlow.

E 349S • Virginia Woolf

35820 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 105
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M

Unique #:  35820

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  WGS 345

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course will examine the critical and fictional works of Virginia Woolf. We will also be examining Woolf’s continuing legacy and influence. Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, English literary heritage and tradition, feminism, creative and critical definitions of gender and sexuality, intellectual activism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, fascism), Woolf and imperialism-colonialism.

Required Readings (all editions Harcourt Brace Jovanovich; please buy the required HBJ editions)

Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” and “Modern Fiction.”

The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf; The Voyage Out; Jacob’s Room; Mrs. Dalloway; To the Lighthouse; Orlando; The Waves; Three Guineas (long essay)

Requirements & Grading: No late papers will be accepted.

* Three 2-3-page critical analysis essays: 30% of final grade

* One ungraded, but critically assessed seminar paper prospectus.

* One 10-12-page: 40% of final grade

Consistently active, substantial, and significant participation: 30%, a portion of which will be determined by reading quizzes. There will be 4-5 unannounced reading quizzes during the course of the semester.

Class policies: This is a technology-free class; all notes must be taken in notebooks. The use of computers, Blackberries, cell phones is strictly prohibited; exception for full compliance to this rule will be granted only for students with a documented medical need.

Come to class thoroughly prepared, which means keep up with the reading assignments; demonstrate that you have completed the required reading and have thought about it--have analyzed the literature rigorously, critically, and creatively. Consistently active and intellectually substantial and significant participation comprises a large portion of your final grade (30%); therefore silence will not serve you well in this class.  Since I cannot tell you what these texts mean, your success depends--to a great extent--on your willingness to engage with the texts and with your fellow classmates. No one has the final, correct, absolute interpretation of these books. I invite you to take risks, to challenge yourself, and to share your understanding of each novel or film. I also reserve the right to give spontaneous, in-class quizzes if silence appears to be a lack of preparedness.

Attendance Policy: Three absences will drop you a full letter grade (an A will become a B, etc.); four or more absences will guarantee your failure of this class.

E 397M • V Woolf And Bloomsbury Circle

36130 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 200
show description

Modernism and Imperialism: Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Circle

In this course we will be examining the works of Virginia and Leonard Woolf, along with additional Bloomsbury Circle members and affiliates. One of the guiding questions for the seminar is: what is the relationship between the age, energy, aesthetics and politics of empire and imperialism and the era of literary “high” and late modernism?  How are these novelists, art historians, biographers, and essayists of the Bloomsbury Circle negotiating, revising, rejecting, or transforming their shared and respective liberal and Victorian-Edwardian ideological, cultural and intellectual heritages and legacies.  We will be reading Bloomsbury travel narratives, novels, essays, poetry, autobiographies, journalism, and literary criticism; research on the non-literary, anti imperialist Hogarth Press publications is also a required component of the seminar (for example, C.L.R. James’s The Case for West Indian Self-Government (1933); Mark Starr’s Lies and Hate in Education (1929), the 1930’s Merttens Lecture on War and Peace, etc.) .

Proposed Readings:      

Virginia Woolf.  The Voyage Out (1915), The Waves (1931), The Years (1937), Three Guineas (1938), and selected essays.

Leonard Woolf.  The Village in the Jungle (1913), Stories of the East (1921), Growing: An Autobiography of the Years 1904-1911 (1961).          

William Plomer.  Turbott Wolfe (1926), “Conversation with my Younger Self” (1962), and selected poems.

Vita Sackville-West.  Passenger to Tehran (1926), The Land (1927).

Winifred Holtby. Mandoa, Mandoa! A Comedy of Irrelevance (1933).

Mulk Raj Anand.  Untouchable (1935), Coolie (1936) and Conversations in Bloomsbury (1981).

Christopher Isherwood, Lions and Shadows (1938).

W. H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood, The Dog Beneath the Skin, or, Where Is Francis? (1935).

Raymond Williams, Politics of Modernism: Against the New Conformists (1989).

Patrick Collier, Modernism on Fleet Street (2006).

Christopher Hilliard, To Exercise Our Talents: The Democratization of Writing in Britain (2006).

Selected poems by W. H. Auden, Stephen Spender, and Louis MacNeice.

Additional assigned readings from Time and Tide, Folios of New Writing, Voorslag, and the New Left Review, and by Jed Esty, Saikat Majumdar, Jane Marcus, Tyrus Miller, Anna Snaith, and Laura Winkiel.

Requirements:

Bi-weekly 1-2 page reading response papers: 30% of final grade.

15-20 page seminar paper: 40% of final grade.

Presentation on contemporary journalism, or non-literary Hogarth Press publication: 10% of final grade.

Consistently active, significant, and substantial classroom participation: 20% of final grade.

E F343L • Modernism And Literature

83190 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm GAR 3.116
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Instructor:  Carter, M

Unique #:  83190

Semester:  Summer 2014, first session

Flags:  Global Cultures

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Literary Modernism’s temporal, aesthetic, and geographical parameters have been debated and redefined since the inception of the cultural movement.  In this course we will survey a variety of international modernisms; the course’s genres will include the manifesto, poetry, drama, the essay, the short story, and the novel.  The literatures for the course will be supplemented by historical, political and contextual readings and selected films.

Required Texts (subject to change): Mia Carter and Alan Friedman, eds. Modernism and Literature: An Introduction and Reader. Selected essays; James Joyce, “Drama and Life,” A Portrait of the Artist as A Young Man (1916); Virginia Woolf, Jacob’s Room (1922), “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown”and “Modern Fiction”; T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land (1922); Aimé Césaire, A Notebook of A Return to the Native Land (1947, 1939); Mina Loy, “Feminist Manifesto,” The Lost Lunar Baedeker and Other Poems (1923 &); Marita Bonner, The Purple Flower (1927); Bertolt Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children (1939);” Modernist Manifestos: Surrealist, Futurist, Légitime Défense, Feminist Manifesto (Loy).

Required Films (subject to change): Dziga Vertov, Man with a Movie Camera (aka, Living Russia)(1929);Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel, Un Chien Andalou (1929); Maya Deren, Meshes of the Afternoon (1943).

Requirements & Grading: two short 2-3-page critical analysis essays: 20% each (40% of final grade); Comprehensive final examination: 40% of final grade; Consistently active, significant and substantial participation: 20% of final grade.

E S344L • Reps Of Chldhd/Adol Lit/Film

83400 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CMA 3.114
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Instructor:  Carter, M

Unique #:  83400

Semester:  Summer 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: In her groundbreaking study of children's psychology The Psycho-Analysis of Children (1932), Melanie Klein announced that the mythical paradise of childhood innocence could no longer sustain belief. In the wake of the modern understanding of development and sexuality initiated by Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic case studies, children like adults, were understood to experience a complex range of fears and desires, anxieties and fantasies. Klein's play experiments were designed to help children articulate the interior world of consciousness; artists would explore children's interior and emotional lives in a range of expressive forms. In this course we will be examining post-Romantic modern and contemporary representations of childhood and adolescence; some of the topical concerns covered in the class will be racial-ethnic, sexual, class, and regional identity formation; genre and narrative experimentation (the bildungsroman, autobiographical performance); childhood as a social imaginary for justice and ethical change.

Proposed literature (subject to change): James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916); Katherine Mansfield, Selected Stories (1918); Gwendolyn Brooks, Maud Martha (1953); Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy (2002); Gene Luen Yang, American Born Chinese (2008); Nelly Reifler, Elect H. Mouse State Judge (2013); Kate DiCamillo, Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures (2013).

Selected critical essays (subject to change): Vicky LeBeau, Childhood and Cinema (2008), selections; Danielle Egan, Theorizing the Sexual Child in Modernity (2010); James Holt McGavran, Ed. Literature and the Child: Romantic Continuations, Postmodern Contestations (1999); Steedman, Carolyn Kay.  Strange Dislocations: Childhood and the Idea of Human Interiority, 1780-1930 (1995); Goodenough, Heberle and Sokoloff, Eds. Infant Tongues: The Voice of the Child in Literature (1994).

Proposed Films (subject to change): François Truffault, The 400 Blows/Les quarte cents coups (1959); Ken Loach, Kes (1969); Benning, Selected Videos: Girl Power (1993), It Wasn’t Love (1992), If Every Girl Had A Diary (1991), Living Inside (1989); Luc & Jean-Pierre Dardennes, The Promise/La Promesse (1996) and The Kid with a Bike/Le Gamin au Velo (2011); David Gordon Green, George Washington (2000); Thomas Alfredson, Let the Right One In/Lat den rätte komma in (2008); Debra Granik, Winter's Bone (2010).

Requirements & Grading: consistently active, significant, and substantial participation (20%). This is a demanding, reading intensive course; the critical essays, films and literary assignments are required and integrally important assignments. Students will be expected to engage with the creative texts and the critical-theoretical ones with commitment and attentiveness.

Two short 2-3-page critical analysis essays: (20%; each 40% of final grade); comprehensive final exam (40% of final grade).

E 343L • Modernism And Literature

35990 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 206
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M

Unique #:  35990

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Literary Modernism’s temporal, aesthetic, and geographical parameters have been debated and redefined since the inception of the cultural movement.  In this course we will survey a variety of international modernisms; the course’s genres will include the manifesto, poetry, drama, the essay, the short story, and the novel.  The literatures for the course will be supplemented by historical, political and contextual readings and selected films.

Required Texts: Mia Carter and Alan Friedman, eds. Modernism and Literature: An Introduction and Reader. Selected essays; Virginia Woolf, Jacob’s Room (1922), “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown”and “Modern Fiction”; D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love (1920), “Why the Novel Matters” and “Surgery for the Novel—or, A Bomb”; T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land (1922); Aimé Césaire, A Notebook of A Return to the Native Land (1947, 1939); Mina Loy, Feminist Manifesto, The Lost Lunar Baedeker and Other Poems (1923 &); Marita Bonner, The Purple Flower (1927); Bertolt Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children (1939); Katherine Mansfield, Selected Stories; Ryosuke Akutagawa, Mandarins (1920’s), selected stories; “In a Grove”; Modernist Manifestos: Surrealist, Futurist, Légitime Défense, Vorticist/Blast Manifesto, Feminist Manifesto (Loy).

Required Films: Dziga Vertov, Man with a Movie Camera (aka, Living Russia)(1929);Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel, Un Chien Andalou (1929); Maya Deren, Meshes of the Afternoon (1943); Akira Kurosawa, Roshomon (1950).

Requirements & Grading: Four short 2-3-page critical analysis essays: 10% each (40% of final grade); Comprehensive final examination: 40% of final grade; Consistently active, significant and substantial participation: 20% of final grade.

E 344L • Reps Of Chldhd/Adol Lit/Film

36005 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 302
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M

Unique #:  83660

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: In her groundbreaking study of children's psychology The Psycho-Analysis of Children (1932), Melanie Klein announced that the mythical paradise of childhood innocence could no longer sustain belief; in the wake of the modern understanding of development and sexuality initiated by Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic case studies children, like adults, were understood to experience a complex range of fears and desires, anxieties and fantasies. The preciousness and innocence of childhood that is sometimes assumed to be a universal experience is certainly not available to children around the world; at present, more than half of the worlds millions of refugees are children. In this course we will be examining modern and contemporary representations of childhood and adolescence; some of the topical concerns covered in the class will be racial-ethnic, sexual, class and regional identity formation; genre and narrative experimentation (the bildungsroman, autobiographical performance); war and displacement; and childhood as a social imaginary for justice and ethical change.

Proposed literature: Ernest Hemingway, The Nick Adams Stories; Katherine Mansfield, Selected Stories (1918); James Joyce, “An Encounter” (1905); Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy (2002); Ken Saro Wiwa, Sozaboy: A Novel in Rotten English (1986); John Green, The Fault in Our Stars (2012); Matt de la Peña, The Living (2013); Curtis Sittenfeld, Sisterland (2013).

Selected critical essays: G. Stanley Hall, Adolescence… (selections); Walter Benjamin, "Berlin Childhood around 1900," "A Child's View of Color," "Children's Literature," Selected Writings, Vol. I & II; Danielle Egan, Theorizing the Sexual Child in Modernity (2010); James Holt McGavran, Ed. Literature and the Child: Romantic Continuations, Postmodern Contestations (1999); Steedman, Carolyn Kay. Strange Dislocations: Childhood and the Idea of Human Interiority, 1780-1930 (1995); Goodenough, Heberle and Sokoloff, Eds. Infant Tongues: The Voice of the Child in Literature (1994).

Proposed Films: François Truffault, The 400 Blows/Les quarte cents coups (1959); Frederick Wiseman, High School (1968); Mira Nair, Salaam Bombay! (1998); Jacques Doillon, Ponette (1996); Sadie Benning, Selected Videos: Girl Power (1993), It Wasn’t Love (1992), If Every Girl Had A Diary (1991), Living Inside (1989); Michael Haneke, Benny’s Video (1992); Bahman Gobadi, Turtles Can Fly/Lakpostha parvaz mikonand (2004); Luc & Jean-Pierre Dardennes, The Promise/La Promesse (1996) and L'Enfant/The Child (2005); Thomas Alfredson, Let the Right One In/Lat den rätte komma in (2008); Dee Rees, Pariah (2011); Behn Zeitlin, Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012); Céline Sciamma, Tomboy (2012); James Ponsoldt, The Spectacular Now (2013); Ryan Coogler, Fruitvale Station (2013).

Requirements & Grading: Consistently active, significant, and substantial participation (20%). This is a demanding, reading intensive course; the critical essays, films and literary assignments are required and integrally important assignments. Students will be expected to engage with the creative texts and the critical-theoretical ones with commitment and attentiveness.

Three short 2-3 page critical analysis essays: one must be on a critical essay, another on a film; the third may be on a subject of the student’s choosing (each 10% of final grade). Required 1 page paper abstract/prospectus—ungraded, but critically assessed. One long 8-10-page term paper (50%).

E 344L • Writer/Director: Litry Cinema

35795 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35795            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: In this course we will be examining some of the intersections of literature, cinema and Cultural Studies. We will begin with foundations of European cinema: for example, Sergei Eisenstein and the influence of Japanese poetry and theatre on his theories of montage; Dziga Vertov and his modernist and experimental influences on later movements like Cinéma vérité; Surrealism, Realism and Neo-Realism (Rossellini, The Dardennes Brothers, Loach); the Nouveau Roman (Resnais & Robbe-Grillet), and the Nouvelle Vague/New Wave (Godard). We will focus on directors who write their screenplays and will also examine the works of film collectives and the influences of manifesto movements, for example the Rive Gauche Collective (Marker, Varda), the Situationists, and the Dogme 95 Collective. The historical and contextual range of the films covers 1920’s Soviet Constructivist cinema, WWII propaganda, the post-war nuclear age, the emergence of working class artists, Queer cinema (Davies), European reactions to Hollywood and cultural imperialism (Adorno & Horkheimer, Benjamin, Godard, Guy Debord and the Situationists, the Dogme 95 Collective), and the realities of postcolonial and contemporary immigrant Europe (Akin, Audiard, the Dardennes, Kassovitz, Haneke). We will examine two writer-directors’ adaptations of others’ literary works (Antonioni’s adaptation of Cortázar’s “Las Babas del Diablo”); Kes, Ken Loach’s adaptation of Barry Hines’ A Kestrel for a Knave). We will also be examining the adaptation of and experimentation with genres like science fiction and the gangster film, the women’s film, and the musical.

            Students will have the freedom to work on other European writer-directors, who may not be included on the syllabus (possibilities include Jacques Demy, Krysztof Kieslowski, Werner Herzog, Claire Denis, Andrey Tarkovskiy, Ingmar Bergman, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Derek Jarman, Pedro Almodóvar, Leos Carax, etc.).

            Introduction to cinematic vocabulary and techniques (montage, mise en-scène, dissolves, tracking shots, etc.) will be included in the instruction. All of the non-English films will be subtitled.

Possible range of writer-directors and films:

Sergei Eisenstein (USSR/Russia). Bronenosets Potymkin/Battleship Potemkin (1925).

Dziga Vertov (USSR/Russia). Living Russia, or Man with a Camera (1929).

Luis Buñuel (Spain). Un Chien Andalou/An Andalusian Dog (1929).

Leni Riefenstahl (Germany). Triumph des Willens/Triumph of the Will (1935). Excerpts.

Roberto Rossellini (Italy). Roma città aperta/Rome Open City (1945).

Alain Resnais & Alain Robbe-Grillet (France). Last Year at Marienbad (1961).

Chris Marker (France). La Jetée (1962).

Agnès Varda (France). Cléo de 5 à 7/Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962).

Michelangelo Antonioni (Italy). L’Eclisse/The Eclipse (1962), Blow Up (1966).

Jean-Luc Godard (France). Alphaville (1965), Pierrot Le Fou (1965).

Ken Loach (England).  Kes (1969).

Lina Wertmuller (Italy). Pasqualino Settebellezze/Seven Beauties (1975).

Terence Davies (England). Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), The Long Day Closes (1992).

Mathieu Kassovitz (France). La Haine/Hate (1995).

Thomas Vinterberg (Denmark). Festen/The Celebration (1998).

Jørgen Leth (Denmark). Det Perfekte menneske/The Perfect Human (1967) and The Five Obstructions (2003).

Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardennes (Belgium). L’Enfant/The Child (2005).

Michael Haneke (Austria/Germany). Caché/Hidden (2005).

Fatih Akin (Turkey-Germany). Auf der Anderen Seite/The Edge of Heaven (2007).

Steve McQueen, Hunger (2008).

Jacques Audiard (France), Un Prophète/A Prophet (2009).

Lars von Trier (Denmark). Antichrist (2009) and Melancholia (2011).

Literature and Criticism:

Sergei Eisenstein, “Methods of Montage.”

Dziga Vertov, The Writings of Dziga Vertov.

Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception.”

Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.”

Michelangelo Antonioni. The Architecture of Vision; Writings and Interviews on Cinema.

André Bazin, “The Evolution of Film Language” and “Cinematic Realism and the Italian School of Liberation.”

Roberto Rossellini, “A Discussion of Neorealism.”

Emmanuel Levinas, “Totality and Infinity.”

Julio Cortázar. Blow-Up and Other Stories.

Jean-Luc Godard, “From Critic to Film-Maker” and “Struggling on Two Fronts.”

Barry Hines, A Kestrel for a Knave.

Alain Robbe-Grillet, “A Future for the Novel,” “From Realism to Reality,” and “New Novel, New Man.”

Requirements & Grading: This is a very demanding, time-consuming, reading- and viewing intensive class. There will be at least one required film per week, along with additional suggested viewings. Please note that some weeks, we will be watching two films; that comprises at least four hours of prep time for class. It is absolutely necessary for students to have viewed the required film(s) before class analysis and discussion. On-campus screenings will be arranged by the Professor; if you cannot attend a scheduled screening, make sure to view the film independently before the class discussion. Active, significant, and substantial participation comprises a substantial portion of the final grade (25%); silence, passivity, or a lack of preparedness will not serve you well in this class. Regular attendance is required: 3 non-medically excused absences will lower your grade by a full grade (an A will become a B); 4 or more absences will guarantee your failure of the class.

Writing assignments: Three short 2-3 page essays on selected writer-directors and films (10% each); One long 8-10-page paper (50%) of final grade.

Final Grade distribution: Consistently active, significant, and substantial participation (20%); Three short 2-3 page essays (30%); One long 8-10-page paper (50%).

E 397N • Cinema And Social Change

36210 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 221
show description

In this World Cinema seminar we will be examining debates about realism, modernism and the avant-garde; capitalism, colonialism, and cultural imperialism/globalism; cinema and oral and literary traditions; war, revolution, reparation, immigration, exile and diaspora; cosmopolitanism and national cinema; and First and Third World cinematic distinctions and intersections.  We will primarily focus on feature films, although many of the films include feature-documentary hybrids; additional documentary and experimental films may be added, depending on availability.  The course will begin with silent cinema, Soviet Constructivism, Surrealism, and the early 20th century’s montage/formalism and Culture Industry debates.  We will additionally be examining literary and theoretical influences on cinema (e.g. the realist novel, Situationism, the nouveau roman, Dogma/e95). Over the course of the semester, we will be analyzing the cinema and the social imaginary--the socio-political and cultural significance and limitations of film.

Proposed films:

Sergei Eisenstein, Battleship Potemkin/Bronenosets Potyomkin (1925).

Dziga Vertov, Man with a Movie Camera; or, Living Russia (1929).

Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dali, Un Chien Andalou (1929).

Basil Wright, Song of Ceylon (1934).

Leni Riefenstahl, Triumph of the Will/Triumph des Willens (1935).

Maya Deren, Meshes of the Afternoon (1943).

Roberto Rossellini, Rome: Open City/Roma, città aperta (1945).

Alain Resnais, Last Year at Marienbad (1961).

Michelangelo Antonioni, The Eclipse/L’eclisse (1962).

Jean-Luc Godard, Pierrot le Fou (1965).

Gillo Pontecorvo, Battle of Algiers/La Battaglia di Algeri (1966).

Maureen Blackwood and Isaac Julien, The Passion of Remembrance (1986).

Thomas Vinterberg, Festen (1998).

Ousmane Sembene, Moolaadé (2004).

Abderrahmane Sissako, Bamako (2006).

Claire Denis, The Intruder/L’Intrus (2004).

Ramin Bahrani, Man Push Cart (2005).

Philippe Aractingi, Sous Les Bombes (2007).

Jafar Panahi, This Is Not a Film (2011).

Proposed texts:

Sergei Eisenstein, “A Dialectical Approach to Film Form” (1929) and “Methods of Montage,” (1929).

Dziga Vertov, Kino-Eye: The Writings of Dziga Vertov (1920's).

Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility” (1935), “Theory of Distraction” (1935-36).

Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception” (1944).

André Bazin, “The Ontological Realism of the Photographic Image” (1945), "In Defense of Rossellini," What Is Cinema?

Alain Robbe-Grillet, “From Realism to Reality” (1955 & 1963), “A Future for the Novel” (1956), and “New Novel, New Man” (1961).

Michelangelo Antonioni, “The Event and the Image” (1963), and “Reality and Cinema Verité” (1964).

Jim Pines and Paul Willemen, Eds., Questions of Third Cinema (1990).

Anthony R. Guneratne and Wimal Dissanayake, Eds. Rethinking Third Cinema (2003).

Hamid Naficy, An Accented Cinema: Exilic and Diasporic Filmmaking (2001), Home, Exile, Homeland: Film, Media, and the Politics of Place (1991).

Ella Shohat and Robert Stam, Eds. Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media (1994).

Martin Stollery, Alternative Empires: European Modernist Cinemas and Cultures of Imperialism (2000).

Art/Cinema manifestos from the Futurists, Surrrealists, Situationists, Dogma95, etc.

Required assignments:

Bi-weekly 1-2 page typed critical response essays, due in-class on day of class discussion. Collectively worth 30% of final grade.

15 page conference paper/publication draft: worth 50% of final grade.

Consistently active, significant and substantial participation. Worth 20% of final grade.

 

 

E 338E • Brit Lit: Victorian Era-Wwii

35430 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 206
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  II / F

Unique #:  35430            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing

Description: This course surveys Victorian to Modern literatures and concentrates on four genres—the essay, poetry, the novel and the short story. We will be examining Victorian to Modern debates and dialogues on culture, its value, uses and purposes; we will also be examining literary heritage and tradition (Ruskin, Arnold, Morris, comedy and satire, empire and its aftermath, etc.) and the evolution of genres, like the detective genre. Literary responses to modernity (Eliot, Conrad, Lawrence, Strachey), the World Wars I & II (Trench Poets, Lawrence, Woolf, Jennings, Wyler), feminism (Loy, Woolf) and migration (Zaheer) are topics that will be examined during the course of the semester.

Proposed Literature: Selected essays from Thomas Babington Macaulay, Matthew Arnold, Coventry Patmore, John Ruskin, and Lytton Strachey; William Morris, News From Nowhere and Other Writings; Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre; Jerome K. Jerome, Three Men in a Boat; Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories, Vol. 1; Christina Rossetti, Goblin Market and Other Poems; Alfred Tennyson, Selected Poems’ Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; World War I British Poets: Brooke, Owen, Sassoon, Rosenberg and Others; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land and Other Poems; Mina Loy, Lost Lunar Baedecker; D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love; Stella Gibbons, Cold Comfort Farm; Sajjad Zaheer, A Night in London; Virginia Woolf, The Years and sections from Three Guineas.

 

Proposed Films: Mike Leigh, Topsy-Turvy (1999); Cary Fukunaga, Jane Eyre (2011); Ken Russell, Women in Love (1968); Humphrey Jennings, Listen to Britain (1942); William Wyler, Mrs. Miniver (1942).

Requirements & Grading: Three 2-3-page critical analysis essays on selected text or film: 10% each (30% of final grade). One of the short essays may be revised. All revised papers will be due two weeks after the original version of the graded and assessed essay has been returned to the student; in order to receive credit for the second version, the original essay must be passed in with the revised one.

One-page research paper prospectus/abstract (un-graded, but assessed). One 8-10-page critical analysis essay: 50% of final grade.

Consistently active, significant and substantial participation: 20% of final grade, a portion of which will be determined by reading quizzes. There will be 4-5 unannounced reading/interpretation quizzes during the course of the semester.

Performance expectations: Come to class thoroughly prepared, which means keep up with the reading and viewing assignments; demonstrate that you have completed the required assignment and have thought about it--have analyzed the required literary, critical or cinematic text rigorously, critically, and creatively. This is a very demanding, time-consuming, reading- and viewing intensive class. Some weeks there will be a required film, along with required reading assignments. Writing about film, like writing about literature requires re-viewing and closer sustained analysis. It is absolutely necessary for students to have viewed the required film(s) before class analysis and discussion. On-campus screenings will be arranged by the Professor; if you cannot attend a scheduled screening, it is your responsibility to view the film independently before the class discussion. If you have not viewed a required film on the discussion date, you will be marked absent for that day. Active, significant, and substantial participation comprises a substantial portion of the final grade (20%); silence, passivity, or a lack of preparedness will not serve you well in this class.

Absence policy: regular attendance is a substantial requirement for this course. 3 non-medically excused absences will lower your grade by a full grade (an A will become a B); 4 or more absences will guarantee your failure of the class. An incomplete grade (X grade) will be granted only in the case of a documented medical emergency

Class policies: This is a technology-free class; all notes must be taken in notebooks. The use of computers, Blackberries, cell phones is strictly prohibited; exception for full compliance to this rule will be granted only for students with a documented medical need.

E 349S • Virginia Woolf

35515 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 105
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35515            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

E 370W (Topic 10: Major Authors: Virginia Woolf) may not also be counted.

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course will examine the critical and fictional works of Virginia Woolf. We will also be examining Woolf’s continuing legacy and influence. Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, English literary heritage and tradition, feminism, creative and critical definitions of gender and sexuality, intellectual activism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, fascism), Woolf and imperialism-colonialism.

Required Readings (all editions Harcourt Brace Jovanovich; please buy the required HBJ editions)

Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” and “Modern Fiction.”

The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf; The Voyage Out; Jacob’s Room; Mrs. Dalloway; To the Lighthouse; Orlando; The Waves; Three Guineas (long essay)

Requirements & Grading: No late papers will be accepted.

* Three 2-3-page critical analysis essays: 30% of final grade

* One ungraded, but critically assessed seminar paper prospectus.

* One 10-12-page: 40% of final grade

Consistently active, substantial, and significant participation: 30%, a portion of which will be determined by reading quizzes. There will be 4-5 unannounced reading quizzes during the course of the semester.

Class policies: This is a technology-free class; all notes must be taken in notebooks. The use of computers, Blackberries, cell phones is strictly prohibited; exception for full compliance to this rule will be granted only for students with a documented medical need.

Come to class thoroughly prepared, which means keep up with the reading assignments; demonstrate that you have completed the required reading and have thought about it--have analyzed the literature rigorously, critically, and creatively. Consistently active and intellectually substantial and significant participation comprises a large portion of your final grade (30%); therefore silence will not serve you well in this class.  Since I cannot tell you what these texts mean, your success depends--to a great extent--on your willingness to engage with the texts and with your fellow classmates. No one has the final, correct, absolute interpretation of these books. I invite you to take risks, to challenge yourself, and to share your understanding of each novel or film. I also reserve the right to give spontaneous, in-class quizzes if silence appears to be a lack of preparedness.

Attendance Policy: Three absences will drop you a full letter grade (an A will become a B, etc.); four or more absences will guarantee your failure of this class.

E 379R • Envisng England: 20c Lit/Film

35715 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.216
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35715            Flags:  Independent Inquiry, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 379S (Embedded Topic: Envisioning England: 20th Century Literature and Film) may not also be counted.

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course features ethnic, immigrant, gay, working-class, and canonical British literature and film. A number of the works are concerned with post-imperial and post-colonial legacies, class, English and British tradition and cultural inheritance, and the intricacies, complexities and contradictions of national and personal identity. We will be examining the works aesthetically and formally; we will additionally consider the works in light of their specific social, political, and historical contexts. Some of the assigned works are shaped by critical and theoretical turns; these include Modernism (Woolf), Documentary realism (Apted, Richardson, Leigh), Poststructuralism and Cultural Studies (Steedman, Samuel, Higson), Postcolonial Studies (Naipaul, Selvon, Hollinghurst).

Texts (proposed): Virginia Woolf, The Years; Sam Selvon, The Lonely Londoners; Allan Sillitoe, The Loneliness of a Long Distance Runner; Raymond Williams, The Country and the City (sections); Carolyn Steedman, Landscape for a Good Woman; Linton Kwesi Johnson, Mi Revalueshanary Fren; Allan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty; Jeanette Winterson, Why Be Happy When You Could be Normal?; selected essays and speeches by Virginia Woolf, Enoch Powell, Margaret Thatcher and others.

Films: (proposed): Humphrey Jennings, Listen to Britain (1942); Tony Richardson, A Taste of Honey (1961); Basil Dearden, Victim (1961) & All Night Long (1962); Lindsay Anderson, If... (1968); Terence Davies, The Long Day Closes (1992) and Of Time and the City (2008); Michael Apted, 28-Up (1985), 35-Up (1991); Shane Meadows, This Is England (2006); Mike Leigh, Happy-Go-Lucky (2008); Christopher Morris, Four Lions (2010), Andrew Haigh, Weekend (2011).

Requirements & Grading: Two 2-3 page critical analysis essays on selected text or film: 10% each (20% of final grade); One 3 page research paper outline, with annotated bibliography with 6 required items, 2 of which must be book-length studies or an anthology of collected essays; the other 4 items must be print articles or essays: 15% of final grade; One 10-12 page critical analysis essay: 45% of final grade; Consistently active, significant and substantial participation: 20% of final grade.

Absence policy: regular attendance is absolutely necessary. This is a very demanding, time-consuming, reading- and viewing intensive class. Some weeks there will be a required film, along with required reading assignments. Writing about film, like writing about literature requires re-viewing and closer sustained analysis. It is absolutely necessary for students to have viewed the required film(s) before class analysis and discussion. On-campus screenings will be arranged by the Professor; if you cannot attend a scheduled screening, it is your responsibility to view the film independently before the class discussion. If you have not viewed a required film on the discussion date, you will be marked absent for that day. Active, significant, and substantial participation comprises a substantial portion of the final grade (30%); silence, passivity, or a lack of preparedness will not serve you well in this class.

Regular attendance is required: 3 non-medically excused absences will lower your grade by a full grade (an A will become a B); 4 or more absences will guarantee your failure of the class. An incomplete grade (X grade) will be granted only in the case of a documented medical emergency.

Class policies: This is a technology-free class; all notes must be taken in notebooks. The use of computers, Blackberries, cell phones is strictly prohibited; exception for full compliance to this rule will be granted only for students with a documented medical need.

E 392M • Brit Cul Stds, Lit, And Film

35850 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.104
show description

Landscape and Legacy: 20th Century British Literature, Culture, Film.  Dr. Mia Carter. 

Fall 2012. British Literature, cross-listed with Popular Culture, Ethnic and Third World, and Cultural Studies.

 

This course surveys 20th C. canonical and popular British literature and film from the Interwar period to the Thatcher Era.  The enrolled students' research presentations for the class will focus on post-Thatcher and contemporary 21st C. British culture (e.g., the Blair-Bush era, 7/7 bombings, Islamaphobia, etc.).  A number of the works are concerned with post-imperial and post-colonial legacies, social class, gender and sexuality, heritage studies, cultural inheritance, and the intricacies and contradictions of national identity.  We will be examining the works aesthetically and formally; we will additionally consider the works in light of their specific socio-historical and cultural contexts (from WWII to immigrant panics, race riots [e.g., Notting Hill, 1958; Brixton 1981], Art-Culture Movements [CAM, the Caribbean Arts Movement, Mass Observation] youth subcultures, the rise of the New Right, Clause 28, etc.).

 

Proposed literature and criticism:

Virginia Woolf, The Years (1937).

Christopher Isherwood, Lions and Shadows: An Education in the Twenties (1938).

Sam Selvon, The Lonely Londoners (1956) and Eldorado West One (1988).

Colin MacInnes, Absolute Beginners (1959).

Patrick Wright, On Living in An Old Country: The National Past in Contemporary Britain (2009             Oxford UP updated issue).

Carolyn Steedman, Landscape for a Good Woman (1987).

Allan Hollinghurst, The Swimming-Pool Library (1989).

Linton Kwesi Johsnson, Mi Revalueshanary Fren (2006).

 

And readings by Virginia Woolf, Enoch Powell, Margaret Thatcher, Stuart Hall, Dick Hebdidge, Jackie Stacey, Andrew Higson, Raphael Samuel, Terry Lovell, Raymond Williams, and others.

 

Proposed films:

Humphrey Jennings, Listen to Britain (1942).

Edgar Anstey & Arthur Elton, Housing Problems (1935).

J. Clayton, Room at the Top (1958).

Anthony Richardson, A Taste of Honey (1961).

Basil Dearden, Sapphire (1959) and All Night Long (1962).

Maureen Blackwood and Isaac Julien, The Passion of Remembrance (1986).

Patrick Keiller, London (1993).

 

Recommended contemporary films:

Shane Meadows, This Is England (2006).

Mike Leigh, Happy-Go-Lucky (2008).

Christopher Morris, Four Lions (2010).

 

Assignments:

Bi-weekly 1-2- page critical analysis essays, worth 30% of final grade.

Research presentation: post-Thatcher/contemporary British Cultural Studies, worth 20% of final grade.

Consistently active, significant and substantial in-class participation, worth 20% of final grade.

Seminar paper, worth 30% of final grade.

 

E F344L • Reps Of Chldhd/Adol Lit/Film

83660 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm PAR 303
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  83660            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Comparative Literature 315, English 603B, 316K, or Tutorial Course 603B.

Description: In her groundbreaking study of children's psychology The Psycho-Analysis of Children (1932), Melanie Klein announced that the mythical paradise of childhood innocence could no longer sustain belief. In the wake of the modern understanding of development and sexuality initiated by Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic case studies, children like adults, were understood to experience a complex range of fears and desires, anxieties and fantasies. Klein's play experiments were designed to help children articulate the interior world of consciousness; artists would explore children's interior and emotional lives in a range of expressive forms. In this course we will be examining post-Romantic modern and contemporary representations of childhood and adolescence; some of the topical concerns covered in the class will be racial-ethnic, sexual, class, and regional identity formation; genre and narrative experimentation (modernist representations of childhood and adolescence; the bildungsroman, fantasy and horror genres); childhood in the age of media; children and/of violence; childhood as a social imaginary for justice and ethical change.

Proposed literature: James Joyce, "Araby" and "An Encounter," Dubliners (1914); Katherine Mansfield, "Prelude" (1918); Virginia Woolf, "Solid Objects" (1920); Ernest Hemingway, The Nick Adams Stories (1925); Ken Saro-Wiwa, Sozaboy (1985); Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy (2002); Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire (2009); Gary Shteyngart, Super Sad True Love Story (2010), John Green, The Fault in Our Stars (2011).

Selected critical essays: Walter Benjamin, "Berlin Childhood around 1900," "A Child's View of Color," Selected Writings, Vol. I & II; Danielle Egan, Theorizing the Sexual Child in Modernity (2010); Vicky LeBeau, Childhood and Cinema; Carolyn Kay Steedman, Strange Dislocations: Childhood and the Idea of Human Interiority, 1780-1930 (1995); Goodenough, Heberle and Sokoloff, Eds. Infant Tongues: The Voice of the Child in Literature (1994).

Proposed Films: Mervyn LeRoy, The Bad Seed (1956), François Truffaut, The 400 Blows/Les quarte cents coups (1959); Ken Loach, Kes (1969); Michael Haneke, Benny's Video (1992); Jacques Doillon, Ponette (1996); Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2003); Luc & Jean-Pierre Dardennes, The Promise/La Promesse (1996) or L'Enfant/The Child (2005); Thomas Alfredson, Let the Right One In/Lat den rätte komma in (2008); Debra Granik, Winter's Bone (2010); Dee Rees, Pariah (2011).

Requirements & Grading: consistently active, significant, and substantial participation (20%). This is a demanding, reading intensive course; the critical essays, films and literary assignments are required and integrally important assignments. Students will be expected to engage with the creative texts and the critical-theoretical ones with commitment and attentiveness.

Three short 2-3-page critical analysis essays (30% of final grade: 10% each); individual or group oral research presentation (30% of final grade); consistently active, significant and substantial participation (20% of final grade); reading/viewing quizzes (20% of final grade).

E F349S • Virginia Woolf

83670 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm PAR 303
(also listed as WGS F345 )
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  83670            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  WGS 345            Computer Instruction:  No

E 370W (Topic 10: Major Authors: Virginia Woolf) may not also be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course will examine some of the major critical and fictional works of Virginia Woolf. We will start with Woolf’s modernist manifestos (essays) and selections from Woolf’s short stories; we will also read three of Woolf’s major novels. Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, aesthetics and politics, English literary heritage and tradition, and feminism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, fascism).

Texts: Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1923) and “Modern Fiction” (1925).

The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf; Jacob’s Room (1922); To the Lighthouse (1927); The Waves (1931)

Requirements & Grading: Three 2-3-page critical analysis essays (30% of final grade); regular Reading quizzes (20% of final grade); Mid-session objective exam (20% of final grade); active, substantial and significant participation (30% of final grade).

In order to succeed in this class, you must make sure that you keep up with the reading assignments; if you are too busy to do heavy reading, you might want to enroll in another class. This is an analysis and discussion based course and you absolutely have to keep up with the syllabus throughout the summer session. Demonstrate that you have completed the required reading and have thought about it--analyzed it closely, rigorously, critically, and creatively. Active and significant participation comprises a substantial portion of your final grade (30%); therefore neither silence nor lack of preparedness will serve you well in this class. Since I cannot tell you what these texts mean, your success depends--to a great extent--on your willingness to engage with the texts and with your fellow classmates. No one has the final, correct, absolute interpretation of these books. I invite you to take risks, to challenge yourself, and to share your understanding of each novel or essay.

Attendance Policy: Three absences will drop you a full letter grade (an A will become a B, etc.); four or more absences will guarantee your failure of this class.

*No late papers will be accepted; incomplete grades will only be given in cases of documented medical emergencies.

E 344L • Reps Of Chldhd/Adol Lit/Film

35310 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 105
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35310            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Comparative Literature 315, English 603B, 316K, or Tutorial Course 603B.

Description: In her groundbreaking study of children's psychology The Psycho-Analysis of Children (1932), Melanie Klein announced that the mythical paradise of childhood innocence could no longer sustain belief. In the wake of the modern understanding of development and sexuality initiated by Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic case studies, children like adults, were understood to experience a complex range of fears and desires, anxieties and fantasies. Klein's play experiments were designed to help children articulate the interior world of consciousness; artists would explore children's interior and emotional lives in a range of expressive forms. In this course we will be examining post-Romantic modern and contemporary representations of childhood and adolescence; some of the topical concerns covered in the class will be racial-ethnic, sexual, class, and regional identity formation; genre and narrative experimentation (the bildungsroman, autobiographical performance); childhood as a social imaginary for justice and ethical change.

Proposed literature: James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916); Katherine Mansfield, Selected Stories (1918); Richard Wright, Native Son (1940); Barry Hines, A Kestrel for a Knave (1968); Shyam Selvadurai, Swimming in the Monsoon Sea (2005); Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy (2002); Emma Donoghue, Room (2010); John Brandon, Citrus County (2010).

Selected critical essays: Walter Benjamin, "Berlin Childhood around 1900," "A Child's View of Color," "Children's Literature," Selected Writings, Vol. I & II; Danielle Egan, Theorizing the Sexual Child in Modernity (2010); James Holt McGavran, Ed. Literature and the Child: Romantic Continuations, Postmodern Contestations (1999); Steedman, Carolyn Kay.  Strange Dislocations: Childhood and the Idea of Human Interiority, 1780-1930 (1995); Goodenough, Heberle and Sokoloff, Eds. Infant Tongues: The Voice of the Child in Literature (1994).

Proposed Films:

François Truffault, The 400 Blows/Les quarte cents coups (1959); Ken Loach, Kes (1969); Jacques Doillon, Ponette (1996); Sadie Benning, Selected Videos: Girl Power (1993), It Wasn’t Love (1992), If Every Girl Had A Diary (1991), Living Inside (1989); Peter Sollett, Raising Victor Vargas (2002); Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2003); Luc & Jean-Pierre Dardennes, The Promise/La Promesse (1996) or L'Enfant/The Child (2005); David Gordon Green, George Washington (2000); Hirokazu Kore-eda, Nobody Knows/Ws Sub Dol (2004); Thomas Alfredson, Let the Right One In/Lat den rätte komma in (2008); Debra Granik, Winter's Bone (2010); Aaron Burns, Blacktino (2011).

Requirements & Grading: Consistently active, significant, and substantial participation (20%). This is a demanding, reading intensive course; the critical essays, films and literary assignments are required and integrally important assignments. Students will be expected to engage with the creative texts and the critical-theoretical ones with commitment and attentiveness.

Two short 2-3-page critical analysis essays: one must be on a critical essay, the other on a film (20%; each 10% of final grade); and one long 10-12-page term paper (60%).

E 379R • Envisng England: 20c Lit/Film

35525 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BEN 1.124
show description

Instructor:  Carter, M            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35525            Flags:  Writing; Independent Inquiry

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 379S (Embedded Topic: Envisioning England: 20th Century Literature and Film) may not also be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course features ethnic, immigrant, gay, working-class, and canonical British literature and film. A number of the works are concerned with post-imperial and post-colonial legacies, class, English and British tradition and cultural inheritance, and the intricacies, complexities and contradictions of national and personal identity. We will be examining the works aesthetically and formally; we will additionally consider the works in light of their specific social, political, and historical contexts. Some of the assigned works are shaped by critical and theoretical turns; these include Modernism (Woolf, Keiller and, arguably, Naipaul), Documentary realism (Apted, Richardson, Leigh), Poststructuralism and Cultural Studies (Keiller, Steedman, Samuel, Higson), Postcolonial Studies (Naipaul, Selvon, Hollinghurst).

Texts (proposed): Virginia Woolf, The Years; Sam Selvon, The Lonely Londoners; Allan Sillitoe, The Loneliness of a Long Distance Runner; Raymond Williams, The Country and the City; Carolyn Steedman, Landscape for a Good Woman; Linton Kwesi Johnson, Mi Revalueshanary Fren; V. S. Naipaul, The Enigma of Arrival; Allan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty; selected essays and speeches by Virginia Woolf, Enoch Powell, Margaret Thatcher, Andrew Higson, Raphael Samuel, and others.

Films: (proposed): Humphrey Jennings, Listen to Britain (1942); Tony Richardson, A Taste of Honey (1961); Patrick Keiller, London (1993); Mike Leigh, Naked (1993); Terence Davies, The Long Day Closes (1992) and Of Time and the City (2008); Michael Apted, 28-Up (1985), 35-Up (1991), 42-Up (1998); Shane Meadows, This Is England (2006); Mike Leigh, Happy-Go-Lucky (2008); Christopher Morris, Four Lions (2010).

Requirements & Grading: Two 2-3-page critical analysis essays on selected film: 10% each (20% of final grade); Two 8-10-page critical analysis essays: 25% each (50% of final grade); Consistently active, significant, and substantial participation: 30%.

Absence policy: regular attendance is absolutely necessary. This is a very demanding, time-consuming, reading- and viewing intensive class. Some weeks there will be a required film, along with required reading assignments. Writing about film, like writing about literature requires re-viewing and closer sustained analysis. It is absolutely necessary for students to have viewed the required film(s) before class analysis and discussion. On-campus screenings will be arranged by the Professor; if you cannot attend a scheduled screening, it is your responsibility to view the film independently before the class discussion. If you have not viewed a required film on the discussion date, you will be marked absent for that day. Active, significant, and substantial participation comprises a substantial portion of the final grade (30%); silence, passivity, or a lack of preparedness will not serve you well in this class.

Regular attendance is required: 3 non-medically excused absences will lower your grade by a full grade (an A will become a B); 4 or more absences will guarantee your failure of the class. An incomplete grade (X grade) will be granted only in the case of a documented medical emergency.

E 344L • Writer/Director: Litry Cinema

35300 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 105
show description

Prerequisites: Comparative Literature 315, English 603B, 316K, or Tutorial Course 603B.

Description: In this course we will be examining some of the intersections of literature, cinema and Cultural Studies. We will begin with foundations of European cinema: for example, Sergei Eisenstein and the influence of Japanese poetry and theatre on his theories of montage; Dziga Vertov and his modernist and experimental influences on later movements like Cinéma vérité; Surrealism, Realism and Neo-Realism (Rossellini, The Dardennes Brothers, Loach); the Noveau Roman (Resnais & Robbe-Grillet), and the Nouvelle Vague/New Wave (Godard). We will focus on directors who write their screenplays and will also examine the works of film collectives and the influences of manifesto movements, for example the Rive Gauche Collective (Marker, Varda), the Situationists, and the Dogme 95 Collective. The historical and contextual range of the films covers 1920’s Soviet cinema, WWII propaganda, the post-war nuclear age, Thatcherism, the emergence of working class artists, Queer cinema (Almodóvar, Davies, Julien), European reactions to Hollywood and cultural imperialism (Adorno & Horkheimer, Benjamin, Godard, the Dogme 95 Collective), and the realities of postcolonial and contemporary immigrant Europe (Akin, Audiard, the Dardennes, Julien, Kassovitz, Haneke). We will examine two writer-directors’ adaptations of others’ literary works (Antonioni’s adaptation of Cortázar’s “Blow Up”; Kes, Ken Loach’s adaptation of Barry Hines’ A Kestrel for a Knave). We will also be examining the adaptation of and experimentation with genres like science fiction and the gangster film, the women’s film, and the musical.

            Students will have the freedom to work on other European writer-directors, who may not be included on the syllabus (possibilities include Jacques Demy, Krysztof Kieslowski, Werner Herzog, Claire Denis, Ingmar Bergman, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Derek Jarman, Andre Tarkovsy, etc.).

            Introduction to cinematic vocabulary and techniques (montage, mise en-scène, dissolves, tracking shots, etc.) will be included in the instruction. All of the non-English films will be subtitled. 

Possible range of writer-directors and films:

Sergei Eisenstein (USSR/Russia). Bronenosets Potymkin/Battleship Potemkin (1925).

Dziga Vertov (USSR/Russia). Living Russia, or Man with a Camera (1929).

Luis Buñuel (Spain). Un Chien Andalou/An Andalusian Dog (1929).

Leni Riefenstahl (Germany). Triumph des Willens/Triumph of the Will (1935). Excerpts.

Roberto Rossellini (Italy). Roma città aperta/Rome Open City (1945).

Alain Resnais & Alain Robbe-Grillet (France). Last Year at Marienbad (1961).

Chris Marker (France). La Jetée (1962).

Agnès Varda (France). Cléo de 5 à 7/Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962).

Michelangelo Antonioni (Italy). L’Eclisse/The Eclipse (1962), Blow Up (1966).

Jean-Luc Godard (France). Alphaville (1965), Pierrot Le Fou (1965).

Ken Loach (England).  Kes (1969).

Lina Wertmuller (Italy). Pasqualino Settebellezze/Seven Beauties (1975).

Isaac Julien (England). Young Soul Rebels (1991).

Terence Davies (England). Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), The Long Day Closes (1992).

Mathieu Kassovitz (France). La Haine/Hate (1995).

Thomas Vinterberg (Denmark). Festen/The Celebration (1998).

Pedro Almodóvar (Spain). Todo sobre mi madre/All About My Mother (1999).

Jørgen Leth (Denmark). Det Perfekte menneske/The Perfect Human (1967) and The Five Obstructions (2003).

Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardennes (Belgium). L’Enfant/The Child (2005).

Michael Haneke (Austria/Germany). Caché/Hidden (2005).

Fatih Akin (Turkey-Germany). Auf der Anderen Seite/The Edge of Heaven (2007).

Lars von Trier (Denmark). Antichrist (2009).

Literature and Criticism:

Sergei Eisenstein, “Methods of Montage.”

Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception.”

Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.”

Michelangelo Antonioni. The Architecture of Vision; Writings and Interviews on Cinema.

André Bazin, “The Evolution of Film Language” and “Cinematic Realism and the Italian School of             Liberation.”

Roberto Rossellini, “A Discussion of Neorealism.”

Emmanuel Levinas, “Totality and Infinity.”

Julio Cortázar. Blow-Up and Other Stories.

Jean-Luc Godard, “From Critic to Film-Maker” and “Struggling on Two Fronts.”

Barry Hines, A Kestrel for a Knave.

Alain Robbe-Grillet, “A Future for the Novel,” “From Realism to Reality,” and “New Novel, New Man.”

Requirements & Grading: This is a very demanding, time-consuming, reading- and viewing intensive class. There will be at least one required film per week, along with additional suggested viewings. Please note that some weeks, we will be watching two films; that comprises at least four hours of prep time for class. It is absolutely necessary for students to have viewed the required film(s) before class analysis and discussion. On-campus screenings will be arranged by the Professor; if you cannot attend a scheduled screening, make sure to view the film independently before the class discussion. Active, significant, and substantial participation comprises a substantial portion of the final grade (25%); silence, passivity, or a lack of preparedness will not serve you well in this class. Regular attendance is required: 3 non-medically excused absences will lower your grade by a full grade (an A will become a B); 4 or more absences will guarantee your failure of the class.

Writing assignments: Three short 2 pages essays on selected writer-directors and films (worth 25% of final grade); One long 8-10-page paper (50%) of final grade.

Final Grade distribution: Consistently active, significant, and substantial participation (25%); Three short 2-page essays (25%); One long 8-10-page paper (50%).

E 379R • Imperial Cities, Global Cities

35525 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm JES A207A
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this literature, film, and cultural studies seminar we will be reading a series of books and essays on the dynamics and formation of imperial-colonial and postcolonial cities, contemporary global cities, social imaginaries, and urban landscapes. We will additionally be examining both real and cinematic landscapes; travel narratives and memoirs; cultural histories and fiction. Some of the subjects we will be examining include imperial cartography and urban planning as both uplift/improvement or development projects, as well as strategies of order and control, containment and surveillance; globalization, migration, and immigration; local and global economies; and the utopian/dystopian city. 

Texts: Proposed Readings

Walter Benjamin, The Arcades Project; Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities; Mike Davis, City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles; Maria Golia, Cairo: City of Sand; Ivan Vladislavic, Portrait with Keys: City of Johannesburg Unlocked; Xi Xu, Evanescent Isles: From My City-Village.

Proposed Reader Selections

Arjun Appadurai, Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization (selections); Mike Davis, Planet of Slums (selections); Michel de Certeau, The Practice of Every Day Life (selections); Shail Mayaram, The Other Global City (selections); Suketa Mehta, Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found (selections); Timothy Mitchell, Colonising Egypt (selections); Saskia Sassen, Deciphering the Global: Its Scales, Spaces and Subjects (selections).

Proposed Films

Thom Andersen, Los Angeles Plays Itself (2003); Mohamed Fadel, Nasser 56 (1996); Patrick Keiller, London (1994); Chris Marker, Sans Soleil (1983); Abderrahmane Sissako, Bamako (2006).

Requirements & Grading: Five 1-2-page critical response essays due in-class on day of class discussion, collectively worth 30% of final grade; 1 page seminar paper abstract (critically assessed; no grade); 12-15-page seminar paper, worth 50% of final grade; consistently active, significant, and substantial participation, worth 20% of final grade.

E S349S • Virginia Woolf

83800 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm PAR 105
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E 370W (Topic 10: Major Authors: Virginia Woolf) may not also be counted.

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course will examine some of the major critical and fictional works of Virginia Woolf. We will start with Woolf’s modernist manifestos (essays) and selections from Woolf’s short stories; we will also read three of Woolf’s major novels. Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, aesthetics and politics, English literary heritage and tradition, and feminism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, fascism).

 

Texts: Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1923) and “Modern Fiction” (1925).

 

The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf; Jacob’s Room (1922); Mrs. Dalloway (1925); To the Lighthouse (1927)

 

Requirements & Grading: Three 1-2-page critical analysis essays (20% of final grade); Reading quizzes (20% of final grade); Active, substantial and significant participation (30% of final grade); Final 5-page critical essay (30% of final grade)

 

In order to succeed in this class, you must make sure that you keep up with the reading assignments; if you are too busy to do heavy reading, you might want to enroll in another class. This is an analysis and discussion based course and you absolutely have to keep up with the syllabus throughout the summer session. Demonstrate that you have completed the required reading and have thought about it--analyzed it closely, rigorously, critically, and creatively. Active and significant participation comprises a substantial portion of your final grade (30%); therefore neither silence nor lack of preparedness will serve you well in this class. Since I cannot tell you what these texts mean, your success depends--to a great extent--on your willingness to engage with the texts and with your fellow classmates. No one has the final, correct, absolute interpretation of these books. I invite you to take risks, to challenge yourself, and to share your understanding of each novel or essay.

 

Attendance Policy: Three absences will drop you a full letter grade (an A will become a B, etc.); four or more absences will guarantee your failure of this class.

 

*No late papers will be accepted; incomplete grades will only be given in cases of documented medical emergencies.

E 349S • Virginia Woolf

34680 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 103
(also listed as WGS 345 )
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Course Description: This course will examine the critical and fictional works of Virginia Woolf. We will also be examining Woolf’s continuing legacy and influence. Some of the areas of inquiry the class will be exploring are the value and limitations of high modernism, English literary heritage and tradition, feminism, creative and critical definitions of gender and sexuality, intellectual activism (Woolf’s critiques of patriarchy, war, fascism), Woolf and imperialism-colonialism.

 

 

Possible Texts: Selected essays, including “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” and “Modern Fiction;” The Voyage Out; Mrs. Dalloway; Jacob’s Room; To the Lighthouse; Orlando; The Waves; Between the Acts; Three Guineas (long essay).

E 397N • Cinema And Social Change

35125 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BEN 1.118
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In this World Cinema seminar we will be examining debates about realism, modernism and the avant-garde; capitalism, colonialism, and cultural imperialism/globalism; cinema and oral and literary traditions; war, reparation, immigration, exile and diaspora; cosmopolitanism and national cinema; and First and Third World cinematic distinctions and intersections.  We will primarily focus on feature films, although many of the films include feature-documentary hybrids; additional documentary and experimental films may be added, depending on availability.  The course will begin with the early 20th century’s montage-realism debates; we will additionally be examining literary influences on cinema. Over the course of the semester, we will be analyzing the cinema and the social imaginary--the socio-political and cultural significance and limitations of film.

Proposed films

Sergei Eisenstein, Battleship Potemkin/Bronenosets Potyomkin (1925). October 1917: Ten Days That Shook the World/Oktyabr (1928).

Roberto Rossellini, Rome: Open City/Roma, città aperta (1945).

Michelangelo Antonioni, The Eclipse/L’eclisse (1962).

Jean-Luc Godard, Les Carabiniers (1963); Pierrot le Fou (1965).

Gillo Pontecorvo, Battle of Algiers/La Battaglia di Algeri (1966).

Chris Marker, Sans Soleil (1983).

Claire Denis, The Intruder/L’Intrus (2004).

Michael Winterbottom, In This World (2002).

Ousmane Sembene, Mooladé (2004).

Tony Gatlif, Exils (2004).

Ramin Bahrani, Man Push Cart (2005).

Abderrahmane Sissako, Bamako (2006).

Philippe Aractingi, Sous Les Bombes (2007).

Philippe Lioret, Welcome (2009).

Proposed texts

Sergei Eisenstein, “A Dialectical Approach to Film Form” (1929) and “Methods of Montage,” (1929)

Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility” (1935), “Theory of Distraction” (1935-36).

Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception” (1944).

André Bazin, “The Ontological Realism of the Photographic Image” (1945) and other selections from What Is Cinema? (Timothy Barnard, Trans., Caboose, 2009).

Sigfried Kracauer, Theory of Film: The Redemption of Physical Reality (1960).

Alain Robbe-Grillet, “From Realism to Reality” (1955 & 1963), “A Future for the Novel” (1956), and “New Novel, New Man” (1961).

Michelangelo Antonioni, “The Event and the Image” (1963), and “Reality and Cinema Verité” (1964).

Roy Armes, “Theory and Practice of Third World Film Making,” from Third World Film Making and the West (1987).

Ella Shohat and Robert Stam, Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media, Chaps. 1, 3, 7-9  (1994).

Melissa Thackway, Africa Shoots Back: Alternative Perspectives in Sub-Saharan Francophone and African Film (2003).

Jim Pines and Paul Willemen, Eds., Questions of Third Cinema (1990) [selections].

Anthony R. Guneratne and Wimal Dissanayake, Eds. Rethinking Third Cinema (2003) [selections].

Priya Jaikumar, “Imperial Governmentality” and “Imperial Redemption” from Cinema at the End of Empire (2006).

Hamid Naficy, An Accented Cinema: Exilic and Diasporic Filmmaking (2001), Home, Exile, Homeland: Film, Media, and the Politics of Place (1991) [selections].

Gilles Deleuze, Cinema I, Cinema II: The Time-Image (2005) [selections].

Kwame Anthony Appiah, Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (2006).

Cinema manifestos from the Surrrealists, Nouvelle Vague, Sankofa Collective, Situationists, Dogma95, etc.

Required assignments

  • 1-2 page typed bi-weekly critical response essays due in-class on day of class discussion.  Collectively worth 30% of final grade.
  • 15-20 page seminar paper.  Worth 50% of final grade.
  • Consistently active, substantial, and significant participation. Worth 20% of final grade.

E 344L • Writers & Dirs: Litry Cinema-W

35105 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 204
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TBD

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