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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Corinne Greiner

Lecturer

Corinne Greiner

Contact

  • Office: CAL 11
  • Office Hours: W 9:30a-2:30p

E S325F • Fiction Writing

83740 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm CLA 0.120
show description

Instructor:  Greiner, C            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  83740            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Summer 2013, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: We will create, analyze, and critique fiction, using contemporary models. This is an entry-level course, with a focus on short narrative fiction.

Texts: The Art of the Short Story, Dana Gioa, R. S. Gwynn, Longman (September 9, 2005); The New Well-Tempered Sentence: A Punctuation Handbook for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed, Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Mariner Books (September 19, 2003); The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Fiction, Tara Masih, ed., Rose Metal Press (May 13, 2009)

Requirements & Grading: Haibun—10%; one-smoke story—10%; flash fiction story—15%; short story—25%; revision of short story—10%; participation—30% (10% in-class comments and pop quizzes, 5% plot outline, 10% critiques, 5% attendance). Final grades will include a plus or minus if applicable.

The first half of the course will focus on in-depth discussion of character, setting, plot, style, tone, mood, literary elements (such as figurative language), voice, pacing, and theme. To demonstrate understanding of these concepts, students will write forms of “short-short” fiction.

Assignments will include:

  • one haibun (a Japanese form of short fiction that incorporates haiku) of 300-400 words;
  • a “one-smoke story” (a Native American/Chinese form of short fiction) of 400-600 words; and
  • a flash fiction story of 900-1,000 words.

(These assignments will total approximately 2,000 words.)

Publication venues for “short-short” fiction will be discussed, and students will be encouraged, but not required, to submit their revised versions for publication.

The second half of the course will address longer, more complex short stories—with a concentration on developing plot and character (through conflict, motivation, tension, and other methods).

Students will create a detailed plot outline and a short story of 3,000-4,000 words. Each student’s story will receive feedback in a workshop format. We will discuss both copy-editing and deep revision. The final assignment will be a thorough revision of the short story. Publication venues for lengthier short stories will be discussed, and students will be encouraged, but not required, to submit their revised works for publication.

Throughout the course, readings from the textbooks will be used to enhance students’ understanding of and appreciation for short fiction. Supplemental readings will also be provided.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

35345 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 210
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Instructor:  Greiner, C            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35345 & 35365            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction) and 325F may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: We will create, analyze, and critique fiction, using contemporary models. This is an entry-level course, with a focus on short narrative fiction.

Texts: The Art of the Short Story, Dana Gioa, R. S. Gwynn, Longman (September 9, 2005); The New Well-Tempered Sentence: A Punctuation Handbook for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed, Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Mariner Books (September 19, 2003)

Requirements & Grading: Haibun—10%; one-smoke story—10%; flash fiction story—15%; short story—25%; revision of short story—10%; participation—30% (10% in-class comments and pop quizzes, 5% plot outline, 10% critiques, 5% attendance). Final grades will include a plus or minus if applicable.

The first half of the course will focus on in-depth discussion of character, setting, plot, style, tone, mood, literary elements (such as figurative language), voice, pacing, and theme. To demonstrate understanding of these concepts, students will write forms of “short-short” fiction.

Assignments will include:

  • one haibun (a Japanese form of short fiction that incorporates haiku) of 300-400 words;
  • a “one-smoke story” (a Native American/Chinese form of short fiction) of 400-600 words; and
  • a flash fiction story of 900-1,000 words.

(These assignments will total approximately 2,000 words.)

Publication venues for “short-short” fiction will be discussed, and students will be encouraged, but not required, to submit their revised versions for publication.

The second half of the course will address longer, more complex short stories—with a concentration on developing plot and character (through conflict, motivation, tension, and other methods).

Students will create a detailed plot outline and a short story of 3,000-4,000 words. Each student’s story will receive feedback in a workshop format. We will discuss both copy-editing and deep revision. The final assignment will be a thorough revision of the short story. Publication venues for lengthier short stories will be discussed, and students will be encouraged, but not required, to submit their revised works for publication.

Throughout the course, readings from the textbooks will be used to enhance students’ understanding of and appreciation for short fiction. Supplemental readings will also be provided.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

35365 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 1.134
show description

Instructor:  Greiner, C            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35345 & 35365            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction) and 325F may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: We will create, analyze, and critique fiction, using contemporary models. This is an entry-level course, with a focus on short narrative fiction.

Texts: The Art of the Short Story, Dana Gioa, R. S. Gwynn, Longman (September 9, 2005); The New Well-Tempered Sentence: A Punctuation Handbook for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed, Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Mariner Books (September 19, 2003)

Requirements & Grading: Haibun—10%; one-smoke story—10%; flash fiction story—15%; short story—25%; revision of short story—10%; participation—30% (10% in-class comments and pop quizzes, 5% plot outline, 10% critiques, 5% attendance). Final grades will include a plus or minus if applicable.

The first half of the course will focus on in-depth discussion of character, setting, plot, style, tone, mood, literary elements (such as figurative language), voice, pacing, and theme. To demonstrate understanding of these concepts, students will write forms of “short-short” fiction.

Assignments will include:

  • one haibun (a Japanese form of short fiction that incorporates haiku) of 300-400 words;
  • a “one-smoke story” (a Native American/Chinese form of short fiction) of 400-600 words; and
  • a flash fiction story of 900-1,000 words.

(These assignments will total approximately 2,000 words.)

Publication venues for “short-short” fiction will be discussed, and students will be encouraged, but not required, to submit their revised versions for publication.

The second half of the course will address longer, more complex short stories—with a concentration on developing plot and character (through conflict, motivation, tension, and other methods).

Students will create a detailed plot outline and a short story of 3,000-4,000 words. Each student’s story will receive feedback in a workshop format. We will discuss both copy-editing and deep revision. The final assignment will be a thorough revision of the short story. Publication venues for lengthier short stories will be discussed, and students will be encouraged, but not required, to submit their revised works for publication.

Throughout the course, readings from the textbooks will be used to enhance students’ understanding of and appreciation for short fiction. Supplemental readings will also be provided.

E 341 • Short Story Workshop

35410 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 2.124
show description

Instructor:  Greiner, C            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35410            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: English 325F.

Description: This course is for students who have a serious interest in writing short stories and have completed English 325F. We will create, analyze, and critique short fiction. Our goal will be to improve the quality of your stories through developing plot and character, refining language, implementing editing techniques, and preparing work for possible publication. The majority of the course will be conducted in a workshop format, with students providing in-depth commentary on one another’s work.

Texts: The Making of a Story: A Norton Guide to Creative Writing, by Alice LaPlante, paperback, W. W. Norton & Company, reprint edition (January 11, 2010)

The New Well-Tempered Sentence: A Punctuation Handbook for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed by Karen Elizabeth Gordon, Mariner Books (September 19, 2003)

Requirements & Grading: Students will write one brief “flash” story (two to four pages); two short stories (at least eight pages); and one revision of a short story (at least eight pages).

Students will also be required to provide two hard copies (one for the author and another for the instructor) of commentary on every short story discussed in workshop; each of these critiques should be at least half a page. Written critiques will not be required for the flash fiction pieces.

Methods of perfecting work for potential publication will be discussed throughout the course. To develop an understanding of the literary marketplace, students will each research a literary magazine, prepare a one-page report on the periodical, and present their findings to the class. The grade for this assignment will increase by 10% if a student submits to a magazine and provides proof via a printout from an online submission manager. If a student already has an A on this assignment, the extra 10% will be transferred to the portion of his or her participation grade for critiques.

All written work will be presented in 12-point Times Roman type, double-spaced, on numbered single-sided pages with one-inch margins. Every written assignment will receive a letter grade.

Because this course is a workshop, participation will be a substantial part of the grade. The participation grade will be determined by the quality and frequency of in-class comments, pop quizzes on reading assignments, written critiques of students’ work, and attendance. Reading assignments from the texts will be brief, but students should be prepared to discuss them in class. Students may miss two classes without an impact on their grade. Students who miss five or more classes will fail the course. More than five late arrivals will lower a student’s final grade.

The final grade will be determined as follows: Flash story—10%; first short story—20%; second short story—20%; revision of short story—15%; literary magazine report—5%; participation—30% (10% in-class comments and pop quizzes, 10% critiques, 10% attendance).

Optional extra credit: Students may attend a local literary event, such as a reading or book festival panel discussion, for extra credit. A half-page typed report on the event will be required. This report will take the place of a quiz grade.

E S325F • Fiction Writing

83855 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Casares, O            Areas:  IV

Unique #:  83855            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Summer 2012, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction) and 325F may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: This Creative Writing course focuses on the mechanics (structure, narrative voice, dialogue, character development, etc.) within selected fiction, allowing you to study the different elements you will use later as you write your own short stories.

Texts: Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft, Janet Burroway and Elizabeth Stuckey-French, Pearson/Longman (Publisher); The Elements of Style, Strunk & White; Various Handouts.

Requirements & Grading: You are required to write three short sketches (3-4 pages) and one short stories (each 6-10 pages) that will be discussed in a workshop setting or individual conference. As part of your Class Participation grade, you will read each other student drafts and write peer reviews. For the student work discussed in class, you will be responsible for writing detailed critiques (1-2 pages). I will also provide written feedback that should help you to revise certain assignments.

Attendance is required. There will be no final exam.

Classroom participation/Quizzes/Written Critiques: 30%; Three Sketches and one Story: 70%.

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